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Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 001. 1983-12-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5332.

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(1983-12-02). Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5332

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983 - File 001, 1983-12-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5357/show/5332.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 162, December 2, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 2, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Starting (and Naming) Your Own Gay Business Peter Harrison, p.15 Van Hightower Wins Montrose but Hall Wins City Hall Hollis Hood, p. 7 MONTROSE v 0 I c E The Newspaper of Montrose Dec. 2, 1983 Issue ... 152 Published Every Friday By Robert Hyde (This is first of a two.part story based an a recent interview. Part two will appear next WPf'k.) Steven H. Shiflett is on his way out-out of Houston, that is-t-0 establish new roots in San Francisco. On Sunday afternoon, the mayor, most of Cit~ Council and mOBt of Shiflett'• friends will gather on the 60th floor of the Texas Commerce Tower to say farewe11 to a member of Houston's gay community who has ~elped . sh~pe its course since his arrival m the city 1~ 1975. Some people will be glad to see him go. They've thought him too vocal, _too devi­sive, too autocratic, too eg~ntnc. . Others are sorry he's l~avmg. 1'.nen~s slip up to him in the bar with tt:ars m th~1r eyes and hug him Some fnends w~te notes to him in smoked-filled roo1!1s w1sh­ina him all the best. Adversanes who opposed him for years can't hold their emotions inside, perhaps feelings that they're losing their most worthy oppo­nent. And in a secret moment, a Gay Polit· ical Caucus member propositions him into vying for his old position as president of the GPC, a position he was elected to three times but uJimately chose to abandon because he had felt betrayed. "My history can be looked at as lo_ts of wonderful successes, lots of good bmes and happy faces and tears and great emo­tion," he said in a recent interview. "But everything has not been that hunky-dory ." . Shiflett is revved-up now for his depar· ture. His apartment is slowly bein~ emp­tied of the unmoveables as gifts to friends. His emotions are peaking over issues which have obsessed him for years­primarily the welfare of this city's gay community which he has loved and fought for for so long Hf' rt"tains aome bitterness. then realizes that there's no need for it-there's too much potential within the community to allow room for bitterness. And he's assumed an attitude that a mother hen might project over her war­ring tribe of chicks, ordering them to stop pecking at each other for the good of the hen house, a lesson he wishes to pass on to his brood from his personal experiences. Then he thinks of San Francisco and worries about what he's leaving behind­not too concerned about what's ahead, other than a personal career which might put him in good stead with what is to become an international corporation. "I'm going to give myself a Jot of time for my work, first ," he said of his planned move to San Francisco, "because the rea­son I'm moving is to make a career advancement and accelerate that process by taking this job." But he sees himself as possibly becom­ing mvolved in that city's gay politics. as 'Private L ives' Explodes with Talent and Laughter Billie Duncan, p .21 How's Your Gay Literature IQ? Roz Ashley's Quiz, p.18 well, but in time-after the newness wears off-and in an area where he can be most effective. "It will be like taking a jig•aw puzzle and throwing it in the air and_ letting ,it land " he said of his futurepolit.J.cal envir­onm~ nt, "and then see what I'm going to do." And from the looks ofit, it won't be long before he's back in the thick of it, promot­ing gay rights as he feels he was born to do. "I was brought up in precinct­organizing, ~ginning when I was 16- years-old," he said. Back in Baton Rouge where he spent his adolescence, his high school civic teacher gave him a major project. teaching him how to run a campaign. His dentist, whom he mowed the lawn for, let him eavesdrop :into his 1-ace for Citv Council. Then when the politi"al seeds ~Pre olantt>d , a tragedy rontmued pagt! 8 ~apartof ·--.3111~1 this extn:IWglTlza rong taped fur television by a Hdlyu,oOO production romfxlny as 30 of the mast beautiful entertainrn ewr ·assembled on one st~ rompete far $15,CXXJ in ca.di prizes. ~tJY EUR0iAN l'IU..ftY"a'YN>tlJlt <ll'\f\llJMTl A L y s 0 N PUBLICATIONS 0 THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Fnedel, $7.DO. The entenamiDg coming-out story of Bunon Raider, wbo is so elegant that as a child he reads Vogue in Ills playpen. "The wntmg is fresh and cnsp, the humor often hilarious," writes the L.A. Tim&S. "The funniest gay novel of the year," says Chn.stophu Strut. 0 ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $4.00. One teenager in ten is gay; here, twcnty-sllt young people tell their stories: of comi.ng to tenm with bcins different, of the decision how - and whether - to tell friends and parents, and what the consequences were. 0 THE BUTTEJISCOTCH PRINCE, by Richard Hall, SS.DO. When Cor­dell's best friend and ex-lover is murdered, the only clue is one that the police seem to consider too kinky to follow up on. So Cordell decides to track down the killer himself - with resulu far d!Hereo• from what be had expected. 0 AJJ,-AMEllJCAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, SS .DO. "I've known that I was gay since I was thirteen. Does that surprise you1 It didn't me .... " So begins All-American Boys, the story of a teenage love affair that should have been simple - but wasn't. 0 CHINA HOUSE, by Vincent Lardo, SS.DO. A gay gothic that bas everything: two handsome lovers, a mysterious house on the bill, sounds in the night, and a father-son relauonship that's closer than most. 0 THE ALEXANDROS EXPEDmON, by Patricia Sitldn, $6.DO. When Evan Talbot leaves on a mission to rescue an old schoolmate who bas been unprisoned by fanatics in the Middle l!ast, be doesn't realize that the trip will also involve his own coming out and the discovery of who it is that he really loves. 0 DEATH TRICK, by Richard Stevenson, $6.DO. Meet Don Strachey, a private eye in the classic tradition but with one difference: he's gay. TO ORDER Enclosed is $ _ ~· please send the books I've checked above. (Add SI.DO postage when ordering 1ust one book; tf you order more than one, we'll pay postage.} 0 Charge my (circle one}: Visa Mastercard expiration date:: ___ _ signature:------------- ~~ess ---------------~ city state __ zip ____ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 DEC. 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Convention Center: The Buck Stops Here By Hollis ~~d . November electi~n. underemployment roblems and a declin- (The follo.wing is the first of two parts giu- OneoftheJeading~l!PPOrtersofthecen· ing national econo~ cau htu with th ing t~e h'story of the recently passed con· ter was the Gay !'ohtical Caucus, which city. Y g P e ue.ntum center proposal and what effect it saw the convention project as a way to wdl have on Montrose.) d.em?nstrate its political dout to the ques­Civic center convention centers espe- tionmg non-gay populace, and it did. ciallycentersdowntown,aregoodf~rbusi· .At 75 percent, Montrose delivered the ness, and all the surrounding downtown h.1ghest vote pe~c.entage of any area in the areas will profit from the building of the city for Proposition A, and its estimated new George Brown Center on the eastside. that some ~5~000 gay vo~ers supported it. At least that's the idea that convinced . Local activist Lee J:l~ngton, who coor­enough people to vote for it in the recent :d·1m ated efforts to solicit gay support, said, want to thank the gay community for its support of the construction of a new downtown convention center. Our endor- U.S. AIDS Budget Falls Short $9 Million By Larry Bush WASHINGTON-The Reagan Adminis­tration's posture on AIDS shifted slightly when two new pieces of information were made public in October. Rep. Ted Weiss (D-N.Y.) made available documents signed by Dr. Edward Brandt, the assist­ant secretary for health, showing that health researchers and administrators actually wanted an AIDS budget of $52 miHion last year, when the Reagan Administration was willing to propose outlays totaling only $41 million. The information comes from a letter from Brandt to Health and Human Servi­ces secretary Margaret Heckler, and out­lines specific health programs such as vaccine development and animal testing that would have cost about $12 million more than the Administration proposed. A letter from Heckler to the Office of Man­agement and Budget director David Stock­man shows entire areas of Brandt's proposal simply dropped from the budget. The Centers for Disease Control is undergoing a change at the top. Dr. Wil­liam Foege is leaving as director, and Dr. James Mason will be appointed to the job. Mason, who once worked for the Public Health Service's venereal disease pro­grams, also served a stint from 1970 to 1977 as director of the Mormon Church's health programs. The Utah­headquartered church includes in its health program a little-known "aversion therapy" program to cure homosexuals. sement of, and bloc vote for, this project has res1;1I~ecl in several significant gains: our pohtical clout and credibility were enhanced citywide-we delivered what we promised. "We have always said that we are not a one-issue political group," Harrington continued. "We proved that. We raised the consciousness level of the downtown busi­ness establishment. Many of the Texas Eastern and Cadillac Fairview corporate hierarchies (many of these executives had never before been in gay settings) in Sep­tember, with Councilmembere Greanias, Greenwood and Tinsley, attended a Texas Eastern-sponsored gathering at the Four Seasons Hotel to woo the gay vote. "It's participants still tell me how genuinely impresseed they were with the people they met over dinner that night. We made it possible for every gay man and lesbian at Texas Eastern and CadiHac Fairview to never again have a concern for job security because of sexual orienta­tion. You are to be congratulated for your efforts once again," Harrington said. The gay vote was important, and with the growing importance of that vote comes the growing importance of being responsi­ble fo r who gets it-beware of corporate executives bearing cold avocado soup. The convention center issue, like any facing the metropolis of Houston, is com· plicated and convoluted. It didn't start with the Houston Sports Association peti· tions last year, nor the year before. As early as 1978, when theeconomy was outrageous in Houston, which is a town that boasts of intelligentsia that loves to party-therefore a natural for conventioneers-the powers that were decided it needed more space to attract bigger and better audiences. But Houston attracted everybody, therefore causing However, the convention center still looked attractive because it would create work. "Houston needs-and is going to get-a new convention center," flatly stated the November 1980 issue of Houston. Mayor Jim McConn appointed a com· mittee to study existing facilities and future options in the summer of 1979, with Frank Horlock chairman. Houston was not getting its fair share of the convention market, and the revenue and business stimulation it brought to the city, which was going to its close competitors New Orleans, San Antonio and Dallas. The committee told the mayor and City Council in September that they had located a site in Houston Center and that the new building should be a minimum of 500,000 square feet with meeting rooms and arena facilities. The council voted for a feasibility study of the 11-acre site of which Cadillac Fairview, one of Houston Center developers, offered to donate 264,000 square feet to the city with the purchase of 106,000 square feet. Other sites considered were the Buffalo Bayou center between Memorial and downtown, the Allen Parkway Village site and the Astrodomain. Research began on all alternatives. Even at that time, then councilman Lance Lalor often opposed the project in council meetings and later was joined by councilman Dale Gorzynski who questi­oned exactly how it would be paid for. Despite a declining convention market in other major U.S. cities, Houston was booming in 1981, and the Houston Con· vention and Visitors Council moved into an expanded facility at 3300 Main. The city was setting records for convention attendance with 661 through the end of 1981, resulting in $263 million infused into the economy, an increase over 1980 figures of 647 conventions and revenue of $223 mill ion. No doubt conventions were becoming even bigger business than they had ever been, and Houston's need for expanded facilities was critical, but the where and how for a center had to be worked out, and cloud~ of opposition we~e already forming. (This has been the first of two articles See the MONTROSE VOICE on Dec. 9 for part two.) Montrose Mouth Holiday Goodies The Montrose Voice Annual Christmas Party-for the staff and the READERS (thafs you) of the Montrose Voice-is Tuesday night, Dec. 20, 8pm to 1am, at the Upper Deck of the Officer's Club. There'll be dancing with DJ Ram Rocha and free beer We'll be requesting $2 at the door for the Media Fund for Human Rights, the non-profit C?mmun1ty serv~e arm of the Gay Press Asso-­c1at1on. -a- No sooner does the turt<ey get digested from Thankg1Ving, than it's time to think about Christmas and all the partying to come. Hon, this 1s a time for events that make the little ol' head just spin! Get out them calendars and start dictatin'. Those of us who are young at heart or may have ktds who need entertaining this season may want to drop by the Main Street Theater, 2540 Times Blvd. Lili, a wonderful play with marionettes, is playing there at 1 :30pm on Saturdays and Sundays until Dec. 18 in a carni­val atmosphere. It will keep the kids happy, and th_e girls off the streets• Tickets are only $3 for children and adults Discountsand/orspe-­clal performance days are available to groups. Call 524--6706 for info or reservations There hasn't been this much excitement since Andy Warhol sptlled his trifles down Liza's dress! Douglas Holt will host a champagne party at his Lamar Tower residence on Dec. 3 Rumor has it, the place will be teaming with celebs from all over, and to add to the sus­pense, the theme of his benefit has yet to be announced' Those of you m the more hoity­to1ty crowd may remember his last benefit-a Marilyn Monroe Look·Alike contest at Anna­belles, which benefitted foster children Dou~·s parties are all for good causes Even Marvin Zmdler approves! For those who think of the Women's Lobby Alliance m terms of Carne. Nation, swinging her hatchet at every susp1c1ous-looking man, there 1s now a wonderful opportunity to prove you wrong . The Women's Lobby Alliance is celebrating it's third birthdav with a big to.do on Monday, Dec. 5 at the Houston Area Women's Center. 