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Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986
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Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 001. 1986-03-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5030.

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(1986-03-21). Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5030

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986 - File 001, 1986-03-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5059/show/5030.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 282, March 21, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 21, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Controversial Documentary to Air Tuesday on Channel 8 mn11lrose Fabian Bridges: 'Let Me Be Somebody' By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter VOICE On Nov. 17, 1985, a 30-year-old man who died of AIDS was given a pauper's burial in the Harris County cemetary. His family was unable to pay for a funeral service or attend the burial. Despite the controversy he created during his last months of life and the AIDS hysteria that followed, he died quietly and in relative obscurity. "The Newspaper of Montrose" Friday, March 21, 1986 Issue 282 (713) 529-8490 continued inside The First Stages in a Long-Term Project Revitalization of Montrose Boulevard Begins By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Take a drive down Montrose Boulevard today and one thing is apparent: change. In recent months two new shopping centers have been builtba sculpture garden has been added, new trees have een planted and several lots have been cleared to build offices. These "early" steps of change and development along Montrose are just that-the first stages of a long-term project to revitalize a boulevard and an area that once had a reputation of elegance. Several homes built along Montrose more than 70 years ago remain as testimony to the street's original grandeur. Today, the ever-changing Montrose Boulevard is shedding the less desirable reputation it once had, while taking on a stylish look that helped it become Houston's first restricted subdivision in the early 1900s. Much of this change has been.brought about by the Montrose Project, a non-profit gro"!1P of in~i­viduals "who love the area and want to see1treach its potential." continued inside Thanks to an $800,000 donation from an area property developer, this former Central Church of Christ building will probably become the Montrose branch library. Prisoners with AIDS Find They Are Targets of Another Epidemic By Kevin Krajick Pacific New Service Special to the Montrose Voice Fear of AIDS, not the disease itself, is becoming epidemic in U.S. prisons, with the result that those few prisoners with AIDS often live out their last days segregated from inmates and guards alike in isolation cells. In all, some 530 cases of AIDS have been diagnosed among nearly half million state and federal inmates across the country, according to surveys by the American Civil Liberties Union and others. In New York's Clinton Correctional Facility, inmates in a disciplinary segregation block broke into a small riot last year when they found they had been sharing a bathroom with AIDS sufferers. Now AIDS victims are routinely placed in isolation cells or special infirmary wards, as much to protect them from the threats of other inmates as to protect them.from infections, say prison officials. Prisoners in Alabama, Indiana, New Jersey and New York have filed lawsuits demanding that all inmates be tested for antibodies to the virus, and that all those proving positive be segregated. continued inside 2 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 21 , 1986 And that means a person's thoughts are turning to love, romance and (yes) sex. To celebrate the arrival of the season of love, the MONTROSE VOICE expands its PERSONALS section. And, we make it easy to place a Personals. Just phone us. (We'll bill you later.) 27 Reasons for Placing a MONTROSE VOICE PERSONAL AD ••• •Making New Friends (33,000 readers each issue) •Looking for Romance • Sending a Special Greeting • Safer than Writing on Bathroom Walls • A Chance to See Your Name in Print • Alternative to Bar Cruising • Anything Beats "The Quest" • It's Inexpensive • Confidentiality Can be Assured • Saves Gas • They're Easy to Place • Getting Back in Touch with Old, Lost Friends• Finding Missing Persons• Because Your Lover Ran One Last Week •Because Your Lover Asked You To• Forming a New Organization •Mother's Pressuring You to Settle Down • You Need a Man • You Need a Woman • You Need a Ride Across State Lines (Quick) •Seek Safe Sex Partners •It's a Chance to Make Yourself Seem Perfect • Send a Sweet Love Note to Someone Dear • Invite an Erotic Adventure • Send a Proposition to Someone (when you make it public, they can't ignore it) • State Your Kinky Desires (and tee who answers) • Good, Clean Fun To place your "Personal" in FREE THIS WEEK 1st 40 NEW 'PERSONALS' A Ticket for 2 to the Comedy Workshop the Montrose Voice, phone 529-8490 OUR RATES ARE REASONABLE: Just 40¢ a word (Bold centered headlines are $1 each word, minimum 3 words. CONFIDENTIAL BLIND BOX NUMBERS are $3.) MARCH 21, 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 3 HOBO Establishes Reward for Pantzer's Murderer By Connie Woods Montrose VoiC't" Staff Rt"pOrter "We are outraged!" Alan Pierce, owner of the Brazos River Bottom and president of the Houston Organization of Bar Owners, said Tuesday during a meeting to estab­lish a reward for the arrest and conviction of the person who murdered Marion Pantzer. Pantzer, the owner of "J ust" Marion and Lynn's on Richmond Avenue was gunned down in her club March 11. According to the Houston Police Depart· ment, a man in a ski mask entered the bar with the intention to commit a robbery. Pantzer was shot several times in the cheRt as she sat at the bar talking with friends. She was taken to Ben Taub Hospi­tal where she died shortly afterwards. "I want to get it across to the Houston Police Department how upset we are with this. It's not just a gay bar problem but it is a comm:mity problem," Pierce said. On Tuesday, March 18, five committee members of HOBO establi shed a $5000 reward for information leading to the a rrest and conviction of the person who killed Pantzer. Members of the committee each contributed $100 to open the bank account to begin the fund. montrose VOICE ANO TEXAS • STAA MONTROSE. TEXAS Popul•tlOl'I (•t 1985) 32.000 Cenaua lracll 401 01. 401 02. 402 01. 402 02. 405 02. 403 •nd '°' 01 Zip codel {roughly) 77008. 77019 (portion). 77099 Boundt<I (roughly} Sn.t>tierd Dr (well). Allen P•rkw•y (north). M••n Sl fu1t). U S 59 (soulh) L•lllude fMontrOH Blvd •t Wnth••mer Ad) 29•.w·13"N Long1tl.ld• 95"22"SO-W Alt1 tud• 40' ELECTED OFFICIALS FOR MONTROSE George Gr .. n1111. Hou.ton Clly Council (d•1t Cl 901 B•gby. (113} :122.5933 El F,.nco L•. H•m• Counl)' ComJTllHIOf'ler (pct 1) 1001PrNIOfl(113/?21·6111 W•ll•r A•nlun_ Corislable {pct 1) :JOI SanJ•cm/o. (1131221-5200 Oebr• O.nburg T•••• HouM ol Repfw.nlat•v" ld•st 137) 1,llfSW F1111y_ f113J520-8088 C11og WHhtnglon. T•• .. 54inlll (doll 13) 2:J23C•rollne/713/~Q43 Mick.., le .. nd. US Houaed Aepr1Mf1111n•• (d•SI 18) 1$11$1Sm1thll820, (113/739·1339 The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 282nd ISSUE. MARCH 21. 1986 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006--3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 DISTR1BUTION 10.500 cop•• ""eekty ,,, Houston through 140 mator dt1tr1butoon points 1n tr.. Mol'ltroee. th• V1ll1.ge. the Hetghll ut1m•redpau-Ofl r•I• f•clor2.8 Htim•led rHd•rsh1p 29.400 WHkly 175 cop•• weekly elsewhere Nllm•led PN•·on r•I• l•clor 2 5 Hlim•l•d rHd•r•h•(J 440 WHkly TOTAL DISTRIBUTION (GUARANTEED) 10.675 cop191 weekly tol•l Hl1meted rHd•rsh1p 29.840 wHkly Contents copyright 1986 Office hours 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg·publ•stier-editor Linda Wyche'men951111g edr/or Conme Woods .. ,,..,,,, Pele D1amond1,...., David Roumfortt~oduc11on Scott Cutsinger. 8111 o·Aourke1re .. -• Sieve Warren1n•''°""' couupondent ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Houston (713) 529-8490 Elsewhere Texas (800) 222-1537 EXT 995220 Elsewhere US (800) 225-0227 EXT 995220 Jerry Mulholland «/""er''''"" diractOf Karen Myrow accoc.int •xecu1, ... Foundmg Members Grffler Montrose Bu11neu Guild. G•y and Lesbian Preu Auoc••l•on New• 5., .. ,c. P•c•l•C Newt Se"'•C• POSTMASTER Send M:ldreu conec11on1 to 408 Avond•le Hou11on. TX 77008-3028 Subtcf/p/IOfl r•I• in US 1n sNlfll en .. e10,,. $49 per year 152 llSUft).$29pers•• month• (26111u•).Of$1 25perwHk(191s lh•n 2fl 1uun) S.c:k 11aun $2 00 uch N•lionel «1vert11mg t•INH•nta/•I"• Joe D1S.beto. R1vendeU Mark•t•ng 866 8th Avenue. N9W YOfk 10011. (212) 242-6863 Ach«rit•nf} rlHdl•,,. Wednesd•y. 5 30pm. lor iuue relened Frod•y hef'linQ Nof1te to «/1"9't1nt• Localltdverl•t•no r•le.c:hedule Seven-A W..M..e llect•v•Ocl 12.11114 andfoghh4.w0Ubeaffec1 .... •J•n 3. Rnpont1b1l11y TM MontfOH Voic:adoM not au.ume Fn90f\· .,blhly lor .av.rl•••no c .. 1m1 RMde,. should •dVIH IM l'leWIP•pet lo •ny decapl•v• Mil"•rh11ng Alan Plerce, HOBO president, is leading the effort to establish and fund th'! Marion Pantzer Reward Fund (Connie Woods photo) Members of the committee include Pierce· Charles Armstrong, manager of Heave'n, J . R 's and the Montrose Mining Company; Ted Lenze, owner of Chutes; Terry Flood , !Jlanager of 611; and Ron Sioux, owner of Cousins. The committee also decided to offer a $1000 reward for the a rrest and conviction T STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMJITED DISEASES AIDS1KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON FRI 8:30AM -5 PM SAME DAY APPOINTMENT ~tsX'rlrkb~~ ~~8~ BY APPOINTMENT ONLY Twelve Oaks Tower 4126 Southwest Frwy #1000 Houston, TX 77<Yl7 621-7771 • --""" of any armed robber in Harris County "I will probably write another letter to Police Chief Lee Brown about the mug­gings, the robberies and the problems in the community," Pierce explained. He said he had written a Jetter during the past several weeks concerning the problems in the Montrose a rea. He pointed out that only recently one of his employees, walking along the street in the Montrose a rea, was stabbed several times, including h a ving his jugular vein cut. After being hospitalized for several days, the victim has returned to work. Pierce also pointed out that several rob­beries and murders have occurred within the gay community but no arrest has ever been made. "Ben Ladeaux was stabbed multiple times about four years ago. Pete St. George was murdered and Jim Chap­pel). And now Marion," he said. He a lso mentioned three bars that had been robbed during the recent weeks: the Venture-N, Outlaws, and E. J .'s. "It is so timely right now," Pierce said concerning raising the money for the reward. "If we don't get going right now the anger and the concern will surely dim· inish. Something has got to be done in Montrose," he added. Pierce said the committee had made a list of some 80 businesses and organize· tions in the community who will be con­tacted concerning the $100 contribution for the reward fund. BOB Lovett By late afternoon Tuesday, the Westhei­mer Cafe had se!!t Pierce a check for $100 before any of the other businesses had been contacted. The committee also discussed holding a fundraiser so that individuals in the com· munity could also contribute to the reward. When contacted, Ma rian Coleman, owner of Kindred Spirits, said she would "consider it an honor" if the HOBOs wanted to sponsor a fundraiser ather busi­ness location on Richmond. HOBO has been organized for about a year. "We have tried to upclass our organi­zation. We wanted to work together rather than fight with each other," Pierce said. About 30 clubs are involved with the organization. Pierce pointed out that dur­ing recent months the group ha.c. had a bigger turnout. "I am sure Ma rion's death had some effect on the turnout we had last week since we would be talking about a rewa rd fund," he added. "We have not been hearing enough about the muggings and knifings in the community," Pierce said. "Publications and bar owners may be afraid of scaring off customers. To protect the customers we've got to warn them," he concluded. Any business, organization or individ­ual who would like to contribute to the Marion Pantzer Reward Fund can contact Pierce at the Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos. 521-1015 Boulevard Big Bang $1. 99 Breakfast Monday-Friday 2 Eggs, Bacon or sausage and 2 Pancakes EXTRA SPECIAL!! Our Regular 1/3 lb. Hamburger Only $2.25 Hours 7om-11pm Mon·Thurs. 7am-MKtight Friday 8an-Mid"l0ght Saturday 8an-11pm Slx1day 4 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 21, 1986 ALCOHOL AND DRUGS ARE REALLY DOING A NUMBER ON US. If you thmk drugs or alcohol are keeping you down, you are m good compan~. One out of every three gays and lesbians are in the same boat. That's 7 million of us, struggling with the disease of chemical dependence. And sinking fast. It doesn't have to be that wa~: Introducing Pride Institute, America's first in-patient drug and alcohol treatment facility run by gay men and lesbians for gay men and lesbians. We offer you a chance to clearthe drugs and alcohol out of your life and a chance to find yourself, without the everyday distractions of your normal routine. All in the safety and comfort of a place that respects your sexual orientation while protecting your confidentiality. Our program is based on a proven combination of 12-step experience and clinical expertise. But unlike other treatment facilities, we also offer you a chance to explore the history and heritage of being gay in a straight world. Our goal is to send you back into that world full of the enthusiasm, talent and energy that make you who you are, proud of what you are, clean and sober and ready to go. If drugs or alcohol are doing a numberon you or someone you know, call our toll free number today: 1-800-54-PRIDE (or, in MN, 1-612-934-7554). Recover with pride. VPRIDE INSTITUTE 14400 Martin Dnve, Eden Prairie, MN 55344 l-800-54-PRlDE(or, in MN, l-612-934-7554) Elaine Noble, President. Ellen Ramer, Vice President. Christopher Eskeli, Ph.D. Memlxr N,u1C1nal A..socta£Km clf LcbtananJ G.n· AlwhJ1hsm PM IOllals MARCH 21. 