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Montrose Voice, No. 324-A, January 6, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 324-A, January 6, 1987 - File 001. 1987-01-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4767/show/4754.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-01-06). Montrose Voice, No. 324-A, January 6, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4767/show/4754

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 324-A, January 6, 1987 - File 001, 1987-01-06, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4767/show/4754.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 324-A, January 6, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 6, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript montrose VOICE Good News for a Worried America Nobody is in Charge Arthur Hoppe, inside HOUSTON WEATHER Tuesday night Cloudy and cool, 50% chance of showers. low 52. Wednesday· Cloudy and cool, high 62. l\~lll)f1fJ~~" JANUARY6. 1987 ISSUE324-A ljljl~9 '------------~ Other Viruses May Trigger AIDS Virus Jan Ziegler, inside AFew­Cheers fora New-Year Elroy Forbes, inside Broadcasters Slowly Accept Condom Advertising Prime-Time Contraceptives By .Jan Ziegler Umted Pre s /nternatwnal WASHJNGTON-ShoL' of houses nash 1m screen. from Southern California Spanish to a trailer with pink flamin· l(oes to white CaP<' Cod that l<~>ks like the snug nest Reaver Cleaver might have grown up. The advertisement is entitled "Home Sweet Home," but it is not about insu ranee or aluminim siding. It is about contraceptives-the rontracepti ve sponge-and it represents the leading edge of change in broadcasting policy. " In the last few years, a blissful har· mony ha~ come to neighborhoods all over the country," the voice-over says " Women everywhere have stopped using their contraceptive. And switched to the Today Contraceptive Sponge." Change has come not from the top, but from the local level. This ad. an ear· lier Today spot and others from Semicid and Encare Ovals, hoth spermicide inserts. have been broadcast by 16 net­work affiliates during local time and by several other independent stations. The three major networks continue to prohibit national-level contraception advertising out of concern they reach many millions of homes and some view­ers mil{ht he offended. Ads for other pro· ducts such as sanitary pads an• accepted, however. and characters are permitted as much sexual freedom as possible. ' The networks, particularly CBS, point that they too have heen changing and are covering issues of sexual responsibility as much as possible within entertainment and public affairs programming Planned Parenthood Federation of America and the Center for Population Options, which SeE- the network policy as hypocritical. are in the midst of a campaign to move contraceptive ads onto national airwaves Planned Parenthood is using dirl'<'t mail and newspaμ<•r advertising trum P<'tinj?: "They did it 20.000 times on tele· vision last year How come nobody got pregnant? .. The federation , alonl( with the CPO Los Angeles branch. has been trying pre~suring networks to make sure char· acterlS in entertainment programming display contral·eptive awareness .. If the only attitude heingconveyed is that sex is without consequence. we can expPC·t the rt>sult.s that we get," said Plnnnt-d Parenthood dire<:tor Fay Wat tleton . rt·ft•rring to tht.· one mi!Jjon tel·n · age girls who heeome pregnant every year "Wt• intend to keC'p the pressurC' on puhlic dt•hatt• until we seC' a change." shC' said. In a reporl on teen pregnancy, a SJ>t'· cial pant.'1 convened by the National Research Council. an arm of the National Academy of Sciences, noted that television and radio have a power· ful influence on young people. Yet. they "have been reluctant to advertise non-prescriplion contracep ~ tive meth<>ds for fear of offending some of their audience." "W• feel it would he objectionabl• to the moral and religious bt'liefs of many of our viewers." said George Schweitzer, vice president of communications for CBS "Howev('r we art• not insensitivt' to the very real problems of things like unintended pregnancy and the sprC'ad of AIDS as they relat• to this issue." The network has run public servicC' unnouncemC'nls from Planned Parent· hood and the Am•riran Coll•ge of Ohstetrics and Gynecolol(y and is "about to announ<·e a CBS·produced public service c:ampaiKn in conjunction with the surgeon general's office ahout preventing the spr('ad of AIDS," he said. ln the prime·time show "Cagney and Lacey," one n·cent scene showed detec­tive Lacey having a heart·to-heart talk wit her son ahout st>xual responsibility. and in "Kate and Allie," a similar mother daughter <·onversation occurred. hP said Tht· diffpn•nct>, h<• said , is one of con tt•xt. VH·wE•rs watching an afternoon soap, for instann•. st•(' what purports to he s<·xual PnC"ountt-rs in the context of a plot. A c·ontra<·t·ptivC' ad would pop up without any warning. But what about those network ads for sanitary pads and feminine hygiene sprays? "We helit.·vp ifs a different issue Thnt's a taste issue." Schweitzer said In apparent contradiction to this. a survey taken hy the Center for Popula lion Options found that 11 or 16 affiJ. iatt•s that airNI the Today and 8emie1d ads on lo('al time would do it again , and tht• ads raised fewt·r.or the same amount of eomplaint!-> than other spots. " In fact. stations reported receiving more complaints for ,Jordache jC'ans ads. a clt·ntal asso<'iation ad featuring the tooth fairy and a public servict• announc<•ment for hus scht'dules which was dl'<:m<'d 'v(•ry silly' by viewers," the non·profit association reported. The remaining two stations said they wanted to review the ads again before giving approval. said the center. whit·h lists as its goal the redudion of the teen ­age pregnanC'y rat.E' through education . The identity of the stations was not released under agreement with manu factut•rs. ac("()rding to the center If affiliates have not gotten com­plaints, however, networks have. "You hear and set> thC'se ads from Planned Parenthood (promoting con tral·eptive advntising) and they've got­ten a lot of publicity, but wt• hear and continue to hear from affiliates and viewers who disagree." 8chweitzerl'Om· mentro. "They're very vocal about it." In fart, said Plannt'd Parenthood, newspapers are often more conserva· tive than th<' networks and also prohibit contra('(•ptive advertising The Neu· York Times. for example believes advertis<•ments for birth ron trol produC'ts ore distasteful and do not helong in the puge8 of a newspaper of the Timl's· caliber. said Elliot SngerJr. manager of c·orporate relations. "Then• are occasional times when for onP r<'ason or another. birth control devices come· into the news. as thev have r('(·ently in th<• <·ase of protectio~ against AIIlR." he said . " For that n·a · son. we fet>I it's important to rl'port th(' m·ws as n('Ws , whi<'h wt• do." "A?.vertising is in a difft•rent ratP· gory 8<'hwt>1tzC'r <'omm<•ntt·d that com· plninti-; nsid<'. h•lt•vision has mad<• great stridN1 in th(• Inst 20 Vf'ars and is ta<'· kling issut•s that m•vp~ would havt• s<·c·n the I if.{ ht of cluy hack tht•n "It's easy to get a lot of publicity by throwing a rock at television, but it doe•n't help solve the problem" he said. "!think we should SP<'nd more time get­ting some constructive ideas instead of arguing." Fortunes Emotions Apt to Flare for Gemini By Mark Orlon For Tuesday evening. Jan 6. through Frtday morning. Jan. 9. 