4 Chelsea Place-6:30 'Iii 8 30. There will be entertainment, beer and wme, hors d'oeuvres and birthday cake. A sug· gested donation of $10 will be appreciated at the door Call 52H)439 for info -a- It's happening whether we like 1t or not! Books are being pu~hshed about (gasp!) gay people. and _the publtc is even buying them• Oh well, this 1s the latter part of the 20th century. . and for those who are familiar with the finer pr~ ducts of the gay press. Pete Fisher is a wel· come guest Fisher, who has written three books of interest to gay readers. will be the guest at a reception in his honor at Wilde & Stein Books, 802 Westhe1mer, Saturday, Dec. 3 (THIS Saturday')from 4 to 5:30pm HlS latest book. 0,,Jamlovers. is a wild and sexy novel (can you 1magme a gay book with­out sex?) about one man's quest to turn his fantasy lovers into reaht1es. despite a lover, his career and uncomprehending friends. Gee. do you think any of us may have something in common with the sub1ect matter of this partic­ular book? The reception is free and open to the pubhc. THATS US-' Those who live in Montrose and have not bothered to frequent the Un1vers1ty of St. Th~ mas· campus have not truty discovered the 1oys of living in Montrose. It 1s certainly one of those places where the city becomes a REAL city, and the Department of Music at St. Tho. mas is puttmg on a Feshval Concert, featuring the UST Singers and Chamber Singers. Come on, y'all! It's Christmas. and St Thomas is so close, and the music is so good, and you'll feel so great, and who knows . maybe you'll meet someone or even learn something• The concert starts at 8pm on Mon .• Dec. 5, at UST's Cullen Hall, 4001 Mt Vernon. Admis­sion 1s free. Call 522·7911 . ext. 240, for mfo Enjoy culture at your very doorstep! It's that time again! We can all start holding continued on next page 4 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 2, 1983 Montrose Mouth Here's More Mouth continued from page 3 hands and dance around the Christmas tree and smg those old Greek songs and wax our moustaches and carry off a wench or two in that time-honored pagan Greek way ... Oh, I just get so excited when I starttothinkofthose Greek pastries, breads and appetizers that the Annunciation Orthodox School is selling for their Annual Holiday Bake Sale' On Fri., Dec. 9, and Sat., Dec. 10 from 9--6 p.m., the wonder­ful people of the Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 3511 Yoakum, will be offering their tine ethnic goodies for us to eat Just go into the S.P Martel Auditorium on the grounds of the cathedral. and help yourself to the best food this side of the Aegean. Pro­ceeds will benefit the Annunciation Orthodox Se~ . which welcomes children of all faiths Pre-sale orders are encouraged (these goo­dies go la•t'). Call 777-5504. 771-6049 or 497- 3667. and pick your eats up at the auditorium either day of the sale -D-A gay bake off sounds like something between a party scene from the movie Giant to a cerEr monial meeting of the National Association for the Prevention of Mass Suicide for Lemmings But tor those of you who are yawning while reading this paper, and wondering what to do and where to go, the Gay Switchboard will be sponsoring a gay bake off that will give you plOt'lty lo do Beg1nn1ng at 4pm at the Barn. 710 Pacific, on Sun., Dec. 11 , the bake off will offer awards for the best dessert in various categories-pies, cakes. cookies. etc. The entry fee for each des­sert is $5. and all goodies will be auctioned off or sold by the piece later m the evening There will be plenty of celebs there. so be in your best behavior! The Switchboard would prefer that you call your entry in beforehand to eliminate the pos­sibility of a massive pie-jam at the door, but if you care to nsk it. just bring your goodies to the door of the Barn and you'll betaken care of. All proceeds will benefit Iha Gay Switchboard Call 529-3211from6-12pm weekdays or 3-12 weekends -o-lt's Ebony and Ivory time. Time to focus atten­tton on mutual love and understanding between all factions of society-to show love and Christmas cheer! The Black and White Men Together of Houston are presenting a hol­iday filled with act1vittes of cheer and socializa­tion. There will be movies. concerts. ornament making. tree decorating, caroling, and numer­ous parties to make up the social calendar. If you are missing the qualities of love and friendship in your life. check this out! Contact the Gay Switchboard of Houston for details, 529-3211 Maybe the true sign of a city becoming a great city 1a the unique quahties of the people who live there. and the certain areas of the city where such people live There's Bloomsbury in London, SoHo in New York, Haight-Ashbury in San Francisco. Hollywood in L.A. and Mont­rose in Houston In the myriad of people who frequOt'lt the Montrose area. Reverend Gracie Lee 1s one of the most notable. Her book store on Fairview and Stanford (Gracietynn Books) has an out­door theater attached, and church services are held on Sundays there. lt"s the •Little Church." Reverend Gracie Lee named it after the Little Portion of St. Francis of Assisi. Feeding (physi­cally and spiritualty). shettenng and counsel­ing Montrosians in need, Gracie feels she's following in St Francis' toosteps. Services are Sun. at 11am at Place in the Sun's outdoor theater at 704 Fairview -o- "POO VIE!!" he says What is a Poo Vie? It must be one of those Cajun phrases from across the border. . Well, Thanksgiving weekend was a big happening at Fantasy I in Lafayette. Our CaJun frtends really know how to let the good times roll. It's too bad those hot CaJuns are 200 mlles away. Oh well. we all know too much of a good thing ain't good •. or WHO says Have a crawf1sh on mel Alan Pierce. acting director for the Montrose Clinic. grves his most heart-felt thanks to those who gave thetr time to raise money for the clinic and the KS/Al OS Committee during Zap Clap Review II. Especially to Danny Villa for his idea to put on the show and NUMBERS II for its facilities. Although the turn-out was smaller than expected, the show was worth seeing, and Alan is proud of the community for its support. THANXI! Cassandra is limping these days using Fanny's old cane. The manager of Mary's broke her ankle recently and will be hobbling around for six to eight weeks -o- The Officers Club 1s now having 2 for 1 drinks every Thursday. That's both call and well drinks-ANO beer. -o- The Trailride, a down-home C&W bar, opens today with Sam Bass the manager and wllh John, Ron, Jum and Bob as bartenders. Ev~ry Saturday will be "Crazy Day" at the bar•and every Sunday they'lll have happy hour all day The WesthBlmer Colony Association will be putting up Chnstmas decorations on Westhei­mer on Monday, Dec. 5. startinc 1om. with the help of the Montrose Symphgonic Band and Chorale Tim's Coffeeshop has moved into their new kitchen. increasing their capacity to serve even more of their delicious food The Boulevard Cafe is frequented by other people besides whispy women in veiled hats, contrary to popular belief. To prove it, the res­taurant is offering the public a chance to see some exceptional works of art by Montrose artist Tom Liddell. Imagine, being able to eat fine food, see great local art and be able to wear that pill-box hat you've always loved-all in thp ""me place' D-PARTY ALERTS Friday is the 29th anniver­sary of the day Sen. Joe McCarthy was con­demned by the U.S. Senate for his witch hunt for communists, many of whom he claimed were etther homosexuals or movie stars Saturday Is the 178th anniversary of the day Lewis, partner of Clark in the Lewis and Clark exped1t1on of the Northwest, carved his name MEMBER CLUB BATH CHAIN on a Pacific Pine Next Tuesday is the 118th anniversary of the 18th Amendment, abolishing slavery And last but not least, the lesbian/Gay Resource Service at U of H will meet Tues., Dec. 6, at 2:30pm m the Spmdletop Room, 2nd floor University Center. LGRS is open to night as well as day students and faculty. Anyone interested is encouraged to write to LGRS, P.O. Box 309 Campus Activities, Houston, 77004; or call 749-1253 and leave a message. -D-WHEWI what s week! Thmgs are really hop­ping in Montrose st this time of the year, and if you have anything you need to announce, just send It lo tho VOICE, 33f7 Montrose Blvd., Suite 306, Houston 77000 (our favorite zip codef). Have s good week, Reading Public, and ramember· Most of us are staying fight here in Montrose unless we all go at the same time/ DEC. 2, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 Congress Looks at Important Gay Issues Atheist O'Hair Excommunicates Gay Atheists By Larry Bush WASHINGTON-Congressional panels took up a variety of issues before their win­ter recess that have important impJica­tions for gay people, including hearing a proposal that the Equal Rights Amend­ment legislation be amended to bar civil rights for gays, a review of a Reagan prop­osal to subject nearly four million Ameri­can workers to sporadic lie detector tests about their reliability, a revamp of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, and efforts to amend Administration proposals on "acceptable" charities to which federal workers may donate. The House Judiciary Committee heard testimony from anti-ERA crusader Phyl­lis Sch a fly of the Eagle Forum asking that the proposed Equal Rights Amendment include a new provision that would block any court from extending civil rights to lesbians and gay men. The ERA, which diP<i at the state level only three states short of ratification in 1982, was re­introduced in the current congress to once again wend its way through the process. According to Schafly, the key reason for blocking civil rights for gays at this time is AIDS, and in her pitch she suggests that airline attendants who are gay be fired to insure the safety of any passengers who might accidently find the steward's blood in their food as a result of a cut during the microwave preparations. Congressional sources indicate that Rep. James Sensenbrunner will lead an effort to attach Schafly's amendment dur· ing the full Judiciary Committee proceed­ings. While the amendment is expected to fail, it is also expected to provide a forum for heated discussions of the "threats" gays present. Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Mootr~1~~1.A'\'?c'.:ingCo A~:.~~l~-~~==i~~ Contentscopynght 1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm HenryMcClurg ptibli&her ~~~,:;~~ Jeff Bray gr•ph•u Sonny Davis eccounrmg Robert Hyde m1n.gmgecMor Hollis Hood "9W•ed1r01 Chuck Meredith lport1ed1tCN B1lheOuncan Peter Derksen Jon Cheetwood Joel.Watts er'lten11nmen1w"l•t11 lytHama ec:h9f'lllMgd11«for Mark Drago .,..,."""'" :.,~':!!~:' GrHler Montrose Bus1neu Gu•ld. Gey ::::c:•'"'c"lnternet1on11G1yNewsAgency,Pac1l1cN8W$ Au11m811rHU C1p1tolNew1Serv1c• ~=~~:i~~::~:~!=~:!~f:$;:~~~:l~ii~i~~ McN1ugh1.JoeS1ker POSTMASTER Send eddreucorrect1on110 3317 Montrose ll08. Hou&ton_ TX77C>Oe StJblcr•ploortreremUSmse.iedM1vt1lope S•9peryHr(52 i&IUMJ . $20per1111mon1h1(:i'61H.,..).or$t25perweek(leu then:i'e .. un) Beck119U81S200e1ch N1t/Oflel9<1~lia1ngrepttsMll•f1Ve Joe01S.blto.R1vendell ~erket•ng . e&ti6!'1A....,.ue New York 10011. (212)2•2·686.l ::=~dee<111 ,.. r~•"t' 5 JOpm. lor ruue1elffsedf1 .. N04icetoedvert1Hrl Loaladverl•llOQr&te1ehedu1eS1•·A """•efteci1veJu1y1 19&3 Mpon11b,lhy MOfllro&e \loict-ll* npt uaa.tm• rnponsr ~tvfP,r•cittft•11ngC11~tR_,iie,..n~kjt1..i MonllQle VOio4(tqant1'tC8JJl•¥e~n; In Rep. Jack Brooks' (D-Tex.) govern­ment operations committee, there was a furor of activity over new Reagan Admin· istration propasals to tighten national security by subjecting any workers with access to classified documents to random lie detector tests. According to testimony at the hearings, about four million Ameri· can workers-1.5 federal workers and 2.5 workers in the private sector contracting with federal departments-would be affected by the random checks. Each federaJ department tolfows its own guidelines on what constitutes "reliable" workers, with some publicly admitting that they want to know which employees are gay. Brooks' committee took a dim view of the Reagan proposal, as have senators in a counterpart committee, and it now appears unlikely that the proposal will swing into full effect without some changes. Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) wrung changes out of a different Administration department in October. The Reagan Administration had announced. earlier this year proposals to deny groups federal grants or contracts if they were doing "grass roots" lobbying with the money they received from nonfederal sources. That would have been an extension of the current rules, which bar the use offederal funds for any lobby purpose. The Reagan propasals were written by the Heritage Foundation, the think·tank started by Joseph Coors of Coors Brewery, and was meant to "d~fund the left." How· ever, the broadly written proposals also angered the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, as well as several major Defense Depart· ment contractors. Among other provi· sions, they would have had to build a separate building and hire a separarte staff for any work they were doing to affect public opinion. Several run-th roughs were tried by the Reagan Administration to satisfy its Defense Department contractors while still gouging groups like Planned Parent· hood off the Jiets, but Frank used his over· sight subcommittee to keep the issue visible. In late October, the Reagan administration finally threw in the towel, accepting a vastly watered-down version of its first proposals. In a closely related area, the Adminis· tration also had sought to cut off the list of acceptable charities any group that it claimed was doing lobbying, again broadly defined to include such things as letting the public know of proposed rules changes affecting programs. Planned Parenthood, which has faced the strong­est hostility of any group during this Administration, was once again the target. The rules change was particularly objec· tionable in the eyes of charities, because the issue was not federal tax dollars, but merely whether federal employees would be allowed to donate to such groups during the annual Combined Federal Campaign, which is the equivalent of the United Way for the millions of federal workers. Lower federal court rulings prevented the Reagan Administration from striking Planned Parenthood and similar groups, and Frank's subcommittee once again kept a close watch on the situation. Frank now says he believes the charities who would like information on how to be listed as an eligible group in the Combined Fed· eral Campaigns of the future. The U.S. Civil Rights Commission offi­cially is dead atthe age of27, a casualty of the Reagan Administration's propasal to rid the watchdog group of its watchdogs and replace them with lapdogs. The issue was an effort to replace three commission· ers with Reagan appointees, fo11owing an earller sweep through the commission that included firing the former Eisen· hower cabinet officer then serving as the Civil Rights Commission chairman .. Congressional supporters of the com· mission, who point to the group's origins in 1957 as a key impetus for civil right.s protections in