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Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983
File 002
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Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 002. 1983-12-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5333.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-02). Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 002. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5333

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 002, 1983-12-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5333.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 2, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript Starting (and Naming) Your Own Gay Business Peter Harrison, p.15 Van Hightower Wins Montrose but Hall Wins City Hall Hollis Hood, p.7 O The Newspaper of Montrose Dec. 2, 1983 Issue •••162 Published Every Friday MONTROSE 'Private Lives9 Explodes with Talent and Laughter Billie Duncan, p.21 How's Your Gay Literature IQ? Roz Ashley's Quiz, p.13 Activist Shiflett Says Bye with Analysis of Community By Robert Hyde (This is first of a two-part story based on a recent interview. Part two will appear next week.) Steven H. Shiflett is on his way out—out of Houston, that is—to establish new roots in San Francisco. On Sunday afternoon, the mayor, most of City Council and most of Shiflett's friends will gather on the 60th floor of the Texas Commerce Tower to say farewell to a member of Houston's gay community who has helped shape its course since his arrival in the city in 1975. Some people will be glad to see him go. They've thought him too vocal, too devi- sive, too autocratic, too egocentric.^ Others are sorry he's leaving. Friends slip up to him in the bar with tears in their eyes and hug him. Some friends write notes to him in smoked-filled rooms wishing him all the best. Adversaries who opposed him for years can't hold their emotions inside, perhaps feelings that they're losing their most worthy opponent. And in a secret moment, a Gay Political Caucus member propositions him into vying for his old position as president of the GPC, a position he was elected to three times but ulimately chose to abandon because he had felt betrayed. "My history can be looked at as lots of wonderful successes, lots of good times and happy faces and tears and great emotion," he said in a recent interview. "But everything has not been that hunky- dory." Shiflett is revved-up now for his departure. His apartment is slowly being emptied of the unmoveables as gifts to friends. His emotions are peaking over issues which have obsessed him for years— primarily the welfare of this city's gay community which he has loved and fought for for so long. He retains some bitterness, then realizes that there's no need for it—there's too much potential within the community to allow room for bitterness. And he's assumed an attitude that a mother hen might project over her warring tribe of chicks, ordering them to stop pecking at each other for the good of the hen house, a lesson he wishes to pass on to his brood from his personal experiences. Then he thinks of San Francisco and worries about what he's leaving behind— not too concerned about what's ahead, other than a personal career which might put him in good stead with what is to become an international corporation. "I'm going to give myself a lot of time for my work, first," he said of his planned move to San Francisco, "because the reason I'm moving is to make a career advancement and accelerate that process by taking this job." But he sees himself as possibly becoming involved in that city's gay politics, as well, but in time—after the newness wears off—and in an area where he can be most effective. "It will be like taking a jigsaw puzzle and throwing it in the air and letting it land," he said of his future political environment, "and then see what I'm going to do." And from the looks of it, it won't be long before he's back in the thick of it, promoting gay rights as he feels he was born to do. "I was brought up in precinct- organizing, beginning when I was 16- years-old," he said. Back in Baton Rouge where he spent his adolescence, his high school civic teacher gave him a major project teaching him how to run a campaign. His dentist, whom he mowed the lawn for, let him eavesdrop into his race for City Council. Then when the political seeds were nlanted. a tragedy continued page 8
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