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 5 Controversial Documentary to Air Tuesday on Channel 8 Fabian Bridges: 'Let Me Be Somebody' By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter On Nov. 17, 1985, a 30-year-old man who died of AJDS was given a pauper's burial in the Harris County cemetary. His family was unable to pay for a funeral service or attend the burial. Despite the controversy he created during his last months of life and the AIDS hysteria that followed, he died quietly and in relative obscurity. Fabian Bridges, an alleged male prosi· tute, became the centerof"a media circus" last summer when said he would continue to have sex even though he had been diag­nosed as having AIDS. When producers of the PBS documentary series Frontline heard of this, they scratched their original plans to do an AIDS program on four patient..s. "He was just to be part of our report until, during an interview in Cleveland, Bridges said he was still being promiscu­ous with other men," David Fanning, Frontline executive producer, said at a PBS briefing reported by the Houston Chronicle earlier this year. It was at this lime that WCCO-TV, the Minneapolis public television station that had been filming Bridges, notified Cleve­land health officials of Bridges' state­ment. From this point on, WCCOreporters and cameramen closely followed Bridges and became part of the story themselveR. They backtracked Bridges to Houston when he left a $29,000 a year job and then to Indianapolis and Cleveland, Oh10, where he was turned away by his mother and sisters. Although able to allude repor· ters and r<'tum to Houston, Bridges later l'Ontnct<'CI the TV crew to ask for their financial assistance. The crew immc>­diately returned to Houston and onre again began their filming of Bridges. Th(• film collected by the reporters has, sinre Bridg(•s' death, been made rnto n controversial hour-long documentary, which is scheduled to be shown on Tues­day, March 25, from 9:00 lo 11:00 p.m. on Channel 8. A Jive panel discussion focus­ing on different aspects of the documen­tary will follow, with speakers from Houston, Denver and San Francisco par­ticipating. Some of the controversy stemming from the documentary involve journalistic ethics: WCCO reporters admit offering Bridges money to pay for such items as food and lodging. Gay activists in Hous­ton, as weH as Minneapolis, have charged WCCO of using Bridges and manipulat­ing the story of his plight. In October 1985, a WCCO producer was quoted as saying, "The man is indigent. We made a choice (to pay) on humanitar­ian grounds. We figured if we didn't do that, he'd find somebody to stay with and maybe hiwe sex with them." Other people, such as John Barnich, an attorney for the KS1 AIDS Foundation of Houston, who also took Bridges into his home, offered a different interpretation. "We're not dealing with a documentary but a paid performance. They made Fabian a media consultant," Barnich says. He explained that when Bridges was admitted to Houston's Jefferson Davis Hospital, where he eventually died, he stood 6' 2", weighed 126 pounds and was suffering from a severe case of rectal and genital herpes. Considering Bridges dete­riorating physical condition, Barnich tmys "I feel he could not have given it awav Jet alone sold it" (in reference to Brid.ges' alleged prostitution). Furthermore, Barnich adds that a per­son suffering from AIDS generally has a greatly diminished sexual drive. "What more appropriate form of denial (that he hns AIDS) than to say he is still having sex and getting paid for it," Barnich asks. During the documentary, Bridges says that when he was diagnosed as having AIDS in July, his "world just started crumbling." "It's hard for me to sit here and realize I have it," Bridges says during an interview with WCCO reporters. He go<'s on to say "I guess I'm just at the point where I don't give a damn." Later, Bridges tells the WCCO crew he has had sex with a man in Cleveland, but did not let the man know he had AIDS. Ray Hill, a Houston gay activist. said the sexual encounter Bridges describes in the documentary came across as a "sex story." "It appeared to me as a Homosexu­als Anonymous story of'tell a spicier story and get a greater reward ."' Frontline producers do not see it this way, however. They maintain the docu­mentary serves several purposes. includ­ing raising various questions about the repsonsibility of health departments and people with AIDS, informing the public what the risks are concerning AIDS and what safe sexual practices are. Hill and Barnich do not dispute that the documentary raises the issue of repsonsi­bility. They agree that a lack of responsi­bility existed throughout Bridges' ordeal until he returned to Houston and was given a place to stay by Bamich. The two men also agreed the documentary does not accomplish the latter purposes as expressed by Frontline producers. "Fabian romes across as a poor, not too bright, stalking menace who is trying to spread his disease," says Hill. "Overall, the documentary reinforces every fear and myth that the most radical population of people hold against gay people and AIDS." In the documentary, a reference is made lo the fart that the KS" AIDS Foundalton refused offering Bridges mealR or shelter Barnich says, however, one of the reasons the foundation was unable to offer Bridges shelter at the McAdory House was because of media attention that would likely be focused on the house. When Bar­nich decided to let Bridges stay with him, the media instead turned their attention to Barnich's house. At this point. the Minneapolis TV crew returned home. "Bridges was in the care of the gay community and they wanted it caUed off," producer Fanning said. "The crew was not with him when hedied ... This crew was very bruised and battered by what was going on. They didn't know what to do any more than anyone else did." Barnich disputes this as propaganda, saying the TV crew was more concerned about their documentary than Bridges welfare. "Off the street Fabian wasn't news. They didn't want him off the street," he says. "They CWCCO) created havoc in Houston and dumped it in the lap of the foundation. They left with a documentary that wil1 probably win awards and left us lo deal with Fabian, . . with the AIDS hysteria, . . Louie Welch, .. the quaran­tine issue, .. and the health card issue." HiU adds that .. when you watch the doc­umentary. try to place yourself in Fabi­an 's shoes and try to view it from that perspective." By doing so, it might be eas­ier to understand what Fabian Bridges (a man who in his final days of life found what Barnich calls "unconditional love from two old senile cats") was feeling and what he needt'd. As Fabian said during an interview in Cleveland with WCCO, "Let me go down in history as being I am somebody, some­body that'll be respeclt'd, somebody who's appreciated and somebody who can be relatOO to. There's a whole lot of people who just go, they're not even on the map, they just go." Group Deals with "Life Issues" Women's Network Begins 2 New Programs By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter The Women's Network, a social / educa· tionalt 1rnpport alternative located at 900 I .ovett, has announced two new programs for lesbians in the Houston community Tht> Life !Rsues Group, which meets on Wednesday evenings from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., offers women a place to talk about problems in a group setting. "The Life Issues group is designed for lesbians where they can talk with each other about 'coming out,' family or any problems they are having to deal with," said Karen Hanson, the director of Women's Network "It's one of the few places that lesbians ran talk about what's going on with their lives .•• where you don' have to explain about heing gay," she addt'd. Shr went on to say that group therapy can be very helpful because members can get feedback from their peers. "It is confi· dential so no one has to worry about what they say," she explained. The second new program which will be offerl'd is Lesbian Couples. The meetings will be held on Monday evening from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Montrose Counsc>l· ing Cf.>ntt'r. "There are no other groups for lesbian rouples whrre they can talk and deal with their rrlntionship," said Han~on. The group will be led by profeHsionol them· pitots. She did point out that both mrmbers of the rtolotiom~hip must attend the mt·t·t mgs. She explained that the group will focus on rommunication skills to learn more about one's self and to express what one wants in the relationship. "The point is for women to talk about their lives and their relationships," Han· son said. "It's an opportunity for women to talk about what they want in their rrlationships-the closeness, distance, intimacy, sexuality, what they like and don't like. It's very difficult for people to be honeRt about what they want and what they don't want," she added. Hanson pointed out that it is difficult for women in particular to be honest. "They put other people's needs first. It's just accepted that way,'' she said. She focused on the fact that the only role models for lt>Sbian rouples is the maier female rela· tionship. "They are not clear about they want. They don't feel the right to gel what they want if it is in conflict with the other person," she continued. She also pointed out that lesbian cou­plrs do not get the support that straight couples get. "The only support the rela­tionship can get is from the lesbian rom ­munity," Hanson Haid. Diana Storms, a staff therapist with a Moster of Social Work degree, and Car· men Zepeda, a staff therapist and clinical MOcial worker, will be conducting the two programs Ham;on a!Ao talked about the Womf'n's Network meeting held March 12 at which time the women discussed death fol1owing the murder of Marion Pantzer, owner of "Just" Marion and Lynn's. "We need to talk about loss and to talk about our feelings and to trust each other enough to talk it," she said. "What Marion stood for is the same thing the Women's Network stands for. She represented what thf' network believes and is." Hanson emphasized the importance of these two new programs for the lesbian community. "The main point is that this has not been offered before," she addt'd. The cost of the programs is based on a sliding scale. Interested people can call the counseling center at 529-0037 for the initial interview. MERI DIEN LEASING INC. llS 528< 735i '86 BMW 309fmo 395/mo 569;mo '86 CADILLAC '86 MERCEDES BENZ '86 HONDA l'IOE JOOE S60Sl 349/mo Ace~ 159/mo 498/mo P~lude 11'9·mo nsimo '86 PORSCHE 'B6 JAGUAR Ot\'ille 329/mo 944 398fmo 498/mo X16 '86 MAZDA RX.;J 209/mo 626 178/mo 944 Turbo '86 TOYOTA C•mry Celie• t711mo 185/mo CALL LEE BORBA (713) 975-1872 'B6 BUICK Sliybrti Electr• 11'9fmo 21'9'mo i!/9&. -!!11-1 =-=-:-~· /\oO lXl\\IN PA'tMt~l • LlJ\\' ~· \'otJ" lt11.t •'\~\~t .... T • CA'-h fOR VOL R TR. ... ()( 6 MONTROSE VOICE i MARCH 21 , 1986 Ob God, she's back again/ The outrageously hilarious, scathingly funny lesson of a lifetime! SISTER MARY IGNATIUS EXPLAINS IT AIJ~ FOR YOU Featuring jean Proctor as Sister Mary by Christopher Durang Late Night Performances Friday & Saturday, llpm Sunday, 8pm All performances - $8. Charge tickets to: MasterCard, VISA or American Express GROUP RATES AVAIIABLE Tickets also available at Showtix, in Tranquility Park Co-presented with The Montrose Voice FOR TICKETS CALL 5 2 -S T A G E 3201 Allen Parkway at Rosine MARCH 21. 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 Prisoners with AIDS Find Themselves Targets of Another Epidemic Hy Kevin Krajick Pacific N(•u• St•rr·1ct• Sp1·ciaf to thl' Montros'' Vo1cr Fear of AIDS, not the disease itself, is hN·oming epidemic in U.S. prisons, with tht• n·sult that those few prisoners with AIDS often livt• out their last days segre­gatrd from inmalt>H and guards alike in i1;olation <·ells. In all, some !').10 cases of AIDS have been diagnosed among nearly half million state and federal inmateos across the roun· try. &<·cording to surveys by the American Civil I.ihertit·s Union and others. In New York's Clinton Correctional Facility, inmates in a disciplinary segn"' tcntion hlock broke into a small riot laat yt•ar when tht>y found they had het>n shar­ing a bathroom with AIDS sufferers. Now AIDS vittims are routinely placed in i~ola· tion c·t•lls or sp(•cial infirmary wards, as much to prot('Ct them from the threats of other inmatN; as to protect them from infE'Ctions, say prison officials. Prisoners in Alabama, Indiana, New J(•rsey and New York have filed lawsuitR d('manding that all inmates be tested for antibodies to the virus, and that all those proving positive be segregated. r>espite the prevailing medical opinion that the disease cannot be spread through casual rontact, guards have also pressed for the tests, and sometimes refused to work with AIDS victims. Jai l officers in suburban Westchester County, N.Y., invented. what a brochure advertises as a "biteproof, scratchproof, waterproof, fireproof" jumpsuit made of nylon and teflon. It is supposed to defend officers against the "Dread AIDS Riots" of the nrar future, according to one local newspaper headline. Violent outbursts among AJDS victims arc• rnr<'. however, according to prison mt'dical per8onnt!l. Said Margaret Wyke, din•<'tor of the medical unit of Sing Sing pri8on in New York, where eight of 12 AIDS vidims an· k(·pt in a special isola· t10n ward. "It's worse when they're pa~ · tiivt", ht•caust> it ml'nns they're giving up." Indt·t·d. tht·inmatE>s' wait for almo~t en tain dt•nth is augmented by the mind· twisting isolation and boredom of thPir prison w1thm a prison. Wht>n H('naldo Ortiz's mother and sister-his wift.• lt'ft him many y€"ars ago-first learn("<! he was dying, thpy made the 35-mile train trip from ~ew York City oncl• a week to visit him for an hour o~ two. But tiOOn they <·nuld no Jon~er afford the SH.SO fare, so KPFr Holding Gumbo Cook-Off From a prrss n·kase If you lnvt• Cajun ~umho, boudin. crock · lins. big crowds, live Zydeco and Cajun music you can reallv ·•Jaisser Jes hon tt·mps rouler." Sunday: March 23 at Clear I.okt> Pnrk from 11 :00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m Comt- ht•ar nnd taste the best that'to1 C'ujun wht-n statmn show produC't•r Pt• Te .Johnson hosts this l:H:·nefit for hstt'ner­support1'< 1 KPVI' Admission is free, with gum ho. tiodn and beer 11t I. The rook·off will be held rain or shim• at CINu Lak(• Park. on NASA Road One, jul't pntit th(• main gate into NASA ('all 52() .. H)()() for further information In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voi'e "What's hurting, boy, is that I have to die right here. As it is, they've taken away all my rights. They've taken away my dignity. Then they make me die in prison. That's the only thing I'm truly afraid of." now he se<>" them only once a month. They are his only visitors. The r<'st of thi~ time ii;; spent "walking from this hf>d: to that room," Ortiz said. pointing weakly to the dayroom down the corridor where three dying in matt's stared quietly at a televii;ion. Asked what runs through his mind, Ortiz, 44 . ~aid. '"I don't think about nothing. What<'ver is coming is coming, and that's it. !fl live till August. maybe I'll makt> my time (be released). When I die I want to die on the street.'" Anothrr inmate, 28, who asks not to be identified, is 8uffering from meningitis, a common illness among AIDS victims. Emaciated and confined to a wheelchair, he spoke slowly, sometimes slurring his words. He said he hasn't seen his two young children since he began serving a 5· l 0 year sentence for armed robbery two years ago. This has been his choice. "I don't want them to see me here," he said. But his chances of ever seeing them again appear small unless he relents. His next parole hearing is 17 months away. His parents, who live in Brooklyn, have told him that if he lives Jong enough, he can come home. They have a room ready for him. But few victims at his stage last that long. Most of the ward's patients are kept in the big communal room until they are about ready to die. or until they need acute care Then they are moved to a nearby hospital to gasp out their Jest few hours or days. Som<' 50 men have left Sing Sing in this wa\· The i~mate who has set·n the mo~t come and go is Daryle Mori;ette, a stocky 27· year-old who was diagnosed as ha\.ing AIDS 16 months ago. Mori'ietteis suffering from Kaposi's sarcoma, a purplish cancer that erupts on the skin of many AIDS vic­tims. His case is especially bad, but on one day a few months ago he beamed with happiness. Mother Teresa had just visited the ward, going from bed to bed, leaving each man a little bag of candy canes and a medal depicting the Virgin Mary. "I feel so honored," smiled Marsette from his bed when she had gone. "I can't believe Mother Teresa came to see me." Morsette said that he is not afraid to die. "What's hurting, boy, is that I have to die right here. As it is, they've taken away a11 my rights. They've taken away my dig· nity. Then they make me die in prison. That's the only thing I'm truly afraid of." He and other inmates have filed a law· suit claiming that Sing Sing does not have enough medical professionals or equip. rnr~COLL cST .