the country, now are consid­ering measures that would take the com· mission away from the President entirely and make it a congressional agency. Cur· rently the commission is charged with answering to both congress and the Presi· dent, with the president appointing com· missioners and congress giving approval. Civil rights protections for gays have not been part of the commission's man· date since a 1977 ruling that the comm.is· sion can not go beyond the charter provided by the 1964 civil rights act, aa amended. Since the act has never been amended to include gays, the commission took a hands-0ff policy. One possible consideration for a congressionally·manda ted commission, however, might be whether language would be added expanding the charter beyond the civil rights act itself to exam· ine discrimination wherever it occurs. International Gay New• A1ency Madalyn Murray O'Hair, preaident of American Atheists, haa expelled the old­est gay atheist group in the United States, the Gay Atheist League, from her organi­zation and endorsed a splinter group called American Gay Atheist, because she says the former has violated the tenets of the organization. O'Hair, who gave a keynote address at GAL.A's convention in 1982, sent a letter to GALA saying that because of the schism between the two gay atheist groups, it iS "obvious to all what we must do." Jeffrey D. Vow lea, President of GALA, said he thought it preferable to "maintain a good working relationship with alJ anti· religious organizations. whether they des· cribe themselves as atheist, agnostic, free thinker, rationalist, scularist or huma· nist." O'Hair accused the excommunicated group of requiring O'Hair's group to accept the religion ofther_eligious mates of gay atheists. Vowles: said that mem~r· ship in his organizabon is on an indiVId· ual basis, and that no inquiry is made "into the religion or lack of it professed by any member's lover or companion." Too Many Managers in Nation's Firms America's productivi ty gap is the fault of America's business leaders, reports the Philtuklphia Inquirer. That's the message from University of Southern California Management Prof es· sor Warren Bennie. He says most U.S. firms are underled and ovennanaged. There are too many "managers" who only try to do the right thing, he says, and too few leaders who do things righl Bennis says it's no wonder surveys show that, while most Americans are sat· isfied with their jobs, they don't believe how they do their jobs makes any differ· ence. For Those Happy Holidays Let Us Cater Your Christmas Festivities A Division of the Party Pro's, Inc. 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Although Montrose went about 68 per­cent behind Van Hightower, Hall suppor­ters say there was evidence of a splintering of the GPC bloc vote. GPC had endorsed Van Hightower. Van Hightower'& support was reflected in the affulent and mid-income white vote and in Mexican-American balloting where she outpolled Hall 59.54 percent to 40.46 percent citywide. But she was no match for the low and mid-income black vote where where she got only about 3 per­cent citywide. Overall election results showed Hall with 67 percent of the total vote to Van Hightower'• 33 percent. "This is not a defeat for the cause of gay right.a," said Bagneris, "it just means it will take longer." He noted that activist Van Hightower would have pushed for a non-discriminatory employment ordi· nance, while Hall's position on the issue is that gays are protected, with other minori­ties, in an employment-related mayor's executive order. "We have to make sure, then, that each new mayor approves that executive order, instead of having our rights guaranteed through an ordinance," Bagneris said. Fair employment is only one of many items thatGPC addresses through its con­certed political activities. Documentation must begin, he said, showing proof that discriminatory hiring and employment practices do exist, aa well as investigation of other areas of alledged discrimination. ''That way, when the time comes, we can prove there ia a need for an ordinance," he .aid. Hall solicited the gay vote and had been supportive of the gay community's righta in the past. He campaigned vigqroualy in Montrose, visiting gay clube and touring with Mayor Kathy Whitmire in the wan· ing days before the early November elec­tion. However, the GPC endorsed Van Hight­ower by a two to one margin, which hurt his chances of gaining major support from the gay community. Jerry Mayes ofGPC said that Hall/Van Hightower backing in the runoff com­pared to the Nov. 2 balloting changed con­siderably, indicating a definite split in the GPC bloc vote, as well as fewer voters. Not only was the overall voter turnout greatly reduced, the percent of that turnout return­ing to cast ballots for Van Hightower cit­ywide was lessened. For example, if Van Hightower had 233 votes in a precinct on Nov. 2, only 115 returned to vote for her on Nov. 29. Hall, however, may have gained only 100 votes on Nov. 2, but all 100 returned to vote for him on Nov. 29; thus, the radical changes in percentages from the Nov. 29 balloting which reflected each candidate receiving about one-third of the votea. Hall becomes the s.cond black to be elected to an at-large city council position and brin&s black representation to one­fourth of the members on city council. He gave up his seat for District D (now filled by Rodney Ellis) to run for the citywide office. He told an extremely packed headquar­ters Tuesday night that the election results prove "that even a young fellow from Sunnyside can achieve citywide office," thus attaining his goal of being given an opportunity to exercise more leadership on issues of citywide impor· tance, such as crime and transporation. "I'm glad that Hall was elected," said one gay Hall supporter, "because I believe he is better qualified because of his expe­rience on City Council and in the legisla­ture. I feel he will be in a better position to work harmoniously with the mayor and City Council and work more productively with them than Van Hightower would have. He will be just ae acceesible as ehe would be; he has always been." This representative noted that Van Hightower had no particular interest in the gay community before running for office. and became responsive to them as a result of gaining the GPC endorsement. "Hall over the years has shown sup-port," he said. Van Hightower's headquarters were a much quieter scene, as the candidate made a thank you speech and promised con­tinued support of the causes to which she has been dedicated for several years. The most gratifying aapect of her work as director of the Houston Area Women's Center is watching people oome from oftentimes very depressing situations to blossom and grow, and the campaign was an extension of that process, she said. "Win or lose, my commitment to work to make Houston a better place to live, a safer, freer place to be all we can be, won't change," Hightower said. After the election results indicated her defeat, ahe telephoned Anthony Hall voic­ing her support of the councilman. In Hall's speech, he said they would be meeting soon to discuss ways to address needs that Van Hightower saw as unmet in Houston. AV an Hightower representative quoted her as saying (at the Copa, a gay club, later that evening), "This sure doean't feel like losing," and that many iBSues that needed to be in forefront had been brought out through the campaign. "She will be allies with the gay community-politics or not," the Van Hightower supporter said, "and she will ill I I . 'fk /f.. •/ii. • ,ANTI • ANTI-- • continue to be a prominent commumty activist in a prominent activist commun­ity." However. she could not comment on whether or not Van Hightower would run again. Lee Harrington, gay community leader, 1aid "I agreed with Lance Lalor on the GPC tour when he introduced Nikki at each stop saying, 'We have the chance to elect to Houston's City Council the best You're Readmg the MONTROSE VOICE One of America's Ma1or Gay Community Newspapers person we ever had for gay rights.' If it had been left to the gays, we would have. I was proud of the bloc vote again-it always sends the clearest messages, even to friendly politicians, that lots of voters expect attention." "I congratulated Anthony and only asked that he be a.a sensitive as he possi­bly can be to our i88uea during the next two yeara. I am sure he will be," Harrington said. 8 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC-. 2 ,- 198-3 --- THOUGHTS FROM SHIFLETT: a) "Ray (Hill) was the only one who knew how to play City Hall. b) There was tension all alcng in the Caucus' deve/cpment as to who really sp-0ke for the gay community, and that problem still exists with us today. c) Leaders are born, not made. Shiflett Leaves with Strong Parting Thoughts from page I were private and closed, were engulfed in a occured m his life that has influenced his tidal wave of protest directed at the orange direction to this day. juice queen, so much so that 10,000 people .. One of my friends in high school com- participated. in a candlelight march to milted suicide," be reflected, "It was City Hall m protest of Bryant's self­because of his gayness that bis family rid· n~.hteous blasts at gay people everywh-:re. iculed him and destroyed his concept of I was so ov~h"!!"ed with ~motion self-worth. And ever since that day, I was and feUsomuchpnd~, Shiflett~wdofthe very committed to making people under- candlelight march, that that s wh~n I stand that it was okay to be gay because I first understood the meanmg of gay knew that I was okay. ' prid~.' I had heard of the concept, but I "So from a long time ago, I was building didn t u~ders~d it. It took Dade County up that desire to do something about the (B~ant 8 Flonda base whe~e she led an problem. because I sawitcomeintomylife an.ti·gay refei:endum} to enhght~ me of and it affected me very profoundly," be this ne";, feehng that was sweep mg the said 1adly. "And I was in high school" country. . Shiflett' a activism. spurred by the death But despite the appearance of 10,000 of a gay friend and coupled with his natu- gai: people and the.II supporters, Hous­ral political bent, was further anchored by ton s and the nation s ~ews ~edia looked the teechings ofbia family. He feels that the other way, a media ~ihon whi~h much of his leadership ability comes from finally catapulted. ~h1flett mto the mam­" the moral strength from my family-the ·~~am of gay po!itlcs. way I was brought up. I was commited to 8 I . was really UTlta~ at the way th~ quality oflifeandmakingsurethatjustice media handled the Aruta Bryant march, should be done. he said angrily. "Not only did they under· '"There were 8 lot of wrongs being done estimate the_ nu~bera ?f peopl~ w~o were out there that J wanted to straighten out," there, they d1dn tdescnbe the oi.gnificance he said of the gay vs. non·gay society of of ev~ts the way our com~~nity wanted the early 70•8. "You don't get prepared for to see it-the way they felt. that except in your upbringing. Leaders Outraged and ready to capitalize on his are born, not made." past experience ae well as his past emo- So with his lion's share of enthusiasm tions, Shiflett was then drawn irrevocably and a zealot's ire at injustice, Shiflett to the organization he had watched being returned to Houston and found the turf born-Houston's Gay Political Caucus, a already plowed, waiting for the seeds to be group of20 or so community-oriented indi­planted that would grow and make Hoc•- viduals who held their meetings upstairs ton's gay community a viable political at the old Inside/ Outside (now Texas force on the local, state and national lev- Renegades) and the Depository II. el.e. '~e caucus at that time Wa.B somewhat "When I moved here and saw that there email and had a feeling of fraternity, not was a quality gay community and people really politics. People got together to make within the community were aspiring to do each other feel good-working on press good things with their Jives and were not releases. They really didn't have a real justintoadrag-queenlifestyle," hesaid. "I serious agenda, and not too many people wassoinspiredthatmylifeotartedtoblos- came to the meetings, either. It surely som. didn't have too much money." "I got to watch ~pherally the GPC Then using the media slight as his organize," he said of1975, 0 because I lived jumping-off point, Shiflett became in an apartment complex of people who involved with the caucus' Media Monitor­were organizing it." ing Committee, the only active committee This combination of his past and pres· within the early caucus, other than it8 ent provided the spark for Shiflett's lead· mailing committee which Shiflett felt was ership in the community when two years the caucus' backbone. after his arrival Anita Bryant brought her "We were able to get the media to ascer· "Save Our Children" campaign to Houo- tain the GPC committee as a significant, ton. constituent group that had needs to be met Prior to her arrival. Shiflett said that under the guidelines of the FCC. And that "there really wasn't a sense of community was an accomplishment," he said of one of at all, but that year really gave it some his (and the GPC's) first achievement .:'.l;l "~nd w~ also ~hli•hed connectio1Y1 ~ ~·~·" '?h.,.,n•m , "!;'*, ' efii~.t 1,11( , and theyrealizedwhothepeoplewerethey for the star in the east. could call for news." "But there was tension aH along in the Then Shiflett was ready to make a little caucus' development as to who really news of his own. spoke for the gay community, and that The fledgling organization was under problem still exist8 with us today." Don Hrachovy, an interim president who "Anditwasthatquick ofadecision," he followed Gary Van Ooteghem, and a timid said of his first presidential bid. "I just felt board, and there was no one guiding force like I had some things to offer that the at the wheel of what Shiflett thought people downtown would respond to." should be a much more powerful political What Shiflett felt he had to offer cen­group. Shiflett then sized up what he saw tered around his professionalism: the way as the community's needs and went after he asked questions, the way he got the obtaining them, and just began to create right answen, the way he was able to get the waves that would see him resign from people to siz~up major issues. The caucus the GPC's presidency several years later. apparently felt 80, too, for in March of'78, ~~hl:;d::~i~::r~h;t'~~s ~~~ ~~~t; ~:n;.as el~d as the group's third presi-own personal lives and work and really Then began the series of what Shiflett didn't have the time to devote to a new calls "quantum leaps" which occurred agenda for the GPC." during his administration. Consequently a coup was organized Three months after hie election, the against existing GPC bylaws and the GPC had manufactured an influential Media Monitoring Committee called for a bloc vote. special election for a new president. "J knew that I could get the caucus Prior to the election, Shiflett was intro- involved in grass roots politics because of duced to City Hall by gay activist Ray my background. They just didn't know the Hill, whom he admit8 helped him in his avenue that was available to them­first years by st.earing him through Hous- organizing at the precinct level-and ton 's gay political waters. that's what I wanted to do." 11Ray was the only one who really knew Then following the May Democratic how to play City Hall," Shiflett said, primaries, Shiflett, along with Ray Hill, remembering the times Hill took him urged the caucus to open up a Town Meet­downtown and told him "and this is the ing, an event which Shiflett says could way it works. mean as much to the commmunity today, "He was a real good teacher," Shiflett if repeated, as it did back in 1978. added. Prior to the Town Meeting which Shi- Then a meeting was arranged by Hill, flett regards as being one of the most whom some members of the GPC felt was important political event8 that this com­out to control the gay community, for Shi· munity h88 ever seen, he met with various flett to meet then Mayor Jim McConn, an membera of the community six weeks event that further pushed Shiflett toward before over 3000 people filed into the hie goal, that of becoming president ofthe Astrodome to make their voices heard in G~.;.asn't real pleased with the way that H?.