1987 ARIES Get your head out of the clouds and take a good look at what 1s going on all around you' Your buddies have a lot to give you, and you are not even there to get it1 Come back and reap the bounty TAURUS Others may almost spend your money for you 1f you don't watch 'em. Look for a piece of surprising news and make plans for a small getaway Later. opposites may attract and become very big winners GEMINI Lots to do this first full week of the new year, and not enough time to do 1t Emotions are apt to flare and tempers may be easily sparked. Do pay special attention to a certain loved one Watch for news and company to arrive CANCER The good luck you were having last week could double, and just about make you forget the troubles you were having with yourself. Don't force any endings. Fun times continue. There is no holding you back You are up for almost anything Kinky and wetrd have turned into wlld and wonderful. You're looking for lust 1n all the right places LEO There are a lot of angles to this week. Many of your ideas or projects are strictly in the development stage. How­ever. this 1s a great time to begin to gather those you need to help you down the line Have fun' VIRGO It's fine to make long-range plans. as long as you don't ignore the immediate needs nght in front of your nose. Be practical. put down your binoc­ulars a minute and check out the imme­diate new year scene with a magnifying glass LIBRA ·Two big events come up. First, the bad news: somebody special turns out to be not much at all. Now, the good news· the fact that you are so hot turns on a new flame. (And. are you still honoring those resolutions?) SCORPIO The holiday lights are all out. but here you are onstage. still play­ing Santa Or. put another way, you've got the goods. and you know how to deliver them and who to deliver them to You're feeling very practical about it all, and you know there'Si nothing wrong with that SAGITTARIUS Good news arrives from a distance. and a trip may be in order Then. a business matter could cause a conflict You must be true to yourself. Latter days bnng a visit from Cupid and a written word CAPRICORN ·It's like thunder It's like lightening The way you work, think, love are amazing A time for accomplishment and excitement You are 1ust too much for some people to take. You don't mind You·re 1ust nght for others AQUARIUS You're feeling and look­ing 1rres1stable You might be surprised at who's not resisting When you sparkle and shine as much as you do, your light travels 1n all directions. Not only that, but what once seemed unusual and unlikely, even to you, may suddenly be very attractive PISCES New Year communications are accented. and both business and pleasure news flies You're in top form 1n expressing yourself too A tall man may cause you some concern. a date 1s set and latter days hear gossip • 1M., l.i()NTRosi: \IOIC( JANUARY 6, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 'A Place in the Sun' is a Unique Shelter By Sheri Cohen Darbonne !.1m1tro.~1· \/oic1• Two womt•n who C'ame to Houston in t9H:l-in a r(•novatC'd milk trm·k, with no worldlv refioun·es-now work around the ~·lock helping otherN gt'i on thrir feC'l rmotionally, socially and financially. Rut Rev. Gracie Lee and her companion, Lynn Herrick, insist they are not running a "crafih pad" or a typi· cul lf'mpornry shelter for the abUH('d , The program at "A Place in the Sun" in northt•ast Montrose il-i unique, C'alling for complete renunciation of all inter­personal prejudice as well as nquiring familial interaction among all its resi­d<• nti-.. Rath(•r than merely .sheltering and "taking care" of those who stay at the c·t•nt<•r for a set period of time, Lee and Jl(>rrirk start newly admitted residents immediately on a program of n•cov(•ry nnd inHtruction geared towardH Helf­suffi<' iency. To he admitted, one must ogn•e to diHplay no prejudice or "reverHe prejudice" against any type of Pl'rfion, and must be ready to deride on a direc­tion to take in life. Rev. Gracie Lee helps the abused at "A Place in the Sun" Residents have included men as well atJ women and children, although the· incidence of battery is small in propor­tion: 95 J>f.•rcent of persons who hecome­entruppcd in a relationship with an abusing partner are women. Rome peo .. pie, !.A·e said, are socially or emotionally· battered, especially with the current unemployment crisis ... ''Wji'V(' ht•lped about 12 men get on thr1r f(>el. although somC' of thPm won't admit it," Lee chided. Th(• vast majority, however, of those who come to the large old house for hop(• and help arp battered women and their children. The staff, consisting of Lee a nd Herri<'k, a resident secretary and an avC'rage of two volunteers daily, and the residenb1 are "bonded as sisters," according to Lee. Each of th€> 8isters 1s also a mother, she added, sharing in the care and non-physical discipline of the rhildr('ll in the house. The restriction against prejudice is a major house rule, covered in one of four qu<•stions ask(•d in the shelter's initial intak<• interview "Wt• t..akP a crosH s{'('tion of peoplP and allow no prejudice whatsoever,'' I,(•(• stut<'d A1>plicnnts are ask,•d to rC'nounce nll pre-judgements on tht• hnsis of ruCt'. sex, rC'ligion, age, sexual oriC'ntation. sorio·eronomir hnck ground or against peopl(• who arr "just plain diffl'Tt•nt." At very least, resid(•nts ur<' r('(}Uired hy policy to refrain from displaying n prejudicial a_ttitud<'. including what Ler cle8cr1bC'H os "r(•vprst• prt•judice." R(•v(•rse μn·judice somt•times t>volvt•s in 1wrsons from a dirferent cultural hil<'kJnound or minonty . gr.oup who havt• h('€'11 victims of preJud1l"t' for so A Place in the Sun's shelves are stocked with donated food long that they develop general bitter feelings for another person, Lee explained. There are other stringent house poli· cies which, when broken. are grounds for immediate dismissal. Smoking cigarettes is prohibited indoors. Con· sumption of akohol on or off the prC'· mises also is against the rules. Other violations that could result in imme· diate evi<'lion include sh·aling. lying, prostitution, po~session of alcohol or ilkgnl drugs, spanking or hitting a child. bn·ach of curfC'w. fighting ovt•r child cure and insubordination to th(• dirt>ctor or staff EveryonC' staying at the houi-;e muHt share in th(• chon•s and must romplt•te tht>ir housl' duties before leaving to st't'k work or job training in thr morning. Euch rt·sident ii; assigned a sp<·cific joh that sht· is r('sponsihlC' for. H(•sidents are ahm r(•c1uin·d to attt•nd counsding st·s· sions at IN1st wN•kly. nnd to s(•t>k tn·at m(•nt if th(•.\' have a problem with drugs or nkohol. Th<' soft-spoken, deeply religious dirN'lor says that she pr(•fns to ht• t"Ull<·d "Tt•at'ht•r'' hv the rbidentH and childr(·n as a title Or respfft "Rut nftt•r they leave." Hhe jovially admits, "they usualJy rail me 'Momma.'" No staff member at "A Place in the Run" rec('ives salary or works at a full time ouL•ide job. Asked how the shelter is consistently able to meet its own C'XJ)('llS<'S and provide for th<• needs of othC'rs, IA'e hus a simple response: ''Miraculously .'' Le(• and Herrick are well-studied in dealing with hard times. Like the people who now turn to them for help, they too have been alone and destitute. In I 98a. Lee says, she was instructed by her tiny Nebraska church, Family of Pea<'e, to carry hrr ministry to Houston She wa!oi told, she clnims, to work with JX'Oph.• in nl't'd. "Rut we had nothing to work with ," IA•e said. l...:•t• und Herrick lived on the slrN·t in u dairy step·vnn rl'model<•d into n mobih• home for several weeks after arriving in Houston. Often, they went for dnys without food. Then, L(•t• said, "God gave us Ow pluc·e and the means." Th<' women were taken in hv a Mont­TOH<' rNiident for a week. TheY saw the shC'lter's first location, a house on Fair­view Str(>et, whilC' staying nearby "Tht•n, from nowhere.came tht> ht•lp." L(•e snid . HC'Trick's family provided Home of thC' funds to move in, and the women wrrt' nbll' to convince their land lord that they could renovate the apart· ment. "He asked how we would pay the rent. and we just said, 'It will rome,'" Lee recalled After seeing the work his tenants did on their apartment. the landlord was so impressed he offered them six months fre(' rent and help in setting up a busi­ness to rC'novate a small store in his building. "Gracie-Lynn Books" h('('ame a neighborhood renter where people, often troubled. gathered to talk, Lee said . The shelter was also established in the house. Its first resident was a woman dying of cancer who had no­where to go, Lee said. At its new location, the shelter stands alone, serving up to 12residents at once. The present "family" consists of four women, four children, and the live-in staff. Herrick's family, who do not live in Houston, still assist with some of the bills. Aside from that, "A Place" sur­vives on donations from individuals. agencies, food banks, and church and montrose VOICE HOUSTON TEXAS 1SSUE 324-A TUESDAY, JANUARY 6. 1< 7 Published bi-weekly (Tuesdays and Fridays) Community Publishing Compan)' 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) SW-8490 Contents copyrrght 1987 Office hours- 8am-6pm Henry McClurg PUbllshM·IJd•tO' Lmda Wyche managing 9d1t0t Da111d Roumlort proflUcltOrl Elroy Forbes soc>a1 "''«'<H Shen Cohen Darbonne M•• SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529-8490 ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529-8490 Jerry Mulholland ~rt11mg dirKfol' Ken Boge accoun1 ... KUf,~• POSTMASTER Send 1ddre11 correct1on1 10 A110fld1le. HOUIJIO,.., TX 77006-3028 Su/Mc11pt1on ret•mUS(by V~•c¥11•rtn "'"'"' Counly or by US M11l •b;•wh¥• m US! $1 25 per week (up lo 2 1nuet). S65 perye1r(52 weeks). or S32 50 per ar• IT'IOJ11nt (26weel(1) N1t•Ofll/ 1Mrt1s1np r•P'•••flf1t1~• RovendeH ~lrket•"'G. &66 6th Avenw. Nf'W YOflt 10011. (212) 242-8863 F1t11I 1cNert11mg dudlin. AH d1spl1y .OS 5pm 2 dliys pnorto pubhc1t1on date At c1aaS1hedlds2pm I d-r-imor to P'Jbhcat•on date Not•CI 10 ldv•r1•1¥1 Advertrs•ng rate schedule E1ghl·A w• •llKl•ve Apnl I I_ 1986 R•fPOn•1biltty We do not assume f1n11nc:aa1 rnpon11 ty !Of' c:M•ms bV ltdwerhMB but rMClerl are •~ed to .ov­lhe newap1per ol .,..., 1uapocion ot rr.dulen1 or dealpt•...e '°"*1tllflg Ind IUll)OCIO<'ll W•ll bl lf\v•l!Qlled Newa l«YfCe Unotld p, .. lnternlllOf'tlll businesg organizations, Food and clothing are given in abun­dance. l...et> said. "We always ha\'e enough .