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Montrose Voice, No. 256, September 20, 1985
File 014
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Montrose Voice, No. 256, September 20, 1985 - File 014. 1985-09-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5207/show/5199.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1985-09-20). Montrose Voice, No. 256, September 20, 1985 - File 014. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5207/show/5199

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 256, September 20, 1985 - File 014, 1985-09-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5207/show/5199.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 256, September 20, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 20, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript SEPTEMBER 20, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz What's Your Dream IQ? By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. Special to the Montrose Voice News America Syndicate "A dream not understood is like a letter unopened." This Talmudic saying reflects the ancients' belief that dreams conveyed important messages for either the gods or the devil. Supposedly, they could diagnose an illness, select a suitable homesite or indicate when to start a war. Science finds these superstitions to be bogus and that dreams tell us more about the personality of the dreamer than of the supernatural forces around him. Serious dream research started about 30 years ago at the University of Chicago Sleep Research Center when Dr. Nathaniel Kleitman discovered that the dream state is accompanied by rapid eye movements (REMs). For the first time in history we had a tangible sign that dreaming was occuring. This single finding alone stimulated more research on dreams than had ever been done before! We know about dreams and how they relate to your personality. What do you know about dreams and how they relate to your personality? Answer True for False to the items ahead to find out? 1. As we grow older our dreams become more pleasant. 2. Dreams can predict the future. 3. Dreams can help us to be creative. 4. Happy dreams suggest happy people. 5. We tend to have more unpleasant that pleasant dreams. 6. Dreams occur by chance and don't have much purpose in our life. 7. Dreams occur in the deepest part of sleep. 8. Since "bad" dreams and nightmares occur when we are not conscious, there's not much we can do about them. d Explanation 1. False—Aging brings on more insecurities about life and hence, more disturbed sleep and dream patterns. 2. False—It may seem at times that a dream has clairvoyant powers but, more likely, it's only a reflection of a plan we've consciously thought of and carried out. Later, it seems that our dream has predicted or foreseen the future. 3. True—Dreams can bring creative inspiration in the thingB we attempt. Author Robert Louis Stevenson, credited a dream for the plot of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Richard Wagner conceived the opera "Tristan and Isolde" in a dream and artists Salvador Dali and Paul Klee relied heavily upon dreams as inspirations for their works of art. 4. True—Well-adjusted individuals usually have pleasant dreams, but this isn't always the case. Some happy persons tend to repress their anxieties and conflicts and then have disturbed dreams. 5. True—Unpleasant dreams outnumber pleasant ones. In addition, as a dream goes on it will probably become more and more unpleasant. 6. False—Since we all dream, we can safely assume that dreams serve some necessary function, although we're not exactly sure what it is. If we interfere with a person's dream during REM periods, he will become cranky, impulsive and forgetful. But control subjects aroused during non-REM timesdon'tshowthesechanges. 7. False—Dreams come mostly during light—not deep—sleep, as commonly throught. The cycle of light-to-deep slumber is repeated several times a night and we tend to dream more as the night goes on. 8. False—We can control and direct our dreams. Professor Stephen P. LaBerge of Stanford University, writing in Psychology Today, describes exercises which train people to be aware of their dreams while they are occuring. In these "lucid dreams" it is possible to signal others that we are conscious, and to even change the dream's plot if we so choose. d Score Tally one point for each correct answer. 6-8—High dream IQ—You have a realistic grasp of dreams and personality. 3-5—Average dream IQ 0-2—Low dream IQ—Some of your notions about dreamB need a rude awakening. Come to the Cabaret! TO.ont.ro se Symphonic Band Singers, Dancers, Big Bind Sound Saturciay, Sept. 28, 8pm AJ_n P_r£ 9nn 2121 Allen Parkway •500 Donation—Cash Bar 527-9454 or 521-932X Chic thrills Scoolers mean freedom and tun' And the Spree" is the easiest way to get started. It's easy on you, with push-button starting, no shifting and low maintenance. And it s easy on your budget In fad. it's the lowest priced scooter you can buy!' So gel the fun started1 Get the Spree' $39900 STUBBS CYCLE 4436 Telephone Rd. 644-7535 HONDA ") The New /f^^T/* idojuK^tctd . .In the heart of The City" A _ _ _f\f\ ■ FREE AIRPORT SHUTTU X/l/1 • COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE & WINE Y"T*T.iWW • COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST (large single/double occupancy) . VALET SERVICE Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Reservations required please call Toll Free 800-253-5263 (National) 800-521-4523 (Calif 1 (415J-441-5141 (San Francisco) 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109
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