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The New Voice, No. 633, December 11 - 17, 1992
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The New Voice, No. 633, December 11 - 17, 1992 - File 001. 1992-12-11/1992-12-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4887/show/4846.

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(1992-12-11/1992-12-17). The New Voice, No. 633, December 11 - 17, 1992 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4887/show/4846

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The New Voice, No. 633, December 11 - 17, 1992 - File 001, 1992-12-11/1992-12-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4887/show/4846.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The New Voice, No. 633, December 11 - 17, 1992
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Price, Christopher
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 11, 1992-December 17, 1992
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 24648896
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Over 100 of Our Very Own Personals AI.LLOC«. AU Cl'/UIElff, AU. L\SJDE GAY NEWS FO~SOUTH TEXAS AND LOUISIANA D "The Montrose Voice"D DECEMBER 11-17, 1992 D ISSUE 633 AUSTIN (512) 478-4245 D BATON ROUGE (504) 346-8617 D BEAUMONT/GALVESTON (800) 300-8271 HOUSTON (713) 529-8490 D NEW ORLEANS (504) 524-3279 D SAN ANTONIO (210) 226-1833 T T T NEW VOICE FEATURE REPORT Fifth annual observance of World AIDS Day is largest ever Acroo;>; the nation, and in 182 nations around the world, people paused on December 1, to remember those who have died from AIDS, and those who are presently living with the disease. Several local observances com­memorated the event. In Galveston, Mayor Barbara Crewes read a proc­lamation, endorsing this year's theme, "AIDS, a community com­mitment:' Gulve1<ton area residents joined in an evening candle lighting ct-remony. At the Metropolitan Multi-Service Center in Houston, representatives of the NAMES Project read aloud the names of individuals who have been claimed by the disease, while friends and family of those lost hung ornaments upon a "Tree of Remembrance". In the nation's capital, President Bush participated in this years observance by ordering the lights of the White House dimmed. In New York, the city's skyline, and Broadway marquees were T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA A candlelight AIDS Day commemoration in Galvt•lon dimmed. The front portico of The New York Public Library was draped in black. Protesters marchro by candlelight down Fifth Avenue. In Copenhagen, demonstrator;; danced in Santa Claus costumes around a giant condom in Town Hall Square. Another giant condom was placed near Neloon'sColumn m London's Trafalgar Square World AIDS Day is sponsored by the World Health Organization, an arm of the Unitro Nations. Health and Human Services calls for increased AIDS awareness on World AIDS Day Hy I.Al' RA:-; Nt:•:RGAARD FOR HE NCW VOIC.E "For l<w> long, Amenca and the world have fact•d this epidemk divid<'<i and frightened;' he said from Little Rock, Ark. "Today we must all pledge to work togeth(•r on the rt'Search and prevention programs that will makt• the Al f)S <'Pi· dt>mic n part of our past" tu mes passed out more than 75,000 con· doms and 50,000 tubes of lubncant donated by manufacturers. In IX-nver, vandals paint«! "500,000 droths. How many more?" on the steps of the slate Capitol. Across the stn'Ct, a sack r(.,.embling n condom was placed m•ar the figur< of the Vtrgm Mary in a nauv1ty scene. ATLANTA, Wt•dnesday, Dec. 2 (Al')­Att1,~ slil drl'ssed in condom costumes hand(od out condom• in Los Angelei;, protcstel'I! in New York blasted the World Health Organization and city Rkyhnt e n o h o n w idt wrrt, dimmt'CI in _..cu"'"rv nf AIDS victinu,, In Atlanta, lll'ulth and Human Strv· ices 8e<Tetary IA>uis Sullivan i;aid such t>florts incn•u111t• All >S awareness in ways n national AIIJH cznr. us propost-<I by l'n•s1dent~lcct Clinton, ('Ouldn't. About I million Americans are infected with HIV. The ma1orily arP ages :!!H4, the group that makes up most of tht• nation"s workforce. Tlu·re ar~ :.!4:.!,l-11i U.S. Aills pat1l'fits. " Weft'<'! that p('Oplt•havcalotufprub· IE-ms talking ahout rondoms and lubn cants;' smd Los Angeles County AIDS Awarenesi; Commilttt chmrpcT'on Jack Carrel. "But it's kind of hard not to talk about it when you seca six·footcon· dom walking down the street:· At the Culifornia Collt·g" of Arts and Crafts, studentsobsnved tht•t•,cnt with a .. Day Without Art:• covering artwork on campus with n black shrt•t to call attention to tht• thousands of art.ists who have died from AIDS. The Ne" York skylme was dimmed for 15 minutei; Tue,day mght as the Empire State Building and other land· marks turned off their lights m memory of AIDS victims. Miami, Atlanta, San Francisco and Austm, Texas, also dunml'<i their hghts. Sullivan markt'CI World AllJS Day on 'l'u.,sdav by launching a proi.>Tam to hdp companies kt~·pemployecs infected with IIIV, the AIDS virus, w~rkmg as long as possible. He mll<-<l on Congn'Ss and Chnton to proh1h1t companies from revoking AlllS patH'nts' insurnnce, whirh the U.S. Supreme Court has smd i> legal. 'The one way to inhibit mnovatwn and flexilnlity needl'd to fight AIDS 1~ a l11r1wr hurt'aunacy:• Sullivnn said. Clinton urgl-d tht• world to work tog(•tll!'r m fighting AlllS. Up to ia oullion lu1vt• het•n 1nft>cted since tht> hcginning of the t•pidcm1c 1n the late 1970s, acrnrdmg to the WHO. Being Alive, a Los Angeles AIDS-HlV rnalition, unveiled a 60-by·40-foot greet· ing card signl'<i by hundreds of AlllS VH·hms. Th(• messages on the card wen• nddn,,.scd to Clinton. "Dear Presidmt-dect Clinton, the hope and prayers of the II IV-A lllS com munity are with you. Pleast• kt'<'P your campu1gn promiSl's to us:• wrote Rich­ard, "'a gay HIV positivt• man. In Los Angeles 40 "Cnptain Con dom" volunteers dl't'Ssed m condom cos· T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA The Metrupolitlln Museum of Art m :\ew York and the Scatllt• Art Mu&'um removed exhibits in memory of AlllS vict11ns. Museums m l'h1ladelph1a shroud'"<! pamtrnl(S m black. About 50 people gathered at the l'nitt-d Nations m New York to protest WllO's tbemt• for the day, "community commitment'.' They d1•manded the crea t1on of n global public health k('('pmg forc·e instead of concl'ntrahng on com· mumty re~pons•"' to AIDS. In l'luladdphm, the motht r of Ryan White, th(• Indiana youth who bccnm< a national >ymboJ of discnmmation against A Ills ~cums, appealed for grea!H understanding of the disease Her son , who rontmcted AIDS from !us tr<'.atment for hemoph1l.a, died m 1990of complicauons from Aills atagc IH. "l think pt'Opie nn• not wanting to listen until it aff€Cts them.' Jmnne Wh1k Gm· der said "If you wait until 1t affects or infect>. a S1bhng, o loved one, a fam: y m(·mber, then we've wmted too long to get involved: AIDS quilt project founder Cleve Jones says Clinton 'glimmer' of hope lly ,JllllY IlAlJHENMIER F R '°Hl ~w vc CE EAST l.J\r<ISING, Mich., Wednesday Dec ~ IAP)-'Jbe man who founded th~ AIDS quilt PrnJect said Wednesday the el_<'t'tmn of Democrat Bill Clinton raised his hopes m the bottle against the dis­ease Clcn• Jones m11d C'linton "s leadership on All>S could l~ad to better consolida· tion and coorchnntlon of American All>S policy. " For thi• first tim<' m 12years,1feel 8 glimmi•r of hop1•" hi• said. "I ahsolutely believe the ele<·tion of Bill Clinton and the reiection of the !{(·publicans' hate l'amp111gn proVJdcs us an opt•mng in which we may make some n·ul pn>gress~' Cl.nton hns promised to nam_e nn AI llS czar to oversee and c°'.'rdmate natwnal pohl'y on acquired immune defica·nry syndrome. Jones. of San r'ranci8<'o, began the Project AIDS Memorial Quilt project S 112 years ago by making a quilt os a memorial to his best friend who died of AlllS. The quilt now lists the names of 25,000 p(.iple who have died from the disease. .lono'8 spoke at a statewide conference on Ams sponsored by the llIV I AIDS Alhann• of Michigan and the Detroit· area AIDS Communit)· Alliance. Ile stno.ssro that AIDS i• now a global prohlem that affects 40 million pt'Ople worldwide, moRt of whom are hett'rosex­unls, not homosexuals. Amenrnn•' view that AIDS wa.q a h~most•xual pniblrm hinden•d effort.. to (' ~t·att• Jlil•opltt nhout tts transmission an must end, ht" said, Jones urged for eu 1 d "- nat1onul polit·y rslhng " rye ucauon about HIV It makes absolutely no St'nse that every smgle board of edul'ation m e\ery single town, city and community in this country has the opportunity to prevent their young people from bcmg educated about HIV. We need notional policy, we need it consolidated nnd coordinated;' he said. " I believe we need explint, graphic education in th(• elementary schools. Until we find a cure, this is absolute!) the only effective weapon we havt' to curb the spread:' MemberH of conl!('rvative rrhg10ns may oppose that, but Jonl's said pt'<>plr will die needleHsly if oppom•nts •ucceed in blocking AIDS education. " It is the nghl, thu responsibility of the par~nts, the t•du<'Pl<>ni, clergy, to PU.I forth their values. to try and communt· catc their valu811 to th~ir children:• he aa1d. "But that 1s noexcu•eforwithholdmg information bceause not all of thl>fie children will follow that pnth:' He eaid at a press conference thnt be plans to drop references to AID~ nnd to refer only to HIV diseaoc The human immunodeficiency ~ru• •• the ~rus that causes AIDS. Counting only people who ha vc de' el­oped full-blo,.·n AID~ vastly underesti­mates the scape of the ep1dem1c, Jones said. "'I myself nm HIV positive I have not vet developed any opportunistic mfec­i1ons. I nm probably gomg to die oftltis dist'asc, but I'm not counted;' he Bllid. Randall Pope, chief of the HIV I AIDS scct1on in the Michigan Department of Public Health, said more than 3300 cases of AIDS had been l't'ported m Michigan ai; of Tuesday But he said counting all those"' ho carry the HIV \irus would odd another 10,000 to 15,000 to that total. 2 THE NEW VOICE / DECEMBER 11-17, 1992 Every observer, partisan or otherwise, has concluded that the Republican National Convention held in Houston back in August ultimately hurt George Bush's re-election. Some have concluded that the vehemence of the right-wing rhetoric at that C'Jnclave was the single largest contributor to the defection of the Reagan Democrats to Clinton. Most people particularly remember the harshness of PatBuchanan~speech(we missed it since, like many others, we were marching toward the Astrodome at that time). And the Republican platform alienated even more with its support of a total ban on abortions and its homophobic language. After all this, a little more than a month after Clinton's victory, the Republican Party is even m Jre the captive of the Religious Right. A progressive, for Republicans, has been stripped of her duties as chair of the Harris County Republican Party and in her place of power is the top homophobe of Houston. ' I I ~ the F.agle Forum. Also enlisted were several veterans groups, although they later qualified this support. It doesn't take a rocket scientist (we've always loved this expression which denotes such being particularly bright -­i. e. those rocket scientists who worked for Hitler were certainly swift, swift to switch loyalties after the war) to see a trend here. And like Hitler's "Mein Kampt," the Christion Coalition is making no secret of their blueprint for conquest. Even before Bush's defeat, the Coalition plotted its takeover of the Republican Party, precinct by precinct. Then it targeted local races, from city councils to school boards. Its goal is to dominate Republican congressional races in 1996 and shoot for the presidency in 2000. And in Congress the Republicans, in an upset, rejected a moderate as assistant party whip for a true son of the Religious Right from North Texas, the Southern Baptists' answer to the City on the Hill. LOBO offers a thousand and one ideas for that special someone, be it a book, a video or simply a ca rd. It can be the latest paperback We can't say we haven't been warned. If the gay and lesbian community could organize as well as the Coalition we would easily combat this onslaught. Unfortunately, such is not the case. And the more moderate forces within the Republican Party continue to lose control of their own party to the Coalition. There is no conclusion here - this battle is ongoing. Even the early posturing of Bob Dole of Kansas, the now reigning Republican in Washington, seemed more calculated to reassure the Religious Right than the nation. Dole has always craved the White House and, like Bush, he is always novel or a beautifully bound volume of photography from Mapplethorpe or Herb Ritts or Bruce Weber. It can be Falcon's latest video or a gay-themed theatrical release. It can be a hot poster or a beautifully framed autograph of your favorite writer or entertainer. 11 assures rnui un:•• - _ _. .... -. no real honeymoon for Clinton with congressional Republicans. This struggle for the soul of the Republican ParlY will spill over into the race of Lloyd Bentsen's Senate seat next year (assuming he will be named to the Treasury post). The leading At LOBO the art of giving has no limits. J ready to court the Far Right. And while campaign focus groups showed that Republican attacks on gays and lesbians did not take with the voters, the Religious Right quickly lashed onto a new issue when Clinton repeated his campaign promise to end discrimination against gays and lesbians in the military. The fanatics on the Right threw together a new coalition to oppose this heinous plot to undermine the high moral character of our armed forces. The Southern Baptists quickly rallied {o Pat Robertson's Christian Coalition and Republican mentioned at this point in Sta~e Treasurer Hutchinson and her position on choH:e~ads the test of the Coalition. So the religious righters will likely urge on a more acceptable choice. Meanwhile the fanatics of the Far West, having batted .500 with their anti.gay ordinances, are already reaching. out to other fertile fields in the West and Southwest. And in furtherance of this goal gay-bashing will continue to be the chosen mode of operation. So we would suggest that everyone fasten their seat belts, the coming years promise a bumpy ride. 1424-C Westheimer (at Windsor) 522-5156 • T-Shirts • Magazines • Cards • Books • Leather • Accessories • Necessities Video Sales • Rentals .- DECEMBER 11-17. 1992 / THE NEW VOICE 3 TT T GUEST COMMENTARY In praise of older gentlemen: Santa Claus and other sexy seniors hws, more cautious about whom they By JIM MERRETI' take up with. Be friendly, but not pushy FOR THE NEW VOICE All the holidays loom, and Santa Clauses fill the malls, inviting boys to sit in their laps and whisper their heart's desire, I am reminded of the old saying: there may be snow on the roof, but there's still fire in the chimney. In my view, the jovial, white-bearded codger in the red suit has always had his romantic side. Santa has oft been pre­sented as a strict moralist, compiling lists and stuffing coal in the stockings of bad boys who don't quite measure up to his high standards. This disciplinary Santa may appeal to Puri tans and other who prefer the heel and the whip, but I've always favored the kinder, gentler Santa; the kindly elf who takes mid­night joyride.; on his sleigh and slides his bulk down your chimney, leaving behind sugar cookies and high-priced merchandise. In the simplest of gay terms, for me, Mr Claus is the best of the best of sugar daddies-a handsome, rich, settled older mun whose happiest moment..