• more than enough," ~he said. So the shelter also gives from its abundance, sharing donated food with neighborhood poor. and seeing off its departing sisters with baskets of food and provisions. "If you can give it away, then your own needs are always provided for," Lee stated. Shelves in the kitchen and a separate storage room are crammed "';th food , and more overflows from yet-unpacked boxes stacked everywhere. Donated fur· niture, rugs and books create a cozy clut­ter in the den. "Everything in here is a donation," [..l'e said. Even the house dog, Honey, was "donated" by l..£>e's daughter Area businesses have offered to donatR labor and materials to paint some rooms of the house. Money, the women admit, is "a bit harder to come by." Lee and Herrick, both musicians and composers, supple­ment contributions by playing at func­tions and preparing sheet music. If they wish, residents may perform with them in their group. "Sistersong.'' Lee claims only l:J percent of persons who rome to the shelter are unsuccess­ful in the recuperation program. She attributes the failures to inability to cope with the rules, inability to accept succt·ss. or "not being quite ready to stand on their own feet yet." Business Guild Readies for Fifth Year The Greater Montrose Business Guild ~oing into it~ fifth year this month _is planning increased participation m varit-d community activities to increase the organization's "'isibility in 19R7 Phyllis Frye, guild president. smd aggressive efforts in 191:'>6 to increa~e awarenesH of the group in the commun­ity at large and attract new members will continue and expand this year. Although 1986 was probably busier than the first three years in the guild's history combined, many newopportuni· ties could be tapped this year, Frye said. For more exposure, the president recom· mended guild involvement in area fairs, conventions and parades. Literature to promote individual members businesses. as well as the guild itself, could be distributed from the guild's booth at local fairs such as the Houston Festival. Frye said Member representatives could ride on the organization's float in parades car­rying placards with their business clas· Hifications, she added. Created in 1982, the Greater Montrose Busim·ss Guild now has almost 200 member businesses. It serves as a "Chamber of Commerce''-type organiz­tion, representing business interests in Montrohe and closely surrounding areas. Other goals for 1987 include increas­mg attendance at weekly mealtime gatherings and publication of the guild's monthly newsletter in the Mont rose Voicl' The group breakfasts and lunches are held Wednesdays at member restau­rants and provide an opportunity for members to meet, socialize, and some­times complete work or obtain business leads. Frye noted . 4 MONTROSE VOICE 'JANUARY 6. 1987 A Few Cheers for a New Year Commentary by Elroy Forbes Montroae Voic1 Social Director o Happy New Year, 1987! Last week's big event was New Year's Eve. There is no way to deny it. Houston has a C'(•nter as important as New York's Times Square. FYI. the Transco Tower fireworks and sky leaps captured most of the city's attention. Who knows what satellite TV did for our exposure? Thou sands crowded the Galleria for the hig­ge:-; t party in the country Other~ camped on the cold Transco grounds to enjoy a first-hand experience. Thou· sands more filled the surrounding hotel rooms, parking garages and roofs Hundreds more attended private parties in the area. Gerald Hines. Transco Tow­er's developer thrE'w his own party in the garage. o Community Celebrates Between Jerrv, Ken and I, most of our community wa'l covered_ I started out at Michael's, trapped in the crowd to ring in 19.!'17 Snuggled betwee-n Mu.o.;c/e.<.; in Action. emcee C.H. Harrinl(ton , owner Ron me Hu<:'kahy and hundreds of c£>1e­brants. I experienced the countdown Pace:-- in the crowd: The Roman's Frank Teeter and part:y: popular dentist Ron Butler und his limo party, Clar ence f:d}!ar and many more. I tried to speak to Ron behind the bar Could i:et m way near? Hotfooting it to The 611, cabs wen• impossible, I made it in time to ~hout Happy 1'ew Year to Stan & Gi/hert, Hunk & ,Jim, Jay, Hou·ard, J.J & Bat, Randy and many others includinl( Mr (;reen ('huC'k and Kitty. Larr)' A-fartm was on vacation. Flying over to The Barn, I spied The Renegades, the dancers, Gene. Jim. Renee & Cindy. Big Tom Venton. Jason. Chuck, Miss Wall(reens and others. I pausC'd to do the Texas Tradition of blackeyed peas, corn bread, and the very best cabbage I have ever eaten. Festive. Festive. A leap to Hot Rod caul(ht handsome Dat•e and ,John on the front side of the bar. The danC'ing was so hot to deejay Mardt Co/pman 's sounds that no one paid attention to the boxes of hats. horns and party favors in the lobby , I spied &•nji, Bruce & Wilber. Gilbert & Frank- out of drag~ Rack on the street I ran into revelers carrying balloons from The Ripcord and a crazy florist outside of Cousins. In Cousins I l(ohbled a slice of Codv's hirthday cake and spoke to R(•d and r-an into carpentt-r &Jb and Bland. fresh from the Transco Blow Out. Alas, my first drink for 1987. courtesy of Bob Cro· mt·an.'i en meas film star Glory de Glitta and her party arrived from tinsel town Spit-<l wl·re Floyd Leather Jerr_y, Kicker ~Villir. and Boots. Bob Bland and I <'Tawled over to Th<' Rip<·ord to join DouJ:. Dal'id, ·Gary. Boots. Rick & Mo, Bil! Marty , Cou·hoy Gt•orJlf'. Oscar, Heavy Hardware'sRo & Georjle, Tom , /_,1ttlr Rt•d, Randy. Clay llm , Hart. and Rtcky I stared at tons of strenmns caught on·rhead in tree brnnches while the magic sounds of d<'f' jay Photo Bil/filled th<' air. There was a sparse crowd on thl"! patio. It was cold 1'it·w Year's Eve. hut Colomhia Jof', a communications major at U of Hand an expt:'rl in smokt- signals. providt·d thr entertainmt•nt English went right out tho door. This llme we loaded Mo. Rick and I into tran!-iportation to hit Mike Cooley's party. Magnificent! FYI, Mike has More tiaras than a royal wedding at the Barn nothing but glamor! His Christmas trees, a traditional feast for the eyes in crystal and glass and a second one made up of apples with cinnamon can· dies were matched by the flawless buffet and special blackeyed peas. Every door was covered in fine green garlands and small Italian lights. But outside, the walk, the building, were bathed in Christmas green lights with travel lights to lead you up the path to the front door and past all the closed circuit moni­tors. What a party! I missed the count­down and most of the crowd, but the party was just great. Finally, I went home. Enough. Ther• wer• all kinds of painted faces at thP BRR tht·rt•. But I m·vt'r saw /)ic/.:w And m•vt:r found tht• dnnc·<·rs. Thnt• was Tom. fli/I. Chuc·/,-, l.arry • ./or. Roy, and .Mac. Of <·ourst• all traffic stoppc"Ci on Wt·stht•imt•r to takt• n gnnclt•r at tht• lux The ret•e/ers u·ere out in force at Ro<:'k N Hors<' o New Year's Day I droppt'<i hy Paci ii«.' Stn"t·t to wish Wal lf'r a big I 9H7 and to !-'mack on The Barn's hulfrt oftruditionnl r\t•w YNlr·s I lay fan•. Tlw nowd movt>d slowly throu~h t}wir pa«t·s. Then in onn big rlustt<r wt· all ht•adt•d over to Mary·~ for the famous Blm·k J<;ye- Pt>a I>ann• f."l-a, Chuck. Cwdy & Rem·r. Huzz Bi1:Jtm , Fann.v. Carlwt·re J Barely unscathed suruiuors at Hot Rod ury r>ink C'adillm· park('(l out front-onp that did not ht·long to Fann v Farnwr.1 Out on thf' patio. it was a s·acl n•umon to st•t' llarruum ·'Hudd.v'' Afartm and t<·ll him gooclhyt'. Huddy movt'<I l.H I .os Angt·l~·s. Hatht'r, lw wus trunsft·rred hv Ogdt'n. Ma~: he h1· will he hack wh(·n th(• convt'ntion eentn opcns. What a ni<'l' f.(U_,. ffl· snid thnt sin<·t· all th(> world t•vt·ntually comps through Mary's, ht· thouJ.:ht ht· would savp monl·y and just sit in tlw nftnnoon trnn and h·ll all his frit•nds j.!oodhyt• Bark insid~ · of Mary':; tht•n• wa!