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Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986
File 020
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Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 020. 1986-03-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5049.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-03-21). Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 020. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5049

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 020, 1986-03-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5049.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 21, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript MARCH 21. 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 19 Risky Business Undergoes Changes 'Isn't It Romantic' Is a Comfortable Production has a beautiful voice, too. Carlos Compean plays the trumpet. One change, however, must be changed back. This, traditionally the most upbeat on Houston of all our theaters, has deserted its boosterism. There is even one hateful line which as much as says that it's too bad this show isn't in NYC, but it will do til the character can land one that is. Boo! Wretch! We are not a colony. We are Houston. □ Notes What a wonderful idea! At 10:00 tomorrow morning, the Lighthouse of Houston is sponsoring an Easter egg hunt for blind and visually impaired children. The eggs beep. There'll be another "egg hunt"— actually an orange hunt—at The Orange Show on Easter. Drop by the Orange Show or call 552-2767 to get a maze. Free admission to all children that solve it. ... Candace Compton, as Janie Blumburg, and Harry Brewer, as Simon Blum burg in Stages' "Isn't It Romantic" By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Critic Most of the other critics weren't very kind to Stages' Isn 't It Romantic. By the time I got it in mid-run last Thursday, it was a very enjoyable show. It's a little uneven. Playwright Wendy Wasserstein's characters often have quite a few things they wish to say without being answered. So they save them up for their exit and blurt them all out, turn on their heels and flee. Howard P. French is woefully miscast but does his best. Donna Whitmore is very good but is shaping the role to herself rather than vice versa. And that is the sum and total of all the caviling I want to do with this show.The rest ofthe show is like a comfortable easy chair—so warm to settle into. Janie Blumburg is a teddy bear who might remind you of television's Rhoda Morgenstern or her kid sister. Candace Compton, in this role, has no sharp edges. They're all padded. That makes her a treat to be with, but people don't understand when they trespass over her boundaries. She'd like to marry a rich, young doctor. Who wouldn't? Along comes another teddy bear who is a rich, young doctor and who wants to marry her. But can he accept her need for self-respect in the form of a job as a freelance writer for Sesame Street? Freeman Williams really connects with this role. Janie's lost her Jewish accent. So has her mother. Tasha (Jean Proctor) studies "dance." Her daughter chides her about her clothing. Jean, as usual, is very real, but she still pushes her flamboyance a little past the organic at times in her comedy. Still, her love for her daughter shines through her every impertinence. Harry Brewer, one of the front runners in my mind for best actor of the year, does nut disappoint as the father. He fades into the woodwork because the character would, but you never lose sight of him. He'd be an island of sanity in this wacky world, except that he brings a cab driver who can hardly speak English home to propose to bis daughter. (Mark Mitchell is very funny in this cameo role.) Tanya Luiutroth, as another mother—a brittle career cactus blooming late in life, n A Lifeline heim, Werner (Klink) Klemperer, Karl (Where's my traveler's checks?) Maulding, William (Beam me up, Scotty!) Shatner and gay playwright Robert Chesley. 23— J.C. Leyendecker (whose drawing of his lover, Charles Beach, became the Arrow Collar Man). 26—Tennessee Williams. 27—Jane Chambers. "Ever since I had that interview in which I said I was bisexual, it seems twice as many people wave at me in the streets."—Elton John (born March 25). Enjoy! d Openings The Birds (Ensemble, 21)—Rollicking comedy about the weaknesses of men and their institutions. Count Ory (Jones, 21)—1 know I said I'd review this madcap farce about a band of men who dress up like nuns to get at some beautiful women, but it's only going to be on for one weekend! By the way, when the is simply phenomenal. Yes, this is a late, but very welcome, entry in the Year of the Strong Women Defining Their Roles which seemed to peak last December. Only two weeks left on this baby, so grab it fast. A Lifeline (Risky Business) is a very exciting show. It is delightful. It is their new model. It is purposefully not as off-the-wall as their past shows. It is not as tightly packed, either. They seem to do fewer songs than they used to. It is more deliberate, a little less spontaneous. These changes are partly due to marketing strategy. They want to be more middle- of-the-road so as to appeal to a larger audience. It's also due to a key change in personnel. There was an in-joke when Randy Jobe went over to the musical director sitting behind the piano and demanded to know where art was. He meant art as in artistic, hut, punningly, he was also pointing out that Art Yelton isn't there any more. He's at the Alley. Michael Jones is the R.B. musical director now and the changes suit his personality. With Art gone. Randy is gaining even more of an upper hand, too. His kind of humor deals in excesses. Because of that, he is particularly vulnerable to a weak or over-trusting directors marring his final effect by indulging him too much. Andrea Modisette needs to stand up more to him for both of their sakes. In his Nell Carter routine, he left out the hyphen she always puts into Honey-suckle Rose. Oh, well. Marsha Carlton can play an audience like nobody's business. She is a fountain of pure delight. In this show, she also does a serious song with such conviction that her tears take her mascara down onto the neck. It was very dang good, but I still prefer the bubbling, vivacious side of her personality, which she gives full play in the second act. Gary Powell is a handsome, very talented man. He needs to have the moxieto realize that. Right now he spends just a tadge too much energy on being cute. Thank goodness one thing has not changed. They still find absolutely gorgeous men to fill the chorus. Eric Carville Jean Proctor stars as Sister Mary Ignatius in "Sister Mary Ignatti It All for You" opening at Stages' tonight. March 21 E.\pia Houston playwright Christopher Woods' "ecclesiastical comedy" Will I Go to Hell for This? is being given a staged reading March 25 at the Playwright's On ter of San Francisco. ... Terry Helbing, artistic director of the Meridian Gay Theater Company (in NYC), has announced the winners of its 1985 Sixth Annual Jane Chambers Memorial International Gay Playwrighting Contest. Also, the New York State Council on the Arts and the NYC Deparement of Cultural AffairB has given that theater $12,000 in grants. ... Celebrate! B-days: 21—John Paul Hudson, James Coco, Richard Kiley. 22—Stephen Sond Count finally gets to the Countess, his page (a boy being played by a girl) has beaten him there. In the dark, the two men start making out feverishly with each other instead—by accident, of course. HSPVA Spring Jazz Festival (Denny, 21)—with guest star Billy Harper, saxophone. ONO! Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You (Stages, 21)—revival of the hit comedy about ignorance masking as authority. Co-sponsored by the Montrose Voice. One (Channing Hall, First Unitarian, 27)—The Group brings Kent Johnson back as a person with AIDS. Benefit for Aid for AIDS.
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