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Montrose Voice, No. 251, August 16, 1985
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Montrose Voice, No. 251, August 16, 1985 - File 001. 1985-08-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 16, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4753/show/4728.

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(1985-08-16). Montrose Voice, No. 251, August 16, 1985 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4753/show/4728

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 251, August 16, 1985 - File 001, 1985-08-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 16, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4753/show/4728.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 251, August 16, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 16, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Misinformation Epidemic Threatens a Vital National Health Resource By Barry Vinocur Pacific NewB Seri ice Special to the Montrose Voice Seemingly overlooked in the rush to report Rock Hudson's battle with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is the fact that the actor underwent coronary bypass surgery several years ago, a proce­dure that ususally requires multiple blood transfusions during and after surgery. The number of patientll who have deve­lopt> d AIDS as n result of receiving blood contaminated with the causative virus remains very small-only about 202 of the 12,067 cases reported in the United States so for-but the psychological impact of those few has extended far beyond their numbers. Some patients have even refused surgery, fearing they might require transfusions and Inter develop AIDS. Whifc new screening procedures and a new blood test should now reduce, if not eliminate, the risk, it may be several years before anyone will know for sure if these method~ will work as well as expected. Unlike infectious diseases that have incu· hation periods of a few days to a few A f\J E: f<IC A' S SUP Pl V weeks, AIDS can take years to surface. Most researchers now say incubation can range anywhere from months to three years or more It is that long wait, coupled with fear and misinforamtion, that threatl'ns the nation's blood supply-a resource on which we all rely. According to the American Association of Blood Banks, some 3.5 million people receive one or more transfusions each year, many literally life-saving. The blood supply is thus a national insurance policy that covers everyone, whether or not they have ever donated blood. But this volun· tary system can only work if we continue to trust it. Before the new AIDS blood test became available, some patients and their fami· lies were demanding that hospitals and doctors guarantee that any blood used would come from family members or friends. Initially, most blood banks opposed this policy of"directed donation," but eventually most gave in. Some contend that blood bank~ realized Montrose Voice "The Newspaper of Montrose" August 16. 1985 Issue 251 Pub' w ed Every Friday (713) 529-8490 the pressure for directed donation stemmed from the amount of media at ten· tion the controversy was receiving, and decided the erosion of public confidence was a greater threat than directed dona· tion. Yet once this was resolved, blood dona· tions began dropping off dramatically. Somehow-as more transfusion-related AIDS cases were reported-people had begun to fear they might get AIDS just by giving blood. Despite repeated efforts to calm these fears, that notion persist>;. Why? Part of the reason may lie in the efforts ofindhiduals and organizatio=­including the news media-have made to reassure the public about the disease from its inception. Since the disease was first officially rec­ognized in mid-1981, a lot of people have tried to ignore AIDS. Sewspaper and mag· azine editors e\idently felt the public had little interest in what they called the "gay plague." Then came a spate of premature predic· tions. One well-known science journalist contended in mid-1983, "Almost certainly, the number of cases is not going to con· tinue to double every six months as it has since the onset of the epidemic." His pre­diction echoed the claims of some doctors that the disorder was unlikely to spread beyond the original four high-risk groups: men who had homosexual contacts, intravenous drug users, Haitian~ and hemophiliacs. That proved to be Y.Tong. Indeed, leading researchers, even in 1983, were saying there was no reason to continued page 6 A asting ntity: ouston ay ars An Interview with HOBO's Alan Pierce By .Jere) Show Editor's Not1•: This second m a series of four giues us an interview with Alan Pierce, chairman of the Houston Organi· zation of Bar Owners IHOBO) He i.i al.