-1 Larry ,Jae}.', (;ary. and Rnhat. Bt·forc· tht> night wus ovn I hud ~N·n lee C'rl'am P1•ter Bruno. Slip Around Stt•t•t•. Terry, 0.H ,Jay.wm. Ted Avers. Tony lkt•, Nohbu· and Mda•. . o The Best of J 986 Evl•ryont• t•l"t' g(•ts a turn at tht• Bl'i-il of 1986, so ht•rr arr min('· Beloit Party: Th(' Hostugt• Party on Richmond Ave. Th(' bt•st mass affair I attended , Best Fundrniser: A tie hetwl'en The Before the stroke of midnight at the Venture-N Sooner or later every thing comes to Mary1s _,,__ paintings hostc>d by Steve Shimer rind The 61 J which raised some $4:i l0 for The Omega House. &>st Prom ~ GPC's Montrose HomC"­coming Prom at Heaven. &>st Hosted Event: Parade Party at Lone Star Guest House ties with The Dt'nim Party at Brazos Hiver Bottom. Best Promotion: Leather Fashion Show at Ripcord with the singing host Craig, fashions from Boot's and Peter's. Best Military Event: Mary's Military Ball and U.S.O. Show. BeAt Sunday Afternoon Event: Venture-Nat Don's Loft followed by the famous Circles Party. Best Giant Event: Gay Pride Week and Parade. Best Small Event: Missouri Street Aquafesl. Best Effort: Christmas in Montrose featuring some Hi events. Best Answered Prayer: Mary's Tur· key Awards was not repeated! Until Friday. I hope to see all of you Around Town. The Best of 1986 was the Survivors of The 611 on New Year's Day Happy Hour Daddy Revu<' at th<• Gal Jeon which raised some $27,2!17 for AIDS Foundation, Houston and A Trih· ult• to the Masters, with Wayne Ml•ans Taking a moment out to mug at Chutes fewer O.W.1 arrests made New Year's ~;ve. Thanks to 222-RIDE and all the bars who sent their patrons hom<"­safely. JANUARY 6. 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 5 Greanias Blames Mayor for Losing HUD Funds By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Montrost· Vmce The City of Houston stands to lose mil· lions of dollars in federal funding for projects in low-income areas if Mayor Kathy Whitmire and Efraim Garcia, director of the city Department of Plan­ning and Development, don't "get their act together," City Councilman Grorge Greanias commented Friday. Jan. 2. Greanias, whose Council District C includes Montrose, made the remarks in response to an announcement by the regional office of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development that Houston's $80 million line of credit for Community Development Block Grants will be reduced by $2.6 million. He said it was "hard to say" how the change would affect development pro­jects in blighted inner-city neighbor­hoods of the district. Meanwhile, a spokesman for the plan­ning office insisted that the action taken by HU D's Fort Worth office is not final and that Whitmire and Garcia are prepared to appeal Houston's case all the way to Washington. D.C Greanias said the city's problems in meeting quarterly spending deadlines established by HUD stem from a lack of continuous leadership, creativity and aggressiveness in the local planning office. The city agreed to a spending timetable to reduce its backlog of unspent funds as part of its 20 million grant in 1986. "I don't think the administration will even admit that there is a problem," Greanias. said. "What the federal government has done is send a very clear signal that Houston will lose funding if it doesn't clean up its act," he added. Greanias said the mayor and plan· ning office have shown an unwilling· ness to approach "creative ways" of met·ting the spending requirrm(•nts_ As an example. he cited road construction in Rkeville, a so·called "red flag suhdi vision" near Meyerland in District C The division, begun by a developer but 1eft without streets, has about 300 very poor ri"sidenLo.;, Greanias said. . The City made plans to build a road through thC' community, but the resi· denL'i' !-ihare of financial responsihilit;.· would have amounted to $SOO-$llW~I p<·r household. "This is a little pocket of poverty They need a road but wouldn't be able to afford sueh a hill," Greanias said. He said he inquired about HUD funding for the project but was told by the mayor it was not possible. In desparation, he approached the HUD officials directly. and quickly worked out a solution, Greanias said. HUD agreed to pay the residents' share of street costs. But Greanias added that individual council members dealing directly with federal agencies "isn't a good idea.,. "It's not the way business ib supposed to he condu<:t<><l I was dt>sperate, this is my distrkt. and I couldn't get the city to list<•n," Grt•nnias said. Houston has a low )(•vel of soda I s<•r vi<·<·s and rt•li<·s ht·avil:v on fed<'ral pro· grams to mt·1·t tht• nt•t>ds of tht• poor <1rt•unias said. Tht• Communitv D<·vl•I opmt·nt Program is targl•tt--<l i~t nt·igh­horhoods wht•re more than half the hout<1t•holds have a familv incomt·oflt>ss than !'i2H.OOO for u famih: of four. In Dis· tritt C', projt>t·ts und(•r constructil1n indudt· a new c·t·nt<·r for the handi· t'ilpped on West Gray. Grt>anias said h(' was concerned that a reduction in credit could result in the "disappearance" of funding for some supposedly budgeted projects, like reno­vation of Gregory School in the Fourth Ward. But Alvin Hebert, public inforamtion director for the planning .department, said even if the reduction is finalized it will not affect projects already on the drawing board. "It would affect us somewhere down the line, we don't know where, but no projects that are in the hopper now." Hebert said_ Hebert characterized the announced reduction as "an effort to penalize the planning department for past prob­lems." Heralled the quarterly spending deadhnes unfair. "It's a slow process. taking projects through the various stages," Hebert said. "It involves many steps-design, engineering, study, and coordination of efforts. The bureacracy doe.sn 't move that fast." Also, he said, Houston's program got off to a slow start because a system of project management had to be set up. HUD officials acknowledged in their letter that spending had improved under Garcia's management, Hebert added The city is going to fight the reduction through the appeals process and has an "excellent chance" of retaining funds, Hebert said. Greanias said he planned to talk to his co11eagues on the counci1. particu­larly Ben Reves, about what council me~bers can Constructively propose to the mayor to offset problems. Reyes, a critic of Garcia's position. had proposed bringing in the Houston congressional delegation to lobby to protect the grant Reyes and others brought up the pos­sibility of losing funds due to sluggish spending during a council session in August and received a cool respon~e from Whitmire and Garcia Greanias .said. Possible Petley Murder Suspect Found in N.O. A possible suspect in the murder of Houston attorney Tom Petley was in custody in a New Or1eansjail and could be brought to Houston Tuesday, a pri- • vate investigator working on the case reported Monday. The suspect, whose identity was not disclosed, was charged with the theft of Petley's watch, stolen the night of the murder. The suspect was arrested allegedly trying to pawn the watch at a New Orleans pawn shop, according to Tim Wilson of Clyde Wilson Investigative Services, which has been working on the case since August. Wilson said the agency believes the man in custody could be Petley's killer. Petley was stabbed to death in hts home on Aug. 9. Detectives said at the time that his killer was probably a street "hustler:' and witnesses reported Petley was last seen lea\.;ng a bar on lower We.stheimer with a man who appeared to fit the type. A clt-ar motive for the tnurJ~r was not estahli,hed, and the watch was the only itfom reported missing fnm the home at the time of tht• murder. ~Pl~y ~Safe! 6 MONTROSE VOICE 'JANUARY 6. 