• are spent holdinl( you tight and letting you whisper in his hot, pink little ear. He never pushei; for sex; he only asks that you be good, and, best of all, he actually delivers on his promises! As younger gay !(UY• who hke older gay guys know, a icay granddaddy fig· ure can mean more than a new ward· robt• and a first class trip to Europe. With hi• tMnkling eyes, his genial, gen tie manner (possibly hiding the libido of a tigE>r) and his years of experience in givmtt good boys t'xactly what they want, 011n1.tt Baby is the paradigm of the older lovn. ~:vt·n for tho•e who don't believe in Santu, men of his ugt, und position in the world can have a strange and won· dPrful faecination for queer youngsters. For Sarntu Claue isn't the only sexy ~en· ior in the world. 'l'lwn•are plenty ofolder gay guys out there who an• Just as warm und fuzzy as Old St.. Nick, and plenty of youthful admirers desmng to be the obit'C'l of thost• warm fuzzies. Ovez tht• Y<'ll1'8, I myself have devel· oped into a connoisseur of older men. Like Mnt>, men of old1•rvintagcare more full-bodied, mort• deeply flavorful, more subtly mellow. Where I once used to savor only tawny boys of22, I can now enjoy the matun• flavors of mm well into tht•ir seventies. knee. But neither will I abandon him as he gracefully ages into character roles. Think how many stars of yesteryear have aged so gracefully that they can still cause your heart to skip a beat? Who can resist the dashing figure Sean Connery still cuts, though he's long past playing James Bond. Paul Newman's blue eyes have grown more sagacious and sweet, but the years haven't rumpled that nasty bod. Cary Grant stayed cool and gorgeous into his 80's. (Check him out in "Walk Don't Run:• his last Hollywood feature, to see how good his genes were.) What of the oldsters next door, who meet us at the churches an stores and bare and cruising spots, looking for pretty much the same things younger guys are looking for-companionship, love, a little excitement. The nation's expert on such matters 1s a 52·year-old Southern California man named Pat Colley, who turned his affec­tion for older men into an international phenomenon. Colley is one of the found· ers of Chiron Rising, a international contact magazine forinli>'r·generational romantics. I asked Colley to tell mew hy younger men are now reJl'<'ting "clones" -the pretty boy of the eighties-in favor of what some are calling ''homo mascu· line"-grizzled, through·the-mill look ev1nced by aged·in·the-wood macho men. "A lot of young guys are looking for the comfort of being with someone who's experienced, who's made all the mistakes already. They feel more a tease around somebody who is olde1;" says Colley. "We've educated a lot of older people that there is such a thing as a younger man who is attracted to older people:· says Colley:'-exclusively so, in a lot of cases. People have always thought that this was due to a father complex, and in fact it isn't. Some people like guys with red hair. some like thin and some like heavy, and some guys like older guys. Be honest. Let them know n11bt off that you like older guys. If you are dealing with an older man who looks at you suspiciously, don't mention money. All a good will gesture. offer to pay for your own drinks and include him in a round. Don't be shocked if he's in the cloi;et. Before the 1970's most gay people were in the closet, and older men remember when it could cost you your job and fam· tly ties to be exposed as a homo.;exual. Respect his wishes, even if you are mili· tant about your own coming out. Don't thmk you 're going to sweep hun off his feet overnight. Most older guys are cautious. They have to make their own decision, at their own pace, whether or not to trust a guy. Of course for this writer, the pt•rfoct older lover will never show up at the local gay bar or community center-hes stuck at the North Pole with Ml'>'. "Some older guys think that a younger guy that likes them is either looking for money, 1s crazy, has got a father complex, or is satisfying a fetish:' Colley adds. "I've been attracted to older men all of my life, and rve been told that I was sick and that I wanted a surrogate father. But after I started out this magazine, I found in my own mind that that's not the case. There as such an animal as a younger man who sincerely Clause. does love older men for all the noble rea· But I can dream what life would be sons. It's a spiritual love. Some guy~ couldn't get on with another younger guy. They have to have the grey hair, that stockine"' that you g1·t when you get olde~ I'm almost positive thatju,t by reading all the mail I icet-several hun· dred pieces of mail a week-that favor- ' ite type of the aver· ai:e (Chiron reader) bt·tween 21 and 50 is the t'.d Asner, Wilford Bnmley kind of older man. I hear thost• names batttod around likt• crazy. 'l'hesc Ji!UYS are the zcmth They are stocky, rugged, mascu line \\batever turns you on- a white mane, a weathered face, a healthy m1dnff-there arc right ways and wrong \\llYS to find an older lover, accord ng to Col· ll')'. like with Mr. Claus as a life partner. He'd look something like Edmund Gwen, '!'he samtly·faced English actor who made a benevolent, irascible but endeanng Santa in the holiday classic, ":'l-1iruclc on 34th Street:' We'd mf'el cute--perhnps he'd ask me to stt on his lap at Macy's, then invite me out afterward for some eggnog.After a trip around the world via a sleigh, we's settle in a little cabin far off from the hustle and bustle of city life. Our days would be spent drinking mulltod wine with the elves; our nights would be re;erved for cuddling by the fire. (I'he keys to the sleigh would lx•made avatla· bit• once in a while, "hen my itch for o tnp to Homre' or the Ramrod could nu longer be quenched by a roll in the snow.) And then once a year we'd get to travel to every i:ood gay house, d1spcns· mg Cubinarts and Doc Martens and rainbow rim~s "lule gay bo) in thetr 1amm1es >noozed peacefully, "~th vtstons of sugarplums rlancmg m their heat,; Wouldn't 1t be 111cc wrapped up in fleece robtos, nuzzled onto that room) sleigh after the mgl>t s \\Ork "as done, falling into a checr·mduced sleep as m' red-suited, white bearded uddyman spurred the reindeer onward? Wishmg to all a ver)· ml'rry-and gay-Oood Night. Don't think that I've lost all taste for young Htuds. I still consider Daniel Day Lewis a fox; if I had Aladdin's lamp, I'd use my first wish to put him over my Santa Claus uis1tmg Tlw Neu' Voiu offices Don't come on too strong Older men tend to be more conservative m their pel'>'onal (Editor's Note: Jim Mcrntt is a free~ lance journalist based in Ht•mpstead, New York) T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Study determines AIDS test helps prompt candid talks between lovers rose from 31 perc. .. nL 1 f.6 P"rrent. The proportion increased only from 34 per· cent to 41 percent umong those who received educndon alone. It rose from 39 By u-;i,; ~rnGEL FOR HE NEW VOtCl LOS ANGELES, Tuesday, l>ec. l (AP)­G.. ttmg an AIDS lt'St mnkf's r<>llege stu· dents almo•t twict• u• liJ..1 •Y '"ask pro· spettive lovers about /\lllS then educa­tion a Ion<'. but mo•t •exually active slu· d1·nts m a new study still didn't u.c con domH. Wnting in tod11y's issue of the Annals of Intl'mal M1•dicine, rest•archers snid discussing th<· topic "may be more important than the sexuel uC'tivittes !'ngnged m with that partner:· since sex· ual ectivity among the students wes fairly low and few had multiple lovers. Hut thc•y warned that people may he ahout thc·ir AlllS nsk, and that "the unaware might be lulled into unpro­tected sexual behaviors by unscrupu. lous partners:· The findings suggest that doctors should offer voluntary test;; for HIV, the AIDS virus, along with AIDS educa­tion, said t)t N!'il S. Wenger, chief author of thc• study al the University of California, I.off Anl(t•lt•s. Dr. M1•rvyn Silverman, prc·sident of the Amnirnn Foundation for AIDS H..,ean·h, said tht• study showed taking a test can mak1• l"'oplc more aware of the. rt•ks, just likt• ahowmg patients ~e1r chest X rays remforccod anti·smok· 1ng ffiP888({t!8. "Sadly, how1·wr, wt• IK'C how difficult it is to get people to weur condoms when having sex;· Silvermun said by phone from San Franci•co. AIDS, which kills by crippling the body's ability to fight other diseases, is spread during sex, by sharing contami· nated needleH and from mother to infant before or during birth. The study involved :l?O heteros1•xual students who attended the UCLA stu dent health clinic. Some 8tud1•nts wt·rt' taught about AJDS, others also J(Ot on AJDS antihody t.1-st and a third .:rouJJ was left alonP. The studl'nts wrrt• ~uc.s· tioned at the start of tht• study an six months later about wheth•·r they asked if sex partners w1·re infected b~ the AIDS v1rus. Among thost' who received AIDS tests and education. the proportion who asked about their partner's HI\' status rcent 10 42 pere<.'nt among those who :.eived neithor testmi: nor education. About nO percent of the students were .,.xuallY active during the stx·month study, and almoi;t two-thirds of them had unprotected int<'rcourse-before and after they received AJDS education alone or with a test. Education and AIDS tests combined "should be central to public health inter· ventions to stop the spread of HI\"' Wen· ger and his colleagues wrote. But the results "in no way support the concept of mandatory te;ting in any population:' they added. 4 THE NEW VOICE I DECEMBER 11-17, 1992 'Y 'Y 'Y IN MEMORY OF Born: Aprl 17, 1968 Died: Navwnber 21, 19112 In lov"1g memory al "'f tllsbend. Please be consoled t> kncW Iha! he iS in God"s care. lhaq1 his time on Ear11l was short. ha louched many Ives In a VetY special way. Dale has a p1aC8 In Heaven, w,;1•1 from pa111 and tears A paradise lliars so rruch more. We wlD be Egelh­er once aga1n in 1he lonfs ~- Whan he's ready tor mo, ho1 cal and n go. AJ "" iove and prayers. DalnyR Willis Fanily & Fnends PAL.\fER GAYLE FINLEY Born: Decanber 21 , 19+4 Died: Decanber 6, 19112 Palmor was the son c:A Eldon E and rne c. Anlay who preceded him In death. He Is survived by his stqMTiothor, Olga Anlay and three s~ bratllelli. Dale, Glen end Carl Brooks He 11a:1 wort<cd 1or Housm lrdepandenl School DiStric1 and Door Perl< School Ois1rict. Palmer lcaVes a host c:A friends. cspeclaly lhe mw ones from Bcmg care Cenlar and Frst MelllOciSI Cl1urch who visited him regi.Carfy, ol­ler1ng compassion and IOYe. He was laid t> rest In East Bernard Cemetery wtiere his Mother Is bur1od, In the farnly plot. A memortal servtce .. ~ be held at Frsl Methodist Church, 1320 Main at Clay 1n Housm. PATRICK EDWARD NUGENT Born: o-nbar4, 1951 Dted: Oacember 7, 19112 Be pralSed. ""I Lord, tlr those who forglV8 becal.e they loYe you: For those who i--sic1meSS and llial6 They - happy. who accept .. in peace, tlr they d be crowned by You, Moat Hi!#>! !BoC !Bandt'~ Custom B & W Photo Lab & Photography Oisaeel 0 Ma~ Order Availoble 0 Cal or Write for arochura 2602 Waugh Dr. Houston, TX 77006 (713) 520-0789 LARRY D. PHILLIPS Born: .Jdy 23, 1952 Dted: ~ 18, 19112 V-*/ .-.:I i:-;eUy • Leny Pl1llip6 ac­oepllld death after belig overcome by AIDS. Af­ter a long and ocuageous struggle With Ile oppor11.RSlic ..,,_... ..r.ich drained his energy. I.any IOOSillvelY. yet lrmly, shared wtlh his friends .-.:I famiy IMI Iha beUle had becomB t>o overwlleln*lg lo cootinUe; he chose t> die al home, sumx.nded by tos mother, tos lneods, and tos l!e's per1nor As along lime ~00 of Soulhweslem Bel Telephone, Leny was lmlolved In cornrrunlty -­vice lllrolJl1l The ~ of AmeriCa Al lhe limo c:A his death, ho was the ~ c:A a local chaplcr Lany also vcklntoomd wi1ll tho amual SWoot Chal1ty event. sponsaed by tho Founda­tion tlr lnlDr!alth Rosean:h and Minls11y Leny Is survived by tis partner of len ye<n. Patrick Csllahan °' Hous!Dn; falhef and ~ mother, L W and Ema Phllllps, brolher Rodney al Fl Myers. Aoricla; mother and slcp-lalhcr. Do­ns .-.:I Vern Timer. sister lloma of lndepoo­dence. Ml:lsou1, other relatives and a greet crcte al friends who......., VetY spoclal t> him Larr(s C()OCCf1l end sensllMly lo lhe - "' lhosO ho did nol know persooally were as il>- mense as his IOYe and~ tlr his <Ner­"' 1dcr*1g clrdo c:A -· With him ho look ou­IOYe .-.:I dOYolon; ..uti 113 ho lell tis porspectiYe on lie. his locus on oompanlonSlip. and memo- """ In honor c:A Larry's wishes, tos ashes wl be llaltlared - - '*""""'Y Announcement The New Voice pWll/lM --as both mws and a community oervtce, free "' charge. Very long --ant sWjecl t> e<lllng. Send lnformallon t> The New Voice main ollice. 408 Avcndale. Houslon. nc 77006 or tax t> (713) 521M1531 \RYSrAL~ Roas~RY 1228 Westbeimer • Houston, TX 77006 (713) S26-616S Hoare T ... ·Sat.: 10-1 WJC • Via ... Aau - hnoaaJ Cbccb Welcome BETTER LAWNS & GARDENS Total Lawn Maintenance Commercial Residential -Landscape -Lawn Care -Tree Service FREE ESTIMATES BEST PRICES (713) 523-LAWN Houston • METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION Rev. Elder John Oil. Pastor Rev. C&rolyn Mobley, Asst. Pastor 1919 Decab.a' L 881-9149 OFF WASl-9'lGTON & SLVER So.n.. Deo. 13, 2:00pm &. 7:00pm CHOIR CHRISTMAS CANTATA Tuea. Dee. 115, 7:00pm AA/NA SUPPORT GROUP MEETING Fri, Oeo. 18, 7:00pm FELLOWSHIP SOCIAL NIGHT Worahlp Servloea Sunday, 10:46am & 7:16pm Wedneaday: 6:46pm Houston Mission Church o~" ''$.'•:~:'Or\,.,~,~~· - COMMONWEALTH 129-1225 Worahlp S•nk:t• Sunday 10:30am A ... Rober1 Carter You'~ invited to COMMUNITY GOSPEL CHURCH Sun. 11.-00 A.M. o Pnlle A WorabJp Tata. 7:30 P .M. o Bible Study Thar. 7:30 P.H. o Midweek Service Pastor - Chris Chiles 713) 880-9235 l 11 .... I "A Church Built On Love" G~b~::-/ Catholics & Friends meet for M•• SatudaJI at 7:30 pm 1307 YALE, SUITE B (713) 880-2872 Kingdom Community Church COME EXPLORE HIS KINGDOM Sunday Worship Service 11 am 614 E. 19th 862-7533 Houston 746-6251 &OOTT K- •• ..... - Attorney &. Counselor at Law Criminal, FamRy and Probate Law Including WIDs, Powers of Attorney, Partnership Agreements & Real Estate Contracts Telephone: (713) UH577 Voice Md/Pager: 70S-3805 5292 Uamorlal Drive Houston, T axa• 770f11 .- DMnl c..-UnH. texH bo9rd or '9Qal apecialuUOI\ MO:\'TROS!l ARI~'\ • 1317 WILi.ARD • 7t:J-6!10-0-~.'J Crr.-tdls • Arom.tthc_rdpy * A>trolO\lical Services Uoun: Tuu·Sat 10·7 Sua and Moa by Appointment __ ...... .._ --.......-............ . --.......--......... .·.--.- -~ THE NEW VOICE ISSLIE DEC.EMBER Publlshed Fridays Ea1ar>11sru111 1173 •• the Houston Montrose Sur ....... ., .. heel 1980 as lhe HO..!Oft MoNrOM YCllCe inc:Ofporanng 199t thrt New Orle1.-. CreKent Ury Stai "The Montroie Voice" 406 Avondale Houston. TX 77006 (713) 529·6490 Contents copyright 1992 Office~rs 9a~ weekday~ Henry McClurgpublall•r Jamel Cheek.11.,.,raJ ,,,.n-oer Christopher Pr1ee«11f0t Leonard Eart Johnson '°''npond9tl' -AOVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Austin/Suzette Locke Baton Rouge' Jeanne Re Montandon Corpus Chrtsti/Suzette Locke Ga1ves1on1s1eve S.tcher HoustorVTad Nelson. Tony Elliott New Orleal\l.IBunch Brittain. Kerth Edwards San AnlOno Eatlcol R1Chard wr~til Ausi.n 1512147μ2•5 Baton Rouge 150< 1 346-8617 Buumont 18001 300-8271 Gatv~ton IBOOJ 30().