--c A f·E-AND Ci\5i\QET Continuous Service 11am-closing Dine Where the Stars Dine Dueling Pianos 'EATUR NG Scott Scott and J erry Hinson performing Tuesday through Sunday Purveyors of Fine Food & Spirits Open 7 Days a Week 1834 Westheimer, 522-7020 ment to administer such things as IV­dripping antibiotics. chemotherapy, or special diets that could prolong patient's li\-'es. or pain killers that rould make them more bearable. Sandra Johnson, nurse administrator at Sing Sing, agrees with many of the com­plainL'>. saying. "'We're always down on items , We really don't have sufficient peo­ple to take care of (the patientsJ." Durinf!" the pru-t several years. Roman Catholic cler1n· and lay workers have appt>aled for the relea~e of dying inmates Finally last Oect"mber, corrections offi. cials did place Mo~ette and two other Sing Sing AIDS sufferers into the care of Mother Teresa, who had them admitted to St. Clare·~ Hospital in :-;ew York City Sin~ Sing hru-; released no other AIDS sufferers since. Spokesman Andrew Minor flaid the corrections department wil1 consider releasing only individuals "who can't possibly rape or beat anyone over the head. I mean minimally am bu la· tory people." "Frankly, we can't take the chance that the public is going to pick up the paper and say, "How come they let this guy out of jail?'" Wyke said she is not convinced that aB inmates with AIDS would be better off released. Even non-convicts with AlDS have found themsi'lves evicted from apart­men~, fired from jobs, shunned by their friends. she pointed ouL "Out in the free world, fending for them· selves. a lot of them would just become bagmen," she said. "I don't think this is the right place for anyone to die, but out there, there art-n 't that many people who want them either " ,-;~---------~ 0 u p 0 N OFFER EXPIRES 3'31186, ~ BY :"~NTMENT ONLY ~~ ~ ~<f:l';:._~ ~~~ ___.:.:-· • 0<s0e the star& . • .. · - Monday-Thursday I Free Ito-We Rental wHh ihlis ad• ·oepos1t Required "Does Not Include Adult Movies 2016 MONTROSE Houston, Texas 77006 529-5544 8 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 21, 1986 The ffiontrose Uoice announces a new Public Affairs Column 'i\sk Citq Hall'' Bq Houston Citq Councilman Cieorqe Cireanias Ever had a problem with Cit4 Hall7 An4 cit4 service? Perhaps 4ou re 1ust curious about some aspect oj ourcit4 government or the services it is required to perjorm for its citizens (streets, police, garbage. health , utilit4 regulation or even the zoo) Councilman ~reanias will answer 4our questions. address 4our concerns. or help 4ou get around Cit4 Hall red tape · Write "Ask Citq Hall," c / o IIlontrose Uoice, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 7'2006 (\lour question will be answered in the IIlonlrose Uoice. Confidentialilq can be maintained if desired. On personal issues, Councilman {ireanias will provide a personal answer.) Startinq in march in the newspaper of ffiontrose MARCH 21, 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 9 An artist's rendering of the office complex under construction by John Hansen muestment builders. At left is the five-story office complex scheduled to open Sept. I. At right is the building which formerly housed the Central Church of Christ and which will Mcome the Montrose Branch Library Developer Donates Site City Selects Location for Montrose Library By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Thanks to an $800,000 donation from an area property developer, Montrose may get it.ff own branch library after all. Mayor Kathy Whitmire announced. Murch 12 that developer John P. Hansen has given the sanctuary of the former Cen· tr al Church of Christ to the city for use as the MontroRe branch library. Th<' dona tion, formally accepted at last week's City Council meeting, lays to rest a several months long query as to where the much needed branch library would be located . Initially, the city had considered leasing thr church's 8anctuary and several class­rooms or building a new $1.2 mil1ion facil ­ity on c-ity-owned property at Mandell and Richmond According to Jack Sheridan, press ha i;ion for Hansen, several commercial uses for the church were considered, including leasing the property to a theater, but that Hansen finally decided "a library would be best for the neighborhood and the city" and that it represented "an element of sta bility for the neighborhood." While the city has accepted the dona lion, it may still be at least 18 months before the library opens, according to Len Radoff, chief of branch services for the Midtown Video 2043 S.W. Freew;ry at Shepherd 522-2805 Your24 Hour Video Store VldeoXXX Movies Super Selection of Gay Flicks Wide Selection Regular XXXX Good Selection of General Movies We Rent-Sell-Trade-Buy No Membership- No Hassle The building which formerly housed the Central Church of Christ u•ill be used for the new Montrose branch library (Pete Diamond photo) Houston Public Library. He explained that in addition to adding a second floor in the sanctuary, other alterations would be needed, including leveling the church floor and making the building accessible to the handicap. When the renovations are completed, Radoff said the first floor of the nearly 14,000 square foot library will likely include circulation and work areas, a THE BEST Ll'ITLE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHnY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVATE BATHS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 URSULINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 children's section and an area for current adult books and magazines. The second floor will be the main adult level and will house the stacks and library offices. Opening a branch library in Montrose has been part of a long-range goal of the library system. Radoffsaid. He added that Montrose is one of the oldest parts of Hous­ton that is still without a branch library. Hansen, who is planning a $10 million, five-story office complex adjacent to the church. will retain owner.ship of the two­story facility adjoining the church. New Montrose Office Building Plans Sept. Opening The Campanile. a five story office build­ing located at 4100 Montrose, will open its doors to John Hansen Investment Builders in September. According to Malinda Russek, an employee of the investment builders, the office building will also house a complete tax and law library for the tenants. The 75.000 square foot office building will also have surface parking. Across the street in the 4200 block of Montrose the sanctuary of the Central Church of Christ Church will house the new Houston city libra~\ The educational portion of the church building wil1 have retail stores and a retstaurant. "One of the unique things about the office building is its bell tower," Russek said. She also said that "Campanile" means bell tower in Italian. The Hansen developers have other com· mercial developments in Houston includ­ing Riverway at Woodway and Loop 610 where there are several office buildings and the Inn on the Park The rompany also developed the Plaza Medical Center at 1200 Binz and the Pen Oak Park , another office development. The company will be locating all of its offices in the new building Sept. l. "'We like the Montrose area and theoompan)· is intere~ted in developing along Montrose Boulevard," she added. 10 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 21, 1986 Montrose Congregations Plan Holy Week Services From press releases Weeklong services at several area churches serving Houston's gay and Jes· bian community are scheduled to begin Saturday, March 22. with observances of Palm Sunday and the Jewish Purim. Rev Jeri Ann Harvey, evangelist, u·ill Bpeak at three sen·ices at thf' Neu..• Freedom Christian Church Coinciding with the start of Easter ser· vices, the Rev. Elder Jeri Ann Harvey of Lo!' Angeles will be in Houston for special eervices March 21-23 at the New Freedom Chri~tian Church,X29 Yale. The Rev. Her­vey, a Metropolitan Community Church evangeli~t and former Houston pai;tor most rece 1tly pastored the MCC-Los Angeleg church. She is scheduled to speak Friday and Saturda)· at 7:30 p.m .• and again at the church's regular Sunday morning service at 10:00 a.m Holy week 11ervices at DignityrHouston will begin Saturday with a 7:30 p.m. mass m celebration of Palm Sunday. Daily Lentt"n i;iervices will be held at 6:00 p.m. Monday through Wednesday. Services on Holy Thul'!lday and Good Friday will begin at 7:30 p.m An Easter vigil is sche­duled for Saturday, March 29, at 7:30, fol lowed by a potluck dinner. All services will be held upgtairs at the Dignity Center, S'll7 Fannin The Congregation Aytz Chayim, Hous· ton's only gay·oriented Jewish congrega· t1on. will hold iUl annual Purim Party Saturday, March 22. at 8:00 p.m. The cele­bration will feature a telling of the Purim story as well ai; the singing of traditional holiday songs. For additional informs· tion. including party location, call Richard at 7211-5181 Ea~ter week servicet; at Houston's Met· ropohtan Community Church of the Resurrection begin on Palm Sunday March 2.1, with regular Sunday services at 10:45 a.m and 7:15 p.m In addition to the rrjn!lar Wednesday midwet·k service, a special Holy Thursday sf'rvice ha'> bet>n scheduled and will include Communion and a washin~ vf the ft-et. A Good Friday service 1s planned for the following day, also at 7; 15, and includt>ti a "sermon Hlide presentation." MCCR'." Wt'ek of services will culminate on Easter Sundav. March ao. with a 6:0<) a.m. 1'~a~ter SuOrise Worship Service. ~cheduled to he held in Allen Park near the Gu!-> Wortham Fountain. An Easter break fast will follow at 7:15 a.m. in tht.> fellow· ship hall of the church, 1919 Decatur While regular Sunday services will be held. the evening service will feature an ''EaRter Cantata" performance by the M('('R choir Additional information concerninJ( Easter week services can be obtained by contacting the r~pective churches or organizations: lS•w Freedom Christian Church, 86.1· 8377; Dignity Hou.ton, 521!·0111; Metro­politan Community Church of the Resurrection, 861-9149. ~~ · CARDS·GIFTS ··ACCESSORIES· 1002 Missouri Street· · Houston-Texas 713. 524. 5227· • 77006 a division ofTLC • ·the Annex Corporation WEEKENDS A BIT LONG AND THIN? MAYBE JUST A LITTLE BORING? WELL. .. LLL! LET US MAKE YOU FEEL LIKE A ..... "QUEEN FOR A DAY" YOU CAN GET SOME OF THOSE CHORES DONE AND HAVE FUN. . . EVERY WEEKEND ... AI . .the Annex! GET THIS. .... EVERY SATURDAY: Porch & Yard Sale WE PULL SELECTED MERCHANDISE FROM STOCK AND CUT THE PRICE IN HALF. . . 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Arn Ex MCard Visa ROCK "N" HORSE Newest Women's Bar (Men Welcome Also) COUNTRY DANCING NIGHTLY DRAF1'BEER 75¢ Happy Hour, $1° Regular Well Drinks $1 •0 Happy Hour Happy Hour 4-7prn Hourti: Tucs.-Thurs. 4pm-2am ~'ri.-Sun. 1pm-2am Cl.OSJ-:D MO:'\UAY8 Narene Kee-ou·ner Kelly-mgr 5731 Kirby, 520-9910 C1mP aud Mt'et DarlenP fJormt·rly of thf' Rriar Pat~hJ -~~&Hf;SWWW~ Thank You Evervone for a nreu1 Grand <Y1wning!! ·-s10°01 I ff I : 0 : I CLIP THIS AD and attach it to I lI y our next order for S 10.00 off I any of the following items: I • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing• Flyers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Envelopes • Amouncements • Invitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet Copying • Invoices · SPEEDY ~ PRINTING SERVICE OF Tl!:XA.S Feist. Rehable Servtce. Excellent Oualtty, Low Cost 5400 BEUAIRE BLVD. Convt"rnent Soottwest locat10n CALL 667-7417 PICK UP AND DELIVERY MfMBFR GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD. GREATER BfUAlRf CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PN".¥>4" ont' coupon ~r Cll'itomf"r and/Of ordM. CM"ln(){ _~ _cornb_11'W'r_l wit_h 01h_M c_tn.co_unts _Of \P_f'Ck'l_ ortr n. J Pedestrian Killed by Auto A 47·year-old Houston man was killed Tuesday in the 2200 block of Montrose as he pushed a grocery cart across the street. Benjamin Hooks was crossing Mont· rose in front of the Kroger supermarket when, according to police reports, he was struck, possibly by two cars. Police have questioned one motorist who said he hit Hooks after another car hit him and sped away. The vehicle which left the scene was des­cribed as a white or light blue Dodge or Chrysler Letters Seeks GPW Board Seat From Ray Hill I have an nounced for one of the positions on the Montrose Activities Center.' Gay Pride Week board. And I very seriously want to serve in that position. I am inter· ested in GPW's transition from an ad hoc, fresh beginning organization to one with a stable ongoing board. I, like many oth­ers, applaud the change to tax deductible status; but hope we can maintain the freshness of annual rebirth and the flexi­bility that our original structure allowPd. My history with GPW goes bark to 1975. In June 1975 I was inspired by the Texas Cay Task Force conference in San Anto­nio, which functio ned as Texas' GPW activity. Encouraged by Morris Kight from Los Angeles, TGTF's speaker that yenr, to start some kind of GPW activity in Houston. I joined Rev. Bob Falls ofMCCR, Pokey Anderson, Rita Wanstrom and Jerry Miller of Integrity, in a news conf(>r· ence announcing the organization of the Gay Political Caucus and that future gay pride weeks in Houston would not be unc<·lrbrated In rn76, about 200 of us marrhed from Main at Bt.·11 north to Texas Avenue and back to Hell on Fannin. GPW activities in 1977 were limited to a rally atCherryhurst Park mi only three weeks beforesome5000 of us had marched and demonstra tOO on the occasion of Anita Bryant's visit to Houston. Gay pride was beginning to be a reality in HouHton. 1978 will be remembered for HouRton Town Meetmg I, but there was also a ralendar of events with several days of artivities inrluding our first National Oay of Remembrance, a tradition that is still a part of GPW I played various roles in the planning and execution ofGPW each of those years. In 191'11, Rita Wanstrom and I were grand marshals for the parade. Since 19~1. my involv('ment in GPW has been more group asRociated than as an individual. In recent vears I have been invited to partiri · pate in.GPW activities in other cities, and I do so when those events do not conflict with our <·elehrations. I want and n<•(.