~~a~·i:.,:ys:':'~;~:;,t about Town meeting wont and felt like I could do a Meeting was that it really established a good job in dealing with the kind of people serious foundation for the (gay) movement we were dealing with downtown. I to go forward," he said of the event. "It set informed Gregg Bell (who was running for an agenda and it gained consensus from the GPC presidency) on the way home the community. When you have that (from the meeting) that I was going to run many people participating in decision­for president. making, you can't help but come out with Bell reacted negatively to Shiflett'• some kind or benefit. ~i:~Shffi:~~~a:rtT~~~~~B:u::!~ "And we ended up having large the hardest worker the GPC had, accord- ~u=t~ ~iweoo"~;;:~a~?:n~~~0~}e~~;::; ~~l~~y ~~i~!~;~i~;.?sn't presidential overnight. It was amazing wha_t Anita q ' . Bryant had done to us. It magnified 10- But Shiflett ov.errode Bell's objection.s, fold that day (of the march), even though as well as the obJect~on~ of others w1thm we didn't have the numbers. "After get . the caucus, and cap1tahzed on what was ting coi:ise~\111 like that " he ~otinuj ttn a lblllcl•rll\11. l"Oltti••l poup.htoluoex " 'we hac!'a V<!l'Y coll•sl\re ~nd uhlfietl co '"" -~~-- .. ._ .. munity, which is nice to look back on. It happened to a coalition of people. It wasn't just one group in charge of the event. It was all groups participating in it, with a couple of groups likeGPC being the thrust­ing force in making it happen." Shiflett recalled other major events which occurred during his GPC presiden­tial history. He is particularly proud of the national convention that "put the GPC on the national gay political map. Texas, as a matter of fact, was put on the gay political map by Houston representing Texas. Cali­fornia and New York finally started to deal with us. It (the gay movement) had been an east coast/west coast pheno­menon up until that time. "Then we had to force our way to the decision-making table. They didn't really want to include us when we got there." But since then, all has changed, and Houston's position in the national gay momement has finally become entrenched in the east/west coast minds. "Texas is now looked at as the moderate voice of the gay community leadership," Shiflett said. "We don't tend to have the radical approach . We're pragmatic and even-keel down here." Shiflett is also proud of the municipal election of '79 that displaced Frank Mann, 14the bigot of the century on City Council," with Eleanor Tinsley. He said Mann's three favorite words were "oddwads, queers, perverts," and that he prticularly delighted in telling Mann, "Little minds belong with little peo­ple, and little people don't belong in big places like City Council. We're going to unseat you." Conseqaently, the GPC fed Tinsley 200 to 300 volunteers, and "shesweptby," Shi­flett said. "That's when the GPC became popular. We were recognized. And gay baiting was used all over." Shiflett recounted the troubled years with the Houston Police Department and the confrontation with HPD Chief Cald­well, who would not acknowledge that the gay community had a problem with the was so tremendous, because there really was a camaraderie and esprit de corps, and it was fun." Then Shiflett reflected on the highpoint of his two years as president of the GPC, that of organizing, watching and partici­pating in Houston's first Gay Pride Week. "It was probably the most memorable event that I can remember during those two years of my being president, because it brought out so many more people. You could see the smiles on their faces as you drove down Westheimer in the parade. It was an incredible feeling just to see the sense of self-worth coming across the com­munity. Overnight they had decided to come out of the closet! "It was very emotional. I would say our first parade had 12-13,000 people at it-an incredible leap in one year for a commun­ity, especially a gay community. "It was so satisfying to see the results of your efforts. But again, it was because eve­ryone was working together." Just prior to Shiflett's election for a third term, the GPC was at its peak of influence. "I had been responsible for bringing the gay community into the mainstream of politics and establishing its ability to per· form and deliver what they say they can deliver. We were riding high on a crest of influence. 0 lt was time for our community to real­ize that we could make a difference. And when we realized that we did make a dif­ference, it reinforced our reason to exist and continue to build and gave hope to a lot of people that things can get done." (Next week, Shiflett discusses his resig­nation from the GPC and the forming of Citizens for Human Equality (CHE), as well as the political diuisions within the community which could plunge it into a dark age without leaders, wherein the cur­rent GPC could become an extinct dino­saur.) HPD - issBuuet ththe apto libcer ipnrgosb letmh e" bceionmg mthuen ointye •·M -~~········ together," GPC's work with the National • Gay Task Force, which was invited to Houston, led to Operation Documentation which encourged the gay community to report actions by the police. Shiflett recalled the frequent bar raids, the beatings by the HPD, the shootings, the police cars parked in front of the gay bars with the cops inside waiting to follow people out and arrest them on DWI charges or for public intoxication, some­times 10 at a time. But what was most important to him during hie presidency was the sense of community and the pride he felt with so many other gay groups besides the GPC growing and forming in Houston. "So many more opinion leaders were available to work with, and the more groups that were out there, the more peo­ple you could put together for your efforts. You could work together. 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As I see it, there are two basic reasons for screening and endorsing candidates. First, we want to identify which candi­dates are best qualified and most suppor­tive of the goals of the gay community. Second, we want to gather political IOU's from candidates we endorse and help elect. lfwe cold trust public officials always to act on the basis of high principle and lofty motives, then a dual endorsement would be appropriate in races between two accep· table candidates, such as Nikki Van Hightower and Anthony Hall. I am afraid, however, that the world is not like that. Poljtical·inarriages are always marriages of to!lvenience. Public officials support our ngh\8 only insofar as it is in their ih~ttit~~ iJ~r:~!e~~~s8~;'~~h1:i~ohutr:~~ of their convictions. Am I being overly cynical? I don't think so. Kathy Whitmire is a long time suppor­ter of our cause, but she didn't want to appear with us on election night while an NBC TV crew was there. Perhaps she didn't want to soil her national image. Similarly, in 1979 when George Grea­nias first ran for city council against Lance Lalor, he didn't want our endorse­ment. He thought it would do more harm than good. When Lalor trounced him, he changed his mind and won with us in 1981 and 1983. I admire both Whitmire and Greanias. They have been good for Houston and good for the gay community. They are pol­iticians, however, and generally act on the basis of what they perceive to be the best for them politically. And so do we. We endorse candidates and work for their election, not becau1e we love them (although we may like some a great deal), but because we wish to further our own political cause. Consequently, the concept of an enforcement and a bloc vote makes good political sense, even when there are two acceptable candidates in a race. Will Nikki Be Able to Recoup Her Losses? From Neil lsbin I write this letter with mixed feeling. Although I have never met Nikki Van Hightower, from listening to her I felt that she was a decent, sincere and capable per­son who would make an exceJlent addition to the City Council. As such, I was deeply distressed by the desperate negativity of her run-off campaign. I had felt all along that she was in the wrong race at the wrong time, but that she could succeed in another campaign. Now I am not so optim­istic. She made too many foolish mistakes. Given the overwhelming victory of Mayor Kathy Whitmire, it was foolish of Nikki to attack the mayor and allow her­self to be used by her strange coalition of supporters 88 an anti-Whitmire tool. In addition, her ad that warned that a Hall victory would strengthen the Lei.and machine wreaked of camouflaged racism, whether intentional or nol The Houston electorate has matured beyond most people's expectations. Sme~r campaigns no longer succeed-they dis­gust voters and backfire. I am proud that the candidate I supported, Anthony Hall, ran such a clean and honest campaign. Personally, I find it difficult to blame Nikki for her campaign mi~takes, and I prefer to blame her campaign manageT Shari Val en tine and others who sur­rounded her. However, ultimately, it.i~ t_he candidate that must bear respons1b1hty for the quality and tenor of her campaign. Will Nikki be abl• to recoup her losses, learn from her mistakes and be a via~le candidate again? I would like to hope so­but it will be an uphill fight for her to regain the credibility her campaign des· troy ed. Reader Not Satisfied with VOICE Coverage From Steven Cuniberti The impossible syntax of your cover story about the mayor at Mary's (Nov. 11) left me with no clear idea as to who did what to whom. Considering the apparently con· fusing circumstances, it would have seemed to me to be of the utmost impor­tance that the reporting be clear. Doesn't anyone read copy before it goes to press? Perhaps-and I do not suggest this as a joke-we are just reading the results of someone's idea of creative writing. My the-­sis cannot be as outlandish 88 the R-grade detective pulp style of the following issue's cover story about a homicide on lower Westheimer. I pick up a newspaper to be informed of the news; if I wanted to read nonsense, I would have picked up a bar guide or a National Enquirer. Also in issue No. 160 (Nov. 18) was a pathetically defensive article about yet another confrontation between the GPC and the VOICE." ... the VOICE addressed the caucus ... and ... the VOICE established itself as an unbiased newspaper .... " we read in Robert Hyde's article. Oh, really? And in what way did the VOICE address the crowd-by rustling its pages? If some­one spoke for the VOICE, I would have liked to have read that attribution in the story. And to whom did the newspaper establish itself? Having attended more than one GPC meeting in my life, I suspect that it was to none of them, Ray Hill's sense of political expediency notwith­standing. What a sad thing it has been for me to discover that the old childish taunts that the GPC'ers have hurled at the MONT· ROSE VOICE for using the Hearst publi­cation's tactics were more premature than inaccurate. (The atory dealing with the mayor at Mary'•, as well as with the following events of election night, was presented chronologically and was meant to show the diviaion and confusion within the com· munity. We would be happy if you would like to explain everything to the commun· ity and tie events up into a nice little pack· age with a bright bow-no one else has been ab~ to do so. And let'• hope your attitude regarding the murder on Westheimer as "nonsense" is not a pervasive one and indicative of why murders in the area are so frequent­who really gives a damn? As for the GPC meeting addreBB, we're sorry to disappoint you by not making the article an editorial.) GPC Member Attempts to Clarify Mary's Incident From Annise D. Parker Open letter to the Houston gay community I am sure most of you are awarethatGPC is once again involved in controversy. Our local gay newspaper has given front page coverage to certain baseless rumors and unsubstantiated allegations. I refer, of course, to last week's (Nov. 11) lead story in the MONTROSE VOICE. When I first read the article, I was fur­ious. I ranted that it reeked of yellow jour­nalism, editorializing and sloppy reporting. GPC has had disagreements with the VOICE in the past. I was told to ignore the story. DEC. 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 For the record. In reference to alleged "Mary'1 would like to apologize to the incidents at Mary's bar on Friday the 4th: mayor for the rudeness and actions of cer· Fact: There were four GPC board lain membero of the GPC which occurr,,./ members at Mary's that night. They were at my bar laat Friday night.