•o an owner of the Brazos River Bottom. located at 2400 !Jrazos. Along with his leadership of HOBO, he •~ inuolued in several oth1•r orl(anizatio1's-l(roups which affect directly and indin•etly the gay lifestyle. Pierce, as a bar owner, talks about HOBO and the ou•ners u·ho make the bars a real entity. JS: How did the Houston Bar Owners Association (HOBO) get started? Alan P ier ce: There are a few of us who are newer in the bar business. We decided it was time to meet and cooperate to form some sort of joint venture. In the past there had been an effort (The Houston Tavern Guild), but due to personalities unable to work together, it did not succeed. HOBO has been organized about eight months. Presently we maintain a mailing list of about 30. All of the bars are not members, but we invite all bar owners to the monthly meeting while maintaining a good firm working core of 10 to 12 bar owners. JS: We know there are a lot oflaws that would affect the status of bars in this area, especially in the most recent legislative session. Do we have any lobbying on t he state level? Pie rce: Yes. We have our own state bar owners RRsociation known as BOAT (Bar Owners Association of Texas) founded a year ago On the state level, BOAT efforts have been significant, as well as, impres· sive. We Wt•re able to hire a lobbyist and he wa~ very effective the first year. In companson to othersimilarorganizations at that level, our lobbyist had some clout. The two other organizations included ACT (Associated Clubs of Texas) and the newly Alan Pierce says that his bar joins several other. m the computer revolution. Computers are being used for inventory control, mailinl( lists, finances and other likely applications founded Mixed Beverage Association. As you probably heard there were a lot of "nasty" laws in the making this year which would have affected the entire liquor business. JS: It would seem that there are inter· ested parties other than bars a nd clubs in the region. P ierce: Yes. HOBO is pre&ently inviting our suppliers and other supportAervices to take part in the action. The state has an associate membership available because the clout depends on how many members you can boast as well as the dollars. We know that gay bars represent a sizable share of the action. Texas Alcohol and Beverage income is viewed as acquiring about 20 to 25% from gay bars. It may mean that a lot of us drink, but most importantly it means that a lot of money is contmued pa~e 8 Space Available for Westheimer Arts Festival Space for the fall Westheima Colony Art Festival, to be held on Saturday and Sun­day, October 19 and 20, ii; still available for artists and crafts people displaying only original works of art. Each space secured from the Westhei· mer Colony Association, sponsor of the semi-annual fei;tival, will be 100 square feet with the artists supplying their O\llm means of displaying their works. Each application must be accompanied by three photos of the original art, craft or photography to be displayed at the fei-ti· val, a check for $150 for the two-day show, and a self·addressed letter size stamped envelope. Request for applications can be made at the fe1>tival office, 1001 Westhei· mer, Suite 163, Houston. TX 77006 or by calling 521-0133. "The festival for the fall will be held on the front and back parking lots of Liberty Bank as it was in the i!J)ring. We look for· ward to a bigger festival since we have opened the area and more artist's space is available," said "Charlie" Zindler, festi· val director. 2 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 16, 1985 D Summertime Specials August 16 -22 Featuring D.J s Larry Thompson & Doug Summers Friday _________ _ Guest Emcee ~ltett 71ttfltttJ 10am - 4pm $1.00 Margaritas Saturday_ opening at 9am ___ _ $1.00 Margaritas \~ ater \ ollf'yball Mining Company Marys Naturally Tournan1enl Sally's Friday, August 16 at 10pm The Texas Gentlemen First time in HOUSTON ••••••••••••••••• 4pm ••••••••••••••••••••••••• Noon - 8pm $1.00 Bloody Marys & Mimosas 8ee1- /iuJt 5¢ Drafts Tuesday 8:30pm - till ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• "ater Volleyball Mining Company Sally's l'ournan1ent Aqua Nets ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Wednesday --~~~-~- 'lllet SwifltJuit CcnteJt $ /C() Cnslt 11J1tf Prizes Come in by 9pm to SIGN UP FOR CONTEST •••••••••••••••••• i....----....-i=;;~ ....... ~~;:a;..11~~ ... ~ ················· Happy Hour Mon. - Fri. 10am - 9pm Shish Kebabs & Egg Rolls Available Spm - ?pm Thursday • Double Feature Picture Show ••••• Show time at 8pm 'Mommy Dearest· - 10pm 'Auntie Mame' Coming Labor Day !ION. SEt•'J'. 2, UUl5 Advance tickets $10.00, at door $15.00 Montrose Voice ,o\NO TEXAS•STAR MONTROSE, TEXAS Population fes1 1985) 32,000 Cen1u11racts 401 01 401 02. -40201, 402 02. 405 02 403 •nd '°" 01 Zip cooes (t0Ughty1 70006 77019 (portion). 77098 Bounded (roughly) Shepherd Dr twett). Allen Parkw1y (north). Main SI just), US 68 (JOuth) l1•·1000 1Montroae Blvd at Westhe1mer Rd) 29•44 13"N Long11u:de ts•22·50"'W. Altitude 40' £LECTEO OfFICIAl..S FOR ,,0NTA0$E Chorge GrHnt .. Houtlon City Council (d1t1-C) 801 B•gby (113) 117-5033 El Frll!"K:O lN. Huns County ConunlUIOner fpcl I) 1001 PrHlon. f113J221·e111 W1ltar Rankin Constabfe (pct 11 101 $111 Jae nto. (113J 221·5200 .:>tbfa 01nburg. Tt•H House ot Aeprewtitahvea (a1st t37) 1911 SW fwy. (113} 520-6068 Cratg 't\'tshtngton. le•u Senate ld1$f 13) 1323 C•roflnt 1113) 659-43'3 M•ckey Le11nc1 US House ot Rep,...ntafJYM (dist 18) 19U1 Smith •m 1113) m-1339 The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 251s1 ISSUE. AUG 16. 1985 Published every Friday Montrose Voice PublishinR Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 ClllCULAT ON 1.000 copies weekly tt1ro1..gh 150 maJOr d11tnbut1on pomt1 1n Mootrose the Village ancs the Het0hts ~t1m•t•d pau-on rare faetor 2. 8 •sr1mared rHdtrsl'11p 25.'00 weekly plus 1 000 copies weekly through .. 5 othtt Te,11119 OJ&lr1but1on poinls •stim•tttd pau on rate factor ? 