1987 Fear of AIDS Beginning to Change Habits By Jen Ziegler United Pre&S International Love and romance among men and women have always been fraught with uncertainty. but AIDS has added an ominous new dimension. Heterosexuals who previously thought AIDS was a "gay disease" and believed they had nothing to fear are worried now. The fear springs from government and scientific reports warning that the general population. unless celibate or in strictly faithful monogamous relationships, could come into contact with the virus that causes the inevitably fatal di•ease. Many sexually active heterosexuals are more interested than ever before in minimizing their chances of meeting that viru.s, a problem that has set them searching for a new sexual etiquette in the Age of AIDS. The virus is spread by two known routes: semen and blood·to-blood con· tact. Although the virus has been detected in saliva, there is so far no evi­dence it is transmitted by kissing. Acting as interpreter, the government has offered handy phrases: Limit the number of your partners, know your partner, and, when in doubt, use a con­dom. Col1ectively, these practices are known as safe sex. They will not elimi­nate risk entirely, but they will tower it. Heducing tne number of contacts is a ~imple enough matter. but following the re:;t of the advice may present difficul· ties. Not even Dr. Ruth is sure how to han­dle them. "There ts no topic- m the world I don't have an opinion on , but on this l'm just super-c-autious. • says bubbly Dr. Wes-theimer, whose call-in radio show­• RE>xually Speaking" -television appearances and book have reached millions. "I am a little bit at a loss. "There is no topic in the world I don't have an opinion on, but on this I'm just super-cautious," says bubbly Dr. Westheimer, whose call-in radio show-"Sexually Speaking"-television appearances and book have reached millions. "I am a little bit at a loss. "It would be very unrealistic to use scare techniques by saying, 'Hey, peo­ple out there, stop having sex,' because that's not going to work," she says. There are several ways to "kno~ your partner." You can get to know someone over a long period and try to be reason a bly certain about their habits or you can interview them. "This is a losing strategy," says Dr Leon McKusick. a research psycholo­gist at the University of California at NOT ALL ADVERTISING WORKS ks our 1ob to sell advemsmg but even we will admit that not every advertisment really sells the product. Somet1mes, you find yourself advertising the wrong thing. Sometimes, the sale or the event you thought would be the hit, just was never meant m be. And sometimes outside factors, such as the weather, affect the results of your advertising Ah' But then sometimes, you really do have the event (or the sale or the club) that rhordd be the biggest in Houston's gay community for weeks. So why keep it a secret from the readers of the publication with the biggest circulat1on in Montrose? The Montrose Voice now has an estimated 40,()()()+• loyal readers each week-thousands of whom do 1101 read either of the other publications The three publications differ in format and sryle, but the Montrose Voice leads big on the bottom line: re.ii Hom/on circul.ition. It's a lead that can make a Ing difference in the bottom line results of your ad\'ertlstng. ne" customers through your door THE MONTROSE VOICE: ADVERTISING THAT WORKS Call our Display Ad Sales Dept for More Re.ii Facts-in writing' 529-8·190 San Francisco and editor of a hook ('alled l\'hat to Do About AIDS. "h's imμosHible to judge based on information gained within the time of a brief interview whether one should ~.;Jeep with one." Bei;ides the problem of getting enough information in a short time, therr is a problem of whether that in for mation will ev(•r he revealed at all. Rays Dr.Ruth: "Are you asking som<'hody, 'With whom did you sleep over the last five years?' How do you know he didn't have a homost·xual affair?" Ev<·n if he didn't have a homo~exual affair, savs Mc-Kusick. he may have slept with.a woman who had pre~·iously slept with a bisexual man. or an intrav· enous drug user and may not know it. "When '.\-'OU !-dt•t·p with someone you're also slt'f•ping with a host of their pr<·· vious partm•rs. when you look at it from the lo;tandpointofthe viruses they'refar· rying in tht·ir body " he says Says .Judith Cohen, a psychologist with thl' University of California­S JHl n 1.;cJred Projf.ct AWARE­Association for Women 's AIDS Research and Education: "How muc-h do you have to know about a person before you can bl' sure?" "The men I'm talking with are noticing there are changes in the gay community, with more attention to developing relationships in the long run. I think that's happening with heterosexuals as well." Cohen says the p<•ri..on who has had a very large number of partners over the years or thf' one who has had a bisexual contact may h<• pretty unusual. "The mon· <·ommon situation is the IM'ri-;on who has had less than thousands and more than onE' partner over the last five Y<'ars. and who isn't sure. "Most oftht·m would rather forget the behavior thnt was risky," she sav.s For thost• who do choose to d.iscuss sexual histori<·s, there is no etiquette. says Jane Zones, a sociologist at the UCSF department of behvioral science and health policy. "It's just a matter of biting the bullet and bringing it up," she says-as tactfully as possible. When the topic is broached. says Cohen, ''in some cases there is outright denial" of having indulged in risky ht.·havior. or that the disl'ase is worth worrying about at that particular mom<·nt. "In some cases the other person turns and walks out," she continues. "In some cases, rarely, the other person says, 'I really appreciate you bringing it up because I wanted to, too."' "Evnyon<' should just state, 'I'm try­ing to hav(' i-;ufpr 8t'X lf you't not intt•r NoilE-d, I'm not intt·rrst('d,"' says Call<' Almt-dal of tht• Finnish Rt'd Cr;)SS, who partic·ipnlt·d in u rt'<"Pnt AlD8 briefing in Washington An angry rN1dion may lw mon• c-om· mon among- ht·tt•rost•xuals at this point, sayl-i l\1<-Cu:;il'k. and is part of thf• pro· t·t·ss of ac-repting thf• thn·at of di seas('. . "A.~gt·r 1i.. almost a pro('el-is of aclnptn · trnn, he suys. Womt·n who know they are carrying the virus may withdraw sexu~lly Cohen says. Some will say they ha~e herpt•s. which allows them to practice safe. SC'X. "I don't think tht'rt's a lot of lying," she savs Wesiheimt•r finds a fine line b(•tween qurstions and thn•ats. "Then•'ioi no way of saying, 'I'm not going to h<• with you unlt•ss you take a test,"' Wt•Hthl'imrr says. In thf' gay community, says Zones, when• all <'an he assumed to he at risk for AlllS, "many of the• men l talked to are trying to ht• N•lihate. Thal doe!<m's work so wt·ll he<.·aust• <'Vl'ntually you fall off tht· wagon. Thw.w who havt• ht'en tr~·ing to avoid t•xposun• or avoid rxpos· ing othn pt•oplt· thf'n havt• the added disadvantagt• of not huvinf.{ had prac: tic<· at m•gotintin~ snft• st•x ." "Tht• men I'm talking with ar<' notie· ing tht·n· art• C'hnnges in tht• gay rom· munitv , with mort' attention to drvrloj,ing rt•lntionships in the long run. I think that's happt•ning with hete· rost•xuah-1 ns w<•ll." "Tlwn• i;hould he a relationship," says Westheimt•r. "Th<•re should h<• responsihility in tt•rms of ui;ing contra­ceptives." One trick some active gay men are using is "going on your first date to a workshop being put on by one of the health projects on rroticizing safe sex," Zones says. So far. "safe i..ex"-use of a c-ondom and placing more t•mphnsis on sexual techniques other than intercourse-has not been a Popular c-ause in the general heterosexual population, and there are few if anv workshops on it Only recently h8.ve condom advertisements been aimed at heterosexuals concerned about disease prevention. Furthermore, says Westheimer, " l don't believe there> is such a thing as safe sex. Sol can't say to heterosexuals or homosexuals what they shou ld do in order to prott•ct themsevlt•s. I can maybe talk about safer 1-;ex." A book called Safe Sex, published this month, contains explicit guidelines as well as long descriptive passages about how to change emphasis from goal· oriented sex to a11-over eroticism and sensuality. It is aimt'<i at gays. hut could be useful to anyon<• io;<·<·king "saft·r i:wx" that is i;till good st•x. RNtding it-or oth<•r books geur<•d towards reportoire expansion-tog<•tht•r with an intended partner c-ould h<' another oway of get· ting the message arross Those <·oncentrating on having safer sex nr<• probably going to use a condom-or at least try A word or two about them. ln heterosexual affairs, men tradi · tionally are not thrilled by them. And, as with other contraceptive matters, it will probably hP up lo women to insist upon deploying tht•m, tht' sc-ientii..ts say Diaphragms with spermicides may aid in prevt·nting some veneral dis· eas<•s. hut tht·re ifi no evidence they afft'<·t AIDS tranfimission "Tht• proi.. S('(•m to h<• doing the b<·st job," says Zones. ref<•rring to Ran Fran cisco hookers. "Thev have b<•t•n informt·d ahout saft• st•x.and .!-it•em to h(' goinJ.(" H good joh of <'nfordng it." A prostitutt· who ('alls h('rself Baht• nnd spt•nk!-! for Coyott• CC'nll Off Your Olcl, Tif(•d Ethics), a nntionnl organi1.a tion of prostilult·s. ust•s what <'nuld lw <·allt•d un nsst•rtivt• approach. "I say. 