·~ =~=~rs~d0 severs! membe~r~s ;pr:e~sernTl h:::1ere~ ·---------· Fact: Bob passed out GPC bloc vot stickers to people in the bar. (I remind you that's why they were printed.) We did not put them on cars. I am not sure what form of coercion he is supposed to have used in forcing stickers on people who didn't want them. If anyone was too drunk or stupid to be able to refuse it, I hope they don't vote. Fact: None of the board members pres­ent spoke to the mayor or impeded her progress in any way. There was no "block­ade" by anyone and, consequently, no forceful removal of it. We weren't even standing together in the bar. Granted, we failed to greet or respond to the mayor as she made "'"'­rounds, hardly a radical confrontati>n. I went outside before she reached me tnd did not return until she had lefl Fact: This supposed incident provided the lightest moment in our subsequent meeting with the mayor. We shared a laugh about the efficiency of the rumor mill. She pointed out that media coverage like this has influenced her current atti­tude. The mayor told the VOICE that nothing happened at Mary's. State Rep. Debra Danburg told the VOICE nothing hap­pened. GPC board members told the VOICE it didn't happen. I think GPC has a right to know the source of this attaclr.. If the VOICE doesn't believe the words of the mayor, our state Rep. or the board of GPC, then I don't think that its (sic) GPC which has a problem. The VOICE responda: It is not a question of what the VOICE believes, a.a long aa we report ewnU as accurately a.a poBBible. Also, no one coerced Mary's owner, Jim Farmer, into making the following statement (Nou. 11) to the VOICE: Mail to PR<MRTE RECORDS 140251\«llt'f"thwdAYcl'lUf:North Mlnneapotis, M1meSota SS« 1 Af'atrvmofSong{PAO/PCD159) 0 AUIUM 0 CASSETlE Sakowitz Offering Ghost Writer You've bought the his and hers blimps from Neim.an·Marcus and the iguana coat from Bergdort' s. Now you can order the ultimate Christmas gift from SB.kowitz: your own autobiography, reports the Pacific News Service. You won't have to actually write it. The store will send a ghost writer to your door to do it for you. You'll get 100 hardback copies of your life story, complete with pic­tures and gold lettering on the cover. The price: a mere $63,000. AM/PM SHIFT EARN OVER $300 WEEKLY Join the hottest radio promotion to ever run in the Houston area. We need SO people in our promotional office with pleasant personalities and voice_ No experience neces­sary. We wHI train. Our office has a cheerful, comfortable atmosphere. Plus cash bonus daily. Guys, girts, homemakers welcome. HIRING NOW Apply in person 10am-3pm or 5pm-7pm every Monday thru Satur­day. 2727 Kirby Dr., suite 203 (on bus route). (61!1) 559-4166 Well, I agreed not to stand here and vent (800)3!11~!145 my initial reaction. But I don't think this type of reporting can remain unchal· lenged. I think VOICE coverage of GPC improved tremendously under Hollis Hood. I believe she is fair, and I know she ~:r~::r~~urate. Unfortui;iatel~;notall ----------------------.1• 12 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 2 , 1983 ~ youc ecouc phone connecuon THE TEX*5 LINEMAN v let us share your erotic fantasy by phone phone sex only tele . (71 3) 960-8082 VISA, MASTERCARD, CHECK or MONEY ORDER~ ...... 7HE ULT/MA.TE BAKED POTATO SPUDS AREA GIRESBEST FRIEND! 416 Westheimer HoU11ton, TX 77006 620-0664 O Regular Subscription $30 0 Trial Subscription $15 0 Send me more information, please. Name ~----------------­Addre~----------------- City. _________ State __ Zip ____ _ Typeo!Compulel _________ _____ _ Clip and Mail to: GNIC NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77008 Plan Now to Attend the Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference January 27-29 Hotel Savoy Houston Workshops, Speeches, Entertainment If you are working in the gay media or are a gay person working in the non-gay media (either journalism. adver­tising or administrative). plan to join your colleagues in Houston. Also. for officials of gay organizations who are NOT in the gay media but who would like to learn hOVJ to better influence the gay media. local and national. we'll have a special workshop. To Henry McClurg. vice president Gay Press Association 3317 Montrose #306 Houston. TX 77006 Enclosed is my $25 registration fee (for GPA members) or $30 registration fee (non-GPA members) for the Southern Regional Conference. (Include $10 additional If post­marked after Jan. 13) o I am in the gay media. o I work for the non-gay media. o I do not work in the media but would like to attend the workshop on influencing the gay media and other events of the conference. Name ________ _ Address Phone(s) I am a member of the Gay Press Association [ I am NOT a member of the Gay Press Association (tf arrMng in Houston .bv plane. train or bus. let us know your time of arriVol and we will piCk you up at the 0trporl or depot) When we receive your form. we'll send you a conference schedule and a brochure on the Savoy Hotel so you can make reseNations. ~S:cv~: ~~ e~t~~~~n~~ ~:ar~~~~u~n~~~~ ally. busses will be available IOI' tours of Montrose nightspots Your registration fee will include tickets for free and discounted admis­sions to several clubs Commentary Naming a Gay Business is Not an Easy Feat By Peter Harrison If you want to open a business, better think up a name right now. One of my oldest, dearest and best-hung friends recently went through the trauma of going to the county clerk's office to register a name for his new plant store: he thought ''The Green Queen" was a good one. But, no! Someone else somewhere else in the state had beat him to it. I tried to soothe him with a combination of warm caresses and cold gin. I even sug­gested a better name, I thought: "Sod 'Em and Grow More Rye." But he went into terminal wilt until he came up with "How Does Your Basket Hang?" and ran off to the courthouse to try that one. I'm beginning to think that I should open a business of my own, a kind of advi­sory service for people like him who need names for new enterprises. After eating at a couple of new gay restaurants, I've come against catchy names, too. You won't find service stations called "Don't Pa68 Our Gas" or 0 The Lube Your Joint Joint." Movie moguls are very happy with "Superman III" and "Rocky Infinity." Hilton and Sheraton just keep on throw­ing up "Hilton Hamtramcks" and "She­raton Sheboygan& . ., But our people suffer from what I call the Rumplestilskin Syndrome. You gotta have a name or the magic's not there. Let me tell you the true story of two men who went to Russian River, fell in love with the place and decided to open a gay guest house. After tramping around (and I emphas­ize tramping) for three days, they con­sulted a real-estate office and found a charming old building with ponds, trees, ducks an? flowers. It was going cheap, because 1t was near a railroad siding where two abandoned cabooses were bak- ~~~si~~i~!ub~;!~s0~~n~7:e~~ t~~~~ a~~ eyesore. • -- Our heroes, truly creative sort.a, realized / y~(l / - :~:~:;~k~ao1;:':;,s:~:;~~~ye=~~~~~:t:i! \.L ~•'• -:'\ charming (a key word in gay business) I ) '"'\ little (another key word here) weekend 1 f\ hideaways (that's called a hterary hat C. ~ trick-three key words in one phrase). ~ They checked with the railroad-sure new construction. Zonmg was nght. There ' I ~ enough,caboo.seswentmorech~aplythan j 1 ~ :~~:~li'!~:fe~ater, sewage and a ready· ~ So they sat back and started planning. There would be little Roger & Gaillet soaps, big bath towels and complimentary shampoo. They started making lists· of ~ - things to check: is KY available in tiny to the conclusion that more time was spent planning what to can those places than on any questions of food preparation or decor. "A Quiche Before Dining" did offer quiche as an appetizer, a bouncy little item that prophesized the latex-derivative steak to come. 0 Tomorrow's Manicotti" had papered the wal1s with old physique magazines, it's true, but the pasta tasted more like yesterday's. Raw fish has never appealed to me, so I can't honestly comment on "Name That Tuna" and "If You Knew Sushi." Obviously, the gay community puts great store in originality. Others don't seem to care quite so much. In both New York and San Francisco, there are "Old Original Joe's" and I believe that there's even an "Old Original Joe's Number Two" in one or the other Having lots of money seems to work httle tubes? Can you grow watercress in a duck pond? And, they considered the name. "Take The A Train," "Loose Caboose" and 0 0range Blossom Special" were all dis­carded. "The Right Track" and "Club Car" just seemed to prove that the railroad motif wasn't the way to go. "Wanderlust" and "Loose Ends" killed a travel theme. Meanwhile, interest rates crept to 12 per· cenL 0 Yo' Mama's," BB in "Where are you staying?" "Yo' Mama's!" nearly caused an argument. "Mother Ducks" was offered rapturously by one of the partners and received coolly by the other. Interest went to 13 percent. To cut. a long story short, by the time they arrived at a name-11Boys R Ua"­mortgage rates had gone through the ceil­ing. Instead of realizing their dreams of welcoming hunks to their soignee orgy parlor, they found themselves over· whelmed with mountains of brochures for kitchen implements, souvenir matches and lawn furniture. Instead of happily :~::~!ut!dir;e~~e~~;:e~rthle!a~~~~;:i~ strained relationship. ("If we'd called it 1Gandy Dancers' like I wanted, we'd be operating now." "If we'd named it that, we'd be out of business now.") All of this could have been avoided if I were in business, offering help to those who need it. A quick consultation with Peter Harrison, and you'd be off in a flame with a name. Vital with a title. All systems a-go-go with a logo. A gay video arcade? "Shirley Booths." Gay farm chemicals? "Weed 'Em and Reap." Gay storage system? "Closet Cases." Dry cleaners? "Pressing Con· cerns." Footwear? 0 The Shoe Must Go On." See how easy I could make it for you? If you're interested, keep watching this column, and I'll let you know how to get in touch. I'll be open for business-as soon as I can think of a name. Harrison liues in New Jersey. His column appears here and in other gay publica­tion•. Cl 1983 Stonewall Features Syndi· cate. DEC. 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 ~ The STRATFORD ~onBaldwin Condominiums as individual and private as you are. Wt offer yo11 tht privary 111ul Jtc11rity you demand, at a prm yo11 can afford. T~ Stratford on Baldwin condumini11m.J, 18 n&ly comtr11cttd ont and two bedroom 11m/J are reasonably przctd Jtartmg at 149,500. Each 11mt haJ a przvatt pa110/balcony, and mdiv1d11al J/oragt doJetJ in th< covered parking ar<a belrJU·. Enjoy th< eaJY accm to a centrally lrxated hot tub and lll'O reduood Jundeck j11Jt a J/roll au·ay. Lrxattd in the Montrose area, ;1111 offT11am, and con­iwzent to down/()WTI Ho11Jton, th< Stratford on Baldu'ln condominium.I are not common, thty art aJ mdiv1d11al aJ pleaJt contact: II Laymon• Finge~ Inc. j/j So•lh PoJJ Oak BhJ. · S•IU 162 · H'"'''"· T<Xal 77027 · 7131621-'JJjO 14 MONTROSE VOICE/ DEC. 2, 1983 'Terms of Endearment' is Rare Emotional Experience Films By Steve Warren With cancer touching more of us every day, it'• useful to have a movie that doesn't prettify it. If that's not your idea of entertainment. the same movie happens to contain enough outrageous humor that they could have named it National Lam· poon's Love Story. But it's called Terms of Endearment, and it ties it.A diverse elements together in a clichb-free portrait of a strange but real mother (Shirley Macl.aine) and daughter (Debra Winger). Writer-producer James L. Brooks, the creator of The Mary Tykr Moore Show and Taxi, makes an impres­sive big·screen directing debut that should win him an Oscar nomination. A few early scenes establish Aurora Greenway as a tart.tongued widow whose outspokenness keeps even her beloved only daughter Emma at arm's length. ("Sure would be nice to have a mother 1omebody liked.") When Emma marries Flap (Jeff Daniels), a blond hunk who calls her his "sweet-ass gal," Aurora advises against it ("You're not special enough to overcome a bad marriage!") and even boycotts the wedding. Still, Aurora and Emma are joined-at least by telephone-'til death do them part-which may not be true for Emma and Flap, whose money troubles lead to other marital strain, even while their love produces three children. ("How is your life going to get better," Mama nags, "if you keep having children with that man?'1 Mother and daughter drift into simul­taneous affa..in. Aurora, who refuses to grow old gracefully, accepts a long­standing proposition hom nutdoor neighbor Garret Breedlove (great name!), a retired opaceman (''There's a hundred and six astronauts in the whole fuck.in' world, and I'm one of them!'') who lives higher than he ever flew. Shirky MacLaine and Debra Winger 118 mother and daughter in "Terma of Endearment" Emma, afraid that Flap is having affairs, has one of her own with ahy, mar­ried bank.et" John Lithgow (who haa the film's funniest line, a terrific putdown of New Yorkers, in his first scene). It 11<>unda like aoap opera in synopaia, especially when canoer entera the picture, but Brooks' humor keeps it from going that routs until a bit of tear-jerking at the end. By that time, we've come to know and care about the characters, despite their off­putting humanness. It's unfortunate that the two stars don't have more scenes together or a real acting duel might have resulted; but while Aurora stays home in the River Oaks sec­tion of Houston, Emma goes with her hus­band to Iowa and Nebraska. So we get two strong individual perfor­mances. MacLaine takes to the self­deprecating role like a true masochist (who else would let herself be photo­graphed in such unflattering costumes?) and is rewarded with dialogue that once only Bette Davis could have gotten away with. Winger has the more ordinary part, but it has quite a range to it, and she han­dles it superbly. Jack Nicholson plays the neighbor with the wrong stuff, and talk about self­effacing! He reveals a belly that's large enough to get separate billing! Brooks has explained his choice of the Locke Lane location: "River Oaks is more distinctively American than it is Texan. The block that we were on is like Ozzie and Harriet's house, Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney's; it's Andy Hardy coun­trv." The ingredien 18 of Terms of Endear­ment don't mix easily, and its uniqueness is such that you can't just slip into it like an old coat. Don't expect to he over­whelmed from the first moment. Instead, just relax and be slowly drawn into its spell. By the time it's over, you'll know you've seen a fine pieceoffilmmakingand ahared a rare emotional experience. Maip's, the National Bai of Te•as, will light up the Montrose Communitp Christmas Tree On Sunday, Detemller n, S:JOpm Por a PREE SHOT ... Bring pour homemade or other Christmas decorations to the IJar IJp Thursday, Dec. 8 -o-o- NIGHTLY HJIPPY HOUR IOPM TILL ll:JOJIM Naturally IOll WesthetmH-518-8851-New DJ Wayne Barton, Hot! Hot! Hotr Quiz How Do You Do at Literature? DEC. 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 South's Largest Art Deco Dealer By Roz Ashley Do you read to fall asleep, or do you read for stimulation? What kind of stimula­tion? Do you think theGreatBooksarethe greatest, or that bestsellers are the best? Do you read the newspaper for news, or just to follow the adventures of Mary Worth? How weH-read are you? To find out this author's opinion, finish and score the fol­lowing quiz. Circle the answer that most truthfully completes each numbered sent­ence. Skip items that do not apply to you; it will ruin your score, but who's looking? Answers follow the last question. I My library is full of: a) records; b) hardcover books; c) other people's books. 2. I read to get to the core of things, such as: a) serious nonfiction; b) soft core; c) hard core. 3. Your new book purchase starts out: "Norbert's brown eyes were feverish with longing, and he sighed deeply, enticed by his lover's smile. He was inflammed, des­pairing of triumph over this haughty beauty's indifference." You decide to: a) read it now; b) return it for credit; c) burn it. 4. You read the book reviews so that you can: a) select the best books; b) avoid diffi. cult books; c) discuss the latest books with­out having to read them. 5. You've just started James Joyce's Ulysses, and you: a) skip to the sexy parts; b) need help and get it; c) need help, but fake it. ' 6. You enjoy poetry: a) and read it; b) and read it aloud; c) as long as it rhymes. 7. You buy current magazines and you read: a) most of the artides; b) the recipes and the ads; c) everything but the silly quizzes. 