5 utimatfKI tHder1h1p 2,500 weekly TOTAL CIRCULATION IOOOOcap ... weekly total Htlm•tN reat:tetJtup 21100 wH•ly Contents copyright c 1985 Office hours· 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg pub/ahe< Linda Wyche ""'"' Roger Lackey ottjc. manager Mark Blazek Austin con1spondflf'tt Scott Cutsinger 8111 O'Rourke localcontr11Juton Michael Helquist, Steve Warren national contrU>vtOt• Jerry Mulholland,'"°""' Hecutivt Joel Cunn1ngham1accounr H.cut•11• Founding Mtm~rt Gr .. ter MOf"llrOH 8u$1ne&1 Guild. G1y 1nd lHb•ln PrHI Aa1oc1a11on News Strv1UI Newt-One. Pac1l1c News SeMce $yrtd1Ctftd Ftaturl S•rv1cH & Writers Brian McN•ughl. Un•· "*'HI PrNI Synd1C1te. B•n Sargent Special Fe.turn/ Syndal10f\ Saia POSl MASTER Send address corrections to ~08 A'f'ondele Houston, l )( 770()6..3028 SuNetltJltOn ttte lfl US 111 1Hlld .,,11elof)6 U9 per yHr (52 i.au.1) $29 P9' •••months (2t51Ssue1) or $1 25perwMk (le!s tha,, 2e .. sun) Oaci ••un S2 00 each National MJy•ttramg reprHenfff1yf Joe OtSablitO. R1vendell Mdtht1ng 866 Sth AYenue Ntw Yortc 10011. (212) 242'-6863 AC111trtlting <H.clline TllHdliy 5 30pm ror lSIU8 feteased fr ... O.y ..,.,,ing Notre• to ffilwtia•t• ... oca1 a<tvert111no r11 1cnedute Seven·A .., .. enec11ve Oct 12 1934 R.,pon11bi11ty The Montrose Voiee does not assume mpon aibt111v tor actvert11tno cia.ms Reader-. ahould alert tne nf'WI~ p•per 10 any decept1we advt1't1a1ng AUGUST 16, 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 3 GPC Starts Discrimination Documentation Program The Houston Gay Political Caucus recently bt>gan a Discrimination Docu· mentation Program aimed at establishing proof of discrimination agaiMt gays and lesbians in Houston. A project of the Documentation Com· mittee of the caucus, the program involves completion of a form describing the details of the diNcriminatory act or acts. The prim· ary areas of discrimination include hou.;. ing, job, physical violence, police, verbal assault, and medical. The Documentation Program comes as part of a two-fold agenda developed by the arc following the defoat of the January 19 anti-discrimination referendum. After the defeat of the referendum, the caucus reahzed that two areas needed to be addrcs11ed immediately. The two areas were educating the public about the gay community and documenting that dis· crimination exists. The job of education involved educating not onlv the general public, hut the gay commu~ity as well. Those voting against tht> rt>ferendum were greatly influenced by a mass of false information. According to a statement provided by the caucus, "A public informed with correct facts about us gay men and lei;bians would have made a more rational decision before voting." Along with other organizations GPC has begun to promote better education and understanding of the diverse community through an expanded educational process. To thi11 end, the GPC has increased the frequency of press conferences and GPC newsletters and has established a Speak· ers Bureau. To educate the gay a nd lesbian com­munity as to some who worked to deny equal rights in city employment, the Eco· nomic Response Committee of GPC r<'searched the names of those who con· tributed to the defeat of the referendum. Throughout the spring liNts of various groups who gave money were published in the local media with a final completed list distrubutt.-d during Houston's Gav Pridt' WN·k. • The Sl'<'ond arPa the caucus felt needed to he addre.qscd wn documentation Throughout the campaign opponents of the referendum pointed to the Jack of proof that gay men and lesbians had Jx>en dis­criminated against. Although most gays are aware of discrimination in many areas, there were no documented cases to prove di11crimination to the public. Thus, a Documentation Committee was formed with the purpose of compiling statistici: on acts of discrimination. If llomeone haR been a victim of di>crimi· nation or knows someone who has, GPC is asking that such individuali; fill out one of the forms. Tht• incident need not be recent ifthe details asked for on the form, includ· ing witnesses, can be provided. The form Wlll be confidential and ,.ill Ix> used for documentation purposes only. However, Gl'C will as,ist tho'e indhidu als interested in rl'fe:rring the case to th<' appropriate agencies or professionals. The Discrimination Documentation Form will he available through GPC, the Gay Switchboard, Montrose Counseling Center, KS/ AIDS Foundation, variou~ city council members, the Westheimer Police Substation, community newspap­ers, bars, and other community organize· tions. ANEW RESTAURANT 25 Years of Quality Catering- Now a Restaurant • Fresh Seafood • Charbroiled Items • Louisiana Favorites • Rolls & Desserts Baked Daily in Our Kitchen • Cozy Bar- Cocktails $1.75 r--------, rtlonl/tlmunla*Y'' I e&I& of OJI~ I I uutlr f/Jin~,,,,fo+'4 I IL O_FFE_R E_XP_IRE_S A_UG _31, _198 5.. .JI MQ:-;-THURS llam-lOpm FRIDAY llam-llpm SATURDAY 6pm-llpm 515 W. Alabama (BETWEEN MONTROSE & MAIN) 526-6900 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUAU Y TRANSMI1TED DISEASES AIDS KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON FRI 9 5 PM MON. ~~D Fm.EVENINGS AND SATIJRDAY MORNINGS B'r APPOINTMENT 2801 ELI.A BLVD., SUITE G HOUSTON TX 77008 (713) 868-4535 :z .