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Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986
File 024
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Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 024. 1986-03-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5053.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-03-21). Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 024. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5053

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 024, 1986-03-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5053.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 21, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 024
Transcript MARCH 21. 1986/MONTROSE VOICE 23 '16 Days' Is Absolute Olympic Glory Films By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic Probably the last thing that many of you want to see is a documentary on the Los Angeles Summer Olympics. Can we take more running, jumping, and diving, and more Carl Lewis and Mary Lou Retton? I surprised myself and found theofficial film record of the 23rd Olympiad to be a spectacular and dazzling experience. My eyes got misty, I got a lump in my throat, and I really was proud ofthe athletes and their talent. The effect was a 100 times more vibrant and beautiful on the big screen than when I viewed them on televi- □ Gung Ho Sometimes a wonderfully inventive story somehow doesn't become a great reality on the big screen. Such is the case with Ron Howard's Gung Ho, a neat idea that never quite gels. The idea of a Japanese firm reopening a Pennsylvania auto factory with obvious culture clashes sounds like a funny movie, but unfortunately the result is a bit hollow. That's not to say that Gung Ho is a bad movie, because it's really cute sometimes. I laughed quite a bit, but the script by Lowell Gong and Babolov Mondel (Splash, Spies Like Us) forces the humor I really expected more than a "save the town" movie from Ron Howard, who showed such promise with Cocoon and Splash. Instead of using a good theme and delving into the implications it presents, we get a shallow comedy played for laughs. Luckily he stays away from any stereotype, which was probably very wise. Still, this was a unique opportunity to explore the Japanese influence on the U.S. and how Americans react to it. The Japanese way of work Is presented, but its strictness and discipline are almost made to look silly. The sloppy American work methods are obviously poor, but they are made to seem acceptable. We never see a compromise, only both sides stubbornly clinging to their ideas. As a top Asson Motors executive, Gedde Watonabe (Sixteen Candles) is a delight. His interactions with Keaton are very enjoyable and provide some of the film's nicest scenes. Keaton overacts a lot, but he is a funny actor. About halfway he settles down a lot and becomes a lot easier to enjoy. Gung Ho is one of those crowd-pleasing films that will make a lot of money. I was disappointed because I wanted a lot more, yet I still enjoyed myself. Hopefully, Howard will look a little deeper into this story for his next film, and not just scratch the surface for laughs. □ 28 Up Writer/ producer/ director Bud Greenspan chats with U.S. champion diver Greg Louganis, the first man in 56 years to win both Olympic springboard and platform diving titles at the Games, for a segment in "16 Days of Glory," the official film record of the 23rd Olympiad held at Los Angeles in 1984 sion. 16 Days of Glory is the supreme achievement of sports filmmaker Bud Greenspan. This acclaimed director was in Houston last week, and he feels that this film is his best effort. He wants to make the audience see and feel the Olympics that the networks never showed. "The film industry goes for instant gratification," said Greenspan, "and sports has become just numbers. I take the humanistic approach, and because of my style I won't work for the networks," he said. "I'm much better than they are." More than anything, Greenspan is a docudrama master with several stories to tell. While we do have segments on superstars like Edwin Moses and Mary Lou Ret ton, many other lesser-known athletes are given the spotlight. They include people like Dave Moorecroft, who finished last in the 15000 meters but was determined to finish with an agonizing injury. And people like John Moffet—the swimmer who came in fifth with a torn right thigh muscle. The director is quick to point out that many top athletes aren'tin this two-and-a- half hour feature film. A five-and-a-hour version will be on video tape and eventually released to television. The long ver- Bion contains the more widely-covered stare like Carl Lewis and events like the Mary Decker—Zola Budd incident. Greenspan uses his film to capture the poignancy and the challenge of the events, not just winners and losers. One of the most priceless segments is on Daley Thompson, the British marathon winner. The beauty and the physique of this man arc truly indescribable, and Greenspan captures him perfectly on film. 16 Days of Glory is a four star film that is a must-see. Greenspan says that he wants to make "good things for future generations." This outstanding record ofthe Olympics is truly a piece of cinema that will stand the test of time. on us. You can see the jokes coming a mile away, and you sort of prepare yourself for a mild chuckle. The film's biggest asset is Michael Keaton (Mr. Mom) as Hunt Stevenson, the plant foreman who goes to Japan to convince Asson Motors to reopen Hadly ville's auto factory. He succeeds but the Japanese take over with an iron fist when they open the plant. Director Michael Apted (Coal Miner's Daughter) has been observing 14 English children age seven (in 1963) to age 28 in 1984. Each seven years he tracked them down, interviewed them, and observed their growth and ideas. The result was a feature for British television that is being shown here theatrically. 28 Up is a novelty film that is often interesting, but sometimes boring. It is interesting as it observes the physical and mental changes of these people, but dull when it lets them drone on and on about their dull lives. This is not helped by the hard-to- understand English accents that several ofthe people have. The film explores children from a variety of classes and areas of the country, asking them questions about everything from marriage to religion. The most apparent changes come with the girls, who seem to go from liberated women ("I didn't see myself getting married") to (Left to right) Rodney Kageyama, Michael Keaton and Gedde Watanbe reach < shaky East/ West alliance when a Japanese firm takes over a U.S. auto manufacturing plant in "Gung Hi>" Workers are made to exercise, speed up production, and cut back on leave time. Soon the men and women are revolting, and the resulting culture clash almost closes the plant down. It's up to Stevenson to save the day. housewives with several kids. The men are more straightforward, often ending up in the job that they said wanted at a very early age. I'm sure psychologists will have a field day poring over this visual diary. It's interesting to see how people change physically, but much more involving to understand why they have a certain job, or what they think about their culture and lifestyle. Most of the people seemed content with themselves at 28, and this was a comforting thought. 28 Up is a nice character study of these 14 people, but it's probably better suited as a series like it was shown in England. As a whole, the film tends to drag on a bit long on some people, and then race through others. Quite an oddity, 28 Up will definitely appeal to a small group of interested people. The film will shown from Sunday, March 23, through Saturday, March 29, at the River Oaks Theater. \SPA-T0G0l Specializing in portable spas Shop and Compare More for Less $$$ 7-Ft. LOUNGER $1995°° 5816 SW Frwy. (Chimney Rock Exit) Open 7 Days Dial: SPA-TOGO 772-86-46 v^D z w a. O o s >- < a a O o 5 WE DELIVER VIDEOS 1420 Westheimer Houston, Texas 77006 522-4485 IS ONE YEAR OLD —Help Us D > > 2 m < > 2 n o TJ D > > 2 —Your First Rental * Free if You Join this < Month £ —Large Selection of s All-Male VHS Tapes " —Tues., Thurs., and o Sun. Rentals $2 for our| Members _, —Now Open Sunday > 12 to 6 _;
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