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Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986
File 013
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Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 013. 1986-03-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5042.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-03-21). Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 013. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5042

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 013, 1986-03-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5042.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 21, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript 12 MONTROSE VOICE /MARCH 21. 1986 The First Stages in a Long-Term Project Revitalization of Montrose Boulevard Begins By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Take a drive down Montrose Boulevard today and one thing is apparent: change. In recent months two new shopping centers have been built, a sculpture garden has been added, new trees have been planted and several lots have been cleared to build offices. These "early" steps of change and development along Montrose are just that—the first stages of a long-term project to revitalize a boulevard and an area that once had a reputation of elegance. Several homes built along Montrose more than 70 years ago remain as testimony to the street's original grandeur. Today, the ever-changing Montrose Boulevard is shedding the less desirable reputation it once had, while taking on a stylish look that helped it become Houston's first restricted subdivision in the early 1900s. Much of this change has been brought about by the Montrose Project, a non-profit group of individuals "who love the area and want to see it reach its potential." Operating under the wing of the South Main Center Association, a group of individuals with similar goals who focus their efforts on south Main Street, the Montrose Project has moved from the initial "thinking stages" about two and a half years ago, to receiving its state charter earlier this year. Like group chairman Alexandra Marshall, the people behind the project believe Montrose Boulevard stands as an important link between downtown and the Montrose area. They envision the Montrose Project as a way "to lengthen the green spaces along Montrose and beautify the connection with downtown (while) linking it with the cultural arts institutions," such as the Children's Museum at the north end of Montrose to the Museum of Fine Arts where the boulevard intersects Main Street. Between these museums lie numerous art galleries, which, over the years, have gradually helped Montrose become an important area for the arts. It is this arts orientation that must be emphasized to further develop Montrose into a full fledged arts district, Marshall says. To further this effort, the Project plans to use special district ordinancing to create the arts district in a more formalized manner. Unlike Montrose area civic organizations, such as the Neartown Business Gay Pride Week Committee to Meet on Sunday The Houston Gay Pride Week Committee will hold its second public meeting ofthe year at 5:00 p.m. Sunday, March 2'.\, at the Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin. At that time, elections will be held to fill two vacant board seats. Other items on the agenda include approving the art work for this year's logo and further clarification of this year's schedule. The commitee has issued a notice to bid on silk screened speciality items (t-shirts, buttons, painters' caps) to all interested businesses qualified to bid. Interested persons should contact. HGPW. P.O. Box 66684, zip 77266, for specifications on the job order. The first public parade meeting will be April 28 after the regular meeting. Bruce Felgar, parade chair, says that out-of- town parade units will not be charged an entry fee this year. The model by University of Houston students of tke propo Montrose Blvd. t look for Alliance or the Avondale Association, Marshall says the Montrose Project is not as much concerned with neighborhood improvement as with creating an asset the entire city can enjoy. The Project does seek input from these and other civic groups as well as area merchants and property developers when planning a project along the street, however. The Project has already been responsible for planting some 22 live oak trees along Montrose as an ongoing effort to "green up" the street. Other options for tree planting have been considered, including clustering palm trees. As development along the street grows and more people are attracted to the area both to live and shop, the availability of adequate parking will become more important. A project currently being worked on with Councilman George Greanias, aimed at increasing parking and utilizing available space, is to develop parking under the Southwest Freeway overpass at Montrose. Construction on the project, which will likely begin later this year, will probably be funded through a joint effort between the city and nearby businesses which need additional parking. However, if the esplanade is rebuilt from Mecom Fountain to Westheimer, as some people have suggested, it would eliminate parking along Montrose and create a greater demand for off-street parking. This stretch ofthe esplanade was removed in 1972 in the interest of less congested traffic. It remains, however, north of Westheimer. Other physical changes that will be incorporated into the boulevard to help make it more "pedestrian friendly," as Marshall says, include installing crosswalk lights at intersections where pedestrians feel they are needed, and adding kiosks, street furniture and decorative street lighting. Numerous other changes that could possibly be incorporated into the boulevard's new look come from a 12- foot-long model created by architecture students at the University of Houston. In addition to their plan for an 80-story metal tower to be constructed at the south end of the Hermann Park reflection pool, the students propose numerous small, green plazas along Montrose and a street- front market to be built in front of the Kroger grocery store. Such a marketing device would not only capture the attention of passersby, but create additional sidewalk activity for the area. "We are promoting retail development as well as the arts district because they are all a part of the same fabric," Marshall says. "We are also encouraging the inner- city development of different types of housing. ... To have all of these— shopping, living and museums—within a three block area is wonderful." While she admits the Houston economy is not the brightest it has ever been, Marshall optimistically looks at this period of the city's history as one of opportunity. "The economy can't not affect us all. It does. But there are opportunities in every situation and this is one to evaluate where we are. It is a time to think about what we are doing and what we are planning." With the real estate market pendulum swung to the buyer's advantage, property owners are more inclined to keep their holdings and make improvements on these, Marshall says. But she adds that the economic picture for Montrose is more favorable than other parts ofthe city and more alluring for investors and retailers. "People have choices about where and how they want to live," Marshall says. She points out that living in Montrose, near the city's "cultural amenities," is"an advantage we'll have for some time coming." montrose VOICE Tt_e Newspaper of Montrose is now available at all & Montrose-area $2.49 Early Bird Breakfast Special 2am lo 10am 2 Eggs any style Bacon or Sausage Hash Browns or Grits Toast or Biscuits Coffee or Tea 1102 Weslheimer 522-3332
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