-.:1 = All Paint & Body Shop 1510 Leeland (Downtown) CAR ACCIDENT SAVINGS • On Insurance Deductibles • On Insurance Estimates • Over Other Body Shop Estimates e FREE LOANER CAR Ask for Reny 659-3131 4 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 16, 1985 Montrose Mouth Around the World the Montrose Way By L'Angelo Misterioso, Esq., M.B.E. Was that Boy George and Annie Lennox we saw upon their return from Europe? Oh no, why it was only Alan Davidson and J.D. Arnold of Rich's fresh from their European tour. Reportedly, there will be an entourage of Frenchmen stopping in to see them. Alan asks If he can send flowers to France Yes he can. All he has to do 1s go to Pluc­cua. Through the use of modern technol­ogy, better known as Teleflora, anyone can send flowers anywhere. -o- "Why shop the Curve when you can work the Corner?" says Trent Mixon of Pluccus. Guess it's the beginning of the trade wars If you've ever been to the corner of Taft and Fa1rv1ew, you've noticed what an exciting place it's getting to be What with Pluccua, TNT Shirts, Reeves Antiques, and Kronlage Design, it's fast becoming a great alterna­tive shopping center. -o- "Help squelch Welch" says TNT Shirts' John Bushland. TNT is priviledged to han­dle Kathy Wh1tmire's campaign T-shirts -o- Does anyone know what happened to Jasper? She disappeared sometime last Saturday morning, a victim of thieves, I fear. -••---••­--•=• -•• ••• ••' ••lJ• r.: •• I ~ •.... , ..._. ...__!.!! .... - ~ :·-·:·-·~·~ Visit Rick at Timeless Taffetta. (Thanks for helping pretty up the girls at the Garden Party.) Photos by Albert Puente She was often seen riding around Montrose on a bicycle, but now that is no more. Her return or information leading to her return woutd be much appreciated. You can't miss her. She's big and green. Anyone know anyone who's gotten a new Double Yello­whead Parrot lately? -o- Poor Jimmy Spaulding. Our condolences are $ent your way and to your smokin­'/ brokin' TV set. -c- Tlmber Grove Condominiums, a three­phase project located along White Oak Bayou on West T.C. Jester, is now offering a no-risk, buy back plan. Buyers of one and two bedroom units will have the option to sell 11 back to the developer at the original price. Timber Grove 1s also offering fixed rate financing with no down payment -o- While were' on the subject of real estate, sexy Tom Grass of the Gardena informs us that they've sold three more condos The Gardens is that big brick complex directly across from Heaven. (Some say it should be the Gardens of Eden. It would be approp­riate. There are enough heavenly bodies around the pool on Saturdays to tempt anyone.) Too bad Tom has gotten married. -o- An anonymous source close to Caven Enterprises informs us that Heaven will open August 29. Just can't wait to enter the Pearly Gates J.R.a John Bent was supposed to be dis­patched to Florida. But, at last report, his destination has been changed to Colorado. Hope he's back in time for the Grand Open­ing next door. Hot hunk Steve Baldwin was this week's winner of J R.s new Bare Chest contest. - c- Also along the Pacific Street Connection. Mother Lode is celebrating its First Anniver­sary. They will be g1v1ng away free bar tabs, dinners and other assorted goodies. You must be present with a drink in hand to qualify. Details can be obtained at the Mother Lode . - c - Cap1tal person Dale Glen. up m beautiful Washington, D.C , wishes to say hello to Michael Wh1tm1re (no relation toyou-know­who). It's been a long time. Dale may soon be coming to Dallas and Houston for a visit. Hope so. anyway -c- News Flash: Park Plaza. Maria (of Mary's fame- has a hole that needs a little filling . So say reliable sources at Mary's. Also, this good news, the famous Fannie returns next week So does the Witch on Monday August Has anyone seen Jasper? Harry of Puerto Rico visiting the Montrose 19. With a wonderful cast of characters like this. how can you go wrong? It's Mary's, naturally. Mary's employee bash will be held on August 20 But, alas, it will be held at a secret location. Oh well. -o- Gorgeous Mark Fielder is moving to Califor­nia soon. What a shame, and to think, I never got my chance to . .. -o- With his head up in the clouds, wonderful Wally Swort 1s moving to Austin to join Ted Sikorskey and Mike Bison, both formerly of Houston and the Rainbow Lodge. Everyone will miss you Wally as you were someone to look up to (ha, ha). But seriously, hope all the best for you. Can Jason and Dean be far behind? - o- The Barn announces that the 5th Anniver­sary of the Sundance Cattle Company will be celebrated this Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Saturday The Barn and Galleon softball teams will be presenting a show at the Galleon, pitting them against each other. On Sunday at 7pm at the Brazos River Bottom, a Mr. and Miss Texas Gay Rodeo show will be held to benefit selected chari­ties At 9pm at Kindred Spirits, The Barn softball team will present a show Also the Annual Labor Day Bar-B·Oue will be held at The Barn. -c- Beachea has a new video system. .. Also this note from Beaches employees· They would like to ask for any and all contribu­tions to help fellow employee Kenneth Edwards. Kenny was critically injured in an automobile accident and has no insurance. There is a fundraiser being planned for him. Let's all get together and help him Many compliments on the choice of music played at Beaches. It's so good to hear a rock oriented mix, instead of the redundant boom-boom of the synthetic music. Hope you keep it up. (Obviously I have my own personal music-type preference.) The sound system at Beaches is super. After the Wet Swim Suit Contest last Wed­nesday, the audience was treated to a Tina Turner concert. It was great to see Ernes· tine back on the boards. She'll be appearing every other week. Shea Thomas will do his show stopper from the Diana's (Fabulous Dress) before the Texas Gentlemen appear Friday night. They are something to see Truly mouth-watering. Are any of them available for after hours? Last week's wet shorts contest was judged by Gordon Thayer, who was also celebrating his birthday that night. When last seen Gordon was still blowing out can· dies, or whatever. - c- The Zoo at Dirty Sally's is losing another animal. So long Bob, we'll miss you. Good luck m Salt Lake Don't forget to give us a howl. We'll still be in the cage. Don't forget we have connections up there. -o­Bobby caught relaxing poolside -·---.