-d your support. Anyone attendmg the next GPW meeting (Dignity C(·nter. :J217 Fannin. Sunday, March ZJ, fl:OO p.m.) may vote. Other GPW matterR will be discu8sed and attendance at three of the GPW meetings qualifies one to vott> in the grand marshal's election. There are no membership requi rements exrept the excitement of plan ning Gay Pride Week activit1eR. Please romc. I need your h<'lp to keep the excitement growing. It ems in the "Letters" section represents opinions of some of our readers and not n ecessarily the views of the JlfON TROSE VOICE. R eaders are encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest to the community . Mary's Salutes Diana's "Sex" Quicentennial Lone Star Show! Special Drink Prices Saturday Night to Everyone Holding Ticket Stubs HAPPY HOURS lam-Noon Daily 5pm-9pm Mon. -Fri. 11 :30pm-12:30am Daily D.J. Lary Thompson HOME OF EAGLE LEATHER 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 MARCH 21. 1966 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 Spruce Up JPur Home for Spring with .. ~ HSK CONTRACTING A Full Service Contractor • Roofing •Tile/ Masonry (All Types) •Carpet aemodellng e Cabinets •Sheetrock/ e Decks/ Painting Hot Tubs • Plumbing/ e Room Electrical Additions •Foundations Repaired •Tree & Trash Removal •Insulation •Water Proofing •Concrete • Fully Insured • References Available No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 OR Emergency Digital Pager 891-4053 Member of Greater Montrose Business Guild Spring/summer special rates: Non-member daily renta1-s2.so Member dally rental-$2.00 Childrens & Adult selectlons-$4.00 Video players-s10.oo + 1 free movie New releases now In stock: "Year of the Dragon," "Better Off Dead" Upcoming Releases: <Available 3/241 "The coonles," <Available 3/251 "Transylvania 6-5000" and "commando," <Available 3/ 261 "The Bride" with sting and "Plenty" with Meryl streep PLUS: • Free popcorn with movie rental • Every Mcmday two-for-one movies • Plenty of free parking along with other unique shops to browse in 3939 Montrose 521-0706 Open Daily 11am-10pm, Sunday 2pm-10pm •Keep your receipts and receive 1 free movie rental after every 5th paid movie rental 12 MONTROSE VOICE MARCH 21 1986 The First Stages in a Long-Term Project Revita lization of Montrose Boulevard Begins By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Take a drive down Montrose Boulevard today and one thing is apparent: change. In recent months two new shopping cen­ters have been built, a sculpture garden has been added, new trees have been planted and several lots have been cleared to build offices. These ••early" steps of change and devel­opment along Montrose are just that-the first stages of a long·term project to revi­talize a boulevard and an area that once had a reputation of elegance. Several homes built along Montrose more than 70 years ago remain as testimony to the street's original grandeur Today, the ever-changing Montrose Boulevard is shedding the lesi:; desirable reputation it once had, while taking on a stylish look that helped it become Hou•· ton's first restricted subdivision in the early 1900s. Much of this change has been brought about by the Montrose Project, a non-profit group of individuals "who love the area and want to see it reach its poten­tial." Operating under the wing of the South Main Center Association, a group of indi­viduals with similar goals who focus their efforts on south Main Street, the Montrose Project has moved from the initial "think­ing stages" about two and a half years ago, to receiving its state charter earlier this year. Like group chairman Alexandra Mar­shall, the people behind the project believe Montrose Boulevard stands as an impor­tant link between downtown and the Montrose area. They envision the Mont­rose Project as a way "to lengthen the green spaces along Montrose and beautify the connection with downtown (while) linking it with the cultural arts institu­tions," such as the Children's Museum at the north end of Montrose to the Museum of Fine Arts where the boulevard inter­sects Main Street. Between these museums lie numerous art gaHeries, which, over the years, have gradually helped Montrose become an important area for the arts. It is this arts orientation that must be emphasized to further develop Montrose into a full fledged arts district, Marshall says. To further this effort, the Project plans to use special district ordinancing to create the arts district in a more formalized manner Unlike Montrose area civic organiza­tions, such as the Nearlown Business Gay Pride Week Committee to Meet on Sunday Thf.. Hvuswn Gay Pride Week Committtt will hold its "econd public meeting of the year at5:00 p.m. Sunday, March 23, at the Dignity Centt-r,3217 Fannin. At that ume eloctfons will Ix- held to fill two vacant board seats. Other items on the agenda indude approving the art work for this ypar'l'( logo and further rlarification of this year's achPdule Tht commit('('" has issued a notice to bid on silk scret•ned speciality ittms (t·shirt~. buttons. painttrs' caps) to all interested businesses qualified to bid. Interested pt'r sons should contact. HGP\\ , P.O Hox ti6hH4, zip 77266, for spedfications on the Joh order The fir.-ot public parade meeting will he April 2H after the regular meeting. Rruct Felger, parade chair, says that out-of town parade units will not be chargPd an entry fee thib year The model by Umuerslty of Houston students of the proposed new look for Montrose Blvd. Alliance or the Avondale Association, Marshall says the Montrose Project is not as much concerned with neighborhood improvement as with creating an asset the entire city can enjoy. The Project does seek input from these and other civic groups as well as area merchants and property developers when planning a project along the street, however. The Project has already been responsi· hie for planting some 22 live oak trees along MontroHe as an ongoing effort to "green up" the streel Other options for tree planting have been considered, including clustering palm trees. As development along the street grows and more people are attracted to the area both to live and shop, the availability of adequate parking will become more impor­tant. A project currently being worked on with Councilman GeorgeGreanias, aimed at increasing parking and utilizing avail· able space, is to develop parking under the Southwest Freeway overpass at Montrose mnntrose VOICE The Nevvspa.per of Montrose is novv available a. t all 9 Mon trose-a.rea. STOP"fV ~fr"'~~ Construction on the project, which will likely begin later this year, wil1 probably be funded through a joint effort between the city and nearby businesses which need additional parking. However, if the esplanade is rebuilt from Mecom Fountain to Westheimer, as some people have suggested, it would eliminate parking along Montrose and create a greater demand for off-street parking. This stretch of the esplanade was removed in 1972 in the interest of less congested traffic. It remains, however, north ofWes­theimer. Other physical changes that will be incorporated into the boulevard to help make it more "pedestrian friendly," as Marshall says, include installing cross­walk lights at intersections where ~es­trians feel they ari" needed, and addmg kiosks, street furniture and decorative street lighling, Numerous other changes that could possibly be incorporated into the boulevard's new look come from a 12- foot-long model created by architecture students at lhe University of Houston In addition to their plan for an 80-story metal tower to be constructed at the south end of the Hermann Park reflection pool. the students propose numerous small, green plazas along Montrose and a street· front market to be built in front of the Kroger grocery store. Such a marketing device would not only capture the atten· tion of passersby, but create additional sidewalk activity for the area. "We are promoting retail development as well as the arts district because they are all a part of the same fabric," Marshall says. "We are also encouraging the inner­city development of different types of housing. . . . To have all of these­shopping, living and museums-within a three block area is wonderful." While she admits the Houston economy is not the brightest it has ever been, Mar­shall optimistically looks at this period of the city's history as one of opportunity. "The economy can't not affect us all , It does. But there are opportunities in every situation and this is one to evaluate where we are. It is a time to think about what we are doing and what we are planning." With the real estate market pendulum swung to the buyer's advantage, property owners are more inclined to keep their holdings and make improvements on these, Marshall says. But she adds that the economic picture for Montrose is more favorable than other parts of the city and more alluring for investors and retailers. "Prople have choices about where and how they want lo live," Marshall says She point.ti out that living in Montrose, near the city's "cultural amenities," is "an advantage we'll have for some time com­ing" $2.49 C([J~ Early Bird Breakfast Special 2om to 10om 2 Eggs ony style Bocon or Sausoge Hash Browns or Grits T oost or Biscuits Coffee or Tea 1102 Westhelmer 522-3332 MARCH 21 . 1986 1 MONTROSE VOICE 13 Houston's Oldest Black-Tie Event Diana A wards Gala Set for Saturday . . , . '~- Certified By Conn ie Woods Montrose Vmce Staff Reporter The 34th Annual Diana Awards Gala will be held this Saturday night, March 22, at the Tower Theater on Westheimer. The annual black-tie affair is held to raise money for various city organizations and to provide scholarships for students of the performing arts. Amateur performers will be featured in show business production numbers. Alice B. Tokalas and Angela Lynnesbury will ~the featured masters of ceremonies for the event. According to the publicist for the gala, which is a parody of HoHywood's Academy Awards show, the Diana Foun­dation event is the oldest black-tie gala in Houston. The invitation·only event started in twmeone's backyard years ago but has grown into one of the biggest and most exciting events in Houston. Members of the community will receive such recognition as Best Makeup, Best Costuming and other such awards. "Jtiea type of roast recognizing members of the community. We use the names of current movies up for Academy Awards to recog· nize those who have misbehaved in pub­lic," the publicist said with a chuckle. " It is one of the most fun evenings in the community as those receiving the awards have to walk on stage to receive the award and be seen by everyone there," he added. The Diena spokesperson, like many of the other Diana mt>mbers, asked that his name not be used in thi's article. Recognizing people who have been a part of the community with a humorous roast is not the only award presented by the Diana Foundation. In the recent past the Foundation has • also recognized outstanding people in the city who have contributed to thecommun· ity. "We have started giving awards to those people who have tried to help the commun­ity. No one knows until the night of the gala who will receive that prestigious award," the spokesperson said. Last year the award was presented to Houston City Mayor Kathy Whitmire for her support of the referendum held in Jan­uary 1985. Barbara Goldberg of the may­or's office accepted the award for Whitmire. Some 750 people are expected to attend the gathering. "It's a great event for all of us," the spokesperson said. "There is just such a sense of oomradery among the par­ticipants and the guests." Plane for the gala begin months before. The actual work begins in late December or early January. Many people donate their time and talent to the planning as well as the show business production numbers which entertain during the even­ing. According to the spokesperson, it is not a gay-only participation in the event. Stu­dents from the ballet company and other performing arts groups contribute their time. Proceeds from the evening go to a numbf'r of Houston area organizations, plus college scholarships are offered to Etelected graduates of the Houston School for the Performing and Visual Arts. "These four-year scholarships are pres­ented to students selected by the school's faculty," he said. "Any student in the per· fonning or visual arts is eligible whether Gardner Blue Haven is Now: Gardner Spas Ir Pool Service 5816 Southwest Freeway - Same Owner. Same Locat ion for 25 Years­It is the Time of Year to Start Thinking About Refurbishing Your Pool R6'R6'436'6'R6'R We Do: •Season Start-Ups • Drain & Cleans • Replaster • Retile • New Equipment Installations •Equipment Repairs • Regular Maintenance RRR6'RRRR6'6' We Sell Equipment, Parts, Spas, Chemicals & Accessories Our Pre-Season Sale Is Now In Progress Gardner Spas Ir Pool Setvice Call Today-977-2112 the student may be a singer, dancer, jour­nalist, or whomever." In addition, the Diana Foundation con­tributes to other organizations including the KS. AIDS Foundation, the Gay/ Les­bian Switchboard, the McAdory House and the Houston Ballet Foundation. "The Houston Ballet Foundation has really helped us through the years loaning us lights and other equipment for the awards night," he explained. "We were the first major sponsors for the KS IAIDS Foundation when it was in its infancy. We were actually surprised that a major portion of the KS ! AIDS funds came from us. It was at the beginning when most people didn't really know what was going on with AIDS and the research that had begun," the spokesperson said The Diana Foundation even paid the rent for the McAdory House through 1985. Cost of the tickets for the gala event is $40 per person. In addition, the foundation holds a raffle in conjunction with the awards night to raise more money. First prize winner of the raffle will receive a trip to Australia and the Fiji Islands. For people who cannot get tickets for the Saturday event, the foundation offers tickets to the dress rehersal held tonight, Friday, at 8:00 p.m. at the Tower Theater No awards will be presented tonight. but people can pay $10 to see the production numbers and the entertainment The black-tie formal event will be fol ­lowed by a celebration breakfast to be held at the Shamrock Hilton Hotel on South Main. The breakfast tickets cost $20. "The breakfast will be quite an extravaganza. The Hilton is doing everything they can to make it exciting," he added . ; ·" \ PLUMBING • Fast, Fair, Friendly • Your Neighborhood Plumber • Licensed and Insured Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily Opening Soon Uptown on Lower Westheimer A New Approch to a Cruise Bar for the Entire Community Off Street Parking Live Deejay Nightly and All Times Weekends .. ( 14 MONTROSE VOICE MARCH 21. 