8. You select a book because: a) it's a bestseller; b) it's been recommended; c) it's easy to borrow. 9. You've finally startedMoby Dick and: a) Captain Ahab makes you nervous; b) the whole book makes you nervous; c) you decide to read Jaws instead. 10. You're reading a book with a lot of long words, so you: a) look up most of them; b) look up every other one; c) forget it and look for the latest copy of Mandate. 11. For current news each day, you con· suit: a) at least one newspaper; b) the news show with the cutest anchorperson; c) the crowd at the bar. 12. You're taking a Great Books course, and you find: a) it's dull, but good disci­pline; b) it's difficult, but exciting; c) it's boring and you quit. 13. You've finally found the time to read just one book. Which would you choose? a) a Jacqueline Suzanne novel; b) a good mystery; l') My Secret Garden. 14. Your favoril.e mysteries havea lotof· a) well-drawn characters; b) hidden clues; c) blood and guts. 15. Which title most appeals to you? a) The Heart is a Lonely Hunter; b) The Dev· il's Desire; c) Tea Room Trade. Now, get your score by adding the points for the answers you've chosen: (1) a-2, b-5, Drunks Forced to Remember 'Last Night' Scientists are working on a new way to deal with alcoholism: making drunks remember the experience, reports Omni. Researchers at the National Institute for Mental Health say a drug called zimel­dine prevents memory blackout and causes drinkers to recall their experiences in embarrassing detail. But Dr. Herbert Weingartner is cautious about its role in treating alcohol abuse. 0 A number of drug& have already been tl'ied," he says, "and none has been particularly effective." c-1; (2) a-5, b-2, c-0; (3) a-2, b-5, c-0; (4) a-5, b-3, c-0; (5) a-1, b-5, c-2; (6) a-5, b-5, c-0; (7) a-5, b-1, c-5; (8) a-1, b-5, c-0; (9) a-5, b-3, c-0; (10) a-5, b-3, c-0; (11) a-5, b-3, c-0; (12) a-3, b-5, c-0; (13) a-1, b-5, c-5; (14) a-5, b-3, c-0; (15) a-5, b-0, c-0. Reading Your Score (4-27) Your low score may indicate that you don't read enough, or that you don't care about what you read .As long as you read, though, don't let it bother you. (28-51) You're reading, and that's good. Your choices may not have snob appeal, but what do you care? (52-75) With all your taste and brains, how did you find time to take this test? Ashley is a personal counselor. r;, 1983 Stonewall Features Syndicate. Circa 1930 REMARKABLE! • Art Deco Anaoires 19' to 11 O • Art Deco Ban • 1158 A ap • Drastts 16' A ap ~ S •nd.ay STEVE & LEANNA appearing thru Dec. 10 2702 Kirby - 524-6272 Dimer Mon-ThU'S 6-11 Frl &Sat6-12 re5el\/Otlons requested Shows 9:30, 11, 12:30 16 MONTROSE VOICE/ DEC. 2, 1983 AIDS and Grief: A Personal Experience By Michael Helquist Reprinted from "Coming Up,'• San Franci.co "Michael, I thmk we need a miracle this time." "Mark, what if we got it? What if you were out of th£ hospital and cured of AIDS? We could go traveling. You know where we would go?" "Where?" "First, I'd take you to the Greek islands because I've always wanted to go there. Then you could take me to your favorite beach in Hawaii." A little later. "You know, Michael. you can still go to tlwse places. I don't know where I'm going from here. But I just might be there wait­ing for you. n -May 1983 SAN FRANCISCO-It's been five months now. Already Mark Feldman died of AlDS complications on Thursday,June 2. I have a little time perspective on those six and a half months from November of '82 (the date of his diagnosis) to June of '83. It seems like yesterday; it seems like never. In six months' time, I came to care deeply for Mark as a friend, a boyfriend and a lover. And now he's gone. Mark chose to play a very important role in making public the personal side of an AlDS diagnosis. He helped others see beyond the medical reports and statistics. There are, of course. more than AJDS diag­nosis hitting the gay male population. Some men also face death and dying. Even greater numbers of gay men and les­bians confront troubling sensations of loss and tremendous feelings of grief. My experiences with Mark were per­sonal and unique. They do not necessarily apply to others. I do think that it's impor­tant to acknowledge the considerable pain and grief in the community now. I believe it's important to be sensitive and suppor­tive of these feelings. Sensations of shock combined with my fear of grief to block much of the inevitable grieving process. Early in August of this year, two months after Mark's death, things began to get out of my control. I was asked to address a new group of hanti Project counselors about the griev­ing process. The day was difficult for me. I had successfully held back much of the pain of loss for weeks, but the pressure for release was building. After I spoke to the group, there was an exercise, a sort of guided meditation, that Shanti employs called "letting go of grief." Even the title scared me. I didn't know if I could handle the pain; it seemed like too much. I also feared that ifl let go of the grief, I would be Jetting go of Mark. I went ahead with the exercise: it allowed me to release just a little bit of the pressure I felt. And I was okay afterwards. Soon after the Shanti training, I expe­rienced a great deal of pain following a medical procedure. Itwasthemostintense physical pain I had ever endured. These physical problems coincided with my growing sense of emotional pain and loss for Mark. I was unable to hold in the feel­ings any longer. With my grief for Mark, there also occurred the withdrawal of a new friend 's valued comfort and compan­ionship. The thought of the second Joss triggered the immensity of the first. My physical resources were at their lowest ebb. The pain killers I was taking after my operation altered my perspective, and I got very depressed. I was in a sorry state. On one of these difficult nights, I had trouble sleeping. The pain kept me awake. I got up to take another pain killer. I returned to my bed, feeling lonely and sad and hurt. I pulled up the blankets, rolled to one side and thought of Mark. I imagined him lying there in bed next to me. I snuggled up closer to him and put my arms around him. I remembered slaying overnight at his house several nights dur­ing the last months. We would hold each other and feel safe for a few moments. I n!memben!d our through-the-night con­veraationa, in between hia violent cough­inr opello. We would tell sleep-tossed stories, and I'd rub his back. And now, during my difficult night, I felt safe and secure with my thoughts of lying next to him. That evening provided me with a valua­ble insight. When I called upon the memory of sleeping near Mark, I felt I was calling upon his spirit and energy, on our shared love and support-all those things still available to me. I began to realize that only when I Jet the grief out and feel it will I begin to get to the other side, that of enjoying my memories of Mark. I started to tell friends that I wanted to let go of Mark's death. His death was tragic and heartrendering; it hurt me more than any· thing I had ever experienced. But his death was an event that had passed. I wanted to begin to cherish more fully his life. The actual grieving had begun many months ago, even before Mark's death . There had been losses along the way. In May of 1983 after the Candlelight March, Mark and I realized that we would not be attending the Denver AIDS Forum together in .lune. He would not be well enough. Mark and I didn't have time to take trips together. I enjoyed the stories he and his friends would tell about past trav­els, but I realized that traveli.rig would not be part of my experience with Mark. We would never visit, as planned, his friend's iris beds or his favorite beach in Hawaii. There was a loss of physical intimacy. Sexual sharing had been curtailed many months earlier. There were times in the hospital when Mark and I were alone together, and Mark would ask me to lie next to him, just for him to be physically close to someone. But there was also the occasion when he suggested that we no longer sleep together in his bed at home. He thought he would be more comfortable with more bed space. I felt a little loss. Most directly I grieved while watching his condition deteriorate. Some with AlDS remain in stable condition; Mark wasn't one of them. He didn't have an easy time with any of his medical tests and treat­ments. They all seemed to be hard on him. There are what I call my "horror stories" about which I won't write. But the horror occurred when I saw things that made me feel intuitively that Mark wasn't going to be able to get over this disease. Reviewing my journal of last year, I noted that on Christmas Eve after dinner with rm !ri"°'da, I came homAI feelinr overwhelmed with sadness. Earlier that day I had visited Mark before he departed to visit his family in New York. A rash had broken out all over his body. It was a reac· tion to the medication for pneumocystis. He seemed so vulnerable and upset.. I hadn't seen him so shaken before. My feel ­ings of sadness and incredible anger stayed with me throughout the day. When I returned home late that evening, I sat next to my Christmas tree lit up in the dark and reached for the phone. I called my Shanti counselor and told him, "I don't know what to do with this grief." We talked about it for awhile, and he was both encouraging and supportive. I was relieved that he was available for this and other caUs. But I still asked, "Where can I put this grief? If Mark gets worse, there's lots more to come." And that was only the end of 1982. I was with Mark when he died. So were his mother, Ruth; his close friend , Stuart; his Shanti counselor, Stephen; and his doctor, Steve. We knew, but with complete disbelief, that the end was near. Mark was not talking; there was no eye contact. His breathing was extremely labored. I knew I was waiting for his last breath, and I hated that thought. I had promised Mark that I would stay with him throughout his ordeal. I believe he waited until we had all gathered around him. I think Mark had prepared himself and was ready to let go peacefully. But I wasn't ready; I hadn't kept up with him. Stephen suggested that I might want to say good-bye to Mark. The thought was devastating. At first I thought, "No, every­thing is resolved between us." But then I wanted to-all confusion and rebellion inside-and I stood up, leaned over the bed; and, as I had so often before, kissed him on the forehead , told him I loved him and said good-bye. Soon thereafter, his breathing stopped. Mark had Jet go. He had fought enough, and his peace was well-deserved. Mark's funeral was held in New York on Sunday, June 5. I had given Mark's mother a framed copy of the only photo I have of Mark and me, taken last March. On the reverse side of the photo I had writ­ten to Mark some private thoughts which I realized would never be seen again. The photo, special items from special relatives and friends, were buried with him, as was the crown that a close friend had made for him which Mark wore the niirht of the Feature Candlelight March Un the day of the funeral , at the same hour, I stayed home alone here in San Francisco, wanting to be aware of Mark in my thoughts and feelings. I lit a candle and played some of his favorite music. I re-read part of a fairy tale that I had read to him a few days earlier in the middle of a sleepless night. I cried for him, and I cried for me, his family and his friends. I remembered the special moments Mark and l had together. Finally, I was still and calm with just the flickering candle and the music, and I felt some peace. The ordeal of Mark's fight was over. I imagined his being laid to rest, literally. By the time of Mark's San Francisco memorial service three days later, I felt that I had already had my service for Mark. This one was for the public, for the larger family of Mark's friends. Congrega· tion Sha'ar Zahav organized and offered a moving and heeling service. I felt a desire and a need then to be public myself. As I had come to be associated with Mark, I wanted people to realize that, of course, we collectively move along. There is continuity. I sensed the useful role of widow/ widower as a Hnk between the past and the present and as a step from the present to the future. With the funeral and memorial service completed, and later with the closing of Mark's estate, there occurred the more or less official ending to the public grieving. For many, of course, it was just the mid-paint for much private grieving. Many of us have so little experience with grieving and with the realities of death. We're often separated by lack of under­standing from our families. Those of us who are younger have often allowed our­selves to be cut off from older gays and lesbians who could perhaps share their insight into these life experiences. We don't seem to have any sub-cultural, meaning gay, traditions for our grieving. This was certainly true before anyone heard of AIDS. Death has not been a stranger to our gay population, but to many it seems death has never been so pervasive. It is this pervasive quality that makes AlDS grief different. Who will we mourn next? And there are so many of us in our 20's and 30's who now mourn the Joss of friends, brothers and lovers-many also of the same age. One of my mote surprising feeling& aoon after Mark'• death was a Oa~h of fury directed at Jackie Kennedy 0naBSi8. Although she had her moment of panic during the assassination of the late presi­dent, ahe generally is remembered as the strong, silent widow standing tall with a humble dignity. That wasn't the kind of mourning I had in mind. I wanted to go out into the dark evening and rage against the sky and stars at whatever or whoever had allowed this tragedy to descend. I've been trying to find my own way through this. I talk with my men and women friends, my Shanti counselor, my therapist. Weeks after Mark's death, I would walk through my days, functioning on a minimal level. I felt confused, alone and very disoriented. I wondered, "Is this part of the grief?" I would recognize grief in my crying, but wonder about the mean­ing of so much confusion and insecurity in my life. I thought of Mark every day; I missed him every day. Somehow every Thursday near 4:00 p.m. (the day and time of his death), I would be especially reminded of him. On a few Thursday afternoons, I would even be driving Mark's car past Franklin Hospital where he died. Mark had been very skillful last winter and spring in bringing the focus of the media to AlDS. He gave endless inter­views to newspapers and to radio and TV stations. His photo was featured in News· week and the German magazine, Der Spie­gel. After his death, the legacy of Mark's activism left me and many others in a cur­ious conflicted position. It was impossible throughout the months of June and July to pick up a gay newspaper or newsletter without seeing a photo of Mark or reading a reference to him. Local AIDS TV specials featured clips of Mark's speaking from his hospital bed or speaking from the stage the night of the Candlelight March. I want Mark and his courage and example tooth­ers to be remembered. At the time, how- :~~~i!:e!