Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983
File 004
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 004. 1983-12-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5335.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-02). Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 004. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5335

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 004, 1983-12-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5335.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 2, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript Dec. 2,1983 / Montrose Voice 3 Convention Center: The Buck Stops Here By Hollis Hood (The following is the first of two parts giving the history of the recently passed convention center proposal and what effect it will have on Montrose.) Civic center convention centers, especially centers downtown, are good for business, and all the surrounding downtown areas will profit from the building of the new George Brown Center on the eastside. At least that's the idea that convinced enough people to vote for it in the recent U.S. AIDS Budget Falls Short $9 Million By Larry Bush WASHINGTON-The Reagan Administration's posture on AIDS shifted slightly when two new pieces of information were made public in October. Rep. Ted Weiss (D-N.Y.) made available documents signed by Dr. Edward Brandt, the assistant secretary for health, showing that health researchers and administrators actually wanted an AIDS budget of $52 million last year, when the Reagan Administration was willing to propose outlays totaling only $41 million. The information comes from a letter from Brandt to Health and Human Services secretary Margaret Heckler, and outlines specific health programs such as vaccine development and animal testing that would have cost about $12 million more than the Administration proposed. A letter from Heckler to the Office of Management and Budget director David Stockman shows entire areas of Brandt's proposal simply dropped from the budget. The Centers for Disease Control is undergoing a change at the top. Dr. William Foege is leaving as director, and Dr. James Mason will be appointed to the job. Mason, who once worked for the Public Health Service's venereal disease programs, also served a stint from 1970 to 1977 as director of the Mormon Church's health programs. The Utah- headquartered church includes in its health program a little-known "aversion therapy" program to cure homosexuals. November election. One of the leading supporters of the center was the Gay Political Caucus, which saw the convention project as a way to demonstrate its political clout to the questioning non-gay populace, and it did. At 75 percent, Montrose delivered the highest vote percentage of any area in the city for Proposition A, and its estimated that some 45,000 gay voters supported it. Local activist Lee Harrington, who coordinated efforts to solicit gay support, said, "I want to thank the gay community for its support of the construction of a new downtown convention center. Our endorsement of, and bloc vote for, this project has resulted in several significant gains: our political clout and credibility were enhanced citywide:—we delivered whatwe promised. "We have always said that we are not a one-issue political group," Harrington continued. "We proved that. We raised the consciousness level of the downtown business establishment. Many of the Texas Eastern and Cadillac Fairview corporate hierarchies (many of these executives had never before been in gay settings) in September, with Councilmembers Greanias, Greenwood and Tinsley, attended a Texas Eastern-sponsored gathering at the Four Seasons Hotel to woo the gay vote. "It's participants still tell me how genuinely impressesd they were with the people they met over dinner that night. We made it possible for every gay man and lesbian at Texas Eastern and Cadillac Fairview to never again have a concern for job security because of sexual orientation. You are to be congratulated for your efforts once again," Harrington said. The gay vote was important, and with the growing importance of that vote comes the growing importance of being responsible for who gets it—beware of corporate executives bearing cold avocado soup. The convention center issue, like any facing the metropolis of Houston, is complicated and convoluted. It didn't start with the Houston Sports Association petitions last year, nor the year before. As early as 1978, when the economy was outrageous in Houston, which is a town that boasts of intelligentsia that loves to party — therefore a natural for conventioneers—the powers that were decided it needed more space to attract bigger and better audiences. But Houston attracted everybody, therefore causing underemployment problems, and a declining national economy caught up with the city. However, the convention center still looked attractive because it would create work. "Houston needs—and is going to get—a new convention center," flatly stated the November 1980 issue of Houston. Mayor Jim McConn appointed a committee to study existing facilities and future options in the summer of 1979, with Frank Horlock chairman. Houston was not getting its fair share of the convention market, and the revenue and business stimulation it brought to the city, which was going to its close competitors New Orleans, San Antonio and Dallas. The committee told the mayor and