'lA·t's lw snft•."' she• says. "If tht• gu~; dot•sn 't want to US(' it, l let him walk. For womt·n who art• not proft·s sionals it st·t·ms th<•v havt' a lot of trou hlr doing that. just tC.lling the guy to run along. "If somehodv clol•im't want to prote<.'l your ht•alth, V:,hy do you want to deal Among Non-Gays Too with somc•hody who treats you so?" she 1.;ays. CohC'n savs the situation is much toughc•r for ~omen in ongoing relation­ships who find they an" at risk hecausC' of thc•ir male mate's activities. "If you love som£•body, you're not just going to say, 'get out,'" says WPsthiml•r. "I say, 'Let's be safe,'" she says. "If the guy doesn't want to use it, I let him walk. For women who are not professionals it seems they have a lot of trouble doing that, just telling the guy to run along. "Tht•rc> are so many myths about con­doms," AlmNlal says, such as, '"You don't eat a banana with a pef'l on it. you won't fr•£•1 anything and so forth."' He says hC'reminds men, "It's a differ­ent fet•ling, but not necessarily an infe­rior freling. We have to tell people it does alter sensitivity, hut it can be in a posi· live way." Almeda! suggests saying, "Let's use this simple little thing and have fun with it" McKusick and Almeda! suggest for those who are new to condom deploy· ment, a little refinement of technique is in order "If you're a man and you're coneered ahout AIDS and con«erned about your partners you might practice in your span• ti mt•. It takt•s a certain amount of hydraulic 'kill," McKusick says. "'If you'r(' a woman. practice on some cylin · drical obied. "Putting a condom on can be a loving act. [njecting more love into lovemak· ing might be useful on more fronts than just disease reduction." "Balw" atknowledges condom's an•n 't natural, but then, "the telephone isn't natural. Nt.·wspapers are unnatu" ral. Cars are unnatural. We use thou­sands of unnatural things every day and W(' don't think about it. This is just like lt•arning to drive a car." Ont• \\'Oman suggests telling a partnrr, "It's the only for~ of birth con­trol I can us<• right now." Condoms are also r('('ommended for oral sex. and for any forrplay involving genital contact. .. Bnb<>" <•mphasizes that since petro· I rum products ran damage a latex con­dom, wom(•n should avoid using lubricants that contain these substan­crs and should remove lipstick or any lip balms. As a woman who says she has "done everything" and then some, "Babe" has further advice. "The most dangerous thing to do is to have sex without thinking about it. Every activity in life, to be safe and enjoyable, requires thought. I think thal's what everyhody wants life to b(', saf(' and enjoyable." Other Viruses May Trigger AIDS Virus By Jan Ziegler l rnit~·d Prt'.<;tt lntnnatwnal WASHINGTON-A dormant AJOS virus can he stimulated hy other viruses into reprodu(·ing itself, a finding that may h(•lp explain why some people sud dt•nly dewlop AIDS years after hecom ing inf(•<·tt·d, sci<'ntists say. Researchrrs at th<• National Institute of Allrrgy and Inf('('tious Diseases said Dec. :m thev found that AIDS virus lying dorma~t in C<'ils can be stimulated into reproducing by <'xposure to a differ· ent family of viruses known as DNA virus<>s. S1milarlv. apparently healthy people with dormant AIDS virus infection could come into contact with DNA virus. Th<' nC'wly activated AIDS virus would then overwhelm the immune sys­tem, IC'aving thC' victim vulnerable to other dist•ases. "One of the big issues is that it deter­mines why people stay asymptomatic for many years and what makes others go downhill?" said Or. Malcolm A. Mar· tin, chief of the laboratory of molecular microbiology at the institute. 'It could he infodions with different viru~Wl", RI'\ wt• hav<' C'xamined, or then• mnv lw Pnvironmental, diet or hormo nai" fndors thnt fnn up·regulate a clor mant copy of nn AIDS virus." Tht• A IDS virus is a mem her of tht• rt•trovirus fumilv, which isa branch ofn group c-uJlpd RN.A virusNL Their genetic codt• is mudt• of RNA. rihonuclC'i<· acid Most human viral diseasC', including the flu, measlt•s and common cold, is caused by RNA viruses, Martin said. DNA virusrR are those whose genetic code is made of DNA-deosyribonudeic acid . Martin and his colleagues, including Dr. Howard E. Gendelman, exposed human cells grow in in test tubes to the main n•gulntory element of the AIDS virus and n then to a ONA virus. Each time, the gC'nt·s responsible for controlling rf'production of the AIDS viruf'i were activated. the scientists reported in a supplement to the December issut• of The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The DNA viruses tested included herp<•s simplex, rNq>0nsible for oral herpes; varicella-zoster, responsible for chickenpox and shinglrs and JC virus, which causes degenerative neurological disease"' Other researchers have also been looking into the possibility unrelated viruses prepare a pathway for AIDS virus infrcton. ''This is an important observation and confirms tht' suspicion there are co· factors in the progression and possibly the acquisition of AIDS virus infec­tion," Dr. John Ziegler, director of the AIDS clinical n•srarch center at the University of California-San Francisco, suid of tht• nC'w paper Only nbout 20 to :lO p<•rcent of people inft•c:lt•d with HIV, or human immu nodrfici(•ncy virus, d<•vrlop acquired immune dt•firit•ncy syndrome. Some do so months nft<•r inft•dion. hut for others th<• disl•nsr dot•s not appear for years­as mnny ns s<•vt•n or more. Martin nnd collt•ague~ are unsure how the DNA virust•s affect the AIDS viruH, hut theorizt>d they may act through normal <'c.>llular proteins "ThC' next step is now to define what parts of theH(' different viruses are actu ally making a proti'in that is stimulator to AIDS virus," he said JANUARY 6, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 7 ~Pl~V. ~Safe! Attention Members: J.O.E. J.O.E.'s Admission Times Tues. & Thurs. 8-9pm Fri. & Sat. llpm-2am Sunday 6-9pm J.0.E. is a private organization for members only (adult gay men). J.O.E. is not a public club. There are membership restrictions. New member inquiries may be made during the above listed hours. J.O.E. currently meets at the Cottage Playhouse, behind the Int at 611 Pacific. Entrance is at rear of house. Look for the Play Safe flag. •••••••••••••• Your Photos can be Big, Bri9ht and Beautiful HENRY'S 1 PHOTO •••••••••••••• New Hours for January: Monday-Saturday Noon-Opm 428 ~ Wesfheimer BEHIND MICHAELS 529-0869 §AME DAY TYPE~ §ETTER§ A NJ•:\\' I Jl\" ISION OF TIJJ<: MONTROSE VOICE We'll typeset your Flyers, Menus, Business Cards, Letterheads, Resumes, Brochures, Forms, Ads­and hundreds of other items­the Same Day (Sometimes You Just Want It Right Now!) Get it to us by Noon (or call for a pickup by 11am) and we'll have 1t ready by Spm (size of thG job permitting) NO MINIMUM TIME LIMIT! If your typesetting really only takes 10 minutes. you'll only be charged for 10 minutes) Al 'l'YPESTYLES '1'0 C HOOSE FROM Pick Up and Oel1very Available ($5 charge) 408 AVONDALE - 529-8490 8 MONTROSE VOICE 'JANUARY 6. 1987 Good News America: Nobody is in Charge The Innocent Bystander By Arthur Hoppe Oh. there's good news today for a wor­ried America. For it's at last become abundantly clear what many of us have suspected for so long: Nobody's in charge of the White House. I speak with authority Ever since 1964, I have vigorously sup· ported Nobody for President. In fact, with all due modes­ty., I think I can say that I am the brains behind Nobody. He was an excit· mg candidate. (Who will ever forget Nobody's Sweethearts singing his campaign theme song, ''Nobody Knows the Troubles You've Seen?") Here was a man who had the solutions to budget deficits, cost over· runs and how to get price stickers off dime store gifts. Here was a man every successful politician acknowledged his indebtedness to. But, frankly, I tend to loi;e track of him between elections. Nobody knows precisely when a lightning coup put him in charge of our ship of state. Looking back, it must have been before the Bitburg incident, the Libyan disinformation program and the Hasenfus capture. Nobody was squarely pinned with the responsibility for those foreign policy breakthroughs. So a nation disturbed by denials and dissension in the highest levels of our government over the Iranian scandal can take comfort from the fact that Nobody firmly has the reins in hand. With contradictions and conflicts swirl· ing about our capital, Nobody is the one to listen to. The facts are coming out: We now know after weeks of congressional hear­ings that Nobody planned the shipment of arms to Iran, Nobody viewed thewea· pons as ransom for our hostages, Nobody knows what they were worth, Nobody knows how much the Iranians paid for them, and Nobody knows where the money went. As befits a take-charge guy, Nobody has accepted the blame for what went wrong. The president, himself, has con· ceded that "mistakes were made." and he was eager to name Nobody. In a candid interview in a small Bui· garian quiche restaurant often fre­quented by Nobody, the power behind the scenes nodded. "It's all my fault," said Nobody. At the same time, however, everybody has to admire Nobody's determination to keep everybody fully briefed through· out the entire affair. Secretary of State Shultz has come right out and admitted