-8271 Housion 171J1529-8490 N•w Orleans 1504) 5~-3279 San AnlonK> 1210122&1833 POSTMASTi:A ~ COrf'9C;llO"I to 408 AWOftGlle Hou•on TX7~ $1.1tner11Jt10nr•te nl.rS(l'JycemetorUSMai/J S 75petw91t1 (t.ts.5() P9' 6 monthl 01 $91 pef y .. t" fv•tJon.r -.lven.ang r•prssonr•l•v• MoChHICrevOla. A""'"'" dell Ma.tti.eling. PUB 1268 Plilonftttld NJ 07061 (906) 769· 8850, K9"'n Ray ak• eommurucat1ont Inc 1w. Bant:a Monie. Blvd •109 Wftl HoltyWOOCI. CA 90CW6. C'13) ~ em Oi.a&Ur "~"•no dMdl,,. !Spm CT Monday 10 '"9rY• 1pacti noon CT Tueld•Y 10 rum11ti .:i copy lor Fnday publlc.1tton C..11.1.s.1.1l.«.J ." '*-" 11ng tHMltM noon CT T .,tldly lar F ;my NoflU JO •cherti#fJ. Adwell• ng r•e IChedull' 1 was et ledrvtt Aug 17 1002 Rupomlb 11 We cto nol: •"""ne ''*" .. rnpontibt! ty fOf cia.rns by lldveft sen bu! rNOtn ere Hhd 10 adv 1e ~ ne.npeper ot any...,, I trldulenl or diactpt'" a4V9r Hing _,d ....,CIOfll w be ig&t90 .\1.-nber Na onalGayNewtpaperQ Id (J.ay&Lestll&nPMP ANoc111 A uoc,.te "*"btr AMO ated PreM DECEMBER 11-17, 1992 /THE NEW VOICE 5 T T T HOUSTON QUICK NOTES Expand your mind and open your heart at these special events While planning your holiday schedule, be sure to make a note of these special events in the Houston area. Men's Network Presents "Homosexuality And The Islamic Tradition" The Men's Network of Houston will present "Homosexuality and the Islamic Tradition;• at the Montrose Counseling Centei; on the evening of Wednesday, Dec. 16, at 7:00 p.m. The lecture will be presented by a native of the middle east. It will cover homosexuality in islamic countries today, as well as offering insight into gay history, as seen through literature produced at the height of the islamic cul­ture. A donation of $3 to $5 is requested. but those unable to pay are welcome. The Montrose Counseling Center is located at 900 Lovett, suite 203. "A Holiday In Hell" Raging Couture To Benefit AIDS Foundation Houston Join Houston's most innovative design pioneers at Rich's at 10:00 p.m. on Fri­day, Dec. 18 for a fast-forward preview T T T HOUSTON LIVE of post-1990's fashion . Featured designers at the event will include Betsy Johnson, Eduardo Ben· nett, Lisa Waering, Nimrod, Alex Chap­man, John Mahe and Johnny Harrell. After the show, dance to music by Houston techno dance band Bamboo Crisis, while sipping cocktails from the smart bat: Admission is $5and will be donated to the AIDS Foundation. Canned goods for the Stone Soup pantry would be greatly appreciated. Names Project Quilt To Be Displayed At The Astrohall Entrance More than seventy panels from the Names Project AIDS memorial quilt will be on display at the Houston Astro· hall's main entrance lobby, Saturday and Sunday, Dec. I I, and 12. The panels will be displayed as part of the 20th Anniversary Edition of the World's Largest Trading Post. Over 500 exhibits showcasing col­lectibles, crafts, antiques and hand­made goods will be at the Trading Post. The Names Project will have merchan­dise available for sale to support its ongoing efforts. Hours are 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Sat­urday, and 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sun· day. Admission is free, parking is $4 per car. Gay Men's Network Dis­cusses The Gay Generation Gap, And Getting Older Support groups for older gays and lesbi­ans are taking shape across America. Gay Men's Network will hold a discus· sion about these groups, and the gay generation gap, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, at 7:30 p.m. at Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. Gay Men's Network is a social and discussion group. It meets one Wednes· day each month to discuss a different topic. For more information, please call 522-0268. Gay Men's Network is not affiliated with Bering Methodist Church. Houston Hospice Invites Vol­unteers For Free Training Program A ten week volunteer training class is being offered in January by Houston Hospice. The class will be made availa· hie in two locations. Volunteers will be taught to work with patients and their families during the final stages of the patient's life. Houston Hospice is a chartered, non· profit organization offering compas­sionate care for the terminally ill. To obtain more information, please call (713) 468-2441. National Leather Association Toy Drive Is In Full Swing The National Leather Association has placed toy drive collection barrels and money jars points in ten local area busi· nesses. Toys collected will benefit the children at Corner Stone Day Care. a center that serves only children with HIV I AIDS and their siblings. NLA members urge you to donate new, factory-wrapped toys. and new or used stuffed animals. Funds collected will be used to purchase Corner Stone wish-list items. The deadline is Dec. 20. Pacific Street is offering free cover to those who bring a toy for their collection barrel. Participating businesses are: Venture 'n, Pacific Street, Gentry, Leather by Boots, Ripcord, Mother'•. The Ranch. X­TC, Ms. B's, Briar Pat.ch, E J's, BRB, The Lazy J, Mary's and QT's. Hayseed classic 'Tuna Christmas' returns to Houston for seasonal run By JAVIER TAMEZ The New Voire/ llouaton Many phenomena in this world have had inauspicious beginnings (consider the Law of Gravity and the apple falling from the tree). And in theater there is probably a larger percentage of humble starts than in other disciplines, hence also a larger number of overnight suc­cess stories. One such raga to riches tale involves the creative team behind "A Tuna Christmas:• which is being presen ted in tlw Cu lion Theatre of the Wortham Cen­ter as purt of U1e 1992-9.1 NationsBank Houston Broadway Series. It ell began with a party. Back in 1981 a group of fun-loving friends in Austin gathered in the home of one of their own for an "entertain­ment party'.' "The rules were simple;• recalls Joe Sears, speaking by telephone form Washington, D.C., of the evening that was to forever change the lives of him and his best friend, J as ton Williams. "Everyone invited to the party had to provide some sort of entertainment for the other gu~'8t8. Jaston and I went and hid ourselves in a room and came up with some of the ch aracters. Tuna, Texas was on the map:' And so it was. Tuna, the third small­est town in Texas, would, before the dee· ade was out, rival its metropolitan neighbors as the most famous commu· nity in the stale. Jo'rom those innocent beginnings at that understalt'd soiree, Sears and Wil­liams went on to perform in local Austin cabarets. Audiences laughed louder and longer with each performance and soon the two actor.writers with their associ­ate writer,dire<"tor Ed Howard had put together enough material to fast talk and countless performances later, the their way into an unused location, the show is still not in its final form. now defunct TransAct Theater. By pure luck, a music critic from Vari­ety Magazine was aaked by friends to attend a showing of "Greater Tuna:• The critic at first scoffed, insisting he was in Austin to check out the cutting edge music scene. He was persuaded, however, a nd the oddball denizens of Tuna now had an important ally. In Octobei; 1982, the show opened in the Circle in the Square, off·Broadway in New York, where it ran for nine months. An eight year tour followed, and simulta neously the show was licen&ed for production in cities aC"ross the country. It was the veritable Cinder· ella story. As Sears put it, "to be success­ful takes a lot of talent and a lotofluck, but we were very, very lucky:• After over 2000 performances, the three men were approached by a repre­sentati ve from the Willia m Morris Agency who handled their a ffairs. Whot did they think about the idea of a sequel to ''Greater Tuna?" "Well we just couldn't believe it;' said Sears. "The ideo of a theatrical sequel was unprec· edented, but we had been playing with new mat<«ial so we put it together using Christmas as a theme:' The current production of the show features an edited and revised script, which is being honed for a Broadway opening in Fall, 1993. The changee con· sistof a sligh\sh uffling of the sequence, the removal of some material and the addition of some new material includ­ing new faces amongst the Tuna popu­lace. Commenting about the changes, Sears said: "We're still trimming. It's not like we're artists with too many brush s trokes, changing it but not a lways ma king it better. It just had false endi ngs~· The thinly threaded plot weaves sev­eral pegs togethei: There's the Tuna Christmas Yard Display Contest, for which Vera Carp (Williams), the town's fashion queen and moral guide, has cre­ated a "Christmas Hall of Fame:' This yard rusplay is composed of a tradi­tional creche with live sheep and Santa, Bing Crosby and Natalie Wood. Vera's "A Tuna Chri•t· . d. ..:.-;. •• ".;. '.•. ;.•_,- ~ •• ~.-~. mas" premiere m • • - - San Francisco in Jaston Wi/11~~· 1Chark,.,, &milkrJ and Joe Sears (&rtha 1989. Three years Bum1/ler) in :II Tuna Chr1&tmas" TT T DATELINE: HOUSTON on track to win the conte•t for the 15th year ma row, except thecontesti• bemg jeopardized by the "Christmas Phan· tom;· who is vandalizing one display after another. There's also the preparation for the community theater production of "A Christmas Carol~' The director of the show, Joe Bob Lipsey (Sears), is con­fronted with the possibility that the light company will pull the plug on Scro­oge and company before any perform­ance. And there's plenty more such as: OiDi Snavely, who is holding a "Peace on Earth" sale at DiOi's Used Gun• and Weapons; Bertha Bumiller. who lei.. down her stiff Baptist hair; Tuna's career girls, lnita Goodwin and Helen Bedd, waitresses at the Tasty (,'ream; and a barnyard full of other•. Sears has his favorites among the townsfolk. "I like Aunt Pearl. Her voice and mannerisms I've taken from a lady in my family. And I've always liked RR-that's DiDi's hu•band. He's based on a Jackie Gleason charactei: Always sees UFO•. poor soul. But I guess my most favorite is lnita Good win. She requires the most energy cause she's so sultry and •assy~ Everyone who watches the show will pick favorites from the 2'2 character.. The large number of characters, in fact. provides one of the most enjoyable aspects of the show. Sears and Williams together go through almost 140 costume change,., and the remarkable transformation form one zany Tunaite to another is a delightfully heady thing to watch . "A Tuna Christmas" i.. kne.,...Jnppinll holiday theatei: It's the nrw""t and fun· niest Christmas tr1tdition. Houston activists gather to say good bye to former headquarters Last Friday night, dozens of Hous- • ton area lesbians and gays, and their friends met one lasttime at 900 D Lovett St. in the Montrose. The building, now slated for destruction, has been home to a number of gay llnd lesbian service organizations over the last decade. A small party was held in the for· mer headquarters of the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucu~. Video footage from past Gay Pride parades, and rallies was shown. State reprei;entative Deborah Dan· burg, who has bet•n a friend of th.e caucus for years, stopped by to rem1· nisce. The party was also the site of the Judging of the 1993 Pride Week logo contest. At the party, judges selected six finalists from the more than thirty entries. Carol Clark, co-chair of the gay pride week committee was delighted with this years entriei; "This year we got some very origi'. nal entries, we are very plea'ed with the response'.' 6 THE NEW VOICE/ DECEMBER 11-17, 1992 T T T FILM REVIEW Bram Stoker's Dracula: pretty to look at, but not much of a movie By JAVIER TAMEZ The New Vo1cel Houston The story of Dracula has undergone countless retellings. It i• possible, though, that none has been anticipated a. much as Francis Coppola's rendition of this timeless tale. In this version, Harker (Keanu Ree­ves), a real estate agent, is sent to Tran­sylvania to handle the London pur­chases of an eccentric Count Dracula (Gary Oldman). He leaves behind his fiancee, Mina (Winona Ryder) with the promise that he will return Wlthin a few months. Not •long after his arrival as the Count's j(Uest, he realizes he is a pris­oner. After several miscues. he makes good his escape, and returns to London only to discover that the Count has already arrived and dined on Lucy (Sadie Frost), Mina's close friend. Harker, Lucy's three •uitors and Abra­ham von Helsing (Anthony Hopkins) prepare to battle the creature, and when he escapes England, they pursue him to Eastern Europe. On a purely visual level, "Bram Stoker's Dracula" is a stunning achieve­ment. Director Coppola has crafted a sumptuously Gothic film, in which splashes of rich, full tones stand in con­trast to uninviting blues and somber grays. An enthralling feast for the eyes is, however, not enough. The movie fails as a whole due to critical errors on Cop­pola's part. the classic novel is closer to Stoker's words than any of the othe~ innumera­ble variations, it does not adequat.ely convey a true sense of the title charac­ter's dark persona. Stoker's Dracula was evil incarnate. Although he cer· tamly lusted, his motives were nev~r noble or in any way sympathetic. Cop­pola's count, though he relishes his appetite, is given to feeble protestations on his existence, and he never shows himself in his most vile state until he mistakenly feels his beloved is threat­ened. These events did occur in the novel, but Stoker's text makes them tan­gential to the crea· ture's evil rather than superseding it. Coppola also resorts to overused images, and he does so too many times. I loet count of the number of times the screen was filled with the ominous castle, balanced on the precipice, against a foreboding sky. It's a movie frame we've all seen in co untless "B" movies. of course billows in great waves as she obliviously marches toward her fate. It's another bad "B" movie flashback. Coppola also took himself just a bit too seriously, and it made him blind to the unintentional levity of the film. Dra­cula's first appearance, for instance, is a joke. An ashen-faced old man appears out of nowhere wearing a laughably strange hair-do (sort of a cross between a Star Wars alien and a Gibson girl) and sporting a ridiculous looking red cape with a train long enough to make the British royals envious (or at least Edward and the females). Other comic areas include Dracula's shadow, which moves independently of his body. This is an ostensibly terrifying phenomena, but it's been used in far too many cartoons to cause anything but a chuckle. Then there's the crazed ran­tings of one of Harker's colleagues, sent to handle the Coun l's affairs before Har­k et Irrevocably altered to serve Dra­cula, his lunacy is more reminiscent of the nutty professor than an obsessed and tormented soul. And finally the passion, or at least the attempt thereof. It's supposed to beover­powenng love, able in the end to over­come Dracula's curse, but it plays out like a pulp romance novel with syrupy sentiment. First, he changes the focus of the story Gary Oldman etaro aa Dracula in tM drama "Bram Stoker's from horror to love. While his account of Dracula" In another trite scene, Lucy is lured out into a garden, in the mid­dle of the night, during