-'"''- - - --.......1 ,Uu;o1.liw,l.MJ!!l'!!liLXr<ll§l<mi:~h:::•::.ve:.:,fu~n:.:.:an::,::;d~P~~s.t=::e.;;.,.~ Tuesday Boys Night Out llam-8pm Happy Hour with mu sic , video and good friends 10:30pm Jockey Shorts Contest with semi-finals August 20th and August 27th. Grand Finale September 3rd, Labor Day Weekend. Grand Prize a trip for two for 3 Days and 2 Nights to Las Vegas at the "Pacifica Resort Hotel" (air fare, hotel and cash) Wednesday Men's Night Out llam-8pm Happy Hour with Houston's newest music video 'IV 5 8pm-2am-Flash us your Fitness Exchange Health Club Card, or wear your club's T-shirt and you get 50¢ draft beer 01 50¢ non-alcoholic juice drinks all night. llpm $100°0 Best Chest Contest (Levis please, no jockey shorts) ... NO COVER. Your host Mr. Gary Chuch from Fitness Exchange u~, c;· V'\f opens Thursday, August 29, 1985. Preview Grand Opening Invitations Available through your favorite bartender at Montrose Mining Company or J.R. 's Bar and Grill. AUGUST 16, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 •••m·m · im·m ·:· m·••• ~ - - - - - - - - - - I ~I TAFT * Cooling System check & flush $27•s * A/C Charge & Check $2695 * Oil, Filter & Lube $24's ln'nc 10 cneck voui COOiing svstem1 • ASK FOR CHIFF BUTIROCK 1411 T.A.F T-522-2190 u . .Adams~ Ltd. NOW OPEN A Distinctive New T-Shirt Shop 2nd Week Open and A Big Success Located 1n 611 Hyde Park : s10°0 ! I I ! off ! I I I CLIP THIS AD and attach it to I I your next order for S 10.00 off a!"o/ of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing • Flyers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Envelopes • Announcements • Invitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet Copying • Invoices ~~· ~'1cy'Y;, SFEEO'r _;JiJ1 PF?INTING SE~'CE J.,,, ~:;;;J Fast. Reliable SeMCe. • E><,ce Jent Ouanty. Low Cost 5400 BEUAIRE BLVD. Convm1t"nl Southwest Locaoon CALL 667-7417 PICK UP AND DELIVERY MEMBER GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD. GREATER BfUAIRE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ~~ ont~~CUStomefand/OIOICler.CNYlOC ~ ccmDl""'1 With - cis<CU'CS Of spociai G~ ----------- ~ {!§)RT~ ~XOH~ NAUTILUS FOR MEN & WOMEN *COUNSELING *60 NAUTILUS MACHINES *SUPERVISION *SAFE UVA TANNING BEDS *WHIRLPOOLS *COMPUTERIZED BIKES *UNIVERSAL *DYNAMIC AEROBIC CLASSES *FREE WEIGHTS *WET & DRY SAUNAS *VERY CLEAN *AIR CONDITIONED * * 1/2 PRICE SALE * * 2900 RICHMOND [neer Greenw1y Pt..) PHONE 524-9932 6 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGuST 16. 1985 Misinformation Epidemic Threatens Blood Supply frompagc l believe anyone would be immune. "Unlike man.:: said one, "disease doe~n't discrimi· nate. Gradually it became clear that it was specific sexual practices rather than sex­ual preference that played the key role., Recently, AIDS has been reported in peo· pie who are heteroi;exual, do not use intav· enous drugs, and have not received blood products. Admittedly, the number is small, but doctors have learned not to undere•timate the disease, and at least one researcher has warned that heterosex· uals should be on guard as well. For the moment, the only ad vice experts can give heterosexuals is to follow the "safe sex guidelines" putout for homosex· uals. Official statements have also led to mii;· understandings. In April 1984, for exam· pie, Margaret M Heckler, SeCTetary of Health and Human Services, proclaimed triumphantly that government researcheri; had identified the virus caus­ing AIDS-nearly a full year after French scientists reported the same finding-and said a blood teflt for AIDS would be availa­ble within six months and a vaccine Wlthin about two years. It took more than a year for the test to reach blood banks-and even the most optimistic researchers say a vaccine will probably not be available for five to 10 years. And, because of the long latency period for AIDS, it would take many years ~~rmorinls Bruce Bailine Bruce Ba1l1ne. 46, passed away quietly m his apartment on Sunday, July 28 Bruce was a native of Philadelphia and had resided 1n Montrose since 1980 He was employed as a pharmacist by The Montrose Pharmacy. Bruce was retured to Alliance. New Jersey. near Philadelphia. where he was burried along side his father whom he loved dearly. He 1s survived by his mother, Jean, of Phila­delphia. and his many friends and acquain­tances m Houston and elsewhere Those of us who knew Bruce will miss his kind and gentle presence to confirm that a vaccine worked. All these pronouncements were offered in an attempt to c-alm the public, not to misinform. Yet that effort may have fos· tered the skepticii;m that now greets assu· ranees that pro~pective blood donors face no risk of contracting AIDS. But there