that Nobody informed him of what was going on. CIA Director Casey, Chief of Staff Regan and Vice President Bush, among others have repeatedly said that when itcametoillega11yaidingtheCon· tras. Nobody let them in on the secret. In fact, if there's one cry that has been echoing through the White House this past month, it's been: "Nobody told me!" Nobody was able to accomplish all this, of course, because Admiral Poin· dexter and Colonel North reported directly to him. In fact, the entire White House staff agrees that Nobody was in charge of the National Security Coun­cil. Now that the scandal has broken, Nobody really wants the facts to come out. Even Colonel North has praised Nobody's zeal in this regard. "Nobody," the brave soldier gallantly admitted, "wants to tell his story as much as I do." So it should come as no surprise in this hour of crisis, with subpoenas and charges flying all over the place, that White House aides are proving loyal to Nobody. In fact, as you watch them on television pointing fingers this way and that, you have to agree that they are definitely Nobody's fools. And when it's all over, which it will be some day, you can bet your boots that Nobody will emerge as a national hero. In fact, I wouldn't be at all surprised if we didn't change our country's motto to: In Nobody We Trust." 1987(SF1 Chrome~ Publtshmg Co In Mont-rose, Neady Eve-ryone Reads the Voi<e Voice Comics "UIK>h, Donny. Sounds like the monster In the basement has heard you crying again .... Lefs be reaaaal quiet and hope he goes away." "It's this new boyfriend, dear. ... I'm just afraid one day your fath8f's going to up and blow him away." JANUARY 6. 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 captain Video! I TUESDAY JanUa!} 6 I • Ill m Ill I[;) Ill Ill) KPRC KUHT KHOU KTRK KTXH KRIV KHTV A&E WTBS CNN DISN ESPN USA WGN SHOW HBO MAX TMC 5 "' .... W•._, .... ~ ....... fld ol U °''- ...., 'QS)Arwt'/ ...... ""'""°"' ~ FIClolU' ,. . .._ ""'" .. • N8C Ntws w- CBS,_, ABC N"°\ ... _ Too- ., ...... ,35)Altb:n ......., .... NBA Todly - GoodT.., w- Abt T_.ut .... 6 ...... """"' .... """"' W<RP ·'""" - 1 ~JSWOf .. ...,, .. - """"""' ..... ·- -"- .. ........ ,. 1-s """' Whl Forturl Pvleeni31T11 J1Ct!mpar>y ' ..... (~ .. ,~ ('~, .. ~ . ""' NflF'"" ..... ._,, ... , .. 7 PM ,1.1..itioek NoQMly8ut TheW1llfd WllOsBoss? fPGoy .... ........ ..... !.:Y.I/ NBA P,m..., ..... ..., Nlil.Hockey '- .... A .... ,_, _,_ .... " -'"" GrowaPll!'I _..., PL T1i'•SI """""" ~· ~· _, w..., .. '"' .... """"'" 8 PM Hill Street '""' AtMomer"s Mooni!Qtltin TBA llllW1~ """""""' '"" ..... L•ryKll'IQ - ...... .......... 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Call your Voice Display Ad Representative for the high circu lat ion facts and low cost figures. VOICE CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING TARGET YOUR MARKET Slart the new year off with marketing to target your business with a new brochure Brochures are an effective. me1tpensive method designed to reach both your goals and your market Call for an appointment 524-0409 - PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep 1t l1sted here m the Voice where liter­ally thousands turn each week VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional service through a Voice Classified Call 529-8490 Pay by check or charge 11 on your Ameri­can E1tpress. Diner's Club. MasterCard. Visa or Carte Blanche ANNOUNCEMENTS KELLY BRADLEY, M.B.S., R.N.C. REGISTERED NURSE CLINICIAN lnd1v1dual. lam1ly and group practice hm•ted to coping-stress. role relation­ships and sell-concept intervention Ofllce 623·6625 LEGAL NOTICES The Voice. a general circulation news­paper havmg published contmuousty for over 5 years. is quahf1ed to accept legat notices ANSWERING SERVICES HARD TIMES MESSAGE CENTER. 933- 194> EE <lUR DISPLAY AO PAGE MEI COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS. 622-4240 Slf0UROt$PtAl'AO ANTIQUES YESTERDAY'S WORLD ANTIQUES. 1715 Westhe1mer. 526-2646 SEE JH DISPLAY AO ATTORNEY ELAINE SHAW. 222-7772. 645-3159 iEf OUR DtSPtAY AD A DON FORESTER. 1011 Bartlett. 528-4668 SU OVR DISPLAY AD AUTO REPAIR MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR. 2516 Genesee (101 Pacific). 526-3723 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO SAL VIN-AUTDM6i1vE~ 52i-8219 $EE OUR DISPLAY AO TA-FT AUToMo-fivE~ 1411 Tatt. 522-21g() SEE OUR DISPLAY AD NEARTOWN KAAZ: 1901Tait. 524-8601 SU OUR DISPLAY AD WEST GRAY-AUT0.-238 w-Gray 528-2886 SH OVR DISPtAY AO BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS 0mo'sBarberShop.302w 11th Haircuts $6 up. 863-1520 !or appointment Tommy's Barber Shop. ha1rcuts s10 and up. 2154 Portsmouth Appomtments 528- 8216 HAIRCUTS BY Ml KE, 522-3003 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ioN BARTON 15 15'4 Dunlavy. 522-7866 lfE OUR DISPLAY AD THE ROMAN. 2602 Whitney, 522~8576. 522-2263 SH OUR DISPLAY AO BARS 8ACC-HUS. 523 Lovett. 523-3396 SEE QUR OISPLA'r AD __ _ _ -· BRAZ.Os RIVER BOTTOM. 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 SEE OUR OISPt.AY A/? __ CHARLIE'S CLUB. 1100 Westhe1met". 527-8619 To odvert1•e 01 ~29 8490 during business ho t11 ' ROCK 'N" H0Rs-E: 5731 Kirby. 52~9910 >EE OUR DISPLAY AD THE611~ 611 -HYde: -528-9(fr9 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD TAM O'SHANTEA:s. 6121 H1Hcr0tt. 771-2470 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD VENTURE-~2923 Main. 522-oooO SEE OUR DISPLAY AD BEER BONDSMAN A-QUICK BAIL BONDS Fast. courteous. discreet. all type of bonds made Michael E. Standage. agent Mention the Voice tor $25 oH all qual1lted bonds 678-4488. 621-8452 BOOKSHOP BOOKSTOP ALABAMA THE-Ai-RE. 2922 S Shepherd. 529-23.45 SEE OUR DISPlAY AD BOOTS OH BOV1 LEATHER GOODS-.-912 Westhe1mer at Montrose, 524-7859 SEE OUR Dl"'>PLAY AD CARS AND BIKES SELL YOUR CAR through a Montrose Voice cl 1lled ad Call 529-8490 CHURCHES CENTER FOR A POSITIVE LIFESTYLE. 531-6600 ff OUR 0-SPlAY AD CLEANERS MONARCH PROFESSIONAL CLEANERS. 2815 S Shep~rd. 522-5101 ';ff O(IR DI · 'tA'r Aj CLEANING SVCS SERVICE PLUS A Quality C .. anlng Servk:e Resldenllal • Comm.rclal e BONDED e JeH Cunningham 522-3451 ~~~~~~service Let Diane clean ti -fr3- CONSTRUCTION. CONTRACTING HsK CONTRACTING. 520:-9064 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD DATING SERVICE LAMBDA'S UNLIMITED DATING SERVICE. PO Box 7418. Houston 77248. 496-3371. 52&-2236 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD DENTIST AONA-l.0 M BUTLER, DDS 427- Wes1he1mer. 524-0538 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO RONALD A PETERS, DDS° -620 w Ala· bama 523-221 1 DWELLINGS. ROOM MA TES. HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE. RENT. LEASE 1 br. apt small quiet com pie• with pool $265 plus electric 529-8178 Montrose. 2br. 1 balh dupiex $395 month; 1br. 1 bathapartmentS225month Covered parking. Jerry. 529-6808 or 526· 3018 Montrose large 1 bedroom garage apart ment Hardwoods. apphances furmshed $250 plus bllls. Call 523-7646 TOWNE PLAZA APARTMENTS. 4655 Wild Indigo. 621-7880 SEE OUR OISPLA Y AD GREENWAY PLACE. 3333-Cummms 623-2034 SEE OUR OISPLA Y AD EMPLOYMENT. JOBS WANTED fh8-ThirdHand Creative Helper w~ll helP w1thalmostanyth1ng S7.50hr .. Chns521· 9775 FLORIST BRANCHES FLOWERS. 1408 West­he1mer. 521-0848 iEE OUR DISPLAY Al (MISC.) FDR SALE STEINWAY UPRIGHT Excellent condition $3200 Anytime 528· 5209 FOR YARD SALES See ads undt r 'Yard Sales at the end of the Voice Cla~ 1!1ed. FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWESfFuNE-RAL DIRECTORS. 1218 Welch. 528-3851 --- Or.JR DISPLAY AD CREMATION SERVICE INTERNATIONAL. 3400 Montrose 529-6666 Qllfl ..-ptAYAO GIFTS TRIBES. 2501 S Shepherd. '29-1714 -- -;JR DISPlAY AO HOME AIR CONDITIONING MIDTOwN AIR-. S21~90o9. 521-9999 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD HOROSCOPES DR -P-cooPER. ASTRO-REFLECTIONS. 2470 S Dairy Ashford #170. 77077. 1-~824-7888 operator 837 LAWN CARE BETIER LAWNS & GARDENS. 523-LAWN Sff OUR OISPLAY AD LEATHER LillHERBYBOofs.711 F81rv1ew 526-2668 SEE OUR DISPtAY AD LIQUOR WAUGH DRIVE LIQUOR 1402 Welch. 529-9964 SEE OUR DISPLA y AD MEDICAL CARE FABRE ci.1NiC~-5s00-Crawtord 526-2320 SEE OUR DISPLAY AV STEVEci MAR-TINEZ. M -D _ 12 Oaks Tower. 4126 SW Fwy lf1000. 621-7771 SEE OUR OISPLAY AD ~~H~~ JANUARY 6. 