a thunder­storm, wearing nothing but a nightgown, which Coppola lavished to much attention on the visual stylization at the expense of the storyline and the acting. It's easy to admire what you see on the screen, but impoRSible to forgive the visual over­kill or overlook what's missing from the film . • T T T HOUSTON LIVE Two tellings of Dickens Christmas classic provide holiday cheer By JAVIER TAMEZ The Sew Voice/ Houston One of the most ht-loved parts of any Chnstmas oeaoon is '"A Christmas Carol;' the Charles Dickens classic which has been enjoyed by generations. There have been around 300 versions of this beautiful story told on stage, screen and radio. Two wonderfully different stage pro­ductions arc currently bcin1t shown locally. '"A ChristmM Carol: A Ghost Story of Christmas;· at the Alley through Dec. 27th, and "Christmas is Comin' Uptown;' at the Ensemble through Jan.5th, offer enchanting vari­ations of this m°"t endearing of all holi­day tales. Both productions adhere to Dickens' general storyline. To briefly remind, Ebenezer Scrooge, a cold, heartless and lonely soul Wlth no regard for his fellow man is not about to change his sour com­portment iu•t for Christmas. He srems particularly ill-mannered with Bob Cra­tch it, a selfle.,s, hard-working employee, who toasts Scrooge's health even though Scroo1te has little regard for Cra­tchit's health or for that of Cratchit's youngest •on, Tiny Tim. On Christmas Eve, Scrooge is warned by the ghoi;t of his dead partne~ Marley, that if he doesn't change his ways, he is destined to a future of Earth-bound haunting, forever weighted by the chain he forged in life. In the course of the night, Scrooge is visited by three ghosts: The Spirits of Christmas Past, Present and lo'uture. Through visions of Yuletides that were, are and might yet be, they're able to change Scrooge's outlook. He is trans· formed into a caring, joyous man who yearns to help those le8S fortunate than he. The a1milanties between the produc­tions end there. At the Alley, the story is snugly famil­iar, even with its minor adaptations. Set in early 19th century London, it has all the charming trappings of a pre-Victo· nan tale. Scrooge (James Black) is a surly, bit­ter miser with nary a pleasant greeting. Marley (Jeffery Bean) is a blustery, bel­lowing apparition who wails with the howls of a tormented wind. Christma. Past(Bettye Fitzpatrick) is a plump woman with a good chet'r demeanot Christmas Present (Charles Krohn) i• a proud, sturdy pereonage, and his voice boom• with stem procla­mations. Christmas Future is a f88Ci­nating, eerie, robotic behemoth, that acknowledges with the shrill siren of a locomotive's steam whistle, appropriate for its metallic shell. In this production, the ghostlier quali­ties of the story are emphas1l.ed and the addition of three street vendors, who are also the three spirits, adds more depth to the play. KenMt.'i Davia, J E.T. J,, &be Wilson, .Joy Joy Wilson and Douilre GIJJVf!r In "Chrutmaa 11 Com in' Uptown • The acting and directing are both g reat James Black makes a ter rific Scrooge, espe>­cially as a bubbly old-timer, who's just rediacovered life ' s effer­vescence. Jeffery Bean does another stand-out job as a tails but made sin­ister with facial highlights sug· gesting a skull, The most signif· 1cant differenc·e though is the m u s c ''Uptown ' B' ' vibrancy as a the­atrical piece comeb from rousing musical numbers that are delightful and effusive. In particular, the James Black (&rooge) in Alley TMater'• production of ''A Christmas Carol" title song, which opens the play; "Lifeline;• a raucous anthem from Christmas Past; "Get Down Brothei; Get Down;' a sizzling, slammer of rhythmic advice from Christmas Present; and "One Way Ticket to Hen;• an electrifying warning sung by the chorus are exctptional, crowd·pleasing tunes. baleful ghost of Marley and even more so as a rumpled and lovable house· keepei; Mre. Dither. Director/adaptor Michael Wilson has a smooth, deft hand. He gives the show added verve and well-developed cha rec· terizations. The Alley's production is a hearty ren­dition of '"A Christmas Carol!' Though ensconced in the period glow of another era, it's flavorfully laced with unobtru· sive alterations. It's a perfect holiday tradition. At the Ensemble, the seasonal classic takes on a decidedly updated look. 18;IO's London is present day Harlem in "Christmas is Comin' Uptown" Scrooge (Keenan Zeno) is an unfeeling slum lord, who ignores the shivering pleas of his tenants when the temperature drop&. Marley (Michael Ballard) moet cloo;ely resembles the Dickens description of the character, appearing in tattered cloth ­ing with a cumbersome chain rattling arouna him. He speaks, thou1th. with a ghetto twang. Christmas Past (Werner Richmond>_is a street.wise ooul brother, dressed m boxer sweats and wearing an oversized afro. Chri•tma• Present. (Donna Mar­lene Wilkerson) is a stnkmg woman, wearing fashionable garb, with an Afn. can flavor, giving her contemporary staiure a suitable tie to Kwanzaa. Christmas r'uture IJE.T., Jr.) is dashing There are also polished dance moves showcased in this work. Ranging from rap-style gyrations to sleek modern dance lines, they add tremendously to the show as a whole. The acting here is first-rate. Michael Ballard is curmudgeonly with a smugly, petulant manner. Werner Richmond makes a frantic and fervent Christmas Past. Donna Marlene Wilkerson is comely and sassy and shows real punch as Christmas Present, and J .KT., Jr. uses a flashy showmanship as a smoot,h·talking, cane-tapping Christ· mas Future. Director Eileen Morris, with the help of musical director Hope Shiver and choreographer Michael Ballard, u•es uptown flair and clever staging to make this show vivac10us and irresistible. "Christmas is Comin' Uptown': 1s a rollicking, jazzy version of a classic story. It's a delectable change thatclicks with appeal. Two Houston Christmas treats are back for the season, and you should make room on your calendar for both. LIVING BENEFITS CAN CURE ONE OF AIDS' MOST DEVASTATING SIDE EFFECTS. DECEMBER 11-17, 1992 / THE NEW VOICE 7 The fight against AIDS is tough enough. What you don't need is a separate struggle with one of its most devas­tating side effects-a struggle with serious financial problems. For many people, a life insurance policy can provide an immediate and welcome source of cash to pay for medical care, housing, transportation or just a vacation to rest and relax. As a general rule, we can offer from 55% to 80% of the face value of our clients' policies. The final amount depends on a variety of fac­tors, including an evaluation of your medical records-which are held in strictest confidence- by our staff doctors. ABOUT OUR COMP~Y Urmg Benefits was the first company to pioneer the purchase of life insurance policies from people with life-threatening illness. Today, 1te set the highest standards and practices and remain the induslrys leading company. Kil ore a publicly traded and regu· lated company with our own cop1tol Liring Benefits hos never (nor will we ever} shored medico/ mfor· motion or sought lo resell any c/ientS policy lo a lhird party. Please call us for a personal and confidential evaluation. We under­stand your struggle with AIDS; per­haps we can help with the financial side of your fight. For more information, call 1-800-458-8790. Or write: Living Benefits, Inc., 6100 Seagull Lane NE, Suite 108, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87109. LIVING BENE FITS ~ A VIATICAL SETTLEMENTS coMPANY tt Dedicated lo living with quality and dignity. 8 THE NEW VOICE I DECEMBER 11-17, 1992 TT T YOURS TRULY IN A SWAMP Remembering Thanksgiving through the years, from Porky's to present By LEONARD EARLJOH!'iSOl" The New Voice New Orleans You know the thing many say about Manh Gras• Yoo know, that it's the amateur's night out? I feel much that way towards ThanksglVmg. Don't get me wrong, I love Thanksgiv· ing It is my favonte holiday, a holiday dedicated to eating. As a youth, I learned to cat m my Father's restau· rant, in the extreme southern Up of Illi nms. He was known from Memphis to C1ucago as the greatest chef along U.S. Highway 61. People drove 30, even 45 m• es toeat at "Porky's,' h1, rucknamc. Hl.8 restaurant grew from a roadSlde, 1uke JOID t, with a sanded dance floor and slot machmes. He was 36 when I was born, and begmning to narr'Jw the wtde swath he had cut through life. HIS swath began a deoded down SIZ· mg when my mother, his second wife, and the first Amencan-bom ofGerman­born Proltlltants, felt the call to Catholi· asm. Our entire family joined the Ca th· olic mission of Our Lady of Pathama, amid a shock of bristled Protestant eye· brows. I vowed to a Methodist-practicing Aunt, I would not join such Latin mumbo-Jumbo. I did, thou11h. And so did my fa the~ The Jukebox, and slots went, the dance floor became a hardwood din· mg room floor; and Porky·, had become a "sit-down place:• by the time I reached the age of gastronomic reason. The meals he pot out from "that hole:' as my mother (who found little solacem her religion) sometime' called Porky's, were the stuff of culinary dreams. On the first Thanksgiving after my parents bought a new home, they had relatives in from as far away as St. Louis. These were Germon relatives of my Mothers, who drank beer; :aughed ti!. tears come down their cheeks. and told toles of how life in "The !'cw World ' had served them. Lots of them remembered "coming ove~ including my Grandmother; who was sixteen at the Ume she made the crossing. My Grandmother "came over" with all her family. Her parents became "Grossvater und Grossmutte~' in The New World, and they never learned to speak much Engli•h. Grossmutter learned to say, "Hold thy gush, and eat thy pens~;· a general admonition to behave at table. She spoke it with Bibli· T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA cal thunder. At that first Thanksgiving, in my par· ents new home, my Grandmother neared 80. Her Parents were dead and she almost never spoke Gennan. She wa. very proud of her daughter's con· quest. Herda ughter, who became my mother, had married the town rounder, and turned him to God, albeit 11 Catholic God. And they had bought the big house that used to belong to the village under takci: I love the opulence of'l'hanksgiving I love the moment of to king stock. The demonstrative boast of bounuful har­vest! In the past 12 years, the horrors of homelessness ond illness, c nc,n be'· wethcrs for Amcnca's decLne, hove left many feeling thot taking stock is no longer a heart warming exper1enl'e. Add to that, this year's resurgence of Nazism in Germany; fascism in Italy; starvation in Somalia, and dark clouds gathering in Yugoslavia, ~;urope's tradi­tional war nursery. and you might fore­see the hope of the new Clinton adminis· lrat1on check-mated, and this year's Thanksgivmg muted I spent the ho) !la~ week ma splendid French Quarter palace, belonging to friends gone to ~1orida. I roasted a tur­key bought at a reasonable price from the Lieutenant Governor's Supermar­ket, and used a new recipe for a mer· liton/seafood, double-l'rusted pie that would have made me shine in my Father's eye. The day was spent lolling under a banana tree m the wa= embrace of a hot tub. The evening found company shoring my merLton pie. It was a won· drous day. Thal mght, standing on the nver bank, a street hustler spoke with a bearded man. We walked (they together, me belundJ past Cafe Du Jllondc to the door of the M1ss1Ss1pi: River Hot toms, a bar famous for grand, free buffets on lesser occasions than todny's. They went m. I went around the hlock once and then sallied to the bar for a long neck Bud. The bearded man and hustler filled their plates twice. They drank. They laughed. Thanksgiving, 199:.! was a• fine 88 they come. We have good days with the bad. Married students resist opening student housing to homosexuals EUGENE, Ore, Saturday, Dec. 5 (AP/­Some students with children say they oppo&e a plan lo allow homosexual couples OT unmarried heterosexual couples with­out kids lo move rnlo Univer•ity of Oregon student family housing. '1b1a would mean the disintegration of family housing aa we know it!9 ~aid Car me! Bender, who lives in family housing with her three children. Hender, along with more than 30 others. spoke at a hearing Thursday afternoon in response to a proposal that would allow any ~tudent age 21 or older to move into apartments traditionally reserved forfam· ilies and marned couples. However, low-income students with children still would be given prionty for the achool'a 752 e.partment.8. Many who spoke at the hearing alsocrit· icized the age limit. "I don't think you can expect us to live in a dorm:• E<Bid Stephanie Oppenlander, 19, who oaid she already lives in family hou•· ing with her husband .... Ibis is age die~ cnmination~· Mo•t of those who spoke disagreed with the proposal but some single students spoke in favor of the chanllH. ·1 deserve affordable housing too;• •a•d Suzanne Levinson, a graduate student who receives finantial &Jd Marlene Dret1che~ a student advocate, .aid she viewed the pniposal as an attempt to eidestep the larger issuP of allowing homo~xuala in "'committed" relation· ships to be defined as a married rouple. The university"s housing director, Mike Eyster, said it is too •oon to decide what to do about the proposal. "I need to let it soak in:· he said. T T T AUSTIN SOAP Talent Search Continues for Twelve weeks of Christmas; Finale is Dec. 22 By SUZE"ITE LOCKE The !'it>w Voice/ Austm Ml2 weeks of Christmas" Talent search continues-The winner chooses a gift!! Tueflday is the last chance to get in on the winnings. Next Tuesday (Dec. 22) will be the Grand Prize Finale evening. All the "12 weeks .