is, in fact, no reason to fear donating blood-the entire blood collec­tion apparatu" is sterile, and the needles are uHed only once. What people should fear is what could happen iflarge numbers continue to avoid blood banks. Blood shor­tages, always worse during the summer and holiday periodi;, could endanger those who need massive transfusions. AIDS has already cost the nation a great deal-not only in dollars, but in nearly 6000 lives loot, many of the victims in the very prime of life. Clearly, much more needs to be done to give researchers and clinicians the tools they need to fight the battle. Dignity Slate Challenges Catholic Church Two controversial figures, one a layman and one a Roman Catholic nun, have teamed up and announced their candi· dacy for executive leadership of Dignity, Inc., an organization for lesbian and gay Catholics and fnends. Mike Olivien, the presidential candi· date, hales from 1'cw York City where John Cardinal O'C"-0nner has repeatedly challenged the city's attempts to enforce ant1-discrimmatory measures for homo­sexual people. As president of Dignity/ New York for the last three years, Q)i,;eri has consistently confronted the Catholic Archdiocese of New York toministereffec· tively to the needs of lesbian and gay Catholics. Sister Jeannine Grnm1ck, Olivieri's run ning mate for vice president, was ordered by the Vatican m 1984 to end her associa tion with New Ways Ministry a national Catholic guy ministry group which she co-founded. Olivien lS a member of Ed Koch's Police Council on Lt>.sbian and Gay Issues and has te.stified on numerous occasions before the :-;ew York City Council on behalf of civil rights for lesbian and gay people. Grumick is a School Sister of Notre Dame who hai; workl'd in lesbian/ gay ministry since 1971. She edited Homo.~ex· uallly and the Catholic Church. The Olivieri team 1s completed by Lew Silverman and Ken Green. Silverman, the candidate for secretary, has served as president of Dignity/ Suffolk and is a practic-ing attorney. Greene, the candidate for treasurer. is vice-president of Dignity/ Atlanta and has been an accountant for the past 22 years. Free Lance Journalists Houston's largest a lternative publication, the Mont­rose Voice, has positions available for free la nce jour­nalists to cover news items of interest to our readers. Important: We are seeking journalists-not commenta­tors. We need writers of factual stories-not editorials or reviews. We need in-depth investigative articles and major news features and interviews. We serve, in combination, Houston 's.large and influen­tial gay community and th e general Mont rose population. Submit samples of your work-and ideas you have for stories-to Linda Wyche, Montrose Voice editor, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006. "Folk music regroups for the BO's" -John MPword. USA TODAY A Ne"'' Ltve Ai bum by HOLLY NEAR ARLO GUTHRIE RONNIE GILBERT PETE SEEGER ·'One of the most significant historical musical events of our time" -Chuck Myer. Weekend Available on records or cassettes at record stores. boo1ntorns and othPr oullets or trorn MIDWEST MUSIC, INC. 207 E. Bul1alo St Suile 545 M1twauke.-.. WI 53202 (4141 278-0066 Hours IOAM GPM M tnru F' NEW RELEASE FROM REDWOOD RECORDS * Monday Oldies Nlte-25¢ draft * Tuesday-Live Band-50¢ draft * Wednesday-Steak Nlte s400 Live Band-NO COVER ALL PHASE LANDSCAPING & HANDYMAN By Lawrence 10% Discount with six month yard maintenance contract • Year Around Yard Care • Complete Lawn Maintance • Roofing • Plumbing • Carpentry • Concrete • Patic and Carport .. NO JOB IS TOO SMALL OR TOO LARGE" Dependable Reasonable Rates Free Estimates 24 Hour Service 713-695-1663 (Inner City) AUGUST 16. 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 INDIVIDUAL & GROUP COUNSELING for Persons with AIDS & PreAIDS -------------------- Support groups for Persons with AIDS & Friends/Lovers/Family • • ~ for further information call: Montrose Counseling Center 529-0037 International Printing Specialists J7/ ~ rteed '§~ on f/Jajwi ' me can f/J'/Md ill Our Services Include: * Design & Layout * Business Cards * Business Stationery * Flyers, Brochures * Price Lists * Menus * Office Forms. including: * Blank Paper Stock: Continuous Forms, Invoices, Copy paper, letter & legal size Purchase Orders, Mailing * Large Mailing Envelopes Labels, Tabs, Interoffice Forms. * Delivery * Wedding Invitations, Social Announcements & Brides Boutique Please consider us for your printing needs - Call 861-0026 so our Sales Staff can asist you with your next printing order. 2103 Yale • Houston, Texas 77008 •Telephone: (713) 861-0026 ·::::. 8 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 16. 