City Council in September that they had located a site in Houston Center and that the new building should be a minimum of 500,000 square feet with meeting rooms and arena facilities. The council voted for a feasibility study of the 11-acre site of which Cadillac Fairview, one of Houston Center developers, offered to donate 264,000 square feet to the city with the purchase of 106,000 square feet. Other sites considered were the Buffalo Bayou center between Memorial and downtown, the Allen Parkway Village site and the Astrodomain. Research began on all alternatives. Even at that time, then councilman Lance Lalor often opposed the project in council meetings and later was joined by councilman Dale Gorzynski who questioned exactly how it would be paid for. Despite a declining convention market in other major U.S. cities, Houston was booming in 1981, and the Houston Convention and Visitors Council moved into an expanded facility at 3300 Main. The city was setting records for convention attendance with 661 through the end of 1981, resulting in $263 million infused into the economy, an increase over 1980 figures of 647 conventions and revenue of $223 million. No doubt conventions were becoming even bigger business than they had ever been, and Houston's need for expanded facilities was critical, but the where and how for a center had to be worked out, and clouds of opposition were already forming. (This has been the first of two articles. See the MONTROSE VOICE on Dec. 9 for part two.) GwUfeW^^- Montrose Mouth Holiday Goodies The Montrose Voice Annual Christmas Party—for the staff and the READERS (that's you) of the Montrose Voice—is Tuesday night, Dec. 20, 8pm to 1am, at the Upper Deck of the Officer's Club- There'll be dancing with DJ Ram Rocha and free beer. We'll be requesting $2 at the door for the Media Fund for Human Rights, the non-profit community service arm of the Gay Press Association. — D — No sooner does the turkey get digested from Thankgiving, than it's time to think about Christmas and all the partying to come. Hon, this is a time for events that make the little ol' head just spin! Get out them calendars and start dictatin'. —d— Those of us who are young at heart or may have kids who need entertaining this season may want to drop by the Main Street Theater, 2540 Times Blvd. Lili. a wonderful play with marionettes, is playing there at 1:30pm on Saturdays and Sundays until Dec. 18 in a carnival atmosphere. It will keep the kids happy, and the girls off the streets! Tickets are only $3 for children and adults. Discounts and/or special performance days are available to groups. Call 524-6706 tor info or reservations. — D — There hasn't been this much excitement since Andy Warhol spilled his trifles down Liza's dress! Douglas Holt will host a champagne party at his Lamar Tower residence on Dec. 3 Rumor has it, the place will be teaming with celebs from all over, and to add to the suspense, the theme of his benefit has yet to be announced! Those of you in the more hoity- toity crowd may remember his last benefit—a Marilyn Monroe Look-Alike contest at Anna- belles, which benefitted foster children. Doug's parties are all for good causes. Even Marvin Zindler approves! — D — For those who think of the Women's Lobby Alliance in terms ot Carrie Nation, swinging her hatchet at every suspicious-looking man, there is now a wonderful opportunity to prove you wrong. The Women's Lobby Alliance is celebrating it's third birthdav with a big to-do on Monday, Dec. 5 at the Houston Area Women's Center, 4 Chelsea Place—6:30 'til 8:30. There will be entertainment, beer and wine, hors d'oeuvres and birthday cake. A suggested donation of $10 will be appreciated at the door Call 521-0439 for info. — D — It's happening whether we like it or not! Books are being published about (gasp!) gay people, and the public is even buying them! Oh well, this is the latter part of the 20th century ... and for those who are familiar with the finer products of the gay press, Pete Fisher is a welcome guest, Fisher, who has written three books of interest to gay readers, will be the guest at a reception in his honor at Wilde & Stein Books, 802 Westheimer. Saturday, Dec. 3 (THIS Saturday!)from 4 to 5:30pm, His latest book, Dreamlovers, is a wild and sexy novel (can you imagine a gay book without sex?) about one man's quest to turn his fantasy lovers into realities, despite a lover, his career and uncomprehending friends. Gee, do you think any of us may have something in common with the subject matter of this particular book? The reception is free and open to the public, THAT'S US! —a~ Those who live in Montrose and have not bothered to frequent the University of St. Thomas' campus have not truly discovered the joys of living in Montrose. It is certainly one of those places where the city becomes a REAL city, and the Department of Music at St. Thomas is putting on a Festival Concert, featuring the UST Singers and Chamber Singers. Come on, y'all! It's Christmas, and St Thomas is so close, and the music is so good, and you'll feel so great, and who knows ,, maybe you'll meet someone or even learn something! The concert starts at 8pm on Mon., Dec. 5. at UST's Cullen Hall, 4001 Mt, Vernon, Admission is free Call 522-7911, ext. 240, for info. Enjoy culture at your very doorstep! — d — It's that time again! We can all start holding continued on next page MWmmmWmmmKfm»mwtwmM'-'
File Name uhlib_22329406_n162_003.jpg