•. " winners will vie for the Grand Prize! !'iicole and Vanessa Raye will host this evening's events. But, before the Grand Finale, there are a few other exciting events. A Christmas Light Show that will be held at both the Austin Nexus and the San Antonio Nexus, Friday, Dec. 11, at 10:00 p.m. "Join us for the celebrations" invites Kathy (Nexus Manager) wa1t ... there's more! Bring out your funniest. sexiest or most comfortable boxers and join the parade. Sunday, Dec. 20, al 9:30 p.m. Nexus is parading ... ond those boxers could be worth $$$!Just in time for last nunute Shopping' Come on, jom the fun! Some of Nexus' weekly specials include· Country Wednesday with 50 cent .Miller Ute on tap and free country dance lessons. On Thursdays .. brmg your meat, we'll help ... cook it! Nexus does steak night 7:00 p.m. till 9:00 p.m. Any drink in the house is only $1.75 all rug ht! And on Fridays ... $1 well, $1 long· nex and $1 Ritas. Play Pool? There's a pool tourney 8:00 p.m. on Sundays. Happy hour- Tues· day through Friday 5:00 p.m. till 9:00 p.m. and $2 mugs with 50 cent Miller Lite refills every night. A New Year• Eve Party in the making! Stay tuned for more information. "A Night to Remember'" Friday, Dec. 18 at 9:00 p.m. until Dec. 19 at 9:00 p.m. Auntie Mame's presents a music mare· thon you won't soon forget! DJ Kevin Campbell is volunteering his lime, tal· enl and energy for an unprecedented, non•top, single-handed twenty-four hour music marathon. Jim, Cynthia and the entire etaff of Auntie Mame's invite you to come and join in this celebration of music, and to support and encourage Kevin as the hours progress! Can he do it'! You can personally sponsor The Christopher House by donating as little as $1 an hour for the twenty-four hours that Kevin spins. If your budget is limited, any donat10ns will be greatly appreci­ated. Make your checks payable to Christopher House. Auntie Mame's would like to thank you for contributm11 to this organization. and for helping to make this concept in fund raiSJng a gleaming success. To end thlS fantastic event Mame's will host a "Down Home Christmas. come share the joY,' This event will benefit the ASA Pantry and the Paul K1rbv Foundatton, Dec. 19, from 10:00 a.m. till closing. Don·t nuss these events! Boy, Austm has many entrepreneurs! Keep an eye on A.D.S. Jewelry ... in the Austin ad section. They have some excellent ideas on bedazzling piece,;! Another ad to watch for is the Leather Chest at Chain Drive ad. Mike has an awesome selection of fine leathery, local 1ewelry (including A.D.S.), toys, flags, mags, chains and hes always putting something special on sale! Like this week it's $49 for a leather veet. Last week it was$99 for leather jackets! What will it be next week? Don't miss these great Christmas deals. In January the Leather chest will be getting body jewelry! Also offered are portraits by a local artist in either oil or pencil-another excellent gift idea. You've got to check out the selection Mike offers at the Leather Chest. For more information call 478-2261. Speaking of the exciting things at Chain Drive ... Dec. 13, 4:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m Capital City Riders pres· ent...Santa ·s Twisted Playhouse! The CC Riders will be dressed as Santa and Ms. Santa and a few elves. Eat, drink and be merry! All proceeds will be used to purchase groceries for the ASA Food Bank ... Heard the Capital City Riders charge out of Christmas !>rag into full color attire and go shopping! Wha~ a~ exciting event! A must see to appreciate. Watch out Apple Tree and HEB ... Capi· tal City Riders are coming. On the 12th day of Christmas Char· lies gave to me .. a smoked turkey! Dec 12, through 24, Charlie's will give away not only one ... but two smoked turkeys a day. One, during happy hour and one, around m1dni11ht. Come Clltch a buzz and a bird! IJcc. 17, A Bi11. Hill ~;vent. Charlie s apprec-iates their sp<-cial. cus· tomers and employees. und 18 havmg a party to stop all part••• to prove it! Bet· ler drink special• than you can possibly imagine. You ha"<' to be there to apprec1- te it! All proceeds (and when I say pro· ~8 1 mean over $2500 in personal sponsors and still more coming) to bene· fit Project Transition! Fruit basket give· aways, food, drink ond ... for his infa· mous Christmas dinner, Christmas day about 1:00 p.m. Charlie's will open at noon. Dec. 20, 'Bout Time also shows their appreciation for their special customers and employees. With a buffet at 6:00 p.m. and drink specials you won't believe! Even if I told you, you wouldn 'l believe me! You've got lo see it for your· self1 Also helping Project Transition and the Wellness Center: Oil Can Harry's ... Seal!OnS Greeting! Get ready for Harry's Winter Wonderland Christ· mas Party Dec. 18. This very special eve· ning the Austin Gay Men's Chorus will grace the club with harmonious voices, during their first ever club appearance. Truly a crescendo to the excitement of Christmas! At Chances they're partying to '!'her· apy Sisters, Saturday, Dec. 12. On Sun· day, Dec. 1a, l.ynda and Ginger, then Diana ,Jones v.ill be ent.crtaining Thursday, !Jee 17, Love Tree nnd Bent· ley Tock will be nl 900 Hed Rivtor, portv· ing at Chanel'&! For mort• informauon call 472~273. Jimmy James will he at the Crossing on Red River Street, Dec. 21 (Monday) at 10:45 p.m. ill' there! The Capital City Community Center and Out Youth Au•tin mvite you to the first Annual Community Holiday Cele· bration: The Fa La La La Feast and Fol· lies Pot Luck and Talent Show. Friday, Dec. JS. at 7:00 p.m. up•tairs at the Out Youth Drop In Center, :.i:i:lO Guadeloupe. Dress casually. Bnng food if you are able. If not, bring yoursclf1! DECEMBER 11-17, 1992 / THE NEW VOICE 9 How are JOU managing? We C'an heJn. '>t,1dtlandcrs L1•et1rie pharm.ic) program emp<'''er~ CU.I JJ• ·<'U to I \C ,1fc t<> the fi..llcst !low~ B\ m.1kmg 11 ca,1cr to get your me<l c. ins. \\t ,1fler free express de 1\Cl) and we l'andle \our msuranu: papen rnrk. \\c also pnllell your rnnf cknu.1l l\ h) ~hippmg xc:ordmg 1,, y0ur mstrucll<'llS Plus, we hill your msurance LOmp.tn) d1rcct'y .111d dtm l rcqu re p;1yment up from, which reduce-; your out of-1wckct cxpcn,c:. 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Wednesday llJec. 16) come and see your favonte drag Queen of yester·year, in full bloom! A Zodiac Revue will be per­forming at Choices. 1214 Leopard. Call il88-a742 for more information. As always, the beautiful Ms Tanya and company will entertain on Sunday at midnight, 1t·s always a full house for Tanya's showb~ Mmmm-.okay, are you ready for this? .The Dream Boys will be back L>ec. 17. Now, back to more serious mat· ters .. : Mo" is hosting a Choices Christ· mas Dinner WJth all the trimmings Wed­nesday, Dec. 23 at 6:00 p.m. It will be held at the Metropolitan Community Church, at the corner of 11th and Craig. (1315 Craig/ Grab,;! Choiceb' way of spreading Holiday cheer. Please sign up for dmner at Choices, Hidden Door, CBAF or the M.C.C so they know how many are attending. Ch01ces customers are hespecially" special, and to prove it they are keeping the pnces down so that you can enjoy the holiday spirit. 60 cent draft, 75 cent wells and I can beer, plus numerous other drink specials. Happy Holi· days! ... Dnve safely' From Choices owner and staffi Zondra and Lisa are throwmg a Christmas Party for not only their great cubtomers but their staff, also. Dec. 17th come and party with you favorite Desert Hearts Staffer. They will be on the other side of the bar, as guest bartenders and guest D.J:s will be in control! (Heard Butch from Hidden Door will be there .•. Mmmm, in control!) Hey! 'Mom" will be in town partying there too! Come by and share the festivities. Dec. 18 is the Birthday Bash, if you haven'tjoined the Birthday Club, do so quickly! The girls look forward to being open Christmas Day and New Years. Be sure to stop by for holiday cheer. Between Christ· mas and New Years (Dec. Z7) Desert Hearts will host another All Female Extrava· ganza •. a great way to continue t h e party! Recently, Desert Hearts had a great show to start the holidays off right. MC: Terri, Keri, Lynn, Patsy, Donna and Naomi-Enter­tainer of the Year­- intoxicated par­tiers at Desert Hearts. Righ t after the New Year rolls in, Dena Kaye will be performing at De•· ert Hearts Jan.3rd at 9:00 p.m. For more information call i'.ondra and Lisa at 1!51·1178. Ms. Teri. Deurt Hearta' command pnformer La Vida's ..• The hfe._welcomea an additional joint partner: George Haines. Salute! TT T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Passt...what's going on at La Vida's? They're keeping it under wraps ... but I hear some exciting plane are in the works! Stay tuned. The Rebels ar going Hog Wild! They're giving away three hams for Christmas. Tickets for raffle are $1 a piece or 6 for $5! Help sponsor a Christ· mas for adopted PW N.s. Bob still has a fantastic Christmas sale going on at the Leatherack. (Inside the Hidden Door) Santa's Helpers; only two weeks left! Tony and Denis of Anthony's Bed and Breakfast (off Ocean Drive) express the bt'Bt Holiday Wishes! Anthony will prepare and serve an exquisite ChristmaR Dinner for in· house guests! Make your reservations now. Bop till you drop to Johnny Dee and the Rocket 88's! A Christmas Charity Gala Event to benefit Coastal Bend AIDS Foundation and the Laura C. Murphy Children's Fund Dec. 18, at Sheraton Hotel Bentley's 8:30 p.m.- 1:00 a.m. Hors d'oeuvres served from 7:00 p.m. till 11:00 p.m. Donations: $25a couple, $15 a single. For ticket informs· tion call 512·994·0647 or write to P.O. Box 72082, Corpus Christi, Texas 78472. (Attention: Rick Compain) Free food for your soul! New Charis· matic Group now forming. It will begin Saturday Dec. 12 at 6:00 p.m. Bible study and prayer meeting with lots offellowRhip. Con· ta~t Rev. Laura or Deacon Dixie at 939-9698 for loca· Keri at Desert tion. Heart• Nationwide gay, lesbian radio station KGAY qegins broadca ing Hy I>A:-iA < onn:1.o FOR TH[ NEW t/ E DE!\ \'ER, Monday, :>iov. 30 (APJ­Don't expect to hear anythini: too rnry on n new coast·to-coast le,,bian and gay rnd o stauon featuring alternative music and 1ssuc-onent<'d newto1. "People wi'. be bored before th~y will I><' Utillated;' KGAY station manager Clay Henderson s~ud. "!'here is nothing thatw~ go out on the airwaves that will offend my sweet, little old Republican mother in Brazoria County, Texas" The station broadcasts from a tiny studio to on estimated 7.5 million homer in North America, Mexico and the Car· ibbcan equipped with satellite dishes. Direct broadcast satellite rea•ption will be an opt10n on sum<· late 199:1 and 1994 automobiles. And the station is working In encourage cable systems to carry KGAY as ba<·kl(Tound music for their information channels. Henderson •aid investors pumped $1 million into the station to bring •main· stream radio for a gay and le•bian audi· enceu to market. The station started broadcasting Saturday night. Specifically lt>Ab1an and gay program· TT T DATELINE: BATON ROUGE ming is SC'heduh·d for uhout flf> hours each wet·k, coupled with 105 hours of progressive rock musi<·. ThP a;tation·1i1 new• programming includes reports from the Gay Net News Service, based in Albuquerqu1·. N M , Henderson said. The statum is not govt""med hy the Fedttal Commun1cat1ona Commisswn. but Henderson said hiutaff-1 :l people in Denver and eight corre11pondenlb­has been instructed to be "journalists first, gay journalist. second:' "We have a r"'ponsibility to show both sides of the story, and to label opin· ion exactly that:• he said. KGAY d1.,•sn 't give out 1t• •tutwn addre.s to the gt·n1·rul puhli1·, partly becauMl of anb-homosf'xuol scntinH'nt m Colorado. '!'ht• stat1•'s voten; approved a measure in l':ovt·mb(•r that invnli dated gay nghts ordinam·<·s in thrt"e l'lt· ieb and prohibit>; any such laws from being enacU.-d in the futur<'. Hender.on said threats won't ket'p the station off the air. "Life i.s too short to live und<·r the veil ot threats;' said Henden;on, a I ?·year vet· eran of gay and lesbian media•tart·upi;. "If people want to threaten me, they'll have to get in line:· Louisiana proposal would require reports on positive tests for HIV BATO!'i ROUGE, La., Friday, Dec. 4 (AP 1-Doctors and other medical pro­fessionals would be required to report all positive tests for the AIDS virus under a proposal tn the works. Rays Rtate epidenuologist Louise McFarland. Doctors now must report on cases of fully developed AIDS, but there is no requirement to report the AIDS virus, known as the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV The AID~ Vlrus, usually spread through ..exual relations or blood con· tact, is fatal. There is no known cure. Mandatory reporting of the test results is noce••&rY to learn the true extent of HIV infe('(ion among Louisi· ana residents, Dr. Mc~'arland said Thursday. The mformation can help the state allocate its own resources or obtain fed· eral money to address the AIDS epi· demic. As of November. 376.1 cases of AIDS T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA were reported to the state Department of Heath and Hospital's public health office since records were kept, and 2404 people died of the disease. It may take a person infected with HIV years to develop symptoms of AIDS. To estimate the number of HIV· infected people in the state. healf!' offi· ctals multiply the number of AJDSc~ by 10. That would put the number o Louisianians with the virus at 37,630, bat health officials acknowledge the true number of cases could be substan· tially higher or !owe• Louisiana ranks ninth highest among the states in AIDS cases per 100.000 residents. Despite that high ranking, Louisiana is one of about eight states that currently has no HIV report· mg program, Dr. McFarland said The office of public health's proposed rule would place HIV on the list of 41 other illnesses that must be reportL-d. A public hearing on the proposal 18 set for Dec. 29 in New Orleans. The rule could take effect early next year. Military and veterans groups meet to discuss ban on homosexuals WASHllSGTO!';, Tuesday, Dec. I (APl­Representativesof major militsry and vet· erans organizations met Tuesday to dis· cuss strategy to keep the ban on homosex · uals ID the military in place. '"There \\'68 not a single dissension" to the conunsus that President...lect Clin· ton's stated intention of ending the ban on gays would nCfet't military reudinees, said retired Army Mai r .. ·n. J Milnor Roberts. Roberts said about 60 retired snd active­duty military people attend«l, from such groups as the Ammcan Legion. the Veler· ans of Foreign Wars, the Association of the U.S Army, the Navy Leai:ue. the Reserve Officers Association and the Retir<-d Offi<·•r• A•s<>ciation. He saud one condusion was that the organizing group, called the Coalition To Mamt.am Military Readmes.. ohould gather eviden,.., of what h<• sD1d an• adverse effed11 of gays on the m1ht.ary. The chairperson of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Army Gen Colin l'ow..Il, &ud 1n a speech Monday night that he support• continuatwn of th(• bun, butdors not think its lifting w•1uld "'break tht> fon·t•" or rausc ma88 ret1ignat10ns. Clint<m ha• s1ud ht• would move a1111res 81vely to end the ban, hut promuwd to con eult first "'th miht.ary oflkiuls and said he would enforce a otnet code of conduct. Declare war on free radicals. With the first multi-antioxidant nutritional supplement developed at a major university research center. 