1986 First-Ever Gay and Lesbian Chemical Dependence Center Pride Institute Offers Comprehensive Treatment From a Pres:; Releai:;e In 1971, political activist Elaine Noble and mental health counselor Ellen Ratner banded together to organize Boston's first Gay Pride March. Now, 15 years later, they've joined forces again for another landmark event-the founding of Pride Institute. the first residential chemical dependency treatment program specifi cally tailored to the needs of the gay and le8bian CXlmmunity. Pride Institute, a 36-bed residential pro­gram located in Minneapolis. Minn., opened itJs doors in March of this year. Incorporating Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous and other self.help gTOups mto a comprehensive clinical treatment program, it offers patients a safe environment in which to confront their chemical dependency and the unique stret;ises they face as gay men and women living in a society in which the majority is heterosexual. Pride Institute is sponsored by the Addiction Recovery Corporation, which operates seven chemical dependency treatmentcentert; around the country. The Institute expects to draw clients from all pal1.8 of the U$. The incidence of chemcical dependence is greater among gays than in society as a whole. Current estimate; indicate that 30 percent of the gay community may have an alcohol or drug problem, compared to 10 to 13 percent of the general population However. in study after study, only one to two percent of those in treatment pro- Elaine Noble (left), president of Pride Institute, has joined with Ellen Ratner, vice president. to open the first gay and lesbian chemical dependence center grams have been identified as gay. "Either gays don't enter treatment pro· grams commensurate with the rate of chemical dependence in ·the community, or thot;e in treatment are afraid to openly express their sexuality," explains Noble, president of Pride Institute. "Actually, both are probably true. We hope to attract both groups-those who may be open about their lifestyle but would refuse to go to a non-gay treatment facility for fear of discrimination, as well as those who are under stress largely because they have such a difficult. time expressing their sexuality." I~ choosing a location for the facility , Ratner and Noble sought a community sensitive to gay issues but relatively Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz Shyness is Nothing to Feel Shy About By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. Newa America Synd,cate Spec,al to the Montrose Voice If you've ever felt diminished in the pres· enceof others. you're not alone. All ofus­yes, even the most aggressive of us-from time to time, experience situations which make us feel inadequate. It's estimated that about 80 million Americans can be called shy; that's about 40 percent. This figure jumps to 60 percent. in the Orient. No matter where they live, shy persons have certain behavior in common. They: • Are more prone to being victims of con· fidence games. • Do not receive job promotions as often as non-shy persons do. • Are often depressed, anxious and lonely • Are usually self-critical. • Do not make good leaders or salesper sons If you"ve ever felt that. down deep, you are a dyed-in-the-wool shy soul, take the quiz ahead . Answer true or false to the items, then read on. 1. I feel uneasy even in famiharst'ttings 2. I usually find it hard to acceptcompli · mentR 3. I'm not relaxed when it comes to socializing with a stranger of the opposite sex (or of the !-lame sex, if gay). 4. I try to avoid situations which might compel me to be very sociable. 5. Being introduced to someone makes me feel nervous. 6. I usually try to avoid speaking with persons unless I know them. 7. When with others, I tend to listen much more than I talk A. It would make me ·nervous" to speak with a very attractive person o Explanation Shyness is nothing to feel shy about. It has bttn called the universal malady Research from Stanford University in California finds that shyness is a state of mind, a reaction pattern, which is induced largely by the society in which we ere raised. _Some are traditionally reserved and reticent (Japan and India) while oth· eri; are bold and assertive (Red China and Israel). Children of shyness-generating socie· ties often_ are not encouraged to express their feelings and opinions openly. They are rewarded for inhibiting their assertive feelings especially toward authority fig ures, such as parents, teachers and bosses. o Score Our quiz items are similar to those used on social avoidance and shyness tests. The more true answers you gave, the shyer you tend to be. Consider that a scoreofthrttor )efqi is average Shyness is nothing to feel shy about. It has been called the universal malady. Research from Stanford University in California finds that shyness is a state of mind, a reaction pattern, which is induced largely by the society in which we are raised. Some are traditionally reserved and reticent (Japan and India) while others are bold and assertive (Red China and Israel). o Measuring Shyness in Inches: Our feelings about someone determine how physically close we'll get to them. That is. if we love someone, chances are wt> will move close as we interact with them But if we feel shy or fearful, we'll tend to creatt> more distance with them. Such was the topic of study for Profes­sors B. Carducci of the University of Jndi ana and A Webber of California State University. Their task was to see if shy persons, compared with those who were not shy, tend to keep a wider "comfort zone" betwt"en them and strangers. ~8 y~u might guess, the shy do keep their distance! They prefer a distance t"ight incheR farther away (33 1~ inches on the av~ragt") than di.d the Jess shy who moved m to about 2.5 mches. The differen· ct>H inC'reased to 12 inches when the shy pe~ons mt"t someone of the opposite flex tTh1s was a survey of as~rnmed heteroi-exu als.) removed from the high-stimulus bar·and­drug nightlife of such gay meccas as New York and San Francisco. After scouting variouR sites, they settled on Minneapolis because of the city's tradition as a leader in chemical dept"ndence programs, its low· key yet self·effirming gay and lesbian community, and a genuinely supportive municipal government. The treatment program at Pride Insti· tute is developed to meet the needs of each patient. The initial phase is an intensive assessment and evaluation of the person's sexual , chemical dependence, and medical history. The clinical staff then designs an individualized treatment program incor pornting private and group therapy ses· sioni;, meetings patterned on the 12-step program of Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous, education, films and lectures, a nutritionally-correct diet, instruction on relaxation and stress reduc· tion strategies, and physical and recrea­tional activities. Records at Pride Institute are strictly confidential. Certain incoming lines reserved for families and employers are answered without revealing the facility's gay orientation. Insurance companies receive bills under the name of the center's corporate sponsor Another unique aspect of the Pride pro­gram is its emphasis on comprehensive aftercare. Upon discharge, patients are referred to both a mental health profes· sional and a physician in their community who is a<'quainted with Pride Institute and has experience dealing with the par ticular problems confronting chemically dependent gays and lesbians. Pride Institute may be reached by cal· ling, toll free, \.800·54-PRIDE. r----------, I I I I I I I I I I I MEXICAN RESTAURANT Beer, Tacos, Tamales, Menudo, Enchiladas Breakfast Speclal $1.99 4am-10am Everyday 4701 N. Main Between 14th & Julian In the Heights 869-1706 2 for 1 Taco Dinners Not good with any other offer Expires 3131.'86 A TASTE OF MEXICO 24 HOURS DAILY CLOSED TUESDAY 10PM L -!~'::N_:"~~~A2'._ 1~':_ _J w u 6 > w en 0 a: 1- z 0 ::; c;; I u a: <( ::; 1732 Westhelmer Applications available at Chutes Deadline for Registration, Fri., March 21 CHUTES Mr . -'N' -/Jl /)m o~I '' Butch Contest Sunday, March 23, 7pm MC Mr. Ron Sioux 52~2213 Beef Brisket with All the Trimmings $2.00 Registration Fees and Proceeds from Food to Benefit The Montrose Clinic PRIZE:S ::::>ONATED BY • Barn •Brazos River Bottom • Chafing Dish • Ctiutes •Cousins • Eagle Leather • EJ's •Hooters • Kindred Spirits • Leather by Boots •Mary's• Tom's Pretty Fish •Touch of Leather• Venture N • Westheimer Cafe• Wonderful World of Pets in Humble --------- Thank You Montrose Businesses !!!!!!! - ---- ---------- -- -Coming March 30th 6pm- EASTER BASKET PARADE AND EASTER EGG HUNT E V E R Y THURSDAY SUNDAY 7pm til 3pm til 25¢ DRAFT Home of Eagle Leathers "For the Man that Knows What He Wants" Thursdays STEAK NIGHT $4.00 "All the Trimmings" Music Programmed by DJ Mr. Mike Scott 16 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 2l 1986 The Far Side by Gary Larson Oh,a hec/\ler,huh 7 .. S:r; d;d YOLI walk. here ton;_ght or bY-achiate ::> When snakes try to chew gum and c rawl at the same time Canine social blunders i ~ ~~ Clowns or the animal world "Hors d'oeuvre?" forest violence Fortunes Cancer Glows in the Spring Sunshine By Mark Or ion For Friday. March 21. through Thursday, March 27. 1986 ARIES You want to impress someone you met recently Your natural wit and charm will go a lot tarther than any mate­rialistic gesture. Honesty and sincerity will be appreciated TAURUS-You handle a crisis at work with skill and savvy, Congratulations Showing superiors how you handle pres­sure gives you new confidence. Keep up the good work GEMINI-A change on the domestic front requires a change in your normal routine. Be flexible to the new regimen The change will improve health as well as finances CANCER ·Spring IS finally here and you're ready. You're as bright and cheer­ful as the budding flowers Your warmth and glow match the spring sunshine. Get ready for a blossoming new relationship LEO-You are contemplating a major change. Whether it be professional or personal, don't allow your emotions to rule your mind. You usually employ good Judgement and that quality is needed now more than ever VIRGO Your busy social schedule has you exhausted_ You can't be two pla­ces at once. A little qwet relaxation and solitude are needed about now. Time spent alone will help you get things back in order LIBRA - Although you strive to do the best at everything, don't be too hard on yourself. Sometimes your standards are almost 1mposs1ble to reach Try to realize you are human and no one expects per­fection. SCORPIO A family matter has you a little concerned Pay attention to little hints After clearing up this matter, rela­tionships are stronger than ever SAGITTARIUS-Although you seldom gamble. you·re being tempted by a risky venture. Since 1t concerns an affair of the heart, your judgement may be clouded Take the chance. A romantic fling will do you good CAPRICORN Because of certain work obligations. you've been out of touch with friends_ This weekend will be a great time to pick up the phone and give them a ring Chatting with buddies helps you recall 1ust how special they are. AQUARIUS -Accept an 1nv1tat1on to an outdoor activity The exercise and sunshine are needed after a long Winter. It will also improve a minor health prob­lem PISCES -Stop worrying so much. Your concern for others has you all worked up Things will be okay Relax an.~J!~~P!ciN~,?~s;J:,~or a change To place an AD in the Montrose Voice . just phone us ! 529-8<190 l~dm 5: )0pm ~t::el dalp Ads can be charged over the phone to a ma1or credit card OR we can bill yo1J later A.l.D.S. NEW TREATMENTS • Doctor Supervised •Privacy Respected IMMUNO-THERAPY CLINIC 704 MEDICAL TOWERS Houston, TX 77030 (713) 795-0098 Beginning fipr .1 .J. the l·lediclne Lhest debuts ir the f'lor-t,...oc.e Vr lc;e. H serui e of the Mi.Jr tr =e Clin.t.c. the Medic.lne Chest l·•il.i. ar·st.Jer reader • que ti ,.. abut heal th. he._l t-h C..1re and mairtePance. Hncir1~rnr u que,· tion'" c~r1 !Je moiled ti:J: The Medicine Chest c o The Mc,nt r-o e Voice -108 A• ·ondale HClU' t.Jr. Te a ,,(1(18 MARCH 21 1986/ MONTROSE VOIC~ 17 K.J.'s @ PREVIOUSL~~£~ARE BEITER 11830 AIRLINE 2 blocks South of Aldine-Bender 445-5849 HOURS: NOON-2AM HAPPY HOUR DAILY 12-7pm, Double Drinks, 75¢ Beer SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY Shrimp Late Night Domino's Pizza Boil Happy Hour Party Spm $3 per 10-2 plate All You WEDNESDAY THURSDAY Can Eat Extended Happy Pool Tournament Volleyball Hour $4.00 Entry Game Noon 'Ill Midnight Winner Takes All at 4pm Dynasty Party FRIDAY SATURDAY 1~ NO COVER! ./~ PARTY!! PARTY!! PARTY!! HELP WANTED-ALL POSITIONS NEEDED (ask for Kim) Word Search w E s G 0 0 D F 0 0 D w s E w -+- E E D & B J 0 c K H J E L L y s B s 0 u p w & A E L & u L --+----J T 0 p T 0 A s T E M L c B N L ~ s y E A H A M s T B c 0 F c F A s c D J E G G s u y M D H A F p I E B & I H I R & E A E E K L A E F F u M u G & s c R T A 0 L F w E E I E E c A B B E E v s F s K F B R R v B K A c R B B 0 0 F 0 0 s R c H I L I ~ B I s c u I T s & G R A v y H w s p M B s p E R s A K F I B F I F i u . M t ~ N I K A B c A K E E s ~ ~ . 1. Westtlelmer Cafe 11 Jelly 2. Good Food 12. Specials 3. Hamburger 13. Muffin 4.Soup 14 Coke 5. Lunch 15. Iced Tea 6. Breakfast 16. Ham 7. Chili 17 Pie 8. Eggs 18. Brscuits & Gravy 9. Coffee 19. Cake 10. Toast 20. Welcome 1525 Weslhe1mer 528-4350 18 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 21. 1986 Montrose Live The Weather Girl Report By Pete Diamond Montrolie Voice Staff Reporter An unusual weather front will be moving through Houston this coming Tuesday and Wednesday. Expect sunny skies and hot temperatures, but remember your rain· coat because there's a good chance it will be .. raining men." On Tue!;day March 25, the Weather Girls wlll thunder into town for a two night performance at Rockefeller's, with their latest Columbia album, Big Girls Gon't Cry. The Popi R&B duo of Martha Wash and Izora Armstead. formerly known as Two Tons of Fun, gained international recogni· t1on in 191'\2 with their release "It's Rain ing Men." The song, rejected by both Diana RoHs and Donna Summer. hit nu.:ilwr one on Blllboard magazine's dance chart Christmas day of that year. The "Girls" have been riding the wave of success created by the song ever since and recently finished touring with come­dienf' .Joan Rivers. But now they're out on their own. a long way from their gospel root1' and the days of the formal music training they received while growing up in San Francisco. The arhievements and success of the Weather Girls seems to come from an inner ~trength the two women have. For Martha, who Rays she's basically a quiet person. maintaining a positive attitude is important. While often que:-;tioned about their weight (which they won't reveaH, Martha believes "largene,;s is an advan· ta~e" for the two women and a basic human condition the world has failed to recognize 'You have got to have a good feeling shout younelf and it will show around you,' Izora said in an interview last year in Spin magazine. ··Always be yourself. And if you want to ~urvive,you have to get better You never want to fall into the same traps. I don't want myself on a dc,wner the whole time and I try not to be that way." Martha, whoge first public performance was .. m church as a little girl ... went on to sing as a soloist with her high school choir in Europe, performing light arias and madrigals. \\'hile singing with Izora in the - gospel group News of the World, Martha ~aid their professional singing careers began to take hold. ·I went to a band rehearsal one day and I came to find out it was for Sylvester, who was putting a new band together," Mar· tha recalh; Following her audition, which got her a job as a backup singer forSylveR· tN, •·He wanted to know if I knew of anyone tlRe that was as large as I was and rould sing as well." It just so happened that Izora fit the bill And backing Sylvester proved to he a good experience for both women as well as Syl· ve:-;ttr. As Two Tons of Fun, they made important c.ontribuhons to Sylvester's firs.t cros~over hits on the Black and Pop tharts and relea~~ two albums of their own. lu·mg Proof and Backatcha. "Working with Sylvester was very good, .. Martha ~ays ··He's crazy. but we really had a lot of fun. You never knew what to expect next from him. I enjoyed it vf'ry much." The next big break for the backup duo came when they were signed to the Enter· tainment Music Company and approached with the idea of singing "lt'1o1 Raining Men." When Martha and Izora went to record the song, Martha says a reference to "weather girls" in the first line of lhf' song was applied to them and the name ~tuck With their new name and a group of "'diehard fans that kept up with what we were doing and stayed with us through the name change," the Weather Girls ~tormed the charts with enormous suc· cess. They're returning in 1986 with Big Girls Don't Cry, an album Martha says is made up of new songs as well as songs from the sixties, updated with "eighties type music." Some of the cuts featured on the album include Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Down on the Comer," the Four Seasons' "Big Girls Don't Cry" and Evie Sands' "You Can Do It." "We hope everybody likes it," Martha says. "My goal is to do the best I can with a song and hope that people accept it the way I give it. l hope that we can please audienres with the songs we're singing, the music, the whole thing." Despite their success and a touring sche­dule which keep~ them on the road about half the year. both women are thankful for what they have achieved. As Martha says, "Everything that's happened to us so far has been a b)e,;sing. We always give thanks to God for them. But however far we go in this business, neither one of us will forget who we are, where we came from or the people who helped us get there." Rockefeller's is located at 3620 Washington GPC Will Host Easter Pet Show & Bonnet Parade From a Prt>S!f RPlease It's almoHt Easter. So it's time to bathe that beastly dog and brush the cat so the costume will fit just right. Otherwise, you two may not be ready for the First Annual Greater Montrose Pet-O·Rama and Easter Bonnet Parade Th• show will be 2:00-4:00 p.m. Easter Sunday, March 30, at Cherryhurst Park. 1700 M1RRouri. It only costs $2 to enter each pet and $1 to watch. TherP will be prizes and ribbons. with each entrant receiving a certificate. The judges. a divt.