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 MODELS. ESCORTS. MASSEURS - THE CADl[L.AC OF MASSAGE ~ Dav1d D o~ EI (713) 520-8232 Houston. handsome.healthy.honest and masculine. (713) 988-0402 A JOyful rub by a nice person. Ben 270- 1828 SILVER FOX SERVICE .. PERSONAL FOR THE PROFESSIONAL" SELECTED cuts of handsome. hairy. masculme. muscled manhood that defiver sat1slact1on Days or Evenings Call Matt (713) 880-4500 trll 11 pm Deep muscie~ ·sensuous body rub. eYen­ings and weekends Le&Ye message SteYe 64D-6690 STOP 9euing rubbed the wrong Way C8.11 Cart 622-3942 Stimulating body rubs by handsome GWM 529-3970. Leave message on recorder 1f no answer THE RELIEVER lntu1trve body rub. secret oils 526-3711 - THOM OF HOUSTON 523-6577 Sensuous massage tn or out 529-3970 MASSAGE BY DAN Sale. relaxmg. sat1sfymg. senous or sen- ~~::;n~ ~eaan~sex~;~~c~n.ta5b~~: ~- 200-11pm weekdays. anytime weekends 523-9821 MOVERS MOVEMASTERS 801ees 1001• Visa MC. Amf?x wt 1925 Westhe1mer 630-6555 PERSONALS Looking for Love in All the Wrong E Places? m Nlssi~~ Phone Texas' Newest Way to Meet Others Hear Hot Uncensored Classified at 526- 4669 Leave Your Free Classified at 526- 4423 We assign your ad a personal ID code for complete discretion A DIVISION OF TECHNOLOGIC ENTERPRISES AH fetish uncensored adl1stings B--. 4-s­- , II·· leather. 1ockwear_ muscles_ etc lnfopak $3 00 TRIKX. 59 West 10th. NYC 10011 Mascuhne. liberal GWM professK>naL 39. 6"4'. 2001b. Seeks masculine GM 35-47 for fnendsh1p maybe more Interests include movteS, theatre. travel. politics :=~!0~~rv'~~nd ~~1;~24~~~~ v~~~- COup1e wanted-for safe fun and f~1end-. ship rm GWM. l4 (look younger). brown/ brown. 5'11". 140 lbs Wnte Boxholder P 0 Box 66282. Houston 77266 - CORNY BUT TRUE - GWM. 37. 5·11· 175. seeking lover more interested m me than himself. and more interested m us than m me_ Attractive. professr0naly employed. capable of total =?mA~";;~~~~1~~~~a~0A~~i~ou the RULES FOR THEPERs.ONALS Person­als (and other advert1smg) should not dMcr1be or imply a descr1pt10n of sexual organs or acts No Personals should be directed to minors Advertising must be "pos1t1ve.* not "negative· (If you have certain preferences 1n other people. 1tst the qualihes you desire. Please don't be negative by lrst1ng the kinds of peof»e or quat1t•es you don't desire Thank you and happy hunting ATTENTION J.O.E. MEMBERS J O E has a new home and new hours Meetings are Tuesday & Thursday (admission 8-9pm) Sunday (adm•ss•on &-9pm). and Friday & Saturday (adm1s­s10n 11pm-2am). at the Cottage Play­house. 611 Pacific J 0 E. helps you expenence your gay male sexuat1ty 1n a safe. sensible (and even legal} fashion Look fOf the Cottage Playhouse sign at 611 PaClhC and follow path through the · ,, Entrance 1s at the rear of the house CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING Whoa' Don't take those pictures of your boytnend or g1rttnend to the drug store You might get baci< blanks and the e1epla­natt0n, ·weJI, !here must have been "°'1'1elh1ng wrong w1tr"I your camera·· Bal­l"' ley They JUS1 didn't want to pnnt your ~~:. B~1~.~~~~ht~1~e:?·1sb1;~~nu~ Michaets) lor conf1dent1al photo devel­oping and printing We promise Big Bright and Beautiful Po.nts as clear and sharp as Po1$1ble SAFE SEX? FOf your mental health. have se1e FOf your physical health. make it safe sex. Sate sex s where there are no bodily •lu•ds exchanged The virus which leads to an AIDS cond1t1on is believed usual!y trans­mitted from one person to another from blood Of' Hmen ThOse who are "recep­tive" are especially at risk Do condoms protect? They cartamly help But con­doms MUST be used with a water-based lubncant (the new product Lubrasept1c is especially recommended)_ Petroleum or veoetable-based lubricants will actually dissolve the condom and eliminate the protection Please ·P1ay Safe - A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederick Brandl can shaw you hOw to have achve fun or play passive games with the personal ads In their book. ·c1ass1lied Affairs ... they'll tell you how to write an ad that really stands out. what to expect when you place or respond to an ad. and even what all thOse funny little abbreviations mean Send SB to "'Cl.ass1f1ed Afta1r1, Atyson Pub. Dept P-5. 40 Plympton SL Boston. MA 02118 (Also 1ncludedw1ll be a coupon for $5 off on your next Personals in your choice of 25 pub!1cat .-,ns. 1ncludmg the Voice) PEST CONTROL AESUL TS HOME CHEMICAL & PEST CONTROL. 2513'1 Elmen. 524-9415. 223-4000 SEE 'JUA DISPLAY AO PETS ANGELS TO ZEBRAS Petworld 11725 Eastex Freeway at East Mt Houston 590--0471 SEE OUR ()IS.."iAY AO CHEERS. 2654 4 FM1960 East. 443-2986 s.El OUR OISPlAY AD r.-;:;;;::;::-=-==-:=:c:--~---,-~-t CHUTES~ 1132 Westhe1mer. 523-2213 5EE OUR OtSPi.A'r AD DIRTY SALL Y'S. 220 Avondale. 529-7525 $UOORDISPIAYAD Hor ROD. 804 Pac1f1c. 524-0806 SEf OUR DISPIAY AD KJ·s. 11830 A1rlme. 445-5849 l:EEOURCUSPIAYAD MARY'S. 1022 Westhe1mer. 528-8851 SU OURDISPtAYAD MICHAELS. 428 Westhe1mer, 52~2506 Slf OUR DISPLAY AO ~f~~J4i~JiJ1,t;~:gherd. 863-oci~~ NUMBERS. 300 Westhe•mer. 526-6551 $EE QUR DISPLA r AO THE RANCH. 9150 S Mam.-fi6&-l464 $((OUR DISPIAI' AO RiPcoAo. 115 Fairview. 521-2192 ,<;fl OUR DtSPlAY AD 12 MONTROSE VOICE JANUARY 6. 1987 PHOTO FINISHING 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO SEWING SPECIAL LADY DESIGNS Sewing for the hard I• f1t "Lao1y CalrJan or Wanda 957- 112 Keeping Up WE DO IT Alli Printing and deve.10p1ng enlargements._ JUmbo pnnts film. Kodak paper 2615 Waugh Or 520-1010. HENRY'S 1- HOUR-PHOTO. 428· West hetmer 529-0869 SEE OUR C SA.A YAO PRINTING SPEEDY PAINTING. 5400 Bellaire Blvd 667-7417 EEOURDtS ..Al Al PSYCHOLOGISTS OR NICHOLAS EDD. 2128 W'lcl 527-8680 SEE OUA DISPLAY AD RECOROS. TAPES INFINITE RECORDS. 528 Westhe1mer 521-0187 SlE ()Ult OfSPlAY AD RESTAURANTS CA-FEE01. W Alabama at Shepherd 520-5221 SEE OUR DC$Pt.AY AD CHAPULT EPEC. 8-13-Ao-ch_m_o_n<_! __ 522-2365 ~EE OUR DISPUIY AO CHARue·~s.-1-102=w-.-,.-n -ei_m_e,-.s ~22~-~333=2 SEE OUR OISPl.AY AO CHICAGo-PIZ:lA. -.,-00-M-an_de_l_I, - 526-9780 $EE OUR OISPLAY AD HUNAN VILLAGE. 1722 c81~fornta 528-6699. 528-4651 SEE OUR DISPf..Ar AD THE HUNT ROOM. 3404 Kirby, 521-9838 SEE OUR OISPU.Y AO MiSsOuAtSTReET cAFe. 1111 M•ssouri 528-126' SPAS. POOLS SPA TO GO. 5816 SW Fwy 772-8646 SEE OUR DISPl..,A Y Ai SPORTSWEAR BASIC BROTHERS. 1220 We1th~ 1mer 5??-16~ STORES (MISC. ITEM SI THE EAGLE. 1544 Westhe1mu 524-7383 • fE OUR DfSPUY AO KiLROYS. 1-723 Waugh 0r 52&-2818 ~~ OURDIS~AYAO WH-ole EARTH-PROV1Sl6N-cCf 2934 ~Es~~~e~J"~; l"8J SUPERMARKETS KROGER. 3300 Montrose TAXI TIRES THE TIRE PLACE. 1307 Fa1rv1ew 529-U14 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO TRAVEL FRANKLIN GUEST HOUSE. 1620 Franklin. Denver. Cc (303) 331-91Cl6 SEE G'JR OISPt.AY AC I wish to re tu rn a book. \\The Mayflower Madam" turns out to be a re prehensibly misleading title. SEE OUR D"SPi.A.,. AO PlzzA INN. at-05 sstlePhe;d. s22-S616 lit£ OURC''S'.Pl.AYAO TYPESETTING ALLEN WADSWORTH CO INC 983f Sweetwater, 445-4141 YARD & GARAGE SALES ~Pl~y ~safe! PO-:;P:1e 1s2s w the•mer 528.-4350 q:E , . SAME DAY TYPE~E ...~. ER' 4j Avondale. 529-08490 SEE OUR Ol$Pl.AY AD -[E OUR OtSPlAY AO YARD SALE Tre re fr0fTI ar•, ind lh worl VIOEO Antiques. crys1a1. clOlhes, fixtures. furni- SELF-IMPROVEMENT UPHOLSTERY. CONSIDERING COSMETIC REFINISHING LOBO VIDEO U24·C Weslhe•IT' 522·5156 ~;:Y a~~::~~o~~~,:·.~J~~lt 719 W - OUR CNSPlAl' AO HAVING A YARD SALE? SURGERY? Amenean l1v•ng 1n Mexico offers com- ~P~~~n Pf~::s 51%9~ c~~~ FURNITURE STRIPPING SHOP In the heart ol MontrO!f" Refinishing. repa1rt. upholstery 529-7833 WE.oel1vER v1DE6s. 1420 Wes1he1mer, 522-4485 -ff0UROl$P'AYA0 Announce 11 here then stand back for the crowd Call 529-8'90 or v1s1t the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard sale announcement 367--0284 367-8847 BLACK & GAY Through stories and poetry, essays arid artwork, twenty-nine black gay men explore what it means to be doubly different, in this first-of~ts-kind anthology Their voices range from poignant to erotic to angry - but they always reflect the affirming power of their visions. IN THE LIFE A ILACK GAY ANTHOLOGY edited by Joseph Beam S7.95 1n bookstores, or clip this ad to order. 'l Enclosed is 58.50 (postpaid) for IN TNI LIH. name address City ----------- state: Zip ----­Alyson Publications. Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St. Boston, MA 02118 Stein & Toklas D ETE CT IVES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardner. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real-life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6. 95 in bookstores. or use this coupon to order by mail. He;; i;$7.5o fo7 Mu-;,;-;;. i; M;;;d;r is Murder, by Samuel Steward. name. address _ city state 1p ____ _ Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 r-- WARNING: I I 1bis could be habit forming! Now at 11IE COMEDY WORKSHOP St~des i lljl l::.S1:1111 II fn/\u, Ir 'i/1</Jl'1 /1 (.o /irt'\t' rlt'ti 11/b The llontrose ioice La l~ 'ight Performance~ \Jturda~. I lpm 'undJ\. 8pm \II pt·dormann·:-. .h lhJr).w l•<t..t·l-tlo \IJ.-.!n(Jn.J \I\\ or \nll"rll'Jll hprr'-" l1HOl 1' ll\lt'.\ \\\11.\KH L:OR TICKETS CALL 5 2 - S T A G E
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