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JOHN'S WORT HERBAL EXTRACT CANAID {ESSIAC FORMULA) VENUS FLYTRAP FORMULA COMPOSITION A-HERBAL FORMULA 12 THE NEW VOICE/ DECEMBER 1117 1992 TT T BATON ROUGE SOAP Buddies celebrates grand opening, Argon Christmas show grows and grows By MS. JEA.'l;NE RE' M01'1ANDON The New Voice Baton Rouge that $50.00 prize money. Scandal­ous is set up as a show bar in town, complete with run· way. The crowd knows how to respond to the tal· ent that shows up weekly. It is alway' a fun time for all who attend. Argon bas planned 1l< first annual Christmas show. The 'how will be on the 1 th at 11 30 p.m. Starnng m the show will be: Amazmg Grace, who was Entertamer of the Year for 1992. and for· mer Miss Goy America, Tosha Kohl. as well ns former Miss Universe nt large. Donna Day Also appearing "ill be Sweet Savage, former .Mj,•s Tn-State of 1991 It IB rumored that the hst could grow sLl larger. we will see. When I stopped m nt Argon, Solly wa;; busy put· ting on the finishing touches. Buddies held 1ts Grand Openmg on I.eon and Dale, Buddies regulars Friday night I hold a pool tourna· ment every Tues· day with a cash prize for the win· ner. The bar has two pool tables Last \loeekend was bu,y, Church had the S&M Video Bar, and the hou"' rocked all rught long. Friday mght Scandalous held its weekly tnlent show. It was well attended with several per­formers coming out to take advantage of think everyone in Baton Rouge stopped m at>omepointduring the evening. The bar wa» pocked. I mean packed. The parking lot was full and you could hear the party going on from down the street. with video and Peggy Hmes at Buddie. Sally at Argon Buddies is located along the Mississippi River on Oklahoma Street next to the Ramada Inn off Nicholson . They poker games. The bar itself is shaped in an "l.:' shape with mirrors behind the ba~ It makes the bar seem even larger than it is. Kyle and James are the owners. You know them, from the Time Zone. There is the same family feeling at Buddies that there was at the Time Zone. All the regu· la rs, but it now is a nightly stop for many as they make the rounds from night club to night club. There is no telling who you ar~ going to run into at Bud­dies. This night the bar was live David Perkms, Jack of all Trade• with muHic. bal· loons, laughter and jokes were abound as people moved into the bar and circu· lated. Some stayed all night long, closmg down the bar, others left in couples. It seems like everyone show<•d up at some point during the night. As I took pie· tures, more than one person wanted to make sure I had regular film and not slide film (grin) in the camera. Some things are hard to live down. As you can tell by this article, the film and camera worked fine. It was a won· derful evening for everyone. If you are one of the few who did not stop in Friday night, take some time and go by Buddies on Oklahoma Street and "'"' who you will run into. It's a fun place to be. Remember Baton Rouge, if you don't coll me I can't post your pla ns here. The number is still 665-7815. I want to hear from you! 'YT TSAN ANTONIO SOAP Hearts in Victory AIDS telethon; Bonham dresses up for Christmas By ESHCOL RICHARD WRIGHT The r-;ew Voicw San Antonio Commg soon to a television near you: 'Hearts in Victory" AIDS Telethon, Sunday Dec. 13th, from 2:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. on Fox 35 cable 7. People have been talking about it for months and now it's here. Ye•, that's right! A four --~-.... star telethon you've got to see. It's about time for an AIDS telethon. Please don't miss it. It's the best thing television has had to offer since the election. Da1ley's Liquors at 2410 N. Main wants you to have a very merry Christ­mas and a gay New Yeai: Check out Dai­ley's Liquors and wme,; and their great pnces with very reasonable delivery fees. There are terrific walk in specials every Thursday, Friday and Saturday. For a good time this holiday season with alcohol involved I strongly suggest Dai­ley's. Charlee Dailey's Liquors at 733- 1251 or 735-9051. Well, what's new in San Antonio: The Wild Club has remodeled-leave it to ~ael the manager to come up with the idea of bnng1.0g ch&n-link fencing into Angie and Brian Bonh4m door 1taff T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA the club. I'm not aur~ prised. The Wild Club has always been known for remodeling the club every other month or month and a half. They usually do this right before a big event What could be bigger this month than Christmas? Well, just think about it. The cost of my Christmas present Dee from Texas Trash perhapi;, or the amount you '11 spend on Miss Gay U.S.A. Tandi Andrews birthday is coming up Wednesday, Dec. 23rd. She will be hav· ing a Birthday 1 Christmas show wi ~ special guest from the Rivera Hotel m Las Vegas. Hot Chocolate. the famous Coco, Georgia Peach and many more. Drop by the Bon· ham Exchange and check out their fabulous Christmas decora tions. Being one of the largest Gay Clubs in down· town side by side with many high risee, the Bonham felt they should join in with trim­ming the outline of the hundred year old building with Christmas lights. On top of that, the •mployees are run· ning around say· ing "You better work bitch;' which meana that could only be a subtle hint that Ru Paul is coming to town. That's right, Dec. 13th at the Bonham Exchange. The walls may come tum· bling down as Ru Paul performs his top ten seller, "You better work bitch:' For more information call 271-3811. United States government must pay some legal fees in gay sailor case I.OS ANGELES, Tuesday, Jl~c I AP>-A federal iudge who reinstated a gay sailor to the Navy ordered the U.S. government to pay some of the sailor's legal fees for failing to withdraw an appeal in the case. U.<; Distnrt Judge Terry J . Hatter Jr. ordered the government Monday to pay Petty Officer Keith Meinhold's expenses for o Nov 16 hearmg Meinhold's attorney, Harry Melkonian, said the fees could run about $10,000 but that the mon•y would be donated to a legal defense fund because hie firm is represent­ing Meinhold for free. Hatter told government lawyer11 before the November heanng that amce they had already appealed his order reinstating Memhold to the 9th US. Circuit Court of Appeal m San Francisco. he no longer had 1unsd1cuon in a lawsuit by Meinhold chol· Jenging the military'• ban on homosexu· ala. Government lawyers said they would drop the appeal. Hatt.er went ahead and heard arguments in the case so that he could make a ruling if the higher court dis· m1saea the government's appeal. According to court pa!>"rS, however, fed era! proaecutors decided not to drop the appeal. Hatter had ordered theNavytoremstate Meinhold. a 12-year Navy veteran honors· bly discharged in August after disclosing on natJonal television that he is gay Hatter said Meinhold, 30, had to be returned to his job pending the outcome of his lawsuit. Meinhold returned to duty Nov. 12 as a sonar technician for P-a submarine hunt· era at Moffett Naval Air Station m Moun· tain View, Cahf. The Ju slice Department has filed another appeal seeking to overturn the t('mporary order with the U.S. Court of Appeal• for the Federal Crrcu1t m Waohingtol'I. There are 1500 homeless youth on the streets of Houston every night. They are 15 times more likely to be HIV-positive than other teenagers, and between 35 and 50% of these teenagers are gay or lesbian. To make a contribution or volunteer, or if you need our help, call (713) 942-9884. HIPY Houston Insu1u1e for the Pro1cction of Youth, Inc. The Houston Institute for the Protection of Youth (HIPY) is here for them. We are here for them with housing so they don't have to sleep in doorways or parks, or trade 'favors" for a place to spend the night. We are here for them with clothes so that they are not left out in the cold. We are here for them with a safe place to meet, iind friends, and just hang out. And HIPY saves lives by giving teens straightfor­ward, non-judgemental information about safer sex. In order to continue to be here for them, we need your help. 500 Ways To Take The Hassle Out Of Holiday Shopping. With over 500 merchants under one roof nothing beats the Astrohall's Trading Post for one-stop holiday shopping convenience. And talk about selection! There's everything from antiques. fine collectibles and crafts to unique handmade goods and accessories. Make the smart choice for Christmas and come to Houston's favorite shopping show. Admission is free! December 1 2 • 13 Show hours Saturday 12/12 IO am I 00 Pm Sundav 12113 II am 5 00 pm p..,kJng $4 I"" w for tnformatton call 1713) 799 9500 t'.>.htbll •im<..-1713) 799 9632 • No pun. I~ ntn"HAl'l' t: ,,., •' hr dotJI Mmtnwm prUt' V1.l1Jr l!lO and pnJ\1drd by ~ ~ l't:n.t IDl'rc-°"lanb 1307 Fairview 3 blocks west of Montrose 529-1414. DECEMBER 11 17, 1992 / THE NEW VOICE 13 SELLING YOUR LIFE INSURANCE POLICY FOR CASH SHOULD BE A QUICK AND SIMPLE EXPERIENCE! If you are getting burnt-out with the process .. .It's time to call Steven Simon, President of American life Resources! 1 ·800-633-0407 NO HASSLES! NO EXCUSES! EVER! • Amen can file R~urces Corporation® AMERICAN LIFE RESOURCES CORPORATION 1130 Wl.SHNGTON AVENl.E. lolMI BEACH. R.DRIDA 331311 Happy Holidays From Us At OH BOY! BOOTS 912 Westheimer @ Montrose Houston, Tx • (7. 859 Come in and see our huge selection of quality-famous brand boots for men & women. Chippewa Also Nacona, Justin, Tony Llama ,M and many more ~ Dingo 14 THE NEW VOICE DECEMBER 11-17 1992 T T T NEW ORLEANS SOAP Knights d'Orleans invite good girls and boys to sit on Santa's lap $10 donation 1s ByBU:o;CH BRITIAJN requested. The .Sew Voice/ :\tw OTleanb Through the hard work of Art Against Aids Chairperson George Lancaster and all of the other volunteers and art· ists who contributed their time and efforts, this year's program raised $90,000 to benefit HIV and AIDS pro· grams and agencies in Louisiana. This makes almost $.300,000 this event has brought m to the fight against AIDS liUlCC it began in 191!7. The Gay and Lesbian Professional Business Association held their Christ· mas "mixer" this past Tuesday at the Anodante Gallery. Larry Potts was the evening's host This quarterly event eel· ebrated the G LBA's dedication to their Partners m Education School, McDon· ough 15 Elementary, "The Little Red Schoolhouse:· Members donated toy• during the event to be passed on to the students at McUonough. There will be a big Christ· mas celebration for all the students this year thanks to the efforts of Gil.BA and other civic minded organizations in our community. Congratulations to the New Orleans chapter of the Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays. They have announced that the 12th annual inter· national convention of their organiza· tion "ill be held in our city next Sept. 3rd through the 6th with the Sheraton Hotel serving as the meeting facility. There are substantial sa'ings if you send in your convention reservations early. Call or write the P-~1ag Convention Host Commitke, P.O. Box 154115, New Orle­ans, LA 70175, (504) 52.1-3922 or 288- 2332. Everyone should get geared up for tonight's Christmas Beer Bust at the Phoenix/Men's Room sponsored by the New Orleans chapter of the National Leather Association. It begins at 9:00 PM this evening at your favorite big red bar on Elysian Field. Incidentally, com· ing up next Friday, Dec. 18th at 9:00 PM, is your annual opportunity to have your picture taken on Santa's lap. These memorable photographs are offered to you by the Knights d'Orleans who will provide sexy little elves to accompany you onto your favorite lap. Saturday, Dec. 19th at 9 PM the Phoe­nix welcomes back Tony Coleman and Lt/and, IM Rawhide's new bartender ~ T T GALVESTON SOAP Paul Vincent for another "Hoe Down at the Ho House" dance. Wear those dan· cin' shoes! And your neighbor· hood alternative is still bringing you "Breakfast with Bobby" every Sun· day from 8 to 11 :00 a.m. All of your juice drinks for $1.25. Papa Noel will be helping you eel· ebrate the big cus· tomer apprecia· tion party at Tom's 2601 tlus Sunday, Dec. 6th. The Born Divas have ~ettled back We'd like to express our appre· ciation for being mentioned in such a "professional" manner in one of the local papers' minor columns. If they had taken time to in tcrview the participants in their story refer­ence they would have been able to get their story straight. into their Sunday Santa pa1d an early v1s1t w the 2601 Personally, we think it's wonder· ful that so many other parts of the 8outh and the Gulf Coast take such an interest in the ... goings~on" in our afternoon show Crescent City. The spot at The Mint. They will appear the next three Sun· days, Dec. 6, 13 and 20, but will miss the New Year's weekend. Zelda Rose is doing her show every Tuesday at 9 PM at The Mint. Andy Boudreaux is hosting two fund raisers this weekend, the Polyphemus Drag Show, 8 PM, Saturday, Dec. 5th and the Petronius Buffet and Auction from 1-7 PM. Sunday, Dec. 6th. We wish the best of luck to the Parade and Alotta Malotte and the Gutter Girls for their "Drag-on.Ville" show set for 10 PM, Saturday, Dec. 12. All proceeds will go to the Darrell Hamby Food Bank. A diversity brought to us by various news· papers just seems to add more to the areas enjoyment and anticipation of visiting in New Orleans. We encourage more of the local gay papers, such as the one from Atlanta, to come to New Orleans as often as they find a reason. We're glad that our readership of 35,000 have an opportu· nity of seeing what goes on in the iewel of the Gulf Coast. Aft.er all, that's what tourism's all about. We all benefit from the publicity to our city. Sixteen more shopping days to Christ· mas. Forty-two more days to the inaugu· ration. Happy holidays' Dickens on the Strand packs Galveston clubs with holiday revelers BySTEVIEB. The 1'ew Voice.1Galveslon "I'is the seru;on to be Jolly ... The Spirit of Christmas has hit Galveston as it has everywhere else. On Tuesday, Dec. lat ...,._limW AIDS Coalition of Coastal Texas along with lhe City of Galveston took time out to remember those we've lost to AIDS and to those hv.ng \\1th the disease. A candlelight ceremony was held at the courtyard of the Galveston County Covet House. The Ball High School Band played and a number of spec1al guest speakers attended. All in all it was n beautiful and touching ceremony. Since I was unable to get around this past weekend I turned the camera and pen OV<T to Kevin for the local gossip and soap. So here s ... Kevin. Now its my tum to pick on Steve, smce rm usually the one that gets picked on about my VlBIU! to the Brazoe River Bot­tom. Steve, all I want to know is: whal were you dollllt to hurt your back the way you did? ' Speaking of the BRB you screwed up one of my Cavonte bartenders names in last week's paper. Her name 1s Jo Ann not Janice. Keeping with the subjt>Ct, so what's this about lln early Chanukah present, and who was the mechanic? It must have been bonng in Hou•ton to T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA bnng Uncle Walter down to Galveston Saturday. Or was it for Dickens? And I don't mean on the Strand. Dickens on the Strand did make Angie, Kon nk1 I neweat bartend-' pie to the Island City and to area clubs. Mike, although you're a local reHident, does it take a big festival to bring you out and have you grace us with your presence? And Double M, what wi·re you and Darrell doing comparing notes on your ex? Speaking of ex's, Philip, what were you doing with Steve's'/ Whi·n are you two going to compare notes? Kirk, we know your not the shy type, so why were you hiding from t1'e caml'l'll all night? Ron, are you and Unrll' Wal­ter competing with each other'' I se<· you've hired a female bartender. Let's welcome Angie tu the Kon 'l'iki. Your service was excellent. l caught John Viggiano actually working, 1t sure was unusual seeing you out of your offi1·l'. Kerry and Emile,can'tyou find bctt.N company to keep othn than thnt slut Henry, "she was rnally on the prowl:' Well. 1t will sure be nice to have Steve back on his feet. This was a bigger job than I actually thought and as Steve always says '1'hat's all folks:' PS. Thanks for th1• extra help Kevin. Florida University researcher: AIDS saliva test may also work for hepatitis GAJ;>;ESVII~. I-la., Wednesday, Dec. 2 (AP>-A University of r1orida veteri· narian who developed a saliva·based test for the AIDS virus says the same method shows promise for detecting hepat1Us B '1ral infections. Dt Roger Clemmons, an associate professor with the UF College ofVeten· nary .