~i;t;:adt:eu~~:~!~sj ~~~t~~ control over how or when the issues of Mark's absence and my grief would be thrown at me. With the lack of any community guide­lines, I confronted a variety of responses from individuals. Some would know just what to do, and a quick hug would replace any initial awkward words. Others would avoid me, as they later explained, because they didn't know what to say. Some would become noticeably uncomfortable if! men­tioned Mark in casual conversation or if sometimes I spoke of him in the present tense. As the weeks passed, I began to get more messages. Now a few acquaintances would suggest that it reaHy was time for me "to get on with it." I was told, "Life must go on. Get out and have some fun. Meet someone new.'' Ironicall~. others would wonder aloud how I could possibly think of feeling affectionate or loving to another man so soon. What I wanted most at the time was for someone to understand that I was confused, that I needed some comfort, and that I wanted to talk­frequently about Mark. During Mark's last six months of being in and out of hos­pitals, on and off treatment programs, there usually Wasn't the time for any of us to really discuss what was happening. Too much happened too fast. There was no normal time. My experiences of witnessing death and confronting grief convinces me that there is often a lack of awareness andsensitity, but mostly a lack of understanding, among our gay population of what is unfortunately going on here. That we have immense good will and that we have responded to the AIDS crisis with courage, devotion and determination I don't ques· tion for a moment. I just find that once again, we have another need pulling at our consciousness. What can I say to those of you who fear that you wi1l soon share my experience of losing a loved one to AIDS? Or to thoae of you who have already lost someone? What can we say to each other? There ~ay not be much need for words: the most intense feelings are shared and understood. O~n · ing ourselves to love takes on a SJX'CIBI meaning, to others this Ql&.Y sound !ike an outdated clich(. . . •. o ! will sim11Jy ~ay whatI.hav1;>!1W.""'1 kl thi8 point, five months later. My grief and the intensity of it are very important to me; it is a reflection of my deep feelings for Mark. My grief is my own experience. I won't follow anyone else's patterns or expectations. Only I will know how long my grieving should continue. I may, how· ever, seek out the observations of others to achieve some perspective. I will seek com­fort where I'm able and when I chooae. I still have both the need and the capability to give and receive love, to be affectionate and intimate, to be sexual. 1 remember Mark 's telling me, "Michael, this disease is mine. You can't experience it the way I do." Now I think this grieving is mine. I want and need to share some of it with others; but it is my own experience to feel and from which to learn. I feel that I've reached a stage, a phase in the process of grieving, of open­ing myself to the experience of death and to the immensity of life. AIDS and the losses associated with it have been too DEC. 2, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 inten•e for me to handle with my formerly adequate self-sufficiency. I have painfully experienced many personal limitations, and I'm now looking in new directions. My life feels changed, and yet I'm just stand­ing on the edge of the changes. It loon pretty frightening out there. I've never felt a greater challenge ahead of me or one with greater opportunities. I 'm very thankful that I'm not alone in this process. I have good men and women friends who understand, and we ca.re deeply for each other. And I have an ally, my Mark, my Jewish American Prince, wearing his crown and nudging me for­ward. If Mark is on those Greek and Hawaiian islands someday when I travel there, I want to be ready to open my heart to him with joy and more love. L'Chaim. To Life. Helqu;;i is a California journalist living m the San Francisco Bay area. Reprinted from "Coming Up," September, 1983. 1983. All rwhts reserved. Now ... Judith ::bouc/aj ATTORNEY AT LAW DWI DEBT RELIEF BANKRUPTCY PERSONAL INJURY FAMILY LAW Free Consultation Reasonable Fees & Terms Sat. & Evening Appts. 303 W. Polk al Tall 520-1370 24 hours Member Greater Monlrose Business Guild Texas Trial Lawyers Association Licensed by the Texas Supreme Court General Practice of Law Ride in Widebody Comfort to Los Angeles ... EA TE ' t- 11 isperliner Departs Daily at 5:35 P.M. -o- Starting January 9 New Widebody Service to New Orleans, Miami and Las Vegas. Check our Affordable Fares! Call your travel agent or Eastern Airlines in Houston at 738-8615. EASTERN, Houston's oldest and largest major carrier serving you since 1936. EASTERN America's favorite way to fly ... 18 MONTROSE VOICE/ DEC. 2, 1983·-----------., Snorts • A ~ I" ~ ..,.. MSA Softball Great Christmas League Seeks Tree Sale Volunteers for Gay this Saturday & World Series Sunday, Dec. 3 Houston's MSA Softball League will be hosting the eighth annual Gay Softball World Series next August and is currently seeking volunteers to assist with planning that tournament week. Planning by the Series 8 committee is well underway at this time, and already the week of the tournament appears as though it will be a great time for both tour­nament participants and those who become involved with the Series. Tournament officials expect to be host­ing about 400 tournament participants and another 2Q0.3()(J fans and spectators from cities across the U.S. and Canada. Tentative plans have been made to hold the tournament games at Memorial Park from August 26-30. If you would like to become involved in this community effort, please get in touch with the Series 8 Committee, MSA Soft· ball, Box 22272, Houston 77227, or call 526-7329 (evenings). MSA Monday Night Bowling STANDINGS Following Nov 28 compet1tt0n A DIVISION B DIVISION 1 Sisters of Mercy 1 MCCR I 2 B•m P1gette1 2 E/J'a Boys 3S1r1keForce 3Ch•rlotte·sHarlots C DIVISION 0 DIVISION 1 Stell•·aFeflas 1 Ball Chasers 2 Hoty Rollers 11 2 Barnyard Hores 3 Reneged• 3 High Heel Aolfers HIGH GAMES HIGH SERIES Ron Johnson 22• Al MlXon 591 Larry Burnell 221 Jan 8ucow 571 JNn Bacow 220 Charlte Hurst 561 GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 DWI CRIMINAL DEFENSE PERSONAL INJURY FAMILY LAW FREE CONSULTATION JOHN PAUL BARNICH ArrORNEY AT LAW 3317 MONTROSE. SUITE 318 (7131 !523-!5006 and 4, from 10am to 5pm, by ... in parking lot next to Mary's. Donations to the Westheimer Colony Arts Association 529--0027 {!/'z.'ti1.tma1. ca'td1., w'tap., 9i{t1., fJ 1. and 1.WE.at 1.hi'th, mo'tE. c'titfru and frE.aH than WE.'tff 6~6 dlawlhorn•-dlo•.ulon 'Juo• 77006-529-1'299 Dpui ,,M.,nday lhu• .S..tuJa!I llam·7pm Dp.w tdl 9pm on "'1ifonJay 5 Clhuuda!I. MASTERCARD & VISA ACCEPTED Dec. 2, 1983/ MONTROSE VOICE 19 Montrose Live 'Private Lives' Explodes with Talent and Laughter By Billie Du;,can late are only thwarted by his innate sense Drop everything next Tuesday night and of honesty. go see Private Lives at the Pink Elephant, Garrott's performance is one of those 1218 Leeland. If you can't make it this gems, one of those treasures against Tuesday, go the week after. which a person can gauge any other per- But whatever you do, do not miss the formance. He is worth seeing again and show. again. Noel Coward wrote the play over 50 Finally, proof that there are no small years ago as a biting and humorous actors, only small parts: Jim Keel is Louis. merry-go-round featuring two 0 regular" Keel is a real scene stealer in a beautifully couples, but it works so well with an all- underplayed rendition of the disapprov­male cast that it is a wonder that the play ing "maid." is not done this way for gay audiences As for the other production values, the with regularity. Basically only some pro- seUI were designed by nece88ity and the nouns and two proper names seem to have lights were not designed at all The BOund been changed. was good, however, with the talent on the For those who have not seen Private tape provided by Tim Tavcar (vocals) and Lives before, the premise of the play is Mickey Rankin (piano). The players were simp1e. Victor and Mandi Prynne are on dressed nicely. their honeymoon. Elyot and Cyril Chase This is the firstofaseriesofproductions are on their honeymoon. planned by the Diversity Theatre, which Mandi and Elyot were once married to is dedicated to bringing to gay (or non­one another'. The two new couples wind up gay) audiences the many facets of gay life at the same resort on the same day in as portrayed on the stage. rooms with adjoining balconies. From If the following productions come near there the sparks fly, passions ignite and the qua1ity of the performance of Private the play becomes a series of explosions Lives, Houston may become known as the ~i~~:;I~~b~ith sifting through the em<>- city for excellence in gay theatre. re~~ti!8nsa 0cr~:~a:~:r:·a:iththt~~ D Duncan's Quick Notes ~[~cx::;t:jJ(}~~fulhairatyks uarcbt1.anone. and witty banter dominating tbe "All artista have a hope. One is to become 1!."J.~~':'/.:;ea/~":!,."::,,a head" BILLIE DUNCAN PHOTO Ian Tanna (Elyot) and Jerry Garrott (Mandi) share a tender moment between barb• in "Private Livea" at the Pink Elephant John Uavid Etheredge directed the pro­duction at the P.E. with a great sense of 1tyle and an obvious love of the charac­ten. His use of the tiny stage space is extremely creative, and his sense of the rythms of the play is superb. (Please note: thi• is done in the much larger expanded room of the Pink Elephant.) Bruce C. Herling is riotous as the pretty, but pouting Cyril, a boy who could tame lion• with his ever-present handkerchief. Herling 1naps, primps and pouts his wa.y through hi• role with an air of total right­ousnes1. Joe Watta (c<>-founder of the Divenity Theatre, producen of the show) is perfec­tion itaelf as the stuffy, pompous, pseud<>­macho Victor. Actually, Victor is a 1oser in thi• play, but Watta play1 him winningly. The two characten on whom the play focuses are Mandi and Elyot, however. Jan Tanna as Elyot is astoundingly varied within the perimeters of his character. Tanna'• gamut runs from domineering stupidity to tender introspection with com­plete concentration and sensitivity. NowwecometoJerryGarrettaeMandi. Garrett would walk.away with.thisahow i( ~e otke aetora were not aa..ao<_>d aa I.hey are. He is 1uperlabve as. t.h~ bnght, C?m­pulsive Mandi who.e ab1hties to man1pu-a big star. That is not mine. I think you are a star every time you step on stage." With that statement, Denise Le Brun somewhat illuminated what it is that makes her so very special every time she steps on a stage. The next stage upon which she will step is the Theatre One, 3517 Austin, in the opening of the Houston Community College Artist and Audience series. Her one-woman show will play from Dec. 7 through the 11th. Fc7rthose who have not been fonunate enough yet to experience Le Brun, here is a quick background: born and educated in France, friend of Edith Piaf, co­entertainer with Jacques Brei, interna­tional singer, presence on the American otage from New York to Houston to Los Ange1es, with a year at the Dunes in Vegas. "Vegaa?" said Le Brun, her musical voice Jilting with the memories of France. '1'o start with, it's not a city. It is a mecca of :V~~7 :r°t~~~~:rican rr.ecca of theatre, New York? 111 think it represents well the United States." Los Angeles: ''To live in a city where you depend on a car .... Well, I'm a Parisian!" However, she now resides in Houston. Denise Le Brun ha11ived in more Ameri­can cities than mo1t Americans. "I have been where my showe took me." Actually, she did not plan to come to this country and spend year• traveling around and singing. "I came to visit for three weeks.'' explained Le Brun. Then she smiled. "I didn't know the country was so big." She first entered the country in 1969. She's still finding new places to explore. When she got here, she spoke not a word of English. She had studied German and Italian in school, so she figured that Eng­lish would not be that difficult. "!thought it wou1d take about siI months." She laughed. "It took much longer than thal" Her gauge for succe88 in the language waa simpJe. "I knew I could really speak English when I could understand the jokea." So now the United States is as much a home to her as France, and she likes hav­ing two countries. "It's like having two husbands. I'd like to have two husbands. Three. Four!" Ao for her current show, she feels that an English-speaking audience would n~t be up to listening to two houri of son's m French. •11 don't want to sing to an ehte. I want to sing to people who have been wt:~~! :~~:·~•n11•-oombinaUM...,f things, both emotional and physical. ~he is a tiny woman who has a commanding Motorcyc~ madneBB was the theme of the final creation in "Illusions a head" presence without being overbearing. She is expressive but not effusive. She is more like a well than a fountain. No matter how much she gives, there is always a secret place kept deep inside. She is the perfect choice to kick off HCC's new program of entertaining artists. For reservations or information, call 630-7264. Another interesting artistic experiment came off last week. And it was quite suc­cessful. "Illusions A Head" took to the Nlllllbers stage on the 23rd. It was a fashion and hair show that fea­tured the present, the past and the future, as envisioned by Ken Powers and a gag­gle of mercbanta and hairdressers. The show was to at.art at IOpm, so most patrons expected a show by maybe 10:30 or llpm. A large crowd waited coruridera­bly longer, while the lasers cut through the smoke and the liquor flowed. Zardoz finally stepped to the micr<>­phone to start the show (Now, please, that really i3 the poor child's name. I know. I asked. Would they lie to me?). Soon we were off to see the first wizard, Antonio Amico, who designed the gowns for the first section: the present. Amico has an eye for the glamorous and the glitz. Bette Midler or Roxie Starr would feel equally at home in his crea­tions. The second section was the past, with clothes from Stop the Clock. This was a delightful section with a variety of 50's looks from the racks of recycled clothing available at top the Clock Finally, the future was revealed. Very revealed. The first models to emerge were basically nude with strategic bands of co1ored cellophane wrapped around their young and nubile bodies. Then from the fog and colored lighta, another image emerged. A massive black and silver machine-motorcycle at ]east, monster at moat-pulled on to the stage. Seated in the passenger position was the occupant of the coup de gras: a studded black leather skirt and hooded top that Mary'• Ca88andra would kill for. The audience screamed their apprecia· tion, and the show was over. Later in the dressing room, producer Powers explained with a sense of aston­ishment that six hairdressers bad been invo1ved in the hair designs for the show with "no problems.'' The six were Powers, Suaan Van Doorn, Annette Noland, Joni Punam, JeffLee, andAntonioAmioo.A!lth&hair styles in the show were a lot of fun. So were the food trays in the dressing