-rse group themselves, will have fun dec:iding the winnPrs in such categorit'S as: The Alexis Carrington Colby DeXter Award, Best Costume, Best Owner and Pet Looka·Like, Most Regal, Best Coiffured. Best Bejeweled, Best Mutt, Mo,;t Ferocious. Prettiest, Wimpiest, Ugli· est, Prissiest. Butchesl, Best Candidate for a Fur Coat. etc. The Pet·O·Rama is sponsored by the Houston Gay Political Caucus in the spirit of fun Rcfre~hmf'nts will be available. All pets are invited hut they must he on a lt.-ash and have proof of vaccination. AmNTION NIGHTCWB ENTERTAINERS Singers, Piano Acts, Impersonators Please make sure the Montrose Vrnce has a good quality (preferably 1n black and white) publicity photo of you rn our files for use when our adv&· llsers are engaging your services. It woulan·t even hurt for us to have sev&­ra1 phol1 of your mi 1ng face Thank YOU The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OI MONTRO' 408 AVONDALE 529-8490 Rockefeller's is proud to present In Concert The Weather Girls with their 11 -piece band just off the road with Joan Rivers 2 Nights, 2 Shows March 25-26 8:00/10:30 For Ticket ReseNations 861 -9365 ~e111ts \\.~CLUB 'f:)} 3620 WASHINGTON• HOUSTON, TEXAS•(713) 861-9365 MARCH 21, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 19 Risky Business Undergoes Changes 'Isn't It Romantic' Is a Comfortable Production Candace Compton, as Janie Blumburg, and Harry Breu·er, as Simon Blumburg m Stagea' "Isn't It Romantic" By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voiu Theater Critic Most of the other critics weren't very kind to 8tag('s' Isn't It Romantic. By the time I got it in mid-run last Thursday, it was a v(•ry enjoyahl<' show. It's a little unrv('n. Playwright Wendy Wasscrstein's characters often have quitr a few things they wish to say without being answered. So they save them up for their rxit and blurt them all out, turn on lht•ir hrels and flee. Howard P. French is wot•fully miHcast hut does his best. Donna Whitmore ii:i very good but is shaping the role to hPr~elf rather than vice versa. And that is the ~;um and total of all thf> <'aviling I want to do with this show.The rE>st of thl' show is like a comfortable eaAy ('hair-so warm to settle into. Janie Rlumburg is a teddy bear who might remind you of television's Rhoda Morgenstern or her kid sister. Candare Compton, in this role, has no sharp edges. Th<'y'n• ull pnddrd. That makes her n treat to be with, but people don't understand when they tr('spass over her boundaries. ShC''d like to marry a rich, young doctor. Who wouldn't? Along comes anothl'r tC'ddy bt>ar who is a rich, young doctor and who wants to marry her. But can henctept ht>r need for S(•lf.reRp('Ct in the form of a job BH a freelance writer for Sesame Stre<'t? Frt•t'man Williams really connects with thiH rolt>. Janit''s lo1:1t her Jewish acrent. So has her moth(•r. Tasha (Jean Proctor) studies "dance." Her daughtl'r chides her about her clothing. Jean, as usual, is very real, hut she still puRhe8 her flamboyance a lit tie paAttheorganic at times in herromedy. 8till, her Jove for her daughter shines through her <•vrry impertinence. Harry BrC'wer, one of the front runners in my mind for best actor of the year, does not disappoint as the father. He fades into the woodwork because the character would, but you never lose sight of him Hr'd hr an island of Hanity in this wacky world, t'xct:·pt that he brings a cab driver who can hardly speak English home to propo"'e to hiA daughter. (Mark Mitchell is very funny in thiR ('ameo role.) Tanva LunRtroth, as another mother-a brittle. career cactus blooming late in life, is simply phenomenal. Yes, this is a late, but very welcome, entry in the Year of the Strong Women Defining Their Roles which seemed to peak last December. Only two weeks left on this baby, so grab it fast o A Lifeline A Lifelinl!(Riaky Business) is a very excit· ing Hhow, It is dl'lightfuL It iH their new model. It is purpo!'efully not as off.tht>--wall as their past shows. ltis not as tightly packed, either. They seem to do fewer songs than they used to. I tis more deliberate, a little less spontaneous. Thet;e changes are partly due to market· ing strategy. They want to be more middle­of. thf"-road so as to appeal to a larger audience. It's also due to a key change in person nel. There was an in-joke when Randy Jobe W<'nl over to the musical director sit­ting h<'hind the piano and demanded to know where art was. He meant art as in artistic, but, punningly, he was also point­ing out that Art Yelton isn't there any more. He's at thr Alley. Michael Jones is the R.B. musical director now and the chungei; suit his f)('ri:;onality With Art gone, Randy is gaining even more of an upper hand, too. His kind of humor deals in exce"ses. Because of that. he is particularly vulnerable to a weak or over·trusting dir(>ctors marring his final eff('('t by indulging him too much. Andrea Modisrtte needs to stand up more to him for both of their sakes. In his Nell Carter routine, he left out the hyphen she always puts into Honey·su<'kle Rose. Oh, well. Marsha Carlton can play an audience like nobody's business. She is a fountain of pun' delight. In this show, she also does a serious song with such conviction that ht>r tt>ars take her mascara down onto the neck. It was very dang good, but I i:.;till pr('fpr the bubbling, vivacious side of her personality. whic·h she gives full play in th<' St'C'ond act. Gary Powell is a handsome, very tal <·nted man. He needs to have the moxie to realiz<• that. Right now he spends just a tadge too murh rn<'rgy on being cute. Thank goodness one thing has not changed. They still find absolutely gor· geous men to fill the chorus. Eric Carville has a beautiful voice, too. Carlos Compean plays the trumpet. One change, however, must be changed back. This, traditionally the most upbeat on Houston of all our theaters, has deserted its boosterism. There is even one hateful line which as much as says that it's too bad this show isn't in NYC, but it will do til the character can land one that is. Boo! Wretch! We are not a colony We are Houston. What a wonderful idea! At lO:OOtomorrow morning. the Lighthouse of Houston is sponsoring an Easter egg hunt for blind and vi!rnally impaired children. The eggs bt-ep. There' ll be another ··egg hunt"­actually an orange hunt-at The Oranl(e Show on Easter. Drop by the Orange Show or call 552-2767 to get a maze. Free admis· sion to all childn·n that solve it. , heim , Werner <Klink, Klemperer, Karl (Where's my traveler's checks?) Maulding, William <Beam me up, Scotty!) Shatner and gay playwright Robert Chesley. 23- J.C. Leyendecker (whose drawing of h1s lover, Charles Beach. became the Arrow Collar Man). 26-Tennessee Williams. 27-Jane Chambers "Ever since I had that interview in which I Aaid I was bisexual, it seems twice as many people wave at me in the stret>t& ... -Elton John 4born March 25). Enjoy~ o Openings The Birds «En.s(•mble 21;-Rollicking­comedy ab<>ut the wt>akne.si-;e.s of men and their institutions Count Ory jJones, 21>-l know I said I'd review thi~ madcap farce about a band of men who dress up like nuns to get at some beautiful women. but it's only going to be on for one weekend: By the way, when the Jean Proctor stars as Sister Mar)· Ignatius in ··s1.'itn Mary Itttwl,u!!< E:..ptamtoi It All for You" opening at Stages' tonight. March 21 Houston playwright Christopher Woods' "ecclesiastical comedy" Will I Go to H<'ll for This? is being given a staged reading March 25at the Playwright's Cen­ter of San Francisco .. .. Terry Helbing, artistic director of the Meridian Gay Theater Company (in NYC), has announced the winners of its 1985 Sixth Annual Jane Chambers Memorial International Gay Playwrighting Con· test. Also, the New York State Council on the Arts and the NYC Dl'parement of Cul· tural Affairs has given that theater $12,000 in grant..s . . . Celebrate! B·days: 21-John Paul Hudson. James Coco. Richard Kiley. 22-Stephen Sond Count finally gets to the Countess, his page (a boy being played by a girl) has beaten him there. In the dark, the two men start making out feverishly with each other instead-by aC'C'ident, of course. HSPV A Spring Jazz Festival (Denny, 21 )-with guest star Billy Harper. saxo­phone. ONO' Sister Mary IJ~natiu~ Exp/amt:; It All for You <Stages, 2U-revival of the hit comedy about ignorance masking as authority Co·sponf'ored by the Montrose \.'ot<'e. One <Channing Hall. First Unitarian, 27>-The Group brings Kent Johnson back as a pen;on with AIDS Benefit for Aid for Al llS. 20 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 21, 1986 Sports Voice The Galleon Sponsors New The Houston Symphony present~ "The Tower Concerts" Tennis Award at the Tower Theater The Galleon, the "home bar" for the Hous­ton Tennis Club, is sponsoring a monthly "Mo8t Valuable Player Award" for Hous­ton Tennis Club members. Each month, the membership will vote on the member who was outstanding in some way during the month. The member does not necessar­ily have to be the best player. The fun award will recognize players for being the cutet;t, the ta1lei;t, the most active in chal· entres, hogt of the betit party, etc. January's meeting ended in a tie vote three times. Someone finally suggested Five Successfully Defend Houtex Challenges A !-!poke~man for the Houtex Tennis Club would like to apologize for not reporting last issue the results of the match between Eddie Cavez and Tiny Tim. Eddie had an E'B1'iier match than his previous contest. He won by a score of6-l, 7-5. The past week was a bad one for those members attempting to move up their respet·tive or next higher challenge ladder Pat Power, as expected, held back thechal· lenge of Eddie Chavez 6-2, 6-4. Tiny Tim, in a very close contest, squeezed by Joe L. 7-5, 7..S. Mr Bill returned to his winning ways and defeated Bill Santaiti 6-4. 6-1 Galx• Herpin had an easy win over Rudy Gare· a 6 ~ f-C Women's Softball League Holds 1st Tourney The Houston Womens Softball League held the Maricin Pantzer Memorial Tour· nament on March 15-16, at Memorial Park Field. Marion Pantzer'R long-time partner Lynn Hornaday. presented the trophies at the awards Cf>remony following the final game. The first place winner was House of Coffee Beans Special Blend; second. Hol lywood Bt-ars; and third. Marion & Lynn's Rebt>Js. - Houston Women's Softball League's regular. eason begins Sunday, April 6, at Heights Lyon f ·eld. on I. :th Street near Sheph.rd French, Others, Expected for Gay Games '86 From a Pre Reif'a. e Pascal Btbollet of France has informed the Gay Game; office in San Francisco that his group has translated all the entry forms into French and his organizing committe-e is set>king support from the French Minister for Culture and expects to receive a favorable reaction Bll>0llet indicated that the group has developed their own po!:iter for the Gay Game:-> and expects to bring at least 100 participants and 100 spectators to the fes tival of evenLq thii; August. The French group is now attempting to interei;t the Swiss in taking a more signifi­cant role. Thii:; and other contacts with European gToups indicate a growing excitement over Gay Game1:1 JI, and, accurding to organizers, major interns· tionaE participation is expected. Everyone is eligible to participate in Ga)' Games II, which is scheduled for August 9·17 in San Francisco. Eighteen mdividual and team sp(>rt.i; will be fea· lured at all levels of ability for both men and women. !'ltumerous cultural programs will also ht> offered. simply drawing a name from a hat. Long­time tennis supporter Rich Corder was selected for the honor. On Sunday, March 16, members again met at the Galleon for a short business meeting before the vote. Newcomer Randy Lunsford was the unanimous pick on the first ballot. Monthly MVPs will be engraved on the 1986 trophy to be kept in the Galleon trophy case. The Houston Tennis Club thanks Jay for sponsoring the award In an attempt to stay ahead of the hot weather. HTC has changed their Sunday playing times to 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m Latt>r this summer. the club will likely move back to the summer houri; of 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon Sunday, March 23, 7:30pm Charles Wuorinen, Conducting Pre-C'..oncert Performance 7: 15pm featuring the Harvard Glee Club -Program- Bet·tho\tn Sprmg Sonata \Vuoruwn Ram/Jou.la Squared \\'uormen Crand Bamboula Pured I J'iprx·1t Come Fe Smn of Art ~mgk TICk<t; "12 (>!Udt-111\ with ID $5) Call 227-ARTS Houston Symphony Orchestra Sergiu Comissiona, Music Director NOW OPEN •• . ...... -- HENRY'S 1 PHOTO ---------··· .. On Beautiful Lower Westheimer We'll Process Your Film* in 1 Hour OUR PROMISE ... * We'll give you the best quality possible * Chemicals always fresh * Equipment always adjusted to YOUR film characteristics * Friendly, knowledgable personnel * Confidential processing for sensitive subjects *Fair prices (even lower if you choose 1-day service) Bill "BEAR" Ross manager FILM SPECIAL OF THE WEEK FRESH AGFACOLOR PROFESSIONAL XRS 100 36 exposure $3.49 a roll STOCK lJPI 428112 WESTHEIMER ON WHITNEY 520-0206 Henry McClurg owner 'All C-41 type film. which is most of the color 35mm and disc film muse today. GPC Returns to Holiday Inn for Meetings By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter The Houston Gay Political Caucus held its r('gular meeting Wednesday, March 19, at its new meeting location, the Holiday Inn nn South Main at Blogett. "Evrryone was simply delighted to be back Ht the Holiday [nn where we used to rn('('t before going to the Dignity Center," said Annise Parker, GPC president. "We nrP nlM exC'ited about our new offi· ces at 900 Lov(•tt. It will take us some time to settle in, but hopefully everything will be organizt'CI by this weekend," sht>added. The GPC's Republican Committee announct"CI it~ candidates for endors~ mt'nb;. The committee had presented name!