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Houston Voice, No. 754, April 7, 1995
File 017
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Houston Voice, No. 754, April 7, 1995 - File 017. 1995-04-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4999/show/4982.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1995-04-07). Houston Voice, No. 754, April 7, 1995 - File 017. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4999/show/4982

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 754, April 7, 1995 - File 017, 1995-04-07, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4999/show/4982.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 754, April 7, 1995
Contributor
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Window Media
Date April 7, 1995
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript 16 HOUSTON VOICE/ APRIL 7, 1995 HOUSTON 29S3 MAIN ST. C713] S22-QOOO PULSE • VI8A MC • AMEX ISLAM 4TH ANNIVERSARY WEEKEND FROM 9 PM FRIDAY GULF COAST BEARS SOCIAL SATURDAY 8 PM JAILHOUSE ROCK PARTY SUNDAY BENEFITING CHILDREN WITH AIDS NEW BEAR ART-ON-OSPLAY BY MARK ANDREW YEA! PARTY! THANKS FDR YOUR SUPPORT! 55) W j-OTRL'STS-**, The PLANT HOUSE Specials This Week Spring is Here! 2 Dz. Long Stem Roses $19.99 Bedding Plants 85< each Cat Spray Orchids $ 1.99 fill Plant Pots 20% off Floral arrangements for all occasions FTP Wire Service and local delivery Fresh Cut Flowers Topiary Animals Terra Cotta Pottery Tropical Plants Bedding Plants Hanging Baskets Vases, Cards, Gift Ideas & more 812 Wssthelnwr (rwor Montrose Boulevard) (713) 529-6050 ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT Urgency, passion propel gripping drama in 'Milleniu Approaches' Joseph Haj (Louis Ironson) and John Feltch (Prior Walter) in the Alley Theatre's production of "Angela in America." Tony Kushner's acclaimed epic opened with "Part I; Millenium Approaches" on March 29 Theater Review By JAVIER TAMEZ Houston Voice/Houston There is an urgency to "Millennium Approaches," Part One of "Angels in America," the award-winning drama by Tony Kushner. Louis Ironson, one of the less appealing characters, says, relatively late in the play, "What AIDS shows us is the limits of tolerance, that's it's not enough to be tolerated, because when the shit hits the fan you find out how much tolerance is worth—nothing." Louis' words exemplify the intensity of Kushner's passion, for though his epic work touches on many themes, its subtitle. "A Gay Faniasia on National Themes." is indicative of its underlving c.phesiveness. With poignant drama, trenchant commentary, heart-rending pathos, expert allusion and bountiful hilarity. Kushner has crafted the must incredible work on gay America ever. And it is an amazing work to behold. The plot is somewhat resistant to easy summation, but is, at its most essential, a recounting of the collapse of two relationships — one gay, one straight—and Roy Cohn. The gay couple is Prior Walter (John Feltch) and Louis (Joseph Haj); the straight couple, or at least the couple composed of a man and a woman, is Joe Pitt (David Whalen) and Harper Pitt (Annalee Jefferies). Prior is dying of AIDS. Though he has a bemused resignation to the impending inevitable, he is actually frightened and attempts to balance his fear with self-deprecating wit. "My problems are lesion," he chirps to Louis when the first sign of KS appears, but Prior's levity is hollow and quickly revealed as such when he admits fearing abandonment. In Prior, Kushner draws a searing picture of the agony of AIDS. No quick, merciful deaths here, but rather the beginnings of painful, vicious demises thai shred any vestige romance from dying, particularly from AIDS. Louis is a man at odds with himself. He fulilely attempts to come to terms with his fear of illness in others—a deathly fear which will lead Louis away from Prior when Prior needs him most. Analytic and intellectual. Louis desperately rationalizes his incipient action, in absurd philosophic arguments, asserting that the "neo-Hege- lian positivist sense of constant historical progress toward happiness" doesn't always allow room for sickness. Yet he never denies the utterly reprehensible nature of the act he ponders and then commits. Joe is a dutiful, honor-hound clerk at a federal appellate court. Joe is, in effect, symbolic of all the values that were supposed to be good in this country. But he is also homosexual and vehemently wrestles with his orientation, staling he has "fought, with everything I have, to kill it." Joe is also [rapped in the throes of a failed marriage, a failure which occurred in no small part, because he is gay and can'i provide the warm, nurturing relationship to his wife that she (as do all decent spouses) has a right to expect. Harper is a woman adrift. Despondent because of her loveless marriage, she finds solace in a valium addiction, an affliction which plagues her with hallucinations. Harper, too, denies the truth she knows, hoping that "companionship and love and protection, and safety from what's uulside" will be hers Roy Cohn (James Black) is a frighten ing representation of the darkest aspects of the Reagan years. Culm is accurately depicted by Kushner as a man of gargantuan ego who relished in his connections and his ability to make or break politicians and judges. Cohn is in the very twilight of his career and lie will go down lighting both AIDS and dis- barmeni proceedings, Moreover, in Cohn, Kushner depicts the plight of the gay community as it was unsuccessful in galvanizing the administration into action against AIDS. "Homosexuals are men who know nobody and who nobody knows. Who have zero clout," Cohn rails. The unmistakable analogy: nol having political muscle, the gay community was ignored. Kushner's cloui analogy is only one of many- Indeed, the playwright uses virtually every literary device wilh which I am familiar: foreshadowing (lots of that), parallelism, metaphor and references that are historical, cultural, literary and religious. The metaphors are the most powerful and they overwhelmingly are correlated to AIDS. Well before Louis in introduced, in each of the first three scenes of the first act, Kushner alludes lo the plague. In scene one, a rabbi eulogizing Joe's grandmother says, "soon all the old will be dead," and the analogy is crystalline. In the second scene, Cohn, arguing with a client about missing a court date, says, "I have clients in Haiti," and Kushner picks this particular geographic location because of its notoriety visa-vis AIDS in ihe early days of the crisis, possibly foretelling Cohn's imminent affliction. And in the third scene. Harper, immersed in one of her hallucinations, observes that "things are collapsing, systems of defense giving way," words often used to describe ihe immune system's destruction, (Coniinued on following page)
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