room pro­vided by Bl\ia's (everything they sa,y about starving journalista is absolutely true). I was having such a good time finishing off the food trays that I asked when another fashion and hair show was planned. Powers atood silent for just a moment, then muttered, "Oh, God!" and walked away. A lot more goes into putting these ahows together than anyone can imagine. And while we're on the subjectofshows, the Ripcord seems to be thinking of hav­ing a coup]e of show& in the next month or two. The tentative dates are Dec. 12 and New Year's Eve. Rumor has it that Vickie Vagina, Clare Clitori1 and the Rev. Mother Christine will appear. One never knowa what to expect from the Ripcord, does one? One more note. Kindered Spirits con­tinues its tradition of fine live music every week. Linda Christian has the Wednes­day spot, while the incredible talenUI of Harriet Reynolds fill the room on Thurs­days. Harriet, by the way, is part of Alexan­dra Haas' group that juat clOBed at a .... '<:'als. H~he11eet,,erf0f'lntln hannome& and song writing abilities add immeasura­bly to an already fine acl David Eisler is HGO'• bewildered Candide in the colorful production o HGO's 'Candide' Is Carnival Masterpiece Houston Grand Opera. ·cand1de' by L90nard BfHn­stem. JoHph McKH (Volt11relPanglou1etc.), O.wd Eta'-' (Candide). Ene AMI& (Cunegonde), Merill Cle­ment (Paquette). William Parcher(MHimllian). Dana Krueger (Old Lady). Chotus and Houston Symphony Orctt.tra. John DeMam. conductor. By Peter Derksen If HGO keeps on presenting operas as well done as their Barber of Seville and Can­duk, audiences here might catch on to the po88ibility that going to the opera can be a delight rather than a gruesome chore. The adaptation of the Broadway musical to the operatic stage was an unqualified sue· cess. The dozens of subscribers who left their seats empty, perhaps in memory of Mr. Bernstein's less successful premiere of A Quiet Place last season, did themselves a great disservice. You could go a long way before finding better singing, acting and fun theatre. Even by the standards of opera, Can­duk's plot is hopelessly complicated. Vol­taire wrote the original tale over 200 years ago, taking sides in a philosophical battle then raging, and which represented one of the last stands of organized religion in the mainstream of Western thought. The i ues: "why do bad things happen to good people?" and .. how may one attain true happiness in life?" are of some interest even today, and. in true French fashion. are much too important to be treated with anything less than comedy. Harold Prince's direction was dazzling Every chance he gets, he wreaks havoc with conventional theatrical boundaries. The stage is open to our view all the time. Characters stroll through the audience, pop up in the orchestra pit, dangle from doorways. help each other with costume changes in center stage. The entire pro­duction i a "show within a show," pres­ented as a carnival attraction at a Victorian fair, with the crowd of onlookers doubling as the chorus. The "fairgrounds" were the frame for Candide's 23 scenes, which took us. among other places, to Westphalia. Lisbon. the mid-Atlantic, Cartagena, El Dorado, a desert island, Constantinople, and rural France. Everything in the opera moves at brea­kneck pace. Only singers who can act and dance well can keep up, and, with insignif­icant exceptions, everyone on stage sang the witty and tricky lyrics clearly and understandably. Joseph McKee did more than double duty as Voltaire, whose narration binds the whole plot, the eternally optimistic Dr. Pangloss, and several lesser roles. The transitions from his high-pitched Mr. Magoo Voltaire voice and mellow baritone singing in the other parts was impressive, despite occasional vocal problems. (Among other things. he was called upon to pop up on the podium, lead the orchestra for a few bars, change character, then hop out into the audience and dash onstage.) Erie Mills stole the show (vocally) as Cunegonde. She tossed off the high colo­ratura in Glitter and Be Gay with ease and precision, and sang the lyric passages smoothly and comfortably. As with Teresa Stratas, we have a superb actress­/ musician whose voice is unfortunately too small for live performances of many of the roles to which her talents entitle her; the full range of her abilities will probably be revealed only in the recording stuidio. David Eisler, indeed the "handsome young tenor" promised in HGO's promo­tions, sang and acted the naif Candide splendidly. His voice, pure and strong, was well suited to the music. He unde­racted perfectly, showing the appropriate mild bewilderment and despair when called for; this is not a role calling for bold drama. He was the blank slate upon which all the other characters and actions impinge. To give proper credit to the supporting singers, chorus and support staff wouJd require IO times this space. In general, the orchestra played well, though there were serious difficulties in the brass during the overture. John DeMain kept the bubbling music moving smartly along Whole books, and even operas(!), have been devoted to arguing over which is more important in opera: words or music. With this performance of Candide, we have a third candidate: the production. We are reminded that opera is theatre with music added; those who feel otherwise have, thanks to technology, the option of sitting home with their stereos. Candide is great theatre with some of the most spar­kling words and music to be found in all of opera. It is Bernstein's masterpiece, and it is unfortunate that our culture does not rate comedy as highly as tragedy, obliging geniuses of the former to consolidate their reputations by dabbling in the latter. From Rossini to Woody Allen, the results are not always favorable. Bernstein's composing talent is much better suited to the bright side of life than to the dreary. Candide plays at Jones Hall through Dec. 8. Don't miss it. o 'Hamlet' and 'Macbeth' Given Bizarre Turn at Chocolate Bayou By Joe L. Watts British playwright Tom Stoppard (Rosen­crantz and Guildenstern Are Dead) has put together more of his historical spoofer­ies, and Shakespeare is the target again. In this case, it's two interrelated one-act comedies with the unusual title Dogg's Hamlet, Cahoot's Macbeth being given its Houston premiere at Chocolate Bayou Theatre. Dogg's Hamlet, Cahoot 's Macbeth was first presented in 1979 for the inaugura­tion of Inter-Action's British American Repertory Company (BARC). Dogg's Hamlet extends and combines two pre­vious pieces, Dogg's Out Pet and The Dogg's Troupe 15-Minute Hamlet, which were written for Ed Berman (Prof. Dogg), director of the Inter·Action Troupe. The inspiration for Dogg's Hamlet came from Stoppard's fascination with language and an idea from the philosopher Wittgenstein whereby two languages could, for a short time, be happily coincident. The 15- Minute Hamlet was originally performed on a double-decker bus. Dogg's Hamlet is a sometimes fun ny skit wherein echool kide take p art in a graduation ceremony and then perform a crazy minute version of Hamlet, using an absurd language called Dogg. A daffy deliveryman called Easy comes in with a truckload of plans, slaps and cubes and becomes totally baffled with Dogg when the audience discovers that plank means "ready" and cube 11thank you." Cahoot's Macbeth takes on a more serious tone, combining political satire with a hving·room performance of Mac­beth. Inspired by Stoppard's meeting with Czechoslovakian playwright Pavel Kohout, who through political dissent formed a call·group, the Living-Room Theatre, through which forbidden Czech actors could perform. Call them, and five people will come with one suitcase. In Cahoot's Macbeth, the one-suitcase troupe are giving their condensed Mac­beth in the home of a hostess when a police inspector barges in to threaten the group. He demands their best Macbeth, or else he will take them all to jail. Cahoot, who has been playing Banquo, hits all fours and goes into his Dogg act, speech and all. Easy, the deliveryman from Dogg's Hamlet, comes in near the end, surprising the audience with his fluent Dogg. The inspector asks Cahoot how you learn Dogg, to which Cahoot replys, "You don't learn it; you catch it." Whether or not you "catch the Dogg" in this production, I'm not sure you will enjoy it, unless you are a die-hard Shakespeare enthusiast (punster not purest), and even that is no guarantee. Stoppard's intent.is rather original and worthy; it's just that "this Dogg" ain't no real Hoot-it might have been on a double­decker bus, however. Fault does not Jie with the able direction by Cindy Goatley or the bright I I -member acting ensemble. Peter Bryson as Easy was an easy stand out and served his role with fine aplomb. Mark Walz and Billie Duncan pair well together and indivually with sharp perfor­mances as Macbeth and his Lady, respec­tively Pamela Donahue has some funny momenta as Mrs. Dogg and as Gertrude in Hamlet. Bill O'Rourke is very fine overall in his multiple roles as Fox Major, Hamlet and BanquotCahoot This production barks through Dec. 10 at Chocolate Bayou (1823 Lamar). Tourists Prefer Torture This year's biggest tourist attraction in Florence, Italy, wasn't art, it was pain, reports Behavior Today. Outdrawing all the masterpieces at the Pitti Palace was an exhibit of torture instruments used from the 15th to the 19th centuries. The exhibit includes such old favorites as the rack, hanging cages and spiked interrogation chairs. The collection was such a hit that it's been taken on the road and may visit the U.S. in 1985. Proceeds go to human rights groups Billie Duncan gives Lady Macbeth a strange tu..•ist in the Chocolate Bayou comedy Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat DEC. DEC. 2 3 DEC. 4 5 6 7 8 For add1t10n1I 1ntorm11ton or phone number1 tor eventS hsted below, look for the apon10t11''1!) Ofg1n1zation under ~organ1ul1ona·· m the Montrose Clauilied Selected Events through 7 Days mFRIDA Y: Committee for Public Health Awareness's "Sharing Group for the Worried Well," 7-Spm, Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett llSATURDA Y: Choice's Lesbian Mothers' Group meets 6:30pm Dec. 3, 210 Fairview, apl I llSA TU RDA Y: Lesbians & Gay People in Medicine meet 7:30pm Dec. 3 llSUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays J0:30am-1:30pm, MacGregor Park mMONDA Y: AIDS victim support group meets 6:30pm, Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 mMONDA Y: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, S200 Braesmain • TUESDAY: Lesbian/Gay Resource Service, Univ. of Houston, meets 2:30pm Dec. 6, Spindletop Room, Univ. Center, Univ. Park •TUESDAY: Montrose Symphonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm • TUESDAY: Greater Montrose Business Guild meets 7:30pm Dec. 6, Liberty Bank community room, 1001 Westheimer • WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Cauc,,. meets 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm Dec. 7 • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show 7:3().9pm on KPFT Radio, FM-90 • THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, S200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks m!N l WEEK: Lutherans Concerned meets Dec.13, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh •IN l WEEK : Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) meets Dec.13 m!N l WEEK : Houston Data Professionals meet 7:30pm Dec. 13, East Room, Holiday Inn Central, 4640 South Main m!N 2 WEEKS: Choices meets 12:30pm Dec. JS m!N 2 WEEKS: Unitarian/ Universalist Gay Ceucus meets Dec. JS, !st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin m!N 2 WEEKS: Familiee & Friends of Gays meets 2pm Dec. IS, Preebyterian Center behind Jet Preebyterian Church, 5300 Main •IN 2 WEEKS: Winter begins at 4:3lam, Dec. 22 m!N S WEEKS: Christmas, Dec. 25 • INS WEEKS: Houston Area Gay & Leobian Engineers & Scientists meet 7pm Dec. 'J:7 m!N S WEEKS: Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) meets 7pm Dec. 27, Bering Church, 1440 Harold m!N S WEEKS: Interact meeting, Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm Dec. 28 rAIN S WEEKS: Integrity meets Dec. 29, 4008 Wycliff rAIN 7 WEEKS: NOW's Lesbian Rights Conference, Jan. 2().22, Milwaukee rAIN 8 WEEKS: Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference, Jan. 27-29, Houston rAIN 10 WEEKS: Lincoln's birthday, Feb. 12 •IN 10 WEEKS: Valentine's Day, Feb. 14 • IN 11 WEEKS: Washington's birthday, Feb. 20 rAIN lS WEEKS: Mardi Gras Fat Tueeday, March 6 rAIN 16 WEEKS: St. Patrick's Day, March 17 •IN 17 WEEKS: April Fool's Day, April I •IN 2S WEEKS: First primary party elections in Texas and party precinct conventions, May5 •IN 2S WEEKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleans, May 12, lasting to Nov. JI rAIN 25 WEEKS: Texas Senatorial District Party Conventions, May 19 • IN 26 WEEKS: Gay Press Association 4th National Convention, May 25-28, Los Angeles m!N 26 WEEKS: Memorial Day, May 28 •IN 27 WEEKS: Run-off party elections in Texas, June 2 m!N 29 WEEKS: Texas Democratic Party Convention, June 15-17, tentatively Houston rAIN 28 WEEKS: !9S4 Gay Pride Week begins, 15th anniversary of Stonewall uprising, national slogan "United & More in '84," June 15-24 -.EARLY J ULY: Lesbian and Gay Bands of America concert, Loo Angeles rAIN 28 WEEKS: National Gay Health Education Foundation's let International Lesbian/Gay Health Conference, 0 Toward Diversity," New York, June 16·19 m!N SS WEEKS: Democratic National Convention, San ~'rancisoo, July 16-19 mJN 87 WEEKS: Castro Street Fair, Aug. 19, San Francisco rAIN S8 WEEKS: Gay World Series Softball Tournament opens in Houston Aug. 28, lasting to Sept. 2 ANNOUNCEMENTS DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES - LARGE SHARPSTOWN CONDO 3 bedroom, 2 bath, all appliances for sale or lease. Washer/ dryer connec­tio~ s. central A/C and heat huge !;~~~:h c~!icf::1ie':~-~2~:;~ CONDO FOR RENT 1-1, security bars, dishwasher, free cable, Marshall at Audubon. no pets $350 per month. 436-1412 -- ROOMMATE GWM, 27. seeks same to share 2- bedroom. 1-bath apartment. $275+ deposit includes utilities 840-7153 GALLERIA AREA Dramatic 1 bedroom, incredible gourmet kitchen, gorgeous hard­wood floors, brass hardware m bath. Galleria area. $650. 871-0602. Lynn. RPAL. MONTROSE/HEIGHTS Close-in, 1 bedroom, hardwood floors, lovely garden area in front. $325+ utilities. 871-0602. Lynn. RPAL. AN INTIMATE WESTHEIMER Boutique and/or club space; will d1v1de 1000 to 4000 sq ft. Call 668- 6373 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED OUTSIDE SALES Needed for travel agency_ Commis­sion only No experience necessary Call Bruce. 529-8464 FOR SALE, MISC. FREE CATALOG Eel skin leather gifts tor men and women. Christmas delivery The Buckeye Company. Box 7653, Houston 1n10 EROTIC VIDEO CASETTES $25-35. Both formats, VHS, Beta Daniel. 526-9112 HANOVER SHOES Fii:ie quali_ty men's shoes at factory· / dtrect prices. Call Hank, 864-8393 (answer service) WILD BILL'S JEANS New and used-worn and torn• Coats, sweaters. slacks, shirts Lots ~~:ci·~r:ad::.o ~~~"~w~~ a~~~ .. b~~ "Sonny " 880-8824 or 880-8844 (Acro
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