-1 at the March 5 meeting but had rt"questt>d that some of those candidates not he inrlud<'d on the election punch card. Howev('r, the caucus voted Wednesday to not change its policy so as to include all GP(' endorsements on the cards. Four Republican candidates were endorsed by the committN.•. Parker urged all members of the caucus to atlt>nd the Gay Pride Week Committee m(>('ting, Sunday, March 23, at the Dignity renter. TwoGPC members are running for Sl•ats on the Gay Pride Week committee board. The members are Ray Hill and Dale Beverly, both GPC board members and active in the caucus activities. Parker also urged the members to attend the fundraiser at Risky Business, Sunday, March 23, at 7:30 p.m. "We would really like to have o good attendance at this fun· draiser. It should be fun and we want eve­ryone to attend," she added. Police Investigate Deaths of Couple Found in Garage A Montrose-area couple was found Mon· day aft<'rnoon in their garage at 4400 Yoa kum. Apparently they died from carbon monoxide poiRoning. Acrording to thl' Houflton Police Depart· ment homicide division, an investigation is continuing to establish if the deaths were a double suicide or a murder f suicide A homicide officer said the division would pursue the <·asl• as "it could go either way." The hod1eH of Pntrirk B. Feagin, 43, nnd his wife, Ann Feagin, age not immediately released, were discovered Monday at 4:45 p.m. in the garage where their twin Lin· coin Continentals were parked. According to homicide, the cars had been running for a long time. The couple had two children, ages 3 and 5, who were at school at the time of the deaths. The mother had taken the children to Mhool Monday morning and did not return for them in the afternoon. One of thechildr<'m~· grandmother~wascalled by tht• BC'hool to pick them up. When Rhe took the children home R<'C'ording to the police department, 8he found the man leaning against the kit· ch1:>n door and the woman lying on tht• gnraJ,W floor Th(• coupll' was takl.'n to the Harris County morgue whl're autopsies were to be pt•rformC'd. ThC' ml•dical examiners offiC'C' imid W(•dnl.'sdny that it had not relC'asC'd th(' rC'Hu)ts of the autopsies. In Montrose, Nearly Ev£ryone Reads th£ Voit£ Stein & Toklas DETECTIVES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real­life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6.95 in bookstores. or use this coupon to order by mail. Her; is $7.50 for Murd;; is Murd;;. is Murder, by Sa,;uel Stew.;:;d. name----------- address __ ---------- city _ state ip _______ _ Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 Losing out on the Battle of the Bug? Call RECjULT5 Pest Control & Sanitation and Win the War 223-4000 Lorena McLaughlin-owner/operator TXPCL #6155 9150 S. Ma in 666-3464 Swtday, March 23rd, 4pm ALABAMA FOWES featuring Miss Alabama, Tracy, Veronica Lake (singing live) • Special Guest Happy Hour All Day/All Night 8r Beer Bust No Cover/ No DonaUon (A Memorial to Jack Gilbert) Tuesdays-Beer Bust 6pm 'til Closing Wednesdays- Dynasty Night TGIF Fridays 8-lOpm $1 well I $1 long necks Saturday Biggest Country Western Dance Bar Live D.J Ram Rocha MARCH 21, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 21 Sisters Special 12:30am-9am 2 for 1 on food (Second of equal or less value) NOW OPEN 24 HOURS 522-2365 813 Richmond You're never too old to quit blowing smoke. American Heart Association Wt GHT'NG Frn n 1q; A Friendly Neighborhood Bar OPEN TO THE ENTIRE COMMUNITY 2402 Mandell at Fairview 529 2949 1 Free Drink with This coupon tllmlt 1 per ~tom.rJ Live Entertainment Happy Hour S-7pm Hours Spm-:zam L ___ ..!~S:y!....---- 22 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 21. 1986 Cutsinger's Choices Oscar Contenders Running Close Races By Scott Custinger M1.1ntrose \.'oice Film Critlc After several years of easy-to-guess Oficar winners, it's nice to see a year where no ne seems to know who might nab the st~1tJes. Will this be the year of The Color Purple. Out of Afnca. or Pnzzi '.<; Honort Can a gay movie like Kiss of the Spider WJJman actually win an Oscar for William Hurt? HolJywood insider!'i are bes1de them­elves trying to eecond-guet"s the voters. The btg fuss 18 over the snub of Steven Sp1 ! rg fColor Purple). which may (Or may not) put Purple in the lead for Best Picture Spielberg won the Directors Guild 11ward, but the Academy obvioul'.;)y didn't want to honor him. The top actin~ awards are verv clc1se this year. William Hurt will he ~o"e-to­nose with .Jark Kichol!-lonf Prrzzi's Honor) for the coveted Best Actor Geraldine Page (who has been nominated more times than fihe cares to admit) is the old-timer favorite for Trip to &Juntiful, but newcomer Whoop1 Goldberg !Color Purple) has received much more publicity and is in a stronger movie. The supporting nominees are also run· ning a tight race with a lot of good perfor· mances. William Hickey tPrizzi's HonorJ was probably the ht-st. but the competition will narrow down to another old-timer I Don Ameche for Coccoon) and the out­standing Klaus Maria Brandauer in Out of Africa Th' Color Purple ladies. Margaret Avery and Ophrah Winfrey, could well canCf'l each other out for Best Supporting Actn·ss. although Winfrey has a slight edge. However. Angelica Huston ( Prizzi's Honor) seemi-; to have a distinct edge over everyone. and will probably win fora !-ltun· ning performance As always, many wonderful movies like .4Ja~k. Sllverado, and Purple RtJseof Ca1ro will end up with booby prizes like Be:->t Makeup, Best Original Score, and B("St Screenplay !in that order). Other films like Ron. Runau·ay Tra1'n, Brazil. and Agne.If of (iod will get little or nothing. Even the heautiful tt'ltness, Wlth eiJCht nomina· tlons, will probably end up empty-handed Still, the Academy didn't do too bad this ycnr nnd has provtded quite a nicecompt"­lltJOn While 1t is the definite "dark horse, • it's great to see that members hadtheo:1ur­age to nominate Kiss of the Spider Woman for Hest Picture-even if it won't win. At least thf'y had the rourage not to stick in something popular like Back to the Future just to please executive~ and the public The following are some educated guesses about the Oscars Monday night They are not my favorites by any means <I'm not a Color Purple fan), but predic· lions based on industry trends, past per· formanCf':;, and even a little Hollywood gossip. • Best Picture: A tie between Color Pur pie, Prizzi's Honor and Out of Africa Color Purple will win. • Director: ,John Huston f Prizzi's Honor) ii; the clear old·timer favorite here. • Actor: William Hurt fKissoftheSpider Woman/ for his superb gay performance • Actress: Many say Whoopie, but I'm stickinK with Geraldine Page (Trip to Bou ttfull out of sentimentality for her eight nominations • Supporting Actor: Don Ameche could win es an old·timer, but Klaus Maria Rrandaun •Out of Africa) is the logical rhoice • Foreign Language Film: The Of{ictal Story • Original Screenplay! Witness nnd Hrazll are wonderful scripts. but Woody Allen's Purple Rose of Ca1ro has won St>V· eral awards already and "";II get the statue •Screenplay Adaptation: Prizzi 's Honor • Cinemutogrnphy: Ron •Editing'. Out of Africa • Art Director: Ron • Co1'1tume Design: Out of Afnca • Sound: Sih·erado • Sound Effects Editing: Back to the Future • Original Score: Sih·erado • Original Song: Separate Lives • Makeup: Mask • Visual Effects: Cocoon • Documentarif's and Short Subjects: Have not seen any of them. Have you? Klaus Mana Brandauer for Best Supparting Artor in "Out of Afrira" .John Huston (renter) and granddaughter Angelica (nghtJ rould u·in Rest Director and Bl·st Supportinl( Artress, Tl'SPPrtil·t·ly Gf•rald1m· Paf!f' fright) might u·m an ()..;car afln ei11ht 11om111atwns MARCH 21, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 23 '16 Days' Is Absolute Olympic Glory By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic Probably the last thing that many of you want to see is a documentary on the Los Angeles Summer Olympics. Can we take more running, jumping, and diving, and more Carl Lewis and Mary Lou Hett.on? I surprised myself and found the official film record of the 23rd Olympiad to be a spectacular and dazzling experience. My eyes got misty, l got a lump in my throat, and I really was proud of the athletes and their talent. The effect was a 100 times more vibrant and beautiful on the big screen than when I viewed them on televi-o Gung Ho Sometimes a wonderfully inventive story somehow doesn't become a great reality on the big screen. Such is the case with Ron Howard's Gung Ho, a neat idea that never quite gels. The idea of a Japanese firm reopening a Pennsylvania auto fee· tory with obvious culture clashes sounds like a funny movie, but unfortunately the result is a bit hollow. That's not to say that Gung Ho is a bad movie, because it's really cute sometimes. I laughed quite a bit, but the script by Lowell Gong and Babolov Mondel (Spltuh, Spies Like Us) forces the humor .. Writn •producer director Bud Greenspan chats with U.S. champion diver Gn•g Louganis, the first man in 56 years to win both Olympie springboard and platform dit 1ing tttle.r.; at the Games, for a srgment in "16 Days of Glory," the o(firwl film rerord of the 2.1rd Olympwd held at Los Angeles in 1984 sion. 16 Days of Glory is the supreme achieve­ment of fiportN filmmaker Bud Greenspan. ThiM acclaimed director was in Houston last w('ek. and he feels that this film is his h<·Mt effort. He wants to make the audience set· and fN·I the Olympics that the net­works m•ver showed. "The film industry goes for instant grat­ification," said Greenspan, "and sports has twcome just numbers. I takethehuma­niidic approach, and because of my style I won't work for the networks," he said ''I'm much better than they are." More than anything, Greenspan is a docudrama master with several stories to tell. While we do have segments on super­stars like Edwin Moses and Mary Lou Ret· ton, many other lesser-known athletes are given the spotlight. They include people like Dave Moorecroft, who finished last in tht• fiOOO meters but was determined to fin· ish with an agonizing injury. And people like John Moffet-the swimmer who came in fifth with a torn right thigh muscle. The dirt•ctor i!<l quick to point out that many top athlt·tes aren't in this two-and-a­half hour feature film. A five-and-a·hour VC'rsion will hf> on video tape and eventu allv n•l<'nfoi<•d to telE>viRion. The long ver­sic; n ('OntainR th(' more widely·covE>r<><l 10tan1 like Carl Lewis and events like the Marv Decker-Zola Budd incident. on us. You can see the jokes coming a mile away, and you sortofprepareyourselffor a mild rhurkle. The film's biggest asset is Michael Kea­ton (Mr. Mom) as Hunt Stevenson, the plant foreman who goei; to Japan to con· vince Asson Motors to reopen Hadlyville's auto factory. He succeeds but the Japa· nese take over with an iron fist when they open the plant. I really expected more than a "save the town" movie from Ron Howard, who showed such promise with Cocoon and Splash. Instead of using a good theme and delving into the implications it presents, we get a shallow comedy played for laughs. Luckily he stays away from any stereotype, which was probably very wise. Still, this was a unique opportunity to explore the Japanese influence on the U.S. and how Americans react to it. The Japa­nese way of work ts presented, but its strictness and discipline are almost made to look silly. The sloppy American work methods are obviously poor, but they are made to seem acceptable. We never see a compromise, only both sides stubbornly clinging to their ideas. As a top Asson Motors executive, Gedde Watonabe (Sixteen Candles) is a delight. His interactions with Keaton are very enjoyable and provide some of the film's nicest scenes. Keaton overacts a lot, bu the is a funny actor. About halfway he settles down a lot end becomes a lot easier to enjoy. Gung Ho is one of those crowd-pleasing films that will make a lot of money. I was disappointed because I wanted a lot more, yet I still enjoyt'd myself. Hopefully. How· ard will look a little deeper into this story for his next film, and not just scratch the surface for Jaughfi. D 28 Up Director Michael Apted (Coal .Miner's Daughter) has been observing 14 English children age seven (in 1963) to age 28 in 1984. Each seven years he tracked them down, interviewed them, and observed their growth and ideas. The result was a feature for British television that is being shown here theatrically. 28 Up is a novelty film that is often inter· esting, but sometimes boring. It is interest· ing as it observes the physical and mental changes of these prople, but dull when it lets them drone on and on about their dull lives. This is not helped by the hard-to­understand English accents that several of the people have. The film explores children from a var· iety of clasHes and areas of the country asking them quei;tions about everything from marriage to religion. The most apparent change8 come with the girls, who seem to go from liberated women ("I didn't see myself getting married") to G~renspnn uses his film to capture the poiKnnnry and the challenge of the ('vent.8, not just winners and losers. One of the mm1t priC'eless isegments is on Daley Thompson, the British marathon winner. The beauty and the physique of this man art• truly indC'i;rribable, and Greenspan captures him perfectly on film (Left to right) Rodney Kageyama, Michael Keaton and Gedde Watanbe reach a shaky East I West alliance u.·hen a Japanese firm takes over a U.S. auto manufacturing plant in "Gung Ho" 16 Days of Glory is a four star film that 1s a must-M'<'. Greenspan says that he wants to makr "good things for future gen· erations." ThiR outstanding record of the Olympics is truly a piece of cinema that will stand the test of time. Workers are made to exercise, speed up production, and cut beck on leave time. Soon the men and women are revolting, and the resulting culture clash almost closes the plant down. It's up to Stevenson to save the day. housewives with several kids. The men are more straightforward, often ending up in the job that they said wanted at a very early age. I'm sure psychologists will have a field day poring over this visual diary. It's Films interesting to see how people change phys­ically, but much more involving to under­stand why they haveacertainjob.orwhat they think about their culture and lifes­tyle. Most of the people seemed content with themselves at 28, and this was a com­forting thought. 