\ledic10e, sees the test's greatest potential as a screening tool. . •·we could prevent the disease by vac­cinating ... unexposed people so they become tmmune:' Clemmons said, "and we can find out who the unexposed pop-ulations are by quickly screening out those who have been exposed and have antibodies to the disease:' In a study funded jointly by UF and by Oracle lllagnostics, Inc. of San Mateo, Clllif., Clemmon• has examined saliva ns a potential menne of diagnos· ing hepatitis ll mfectton by first testing hepatitis patients st the UF Health !';ci ence Ccntct "The results were so good. much bet· ter than expected. lhat plans are to con· tinue the study in the general popula· tion:' C..'lemmons said. Future tud1es would be conducted with cooperation from the lJFCollegeof Dentistry and the state ll<·partment of Corrt>ctiona. Clemmons' m<•thod offers lt•sters much fast<-r results, he said. "Using the routine te.11ts, you have to modify them. if you're uRing saliva 80 that the time 1t takes to obtain a result is ~ea~ly eight hours,' Clemmons •aid. We ve been able to detect the hepatitis B surface antigen m an hour. and to detect the hepatitIS B core antibody in under 10 minutes usmg our test:' Patents are pending on Clemmons' AIDS detection method, which involves incubating a saliva saniple .with a dip· stick for five minutes. washing the dip· stick before and after a second cht·mical is added, then applyi_ng a developing compound to obuiin v1M1hl1• results. Since it eliminatR• the need for syr· inges-and because saliva isconsidi·red far less likely to bc1nfoctious than blood products the test is thought to be safer for teSt handlers thon current blood teSts- DECEMBER 11-17 1992 / THE NEW VOICE 15 ''The Problem is - Most People Wait Too Long" Danna K Archer Danna K. Archer Bankruptcy Law 1-800-281-2955 24 Hour Information Line (713) 236-0312 1720 Lyric Centre Bldg., 440 Louisiana (713) 236-0003 405 First City Bank Bldg., 11550 Fuqua (713) 481-2244 BOARD CERTIFIED IN CONSUMER BANKRUPTCY LAW BY TEXAS BOARD OF LEGAL SPECIALIZATION ~ - INFORMACION EN ESPANOL T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA District of Columbia council to keep sodomy law WASHINGTON, Wednesday, Dec. 2 (AP)-The District of Columbia Council decided against repealing the city's sod· omy law during a meeting that was dis­rupted by shouts and jeers from gay­rights protest.ere. Council members deadlocked 5-5 Tuesday in the first vote on the law in more than a decade. The law forbids sodomy between con­senting adults. Leaders of Washing­ton's gay community have called it a violation of the constitutional right to privacy. "The times have changed, and this archaic law ought to be changed;' said Councilman Jack Evans, who led the effort to scrap the law. ''A signjficant part of the city believes that its funda· mental civil rights are being violated:' But several council members who said they supported the repeal accused Evans of ignoring standard council pro­cedures and trying to change the law without committee meetings or public hearings. They said he was rushing to respond to political throats from the large number of gay residents in Ward 2, T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA the area he represents. "I'm absolutely shocked by those who are willing to do 1t this way;· Council· man John Ray said. "For tho•e of you who want ID Kink to legislation through intimidation, fine. I'm not:' As the lawmakers angrily debated the issue, gay-rights activists began jeering them. Council Chairpertion John Wilson ordered D.C. police ID remove three protesters from the council chem· ber, and others left acreammg at council members who did not aupport ehanginte the law. If you are terminally ill, do you know what your most valuable asset may be? DO NOT DROP YOUR LIFE INSURANCE POLICY! $ell It! VIATICAL ASSISTANCE CORPORATION IS A TRULY CARING COMPANY THAT SPECIALIZES IN HELPING PEOPLE LIKE YOU. GIVE US A TRY. VIATICAL ASSISTANCE CORPORATION "a financial alternative_." 1-800-892-1282 Charter Member, National Association ofViatical Settlement Organizations. Miami Beach City Commission passes ordinance to protect gay rights MIAMI BEACH, Fla., Wednesday, Dec. 2 (AP)-City commissioners Wednes· day passed the first gay rights ordi­nanc1• in Dade County since Anita Bry­ant's crusude toppled acountywideanti­discrimination law in 1977. Proponents of th<' ordinance, passed unanimously by rnmmis~ioners in packed chambers, say it not only bans discrimination against gay people, but acknowledges the gay community as an integral part of Miami Beach. "It recognizes that the so-called gay and lesbian community is contributing and int.ends to contribut.t> in the future;' said Beach attorney Mike Fine8ilver, a former state prosecuto~ The measure prohibits discrimination against all, regardless of age, religion, sex, family status, race or sexual orien­tation. "We think it's another 8ymbol of how Miami Beach is trying to work together to avoid any type of ethnic battle•, or any gender·related battles:' said City Manager Roger Carlton. The new law exE>mpts n•lig1ous insti­tutions, small businesses and small apartment buildings with resident land­lords. Bob Skidell, who ran for M;ami Beach mayor last year and was a key player in the 1977 Bryant campaign, denounced the measure as one designed to give T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA homosexuals the right to "Oaunt their sexual conduct:• "This ordinance, in effect, is to legiti­mize the homosexual presence in our community by forcing child-care cen· ters, youth centers, theaters, ar!8 and recreation facilities and apartment buildings to open their door• to homo­sexual role models;' Skidell told com· missioners Wednesday night. The city's move to protect gays comes as communities elsewhere a re attacking gay rights laws. Voters in Tampa overturned an anti· discrimination law and Colorado voters approved legislation excluding gay peo­ple from other human rights !awe on Nov. 3. Oregon voters defeated a measure that would have declared homosexual­ity "abnormal, wrong, unnatural and perverse'.' Some of the most respected cttizens of Miami Beach are Hol0<·au.'t 'urvivor>, whose own feaT8 of persecution led them to back the measur~. Citv Commissioner Abe Resnick, a Hol· oca¥ust survt\:or, wrote 1n a lettf'r to his colleagues that. had the nghts of people in Russia, Germany and Cuba been guaranteed by law, '"Who can tcU how many scores of millions of human beings would still be alive?" FDA approves sale of alternative AIDS drug atovaquone to treat pneumonia RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK NC Tuesday, Dec. I (AP)-Federal he~Jth official& have approved the sale of an alternative drug to treat a type of pneu­monia common among AIDS victims. The new drug,atovaquone, will be rec­ommended for people unable to take trimethoprim·aulfamethoxazone for treatment of pneumocyetis carinii pneu­monia, or PCP. About 80 percent of all AIDS victims gH PCP. and recurrences ~re comm?"· But up to half can't take tnmethopnm sulfamethoxazone because of side effects such as rashes, lowered white blood cell counts, feve~ nausea and vom­iting Burroughs Wellcome Co., which markets atovaquone, said Monday. David Peck, an AIDS activist with ACT UP-Boston who had negotiated with the company to make atovaquone available, said he was pleased with the Food and Drug Administration's approval. "Early accesa and rapid approval of atovaquone mean survival for thou. T T T DATELINE: AUSTIN sands of people living with AIDS who face the life-and-death consequences of PCP,' he said. Atovaquone, with the brand name Mepron, also received a notice of compli­ance from Canada's Health Protection Branch and is the first medication ID receive a joint, integrated review by the FDA and the Canadian agency. Burroughs Wellcome tested the d.rug on 322 patients at 37 sites in the Unitt'd Stat.es, Canada and Europe. While Mepron alB<> has aide effects that may include headache, nausea, diarrhea, rash, fever and elevated liver enzymes, rebearcher• callt'd the drug a good alternative. . . . "This provides an additJonal opbon fo peoplewhodonotdow~llonconven· ti:nal therapu.,:' said Dr. Sam Bozzette, a•<1s<ant profeosor of m~cme at_ the University of California-San Diego School of Medicine. Since Nov. 1991, more than 900 people have received Mepron for free under FDA controls. Texas A&M University adviser chides State Representative Ron Wilson AUS'nN, Wedneedoy, Dec. 2 (AP)-Stst.e Rep. Ron Wilson, who went to Texas A&M Univennty this week to speak out against in..,denl.8 he eaid were racist, is being criti­cized by a faculty odvieer for not distanc­ing h1mst'lf from remarks about gaye mode by one of hie conetituents. The constituent. Quenell X. a former gang membt'r end a member of the Nation of Islam, told about :JOO students Monday night that homosexual black men are "sick!' "Mt Wilson was asked two times to dis· tance himself, to repudiat.e the remarlr.e;• "d Larry Hickman, a philosophy profes­=~ and faculty adviser to G~y and Les· bian Student Services. '"He foiled on both occasions:' But Wilson, a black who haa been a etrong proponent m the Legielature ~f gay and lesbian nghts, put a different twist on Quanell X's words. He noted that many young black men are victims of violence or are incarcerated. "I don't think his intent wee to 88y that he condones diecrimination against gays and lesbians;' Wilson, !).Houston, wld the Austin American·Staletiman. "He does not, and I do not. He wee say ing that basically we could not afford to have homosexuality among black mal'"' because we did not have enough black males as it is;' Wilson 88id. The lawmaker said he diaagree8 with Quenell X on the i88ue of homosuual1ty among black men because he docen 't believe people choose ID be gay. "I think that homosexualitv ;.. baaed ID a great degree on genetics:· he eaid. 16 THE NEW VOICE I DECEMBER 11 17, 1992 T T T NEW ORLEANS La Peniche Restaurant, neighborhood restaurant in Faubourg Marigny By LEONARD EARL JOHNSON The New Voice/New Orleans La Peniche Retitaurant, 1940 Dauphine, is a long time survivor on the New Orle­ans restaurant scene. It has been around since the 1970s, under various owners and managers. In its first incar­nation it was called The Apple Barrel. During all its changed managements it ha.; retained a strong Faubourg Mar- 1gny, and non-tourist French Quarter following. For years, the place could not get a liq­uor license. Several of the restaurant's former entrepreneurs cited this problem as the cause of their quitting. A few years ago, beer, wine and mixed drinks joined the menu. Success has come in heaping helpings since. La Peniche is open 24 hours a day, with only one complicated exception, when they close Wednesdays from 7:00 T T T DINING NOTES C & Non Fairview is now Barnaby's Cafe; A Moveable Feast has new specials By THE NEW VOICE STAFF Barnaby's Cafe Remember the old C&N Cafe? Well Bar­naby's Cafe is now in the same location at 604 Fairview. With an eclectic menu offering salads, cool & hot sandwiches, specialty pizza (baked potato or pesto tomato among others-served only after 5:00 p.m.), plate meals (served with garlic mashed potatoes and vegetables) and several sweet offerings, it should be a great place for a lunch or dinner get­away. Hours: 11:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Sun.-Thur. (Closed Mondays) 11:30 to midnight Fri & Sat. Blue Water Grill The Blue Water Grill at 2181 Richmond at Greenbriar has "Early Bird Specials" for diners from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. The Paul English Jazz Quartet, appear Wed.-Sat. 8:30 to midnight. Open for Lunch: 11:00 a.m. Mon-Fri; Dinner served till 10:00 p.m. Sun-Thur. till 11:00 p.m. Fri. & Sat. Open 7 days a week. Call (713) 526-7977 for reserva­tions or information Charlie's Coffee Shop Charlie's Restaurant has e very large, versatile menu and is open 24 hours e day for your dining pleasure. A favorite stop over of after hours diners end early bird type&. this is one menu that doesn't stop breakfast et 10:30 a.m. If your date wants pancakes but you want roast beef, it's no problem for the cooks et Charlie's. Located at 1100 Westheimer near the Tower Theater service is friendly and there's never a wait. Phone 522-3332. Orders to go available. Enchanted Garden/Karma Cafe For healthful dining try the Karma Cafe et The Enchanted Garden located et 1512 West Alabama. Vegetarian and macrobiotic specialties abound at e moderate price. Also available is e full service "Day Spa" and Esthetique with natural products for your body and home. Open Tues.-Sat. 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Sunday brunch: 10:00 e.m. to 3:00 p.m. For information or appoint­ments call (713) 942-09'22. Jade Dragon Hunan Res­taurant For a very reasonable price and no wait­ing, check out the buffet et Jade Dragon. Recently under new ownership, the Dragon's menu still has the familiar items you love; full dinners from various regions (Canton, Szechuan, Hunan end more) along with luncheon special and the new steam table buffet. The Jade Dragon is located at 224 Westheirner. Phone (713) 526-2683. Hours: 11:00 a.m. to lO:OOp.m.Mon.-Thurs.; 11:00a.m to 11:00 p.m. Fri.; 5:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Sat.; end 5:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Sunday. Orders to go and limited delivery availa­ble. A Moveable Feast Not only ~an you get a great warm or cold lunch or dinner from varying stages of vegetarian dining atA Movea­ble Feast (lacto/veg; vegan; macro), but you can also shop for numerous vita· min/mineral supplements, health food products, organic produce, dried herbs & potpourri and informative literature. Dine in or take out meals are prepared daily from 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Mon. & Thurs. are Enchilada Days. Try the Veggie Chicken Fried Steak Dinner each Sat. and Sun. Brunch is offered each Sat. & Sun. from 11:00 e.m. to 3:00 p.m. Located et2202 West Alabama, you haven't had Health Food till you've tried A Moveable Feast. Phone (713) 528-3585 FAX (713) 528-5089 Sazarac Celebrity Grille For greet dining and live cabaret try The Sezarac Celebrity Grille. This week· ends act is Swing Shift. Coming Attrac­tions: Dec. 14 & 15, Marsha Carlton & Clay Howell; Wed. Dec. 16 & Wed. Dec. 23, Bubba McNeely; Dec. 30 to Jan 2; Pudgy! Queen of Tease;. Showtimes ere 9:30 & 11 :30. "Open for Lunch: 11 :00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Dinner: 6:00 p.m. to 10:00, Mon.-Set.(till 11:00 p.m. Fri. & Set.) Happy Hour: 4:00 p.m. to8:00 p.m. with FREE buffet. Sunday Brunch. 