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Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986
File 015
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Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 015. 1986-03-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5044.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-03-21). Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 015. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5044

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 015, 1986-03-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5044.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 21, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript 14 MONTROSE VOICE/MARCH 21, 1986 First-Ever Gay and Lesbian Chemical Dependence Center Pride Institute Offers Comprehensive Treatment From a Press Release In 1971, political activist Elaine Noble and mental health counselor Ellen Ratner banded together to organize Boston's first Gay Pride March. Now, 15 years later, they've joined forces again for another landmark event—the founding of Pride Institute, the first residential chemical dependency treatment program specifically tailored to the needs of the gay and lesbian community. Pride Institute, a 36-bed residential program located in Minneapolis, Minn., opened its doors in March of this year. Incorporating Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous and other self-help groups into a comprehensive clinical treatment program, it offers patients a safe environment in which to confront their chemical dependency and the unique stresses they face as gay men and women living in a society in which the majority is heterosexual. Pride Institute is sponsored by the Addiction Recovery Corporation, which operates seven chemical dependency treatment centers around the country. The Institute expects to draw clients from all parts of the U.S.. The incidence of chemcical dependence is greater among gays than in society as a whole. Current estimates indicate that 30 percent of the gay community may have an alcohol or drug problem, compared to 10 to 13 percent ofthe general population. However, in study after study, only one to two percent of those in treatment pro- Elaine Noble (left), president of Pride Institute, has joined with Ellen Ratner, vice president, to open the first gay and lesbian chemical dependence center grams have been identified as gay. "Either gays don't enter treatment programs commensurate with the rate of chemical dependence in the community, or those in treatment are afraid to openly express their sexuality," explains Noble, president of Pride Institute. "Actually, both are probably true. We hope to attract both groups—those who may be open about their lifestyle but would refuse to go to a nongay treatment facility for fear of discrimination, as well as those who are under stress largely because they have such a difficult time expressing their sexuality." In choosing a location for the facility, Ratner and Noble sought a community sensitive to gay issues but relatively Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz Shyness is Nothing to Feel Shy About By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. News America Syndicate Special to the Montrose Voice If you've ever felt diminished in the presence of others, you're not alone. All of us— yes, even the most aggressive of us—from time to time, experience situations which make us feel inadequate. It's estimated that about 80 million Americans can be called shy; that's about 40 percent. This figure jumps to 60 percent in the Orient. No matter where they live, shy persons have certain behavior in common. They: • Are more prone to being victims of confidence games. • Do not receive job promotions as often as non-shy persons do. • Are often depressed, anxious and lonely. • Are usually self-critical. • Do not make good leaders or salespersons. If you've ever felt that, down deep, you are a dyed-in-the-wool shy soul, take the quiz ahead. Answer true or false to the items, then read on. 1. I feel uneasy even in familiar settings. 2.1 usually find it hard to accept compliments. 3. I'm not relaxed when it comes to socializing with a stranger ofthe opposite sex (or of the same sex, if gay). 4. I try to avoid situations which might compel me to be very sociable. 5. Being introduced to someone makes me feel nervous. 6. I usually try to avoid speaking with persons unless I know them. 7. When with others, I tend to listen much more than I talk. 8. It would make me "nervous" to speak with a very attractive person. a Explanation Shyness is nothing to feel shy about. It has been called the universal malady. Research from Stanford University in California finds that shyness is a state of mind, a reaction pattern, which is induced largely by the society in which we are raised. Some are traditionally reserved and reticent (Japan and India) while others are bold and assertive (Red China and Israel). Children of shyness-generating societies often are not encouraged to express their feelings and opinions openly. They are rewarded for inhibiting their assertive feelings especially toward authority figures, such as parents, teachers and bosses. d Score Our quiz items are similar to those used on social avoidance and shyness tests. The more true answers you gave, the shyer you tend to be. Consider that a score of three or less is average. Shyness is nothing to feel shy about. It has been called the universal malady. Research from Stanford University in California finds that shyness is a state of mind, a reaction pattern, which is induced largely by the society in which we are raised. Some are traditionally reserved and reticent (Japan and India) while others are bold and assertive (Red China and Israel). □ Measuring Shyness in Inches: Our feelings about someone determine how physically close we'll get to them. That is, if we love someone, chances are we will move close as we interact with them. But if we feel shy or fearful, we'll tend to create more distance with them. Such was the topic of study for Professors B. Carducci of the University of Indiana and A. Webber of California State University. Their task was to see if shy persons, compared with those who were not shy, tend to keep a wider "comfort zone" between them and strangers. As you might guess, the shy do keep their distance! They prefer a distance eight inches farther away (33V_ inches on the average) than did the less shy who moved in to about 25 inches. The differences increased to 12 inches when the shy persons met someone of the opposite sex. (This was a survey of assumed heternscx a ate.) removed from the high-stimulus bar-and- drug nightlife of such gay meccas as New York and San Francisco. After scouting various sites, they settled on Minneapolis because of the city's tradition as a leader in chemical dependence programs, its low- key yet self-affirming gay and lesbian community, and a genuinely supportive municipal government. The treatment program at Pride Institute is developed to meet the needs of each patient. The initial phase is an intensive assessment and evaluation ofthe person's sexual, chemical dependence, and medical history. The clinical staff then designs an individualized treatment program incorporating private and group therapy sessions, meetings patterned on the 12-step program of Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous, education, films and lectures, a nutritionally-correct diet, instruction on relaxation and stress reduction strategies, and physical and recreational activities. Records at Pride Institute are strictly confidential. Certain incoming lines reserved for families and employers are answered without revealing the facility's gay orientation. Insurance companies receive bills under the name ofthe center's corporate sponsor. Another unique aspect of the Pride program is its emphasis on comprehensive aftercare. Upon discharge, patients are referred to both a mental health professional and a physician in their community who is acquainted with Pride Institute and has experience dealing with the particular problems confronting chemically dependent gays and lesbians. Pride Institute may be reached by calling, toll free, 1-800-54-PRIDE. Spanish/ ! J-tomex/ MEXICAN RESTAURANT | Beer, Tacos, Tamales, I Menudo. Enchiladas | Breakfast Special $1.99 4am-10am Everyday I 4701 N. Main i Between 14th & Julian In the Heights 869-1706 2 fori Taco Dinners j Not good with any other offer ■ Expires 3/31/86 A TASTE OF MEXICO 24 HOURS DAILY CLOSED TUESDAY 10PM | J I REOPEN WEDNESDAY 10AM
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