28 Up is a nice character study of these 14 people, but it's probably bettersuitt'd as a series like it was shown in England. As a whole, the film tends to drag on a bit Jong on some people, and then race through others. Quite an oddity, 28 Up will defi· nitely appeal to a small group of interested people. The film will shown from Sunday March 23, through Saturday, March 29, at the River Oaks Theater. I rJ) ~ 0 ... z w a.. 0 0 :E c( rJ) > )( w :E c( rJ) > c( .0.. z w a.. 0 SPA-TO GO Specializing in portable spas Shop and Compare More for Less $$$ 7-A. LOUNGER $199500 5816 SW Ffwy. 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I'm a day lale (or longer) and a dollar short Check your attics and dig m your closels Some one out there has to have one they would hke 10 sell. 952-7650 GWM ~de;rt°5710"~170. b/brown. hand­some. masculine. and desired seeks attractive GWM students 18-30 who are thick. hung, horny for s1a1sfy1ng French actrve1pass1ve. Gr/a. safe sex Send lener, phone number and photo Oon·1 pass on this onet Reply Br1nd Box 282-W c/o Voice DOUBT YOUR LOYER? Ele<:tromc bugs, llstenmg devices Kits, plans Catalog $2 Whisper Electronics. P 0 Box 270204. Houston 77277 GWM SEEKING INTELLIGENT LIFE College student 1n Clear lake area destres to meet someone with a future. I am 21, 6'4" 1751bs. brown/ brown. Look­ing for someone 20-30, possible student to professional For honest relat1onsh1p Sorry no lats. lemmes. or drug heads Send letler. phone number and possible photo Reply Blind box 281-F c/o Voice FREE ACTION VIDEO frlmed by amateur photographer ol you and your lnend and lo"er For mlo. send phone number to Occupant. PO Box 42445. Houston 77242 GWM, STABLE, 36 A slim and horny bollom seeks non­smoking top thru 40's. who·s thick. hung and horny tor deep and sallslymg sale :e~ly :~~b~ox'~9g_-~e~"'c, ~6:~~onsh1p GBF would llke to meet a fish. Owet. hon­est. sincere. 35-40 Reply Blind Box 279-L c/o Voice GwM. 35. s~11", 155. br/hzl. profeu1onal. sincere VES1 Air. food and water exist outside the Loop• Anyone else live m Weet Houston and want to meel others in Mem­orial area En1oy cooking. movies. theater. talkmQ and laughing For fun. frolic. fnendsh1p and a safe romp 1n the hay. reply Bhnd Box 278-S c/o Voice PHONE SEX OUI &ef'11ce connects Horney Guys 24 hrs. a day Do 11 now tor less than $3 50an hour (415) 346-8747 OuR POLICYonSeXuaiiy-Expiic1tAdver- 11smg The Montrose Vorce does not believe that humans engaging 1n consent­ing sexual acts with one another is immoral. Our readers are encouraged to adverllse hEW'e to seek relationships. encounters. actvenlures. etc. All advert1s- 1ng should. howe'ler. not contain lan­guagethat would ollend an unsuspecting reader A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Fredenck Brandt can show you how to have actrve lun or play passive games with lhe personal ads. In their book. '"Classified Alla1rs." they'll tell you how to wnte an ad that really stands out. what to expect when you place or respond to an ad. and even what all those :~~.~~~~11rie~b!~~;~~'.~?~~~~a~u~.~~~~18 P-5. 40 Plympton. SL Boston. MA 02118.(Also included will be a coupon tor $5 olf on your next Personals 1nyourcho- 1ce of 25 gay publlca11ons. mcludmg the Montrose Voice.) PLAY SAFE Sale sex is lun. erotic. Play sale. for your sake. tor your partners sake YARD & GARAGE SALES HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce 11 here then stand back tor the crowd. Call 529-8490orv1s1t the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard sale announcement ~~ ~-~~~(~=:(~~;~eb~i I=~= Call 528-6245 David Hous1on -Heights-House. 90s HOward. -2- 2' . n~w appliances. central arr. sun deck skyhgMs. marble fireplace Great for enterta1nmg Lease-purchase agreement possible S6SCVmo S250 deposit 526- 8790 EXCELLENT LOCATION $180/mo tor elhc1ency apartment Mont­rose/ lower Westhe•mer area 523-4483 1920 WEST ALABAMA APTS. 1920 W Alabama. 529-6798 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat ~~~o~~YB~dn~:;',. Dignity IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GREENWAY PLACE APTS 3333 Cummins Lane. 623-2034 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MAR MAR Center 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm 21 22 WI'UESDAY: Lutherans Concerned meets Mar. 2.5, Grace HUGE MONTROSE TOWNHOUSE Lutheran Church, 2.515 Waugh ~2 2. 2 C.rge decks, W1 B. FP. all the rs MNm1t1es $1 l()O;month can Sal 963- "568 Roommate needed 2 bedrm. small com­~ · with pool and laundry $175 plus . bills. Call Mac: 52fF3140 Evenings and w~kends Smal complex. 1-2 br avarlable applian­ces, carpeting. drapes. beautiful garden and pool Easy access to all freeways. bus. downtown. Medical Center 1br­S280. 2br-S350 plus deposit and ut1ht1es 523-8849 or 862-8037 HYDE PARK ~1 leatured on cover ol Houston Home and Garden Beauhlully renovated $149.500 2406 Van Buren Call Poma Aberc,omb1e. 626-3930 MONTROSE-SHEPHERD SpaCX>01 spotless. br1ek. 3-2. central air $550 Adult 524- 2798, 520-5838 GWM des•res same to share I bedroom cond0rrun1um $200 per month plus 1 '2 e4ectr1e 771-4010 ~:-;'~r~~~7;i:e~~~i~~ bdr Sum- MONTROSE DUPLEX Large 2 bedroom. cen!rat a. h washer, d­ryer connection fireplace m1mbhnds t\ardw<)Ods Must see 510 W Saulmer S49S<mo 464-6197 MONTROSE APT J POOL s~~ltr~:1~~1 ~!u~~~fo;~~~~e~~~~~~ ~~~:~.'~~~~.~~ a~~n,!!~~eA.1CB~a~ $31S, 2BA at $375 plus security deposit & electric 306 Stralford •I Taft Discount on 1 yr Le8$e 523-6109 IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Small quiet Montrose COITlplex New paint. new double door ice bo•es $100 deposit 1 bdrm $285 plus 8'ec Also avad~ able 2 bdrm 529-8178 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Par1-11me™ Ip wanted Oaysonly Bonda ble. dependable. clean cut For tnl81'\'1ew call 528-6245 Leave message EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER to care tor 6-month-old 1n our hOme ruu-l: rr~ v~~;9~·.,~;,g~~ speaking pre- Hair dresser and manicurist Lease or commlSStOn Pn ... ate aalon Centrally located West U A111er Oaks/ Greenway Ask for Jolene S20-6600 SALONOANIEL Rent a chair 1n Houston's besl salon Be your own b05s Cal! or eotne by 2431 81uonne1 520-9327 PERFORMING ARTS T1ckel oll1ce personnel sought lull/par! time. Excellent v•rbal skills required Base plus commission ra11 Ms Knipp alter 11am 526--532"' MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS RELAX AND ENJOY! Tm. Body WotkS MMs.age I~ back For appcmtmenl. call Bill 526-2470 MAR MAR MAR MAR MAR 23 24 25 26 27 Cntet•alorooc "''in 7·0•y f.4( R"'°" ;IH 1 E•ent0fgroupnuals.p«1l1Cally penaon1oneigl'lbc >1"4< lol'Ht I< 11gay1 mm n11yun1essm.1iorc•ly.1Uale0fn11t1ona1 hohdayormatotn.Jt•~I y .... it 2 .>tflCl!y _ _..,,mer( e¥enllnot1ncluded ;it 8us11'1H1,Clv•Cand social grot.ipt and tl'le•r ....-rits .,. ~neralty qual<l•ed ' Poliloea1 even1s where only one..,,..,... 01 a subtKI. candidate Of party '' donuriant nol q.,a111<ec1 For add1t1ona1 1nlorm1tion tt- -!'--"le """'!>«•. looll lor trie s.pontoririg organiut•on undet Resources Typestyles indicate events' location Events in Houston, Events of local Interest Elsewhere. Events of Area lnt&fest SELECTED EVENTS THROUGH 7 DAYS • FRIDAY: "Breakthrough" lesbian-feminist program, KPFT FM·OO, Rolf>.llam • FRIDAY: Montrose Country Cloggers meet 7pm. MCCR. 1919 Decatur ~~~~ ~a~al)own Lambda meels • FRIDAY· Dianas '"Sex' Quicentennial Lme Star Show" preview Mar.21, Tower Theater llSATURDAY: Dignity ma08 and social, 7:30pm. :l217 Fannin llSATURDAYo Dianaa '"Sex' Quicentennial Lone Star Show" Mar. 22, Tower Theater llSUNDAY Houston Tennis Club plays 10:30am·l:30pm. Homer Ford Tennis Center -SUNDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center -SUNDAY· Final team captains meeting, Pool League, 2pm Mar. 23, Hooters .SUNDAY: Women's bowling league plays, 3pm, Stadium Bowl llSUNDAYo Houston Gay Pride Week Committee public meeting, 5pm Mar 23. Dignity Center. 3217 Fannin llSUNDAY· W.W.B. &wling League, 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanes -SUNDAY: Gay Pride fundraiser, Risky Bu.i;inese, 2700 Albany, 7,'!0pm Mar.23 -SUNDAY; Overeater& Anonymous meet 8pm Montrose Coumieling Center, 900 Lovett • MONDAY: Integrity meets 7::l0pm Mar 24, Autry House, 6265 Main • MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm ut Stadium Bowl. 8200 Braesmoin -nJESDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center WI'UESDAY· MSA "Fun Volleyball League" plays. 7pm llER£5 ONE· ,.HER fill lHlS[ </£AAS. P£m [ STILL 60 ON !\NI) <X'I ABM HO..! THE. PR£510£NT IS A THIRD RAT[ ACT~ FROM 0\.0 B-GRAOC I DON'1 SEE T\1[ POINT OF RELENTlt55L'{ HARPING '{()\)? ON n\E PAST .. so MUCH HAS IW'PENEO Sil\(.( l\E TOOK f, omcE . I JUSI DoNT H11N\<. MOJIE5 .. Of KIM 1t\AT WA~ AN'<MOll£ - '•) . ='­: 31.1~- mTUESDAY· Houston Area Gay & LeBbian Engineers & Scienti8ts meet 7pm Mar. 2.5 IWTUESDAY: Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) meets 7pm Mar. 25, 1413 Westheimer • WEDNESDAY: Houtex Tennis Club plays 7:aOpm, Homer Ford Tennis Ctr • WEDNESDAY: Greater Montrose Business Guild general meeting 7pm Mar. 26, Backstreet Restaurant, 110.1 S. Shepherd • • WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League competition • WEDNESDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Berin~ Church, 1440 Harold llSTAl!TING THURSOAYo IGBO-aft'lllated Dixie lnvltotlona l, Atlanta, Mar. 27-30 mTHURSDAY: Frontrunners run from Mc·morial Park Tennis Center WI'HURSDAY: "Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPF'T Radio, FM·90 WI'HURSDAY: Clt·is, Lesbian Mothers Group, open meeting Mar. 27, Dignity Ctr WI'HURSDAYo Mixed &wling LA"ague, 8:45pm, Stadium Bowl, 8200 BraeRmain SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS • IN I WEEK: Good Friday. Mar 28 • IN 1 WEEK IG90-allllloted MAK.IT konsos City. Mar 29-31 • IN I Wt:EK- Pool League Turkey Shoot. 2pm Mar 29, Tht> Ranch • IN 1 WEEK: E8JIU-r Sunday, Mar. "Kl • IN I WF.EK: MCCR F.aster Sunri•t· Sf>rivtt, 6am Mar. 30, Allen Park • IN I Wt:Jo:K: Gay Political Caucua ho11tA Pet·o-Rama. Cherryhust Park. Eafl~r Sunday, Mar. :lO • IN I WEF.K: Fin1t Annual Greater Ml1ntro11(' Pf't·O·Rama and E88ter Ronnel Parade 2-4pm Mar 30, Cherryhunt Park. &ponaored GPC • IN I WEEK Gay Political Caucu• mtttA lloliday Inn, 8 Main at Bloclgetl. 7<JOpm Apr. 2 • JN 2 WU:KS: Rillard11 va. Bowlf'ra Pool Tourney Apr 5 • IN 2 WEJo:KS. Houston Gay Health Advontftl mttt 7;Jopm Apr.5 e JN 2 WEEK8_ HouMton Womt-n'• St1rthall l.eai{ue flf"ftPM•n opener Apr. fi, Ht1ahti1 Lyona Fu•ld, 13th Stl't'f't near 8hephl"rd Montrose Voice Classified Advertising i,~:.~ ;::~~:,~~::;': ~~:';:,':;:~~nj,',:;11/j.S,:~':;:/ ~ti;;!::~.,,_, Frx regul1r display IKMtt•••nQ THE HEADLINES: Headline words in bold type, centered, are $1 each word (minimum $3 per line). (Centered bold headlines can also appear w1thm the text or at the end of the ad, and are also $1 per word. with a minimum of $3 per line.) THE TEXT: Each word m regutar type is 4()¢ (Additional regular words in "ALL CAPS" or Bold Words not m all caps are 55¢ each. A(:ld1t1onal BOLD WORDS in au caps are 70¢ each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each addillOnal word like this 40¢ THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each additional word like th•s 4():: THESE THREE LINES All CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLO, $9.00 Then each add1t1onal word like this 1s 40¢ AOOITlONAL CAPITAL WOADS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE 55i;: EACH Addition•! bold words Ilk• this In l••I .,. SSC HCh. ADDITIONAL BOLD, All CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer. make nc copy changes during the run. pay for the full run in advance, and deduct 1S% Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same cond1t1ons and deduct 25% BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number We'll f~en~~~n!~a~lir'g[,7c'!:~~l::~ssf~~~re:at6~~~~=~~~ ~g~ubXs~~1!~~~~~ecsa~i~1~ forwarded indefinitely. however, for as long as they come in.) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail your ad m or phone 1t in. You can pay by check. money order. M~stercard, Visa. American Express. Diner's Club or Carte Blanche Or we'll bill you DEADLINE: Classified ads received by 3pm Wednesday will be placed m that week's newspaper Ads received later will be placed m the following week's newspaper ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number. clo Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006-3028 It will be for­warded, unopened, to the advertiser. Enclose no money ADDITIONAL NOTES: A ··word" is considered anything separated by ··spa­ces," except hyphenated words are considered 2 words when each segment is a recognized word if it stood on its own. A complete phone number. including area code. 1s 1 word. City, state and zip 1s 3 words bold line bold line text words bold llne --------- Use add1t1onal paper 1f necessary CATEGORIES: O Announcements 0 Accomodations (~od~ing for Houston visitors) D Cars & Bikes ~ ~~~~~~~~t f~~~~ ~a~~~dn&s1~~~~~;"t~~: O Models, Escorts. Masseurs D Personals O Pets D Rides O Travel D Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AD UNDER ·-- __ IN THE "GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY," OPPOSITE PAGE bold headline words at $1 each (minimum $3 per line)· regular words in text at 40¢ each __ ALL CAPS regular words in text at SSC each Bold words In text at SSC each BOLD ALL CAPS in text at 70¢ each: Blind ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad in 11 mailed to me. $1.25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Tlmn weeks: Less lS~ discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 2S"' discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) 0 Also. I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week I have enclosed (or will be billed or charged, as indicated below) an additional O $29 for 6 months or D $49 for 1 year. TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be btlled or charged METHOD OF PAYMENT: 0 Check enclosed D Money order enclosed O Cash o VISA charge D MasterCard charge D Diners Club charge D Carte Blanche charge D Amercian Express charge D Btll me If charging, card expiration date ------ Credit card number Signature Name __ _ Address-------- Phone(s) for verification of ad, 1f necessary - MAIL OR BRING TO. Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 10am-5 30pm MARCH 21. 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 25 MONTROSE RESOL: ROES SELECTED STATE. NAT ORGANIZATIONS a.r Owners Assn ol h (BOAT). 120 B<a..r:OI •l!I02 Auston. (511) 472-3333 AIOS Achon Counc:illFederllOfl ol AIOS Relmled Org1niz11ton1 1115·,, tnd•P9ndenc. Aw SE Wastnngton OC 20003. (212) 50·3101 G•y & Lnb<lf'I p,.,. Ann POB A. Old ChelMI SI• New YM NY "l011. (212) lllllJ.&622 G1y Rl~ts N#: Lobby POB 1892 Wastmgton. DC 20013(202)546-1901 Humtn Rlgl'lts Camp119n Fund. POB 13915. W•th· ongton0C20013.(202)5'6-2025 Intl G.y Assn. RFSL. Bmo. 350. S-10125 Sloclcholm S-0.n.ptiorw•~&&tl!IOSO L..,,bdll ~11 Delen ... 132 W '31d New YOfk. NY 10039.f2121~-9'88 Lnb1ar1!G•y R1gt\11 AO..-OCllt". POB 822. Auston 78787 N.i ...._n of But•- Coun<:llS. Bo~ 15145 SM Fral'lc•sco. CA94115_ (415)895-e315J Nat Aun of Gloy & LMboan OetnoClubl. 1742M­Av S£ Wesr11ngton DC 20003. (2021547-3104 ,...t Gay Helolltl Educ Fovndlhon. POB 784 New YOfk NV 10036. (2121 ~8313 or 0.. GIMl'lbefg 17131S23-520C NII Gay A•!f'l1 A<JvoQI,,., 540 Cnt>t:i $an Ffln• C•ICO CAIM114 r415111l-382• Na! 0.y Task Force ,N(jTF1.
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