11:00 e.m. to 3:00 p.m. with Claudia Bur· son Cell (713) 520-5050 for reservations or information. Secured valet parking available. Moondance Diner-Austin Go to Moondance Diner for hearty southern "family dining" that keeps your health in mind. The menu features a wide variety of items from e flame broiled shrimp salad to classic chicken fried steak. Texas wines are featured and the desserts are out of this world Moondance is located near the state cap­itol at 706 Congress and offers a full bar and live music Thursday through Satur­day (call for schedule). Monday is "Gey Night:' Most major credit cards ere accepted. Green Leaves Cafe-New Orleans Green Leaves Cafe offers up a greet menu featuring Creole American Foods. Deily specials are served from $3.95 up. Open six days out of the week, Green Leaves is only closed on Wednesdays. Hours ere Lunch: 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. end Dinner: 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Located in the French Quarter in New Orleans at 539 St. Philip. For informs· tion call (504) 524-4398. St. Ann's Cafe & Deli-New Orleans Known throughout the quarter for its daily lunch & dinner specials, St. Ann's Cafe & Deli is quite the hit. Featuring items from various cultures, Cuban, Cajun, French, American, etc., they cover just about all the bases. The menu boasts 101 items of authentic New Orle­ans cuisine and all are available 24 e.m. to 5:00 p.m This shouldn't be com­plicated, but it is. Most regulars have had the experience of finding them­selves hungry in front of e locked door. Regulars include an ample lesbian and gay clientele and members of the New Orleans Police Department. Tables ere filled with good food and harmony. Very popular for daily breakfast, Sun­day brunch, and late night dining. Mod­erate prices. Beat buys: Red Beans end Rice, $3.2.5, with sausage, $4.25; Chopped Sirloin with mushrooms and brown Gravy, $5.95, both meals include potato and salad. Breakfast: great pan­cakes $1.50 to $4. Eggs, with bacon or sausage, $3.25, served with potatoes or grits and biscuits or toast. Good coffee, but no chicory, 95 cents, refills with meals, free. Pleasant, neighborly atmosphere. Rec­ommended. YOUR HOLIDAY PRESENCE REQUESTED FOR M r11 PAUL ENGLISH QUARTET JA!l 8:30 -12:30 Wed -Sat evening M r11 EARLY BIRD DINNER ENTREES Alarmingly low prices on selected items 5-7 PM M r11 INFAMOUS BLUE WATER MARGARITAS So enticing you will think you have found "Treasure Island.· M r11 HAPPIER HOURS AFTER WORK SeNing Pasta Hors d'oeuvres and smiles M r11 "SMASHING" HOLIDAY PARTIES Letting the Host/Hostesses have some fun too! 4~ BLUE WATER GRILL 2181 Richmond at Greenbriar • Shepherd Plaza • 526-7977 FRENCH AFFAIR CATERING Quality • Breakfa•t • Lunch • Dinner Coctails • R.oeptJe>qs • Buffets • Deli als Veg t eris ine (713) 626-3826 Phillpp • Advertise Your Restaurant Here For Details 529-8490 Call (713) hour• a day. Located on the comers of St. Ann Street end Dauphine, St. Ann's also offers 24 hour free hotel room-serv­ice end home delivery. For orders to go or information call (504) 5294421 If you want your rest­aurant listed or review· ed, call us at : (713) 529-8490 DECEMBER 11-17, 1992 /THE NEW VOICE 17 3219 Smith@ Elgin - Houston, Texas 77006 CoMiNG ToNiqJn, fRidAy & SATuRdAy DECEMbER 10, 11 & 12 SWING SHIFT "HousroN' s DyNAMic BluEs ANd JAZZ lRio" "Ir's A HiJ! ' lRy OUR BonoMlEss MiMosAs SUNDAY JAZZ BRUNCH whli ClAudiA BURSON • 11:00 A.M. ro }:00 p.M. MoNdAy & TuEsdAy DECEMbER 14 & 15 MARSHA CARLTON WEdNESdAy DECEMbER 16 & 2"} DiRECT fROM L.A. BURBA McNEELY : I wirl-t ClAy HowEll PUDGY! - ''OUEEN OF TEASE'' As SEEN ON SliowTiME AN EvENiNG AT THE IMpRov AN<l AT lAj MAHAl's "CAsbAH Ro~M" AT BAlly's CRAN<l iN ".'rlANTic CiTy ANd SOON AT THE SAZARAC CElEbRiTY GRlllE DECEMbER ~OTH - JANUARY 2Nd NEW YEARS EVE DINNER & SHOW $60 PER PERSON SHOW ONLY $JO • MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS NOW ~,., • ..,<//~,...,/'\,.,.-:Irr.I .;;-·,,..' , •. v f..,,..,"' / I t.~ <A - ~:A ~ ! 1. v I -"'~"' FOR RESERVATIONSCALL: 520-5050 I s:cuR:OVAL:i PARKINGAVAllABLt II= 18 THE NEW VOICE DECEMBER 11 17, 1992 T T T HOUSTON SOAP PART ONE Emus for dinner, think again; TGRA has new officers; Tasha's in for DeeeDrag By TAD NELSON The ="ew VoiCE>j Houston Hello Houston! I know that there are thOBeofyou who were expecting advice on how to keep your trucker happy and healthy for the holidaze but due to a recent side trip with my trucker buddy to deliver goods to an Emu Ranch here in Texas, I didn't have time to think how I was going to keep him happy. But I hope to have that ready for next weeks i88ue. But while on the subject, have you ever seen an emu? They are a cute sort of dinosaur looking bird. l'iow my idea of a bird is more like a little canary or para­keet. Possibly even a parrot or a cocka­too. (Yes, I'd love a little cockatoo) But these creatures are of gargantuan size. Can you imagine resting 6 feet worth of 160 lbs. on your finger? Yeb, I'm sure eome of you can. but back to birds­it just doe•n 't seem right. I mean. not even can this bird look you in the eye but 1t can peck the top of your head They do eeem hke nelly crea· tures though. Walking around all day with a boa Treasurer Keith Reiser;ContestantRep­resentative, Marsha Johnson; State Reprebentative, Michael Romero. Good luck to the new board and all members of TGRA. We know how hard you all work to bring recognition to Houston. Bring back the buckles this year! Rochelle Ramone was crowned the new "Miss Gentry-1993" last Sunday night in an exciting and "stiff' (so to speak) competition. There were eight contestants present and the choices were difficult. everyone was beautiful and talented. First runner-up in this years pageant was Black Velvetand sec­ond runner-up was Delilah Sashay. Gurhl•. where do you get theRe names? Congratulations to the winners. Dela McGee Mag;llicutty and hiB staff, Val­een. Rita and the other guhrls are a good crew to repreRent. For you men out there who have talent and looks and a wardrobe to show off, the Mt Gentry con test is taking place this Sun­day- don'tmiss it. wrapped around Ryan Idol posed for our cameras at their bodies. And Heauen last u:e•k Last Friday and Saturday rughts Swing Set put on a wonderful show at Sazarac. If you like Manhattan Transfer. you'll love Swing Set. Check them out such gawky feet and legs! Heels would never do on these birds. They do have beautiful eyes though-big brown saucer eyes, that make them too cute. Kind oflike turkeys on stilt8 with a nOtie job. And to think, those brutes at the Rainbow Lodge serve these cuties up for din-din. This I don't understand, smce the going price for even the baby emus is in four figures. Can you imagine the check when it arnves at your table? Yes sir, that'll be only $1500.95 for your meal. not includ· ing tax, wine or tip. Well enough of that on with soap. Congratulations to the members of TGRA who have jU>1t held their chapter elections la•t weekend. Charlie's Coffee Shop WSb the scene for thei;e elections and the new 199:3 board officers are: President, Rick Chew; Vice president, Virgil Burke; Secretary, George J., I I when they come back to Sazarac in January. If you misbed the 10th Anniversary of the Ripcord this past Monday night, you misoed one of the best parties of the yest Gary and Gary and the staff pulled out all the stops for this feast of gorgeous hunks in leathe~ not to mention an incredible buffet spread. There can't be a crawdad left in a ditch in Houston because they were piled to the rafters along with a bounty of shrimp and a hot buffet to boot. The staff was very hand­some looking. too, behind the bar in their black tuxedos. It's amazing what a tux can do to enhance the looks of the already-gorgeous. And there were more men in various leather outfits greeting old friends and making new ones while watching a video-<:ollage of the past ten years. Thanks for the memories-hope to be at the 20th anniversary party with you all. Suing .Yt U'O• great entertainment at Sazarac Heaven is hav­ing their 1992 Recession Buster I Autumn Harvest with Hi-NRG Dance Music Vid­eos and NO COVER from 9:00 to 11.00 p.m (excluding Holi­days and Special Events) with any nonperishable canned good for T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA AFH Stone Soup Food Pantry. With no canned good you will still receive Reces­sion Buster price cover of only $2.00 between 9:00 to 11:00 p.m. and after that General Admission applies. Of course Heaven has "fabulous drink specials nightly!" Tonight, and Friday and Saturday Dec. 9, 10, 11 & 12th, at The Sazarac Celebrity Grille at Smith & Elgin will have another local Houston trio, "Swing Shift'.' These guys have been performing for a good number of years on the Houston B.J. Williams is ~-~·•••r-- music scene and do some great blues and jazz numbers as well as contemporary original work. Swing Shift will be performing two shows for your dining and caba­ret pleasure; the first at 9:30 p.m and the Becond at 11:30 p.m. hosting the Wheel ••i~­of Fortune at El J 's at 10:30 p.m.on Thur.day night, and this week his guest Vanna White is a sur­prise! Wheel of Fortune is spon­sored by the Pot Pie Restaill-ant. Pacific Street's red hot sweat shirts will soon Boots and frumd attend Ripcord'• 10th Thursday night appear on streets across the nation, as mail orders con­tinue to come in for gifts or for the holi­day souvenirs. Meanwhile attention is given to the National Leather A88ocia­tlon: Houston toy collection boxes. You can receive free entry any week night until Christmas 1f you contribute a $5.00 value gift. Dean reminds you that toys should be factory wrapped, in their original boxes with instructions. etc. Stuffed toys will be accepted "as is" and are very spe· c1Bl for both the don't miss the Wheel of Fortune at E/ J's. Host, B.J. Williams is having a special guest Vanna this week, Miss T.T. Pot Pie is sponsoring the Wheel and there are lots of pizzas to win. Don't miss your chance to fight an elephant for a pizza begin· ning at 10:30. Rainbo d'Klown is still having thol!f' red hot all male revues at E/ J's. 11:00 p.m. ie showtime and this weeks dancers and prancers are Jimmy, Anthony and Flash. tots and many of Jill Jordan entertained at Dance Hall & our community Saloon shut-ins. Dean Get into the Christmas sp1nt Saturday at Et J's with their official also reminds us that many people donate their collec­tions of stuffed animals for distribution to people with greater needs. J.R:s Bar & Grill is having Karaoke Thursdays on the Santa Fe Stage from 11:00 p.m to 1:30 a.m. You are invited to join in the fun; some up scale, and some silly. Evenings at the Karaoke Bar keeps getting bigger. And a special note to you who might be intereeted, every­one who sings on stage gets a FREE audio cassette of their performance. Hunk Night! Pacific Street continues the Hot Thursday epecials. You ehow them your Gym JD. card, and Pacific Street will show you a good time with no cover charge! Flex you muscles and show off you latest construction achievement. Better still, watch the con· struction workers show their brawn off. Prepare you Merry Ho Ho Ho·ing with Pacific Street in mind-where "Real Men Still Dance:• Heaven has as special guest for DeeeDrag on Dec 17th is TDBha Kohl, 1992 Entertainer of the Year. Tasha docs some really fun numbers so make your plane early and be there tree lighting at 6:00 p.m. The Lone Star Symphonic Band will be there as will Quintessence from MCCR. Then later Saturday night, E/J's offers something different with the "Backstreet Players:· Your players for this week's show are Brittany Paige, B.J. Williams and Jerry Morin. Show­time is 10:30 p.m. Gay Men's ChorU>I of Houston will be having a Christmas Concert Saturday Dec. 12 at 7:00 p.m. at Hamman Hall on Rice University Campus featuring Heartsong, Houston Women's Ch'>rus. Tickets are $10.00 and are available at Basic Brothers, Briar Patch, Cro•s· roads Market, Inklings and Lobo Books. There is a requested donation of a gift­wrappedtlabeled nonperiehuble food item for Stone Soup. SEX! SEX! SEX' I knew that would get your attention, because this one is important. This Sunday, Dec. 13th at 6:00 p.m., the Annual Montrose Commu­nity Christmas Tree Lighting will takf' place awp the roof at Mary's naturally. State representative, Debro Danburg will be officiating at the N'remony. Be sure to be there, and welcome Chnetmus to Montrose one more time Whoopi Goldberg, Philadelphia officials join protest against Amendment 2 Fnday, Dec.4 (AP)--TheproteetofColo­rado's Amendment 2 has been aug· mented by the support of actre•s Who­opi Goldberg and officials in Philadel· phla, while an organization of mayors is set to reconsider plan,; to meet next sum­mrr m Colorado Springs. In Chicago, Gov. Roy Romer'sappear­ance at an economic development meet­ing was picketed by amendment oppo­nents. Goldberg was joined Thursday by Jonathan U{'mme, director of Silence of the Lambs and other films, in endorsing a Colorado boycott promoted by the Gay and Lesbian Alliance against Defama­tion, or GLAAD, Los Angeles chapter. Barbra Streisand previously urged Hollywood to protest Amendment 2 by boycotting Colorado. A handful of Hollywood producers, including Ed Saxon, have also joined the boycott. The GLAAD boycott calls for the Hol­lywood community, which has long used Aspen as a winter play land, to stop attending events in Colorado and end filmmg or vacationing here. ''Amendment 2 makes Colorado the first state in the union smce Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proc­lamation to identify a clBBa of people for purposes of denying them civil rights:• the GLAAD boycott proclamation says. In Philadelphia, the City Council approved a measure Thursday discour­aging the city from hiring firms baBed in Colorado. The measure, which has yet to be approved by Mayor Edward Rendell, was accompanied by a recom­mendation that the mayor avoid send· ing city officials to events in Colorado. DECEMBER 11-17, 1992 THE NEW VOICE 19 'Y 'Y 'Y HOUSTON SOAP PART TWO Try Gentry's lasagna night; MCCR's Christmas Fest this Sunday; Hello Santa By TAD NELSON The New Voice/ Houston New for winter at Gentry is Lasagna Night. Every Sunday from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m for only $4.50 you can enjoy lasa­gna with meat sauce, salad bar and gar­lic bread. For a break from the steak, try Gentry's Lasagna Night. And this Sunday don't miss the Mr. Gentry 1993 Pageant. Competition will begin at 8:00 p.m. sharp. The club will award over $500.00 in cash and prizes. Call the bar for details on entry and awards. increasing the value of the available cash and prizes to $1000. The Bear Club for Men is held every Wednesday at the Mining Company for those of you with a taste for men with a little hair or weight or both. Join the Beary Hot Men for $1. 75 well drinks and longnecks as they The Sazarac Celebrity Grille is now serving Sun· day Jazz Brunch, and according to the staff, last weekend's brunch was a hit! The lav­ish brunch is served from 11 :00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. each Sunday. If you are looking for a beautiful and John T. looked hot in his tux enjoy the C & W sounds of John Sims. (Sorry about that Jimmy Spau· !ding thing last week John-I knew I should have just said ~'at Patty Ann instead!). This Wednesday Dec. 16th at the Mine i> the next install­ment of the Boote and Boxers party, where you can strip down to your boots and boxer shorts and enjoy great C & W music and drink specials while you find a cool dude to call your own. The next Bear of the Month contest is coming up on Dec. exciting place to 23, so get your gather with your friends after church for brunch, they are located at 3219 Smith at Elgin. You will also be enter­tained while you dine by Claudia Bur­son. Sunday at the Brazos River Bottom at 5:00 p.m. the MU.fits will be hanging their colors al the club. Go by and help celebrate on of Hou.ton's newe•t lcatherllevi social dubs when they make the BRB their home base. Every· one is welcome. Also al the BRB, at 7:00 p.m. sharp, it's the "Bitch of the BRB" employee turnabout show. Yes, once again you get to see Lady Naugahide and the entire BRB gang out from behind the bar and on the stage for some
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