1985 Gay Bars Fulfill Vital Social Function, Says HOBO from paRe I being expended to our supplier;; and there should be a meaningful and potential clout. I remember the mention of boycotting Coors beer in Denver, Colorado, some time back. Since this awakening, Coors has been an avid supporter of gay enterprises, especially in regards to advertising in many gay publications. (Editor's note: Local, independently-owned Coors diR· tributors across the country have adver­tised but the Coors family-owned brewery has not.) Other beverage companies have followed the lead. Miller Lite doe~ a Jot of promotion with gay bar,. The Galleon does a weekly promotion with Miller Lite. I think they acknowledge us a;; a signifi­cant pari of their business. Moreover, HOBO is open to not just the bar owners, but also the " straight" clubs, all the suppliers, electricians, and all who may share a direct or indirect interest in the bars. There are some of the gay bars who belong to ACT, but HOBO represents the sentiment of gay gars more tho­roughly JS: Alan, m this series we are attempt· ing to identify the role that gay bars play in the gay lifestyle, as well as, the com· munity at-large. Would you agree that gay bars are a definite part of the gay lifestyle? Pierce: Certainly. They're the whole social center of the gay community it seems. I suppose you can define the gay commu1ty as the " bar people " and the " non-bar people," but I think a large per­centage are those who generally frequent the bars periodically. I'm not sure what I would compare it to m the straight community. but the bar seems to serve a 'ocial 'ervice function. It's a place where one goei; to get away from the house, to meet people, to forget problems. JS: Concerning the different level8 of social function, doesn't the bar get involved with social cauRes? Pierce: Sure, by all means. I would say that most of the major fundraising , that's changing recently, but in the pa11t all of it has been m the bar, whether it's a fun· draiser or answering the call to a situation where someone died and didn't have enough money to cover burial coi;t. When Parents and Friends of Lesbian;; and Gays <P·FLAG) needed some money to attend the national convention, we were there to raise quite a bit. The early KS/AIDS fundraising took place exclu· s1vely in the bars. more recently fundrais· tng has extended to other social organizations, but in the beginning it was completely bars. I think th&.t the bars have proven them· selves in the sense they're not out just to make a dollar. I know one bar owner in particular whom I admire very much. He owns his own building free and clear. He pays his employees better than most. He gives them a percentage, and he puti; back . a hell of a lot of money into gay cau,es. Not every bar owner is able to match this belevolencc. Yet. whether it's "Gay Pride Week" or a community promotion, the bars always try to be supportive. JS: Alan, we have spoken some about HOBO and some aspects of bars being the social center of the gay lifestyle. Are most bar owners encouraged by the business they get from the community? In Montrose . Nearly Everyone Reads the Voice The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE many flock to larger cities like Houston, I~A., and Chicago. There's more popularity being given to the gay lifestyle today. Today, there is something every other day in a Houston daily, especially since the recent gay refer­endum and the advent of AIDS. I've seen more straight people in bars. Last week we had four middle-aged, two couples. They looked around, laughed a lot, had a few drinks, and acted as if they were having a good time. They seemed to fit comfortably and have a non­judgemental attitude. We have a straight couple who plays in the band every week. I have straight bands always calling want· ing to work here. It should be noted that gay bari; in Hous· ton have progressed in the area of welcom­ing both male and females to their repsected bars. Kindred Spirit~ has broken grounds in this area. And once again, non-gay clientele is becoming more evident. The l(ay bar business is said to account for up to 20% of all bar revenues received by the Texas Alcohol Beverage Commibsion Several years ago I debated on whether I should invest in this bar, and decided against it twice. Today I find that the caliber of bar owners is inspiring and this was one of the reasons why HOBO evolved. I don't want to sound boastful, but I think we have a better group today. And I hope that getting bar owners together will serve a purpose for good interaction, Pierce: I thmk a lot of people have been afraid of bars for the laHt couple of years primarily because of the AIDS scare. It's something which is often discussed in HOBO. Recently we sponsored a "night out" designed to help those come out of their winter closets and come back to the bars for a special party occasion. The con· sensus of bar owners has obe5erved that business is down. While a reaRon iR AIDS, the other b most likely economic. ,JS: Has this affected the stability of bars? Pierce: I can show you two or three in the Montrose area who wouldn't say RO. Then, several more would say yes. It depend. on many factor;;, just like any other business. You run it as a busine!IB first of all, not as a toy. As our mayor says, ''A business-like approach . ... "The bar can be a profitable business, yet you have thoRe who go all out to give their bar a winning personality. In so doing their expenditures are larger, whereas, it is pos· sible to open a bar with a minimal down. It is not unusual to see bars opening and closing each month. JS: Has the bar acquired a positive role in the community at-large in which it is located? Pierce: First of all, the bars are designed (save a few} to attract re11pecta· ble clientele. It's been public knowledge that the Avondale Association has been fighting the existence and application of new bars, complaining about the effect some of the clubs and bars may have on the residential area near Westheimer. Being a property owner myself, I value the importance of residential property very much. I live close to Westheimer down further on Taft. However, a lot of the action often overflows to that section. For­turnately, a lot of that negative traffic is getting cleaned, and the closing of the BALDING? New Medical Treatment* Prox1dil •, an advanced combination of Minoxidil with other Prescription Drugs is far superior to Minoxidil alone. Call today for a free consultation. MPB CLINIC Suite 10, 5401 Dashwood 661-2321 ' Board Certified M o game room (located at Westheimer and Taft) helps. JS: Does the Sexual Oriented Ordinance (SOBI aim at the gay bar? Pierce: I'm a member of Neartown Association and Councilman George Greanias speaks to us several times a year. Neartown is partially responsible for the ordinance. It ih aimed at sex in pubhc places and I don't consider those situs· tions are in the bar.- and there are always exccpuons to the rule. JS: Alan, in which ways do you feel Houston bars are unique? Pierce: I hear out-of-towners say that Houston bars might be a little more open. There's certainly more here compared to a smaller city. This may justify reasons why Thus far it has. Often times we find those who are active in professional organizations like HOBO are involved in serveral other organizations. Like myself, I was involved in the Gay Switchboard, and am now active in servers! community associations, the Gay Rodeo and others. Just like GPC, TGRA. etc., HOBO is kef 1, on seeking ways to get fresh blood active. Next Week: More from the bar owners, managers and employees and about the bar BCl'ne in general. "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED AUGUST 16. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Woman to Walk Death Valley to Dramatize AIDS Issue On August 16, Patty Rose was to begin a walk across Death Valley to bring atten· tion to AIDS and to raise funds for the Mobilization Against AIDS. Rose, who is not gay or bisexual, will be wearing a T· shirt that reads "AIDS never was a gay disease." If su1·ce11sful, Rose will be the first woman to walk Death Valley during the hottest months of the year. The high temperature "ill exceed 125 degrees Fah· renheit and the surface of the road will heat to over 165 degrees. The distance she will walk will be over 130 miles. Rose has crossed Death Valley twice before, but on a bike. In 1974 she became the first woman to bicycle across and in 1979 she rode it again as a benefit for the National Cancer Institute. Why is Patty Rose undertaking thi' walk? Her response is: "Walking through Death Valley won' t be easy. But it's nothing compared to what people with AIDS and AIDS related condi· tions are forced to face everyday. At the current time, AIDS is not being given any· where near the attention that will be required to stop its spread into all the sec· tors of public community." "The government must come to realize that taking action now may save the lives of the tens of thousands of Americans who are all innocent people with AIDS, in addi· tion to saving the billions of dollars that will be loi;t if this horrible disease is " .. . In the hecrt o f The City' allowed to become further out of control. used to fight for an adequate government Please help in the fight to truly make AIDS ' response to this epidemic and to oppose this country's number one health prior· the civil rights in the name of AIDS. There ity." is $47 million for AIDS stalled in Congres· " I have many friends who have AIDS. I sional committee~ and meanwhile Jerry have had people I love die from AIDS. The Falwell is calling for mandatory AIDS time for action is now, and the Mobliliza· testing, registration, and quarantine of tion Against AIDS is leading the way " people with AIDS." commented Mobilize· The beneficiary of the Death Valley tion Coordinator Paul Boneberg. " Patty s walk against AIDS is the non·partisan effort couldn't come at a better time." AIDS political organization, Mobilization Against AIDS. The Mobilization is best known for organizing the nationwide memorials in support of People With AIDS and for its ongoing fight for more federal funding to fight AIDS. "Every nickel we receive for Patty's Death Valley Walk against AIDS will be People who wii;h to support Patty Rose's Death Valley Walk Against AIDS can send a donation to Mobilization Agaist AIDS, 335 Noe Street, San Francisco, CA 94114. Pledge" of a specific amount per mile are also encouraged. More inforrna· tion is available at (415) 431-4660. dramatika *Framing $44 00 · FRfE AIRPORT SHllTTU ·COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE & WINE • • COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST (large s1ngletdouble occupancy) •VJ.UT SERVICE * Fi,ne Art Posters * Broadway Posters *Cards of All Sorts * and of course • Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Reservations required pleose coll Toll Free 800·253-5263 (Notiono) 800-571-4523 (Col' J '415)·44' 5 ~4· (Sari f-ro~C'ISCO) 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 SUNDAYS PROFESSIONAL All MALE REVUE SATURDAY 11PM Houston's Most Popular Entertainer ... FUN! 3224 Yoakum Call 528-5457 20% off all custom framing with this ad!! Hurry! Good through 8/ 31185 Maude Plus: Tina Alexander0~b Dyan Michaels WEDNESDAY MIWONAIRE NIGHT Ms Corpus Christi. ' Newcomer of the Year 10¢ Well Drinks, 10¢ Beer (Show Room Bar Only) THURSDAY For years a lrodilton 1n New Orleans 3FOR1 (3 shots for the price of 1) 8pm Iii closing FRIDAYS-AMATEUR MALE STRIP NITE: $15000 in CASH PRIZES, 10 PM SATURDAY AND SUNDAY LIQUOR BUST 4PM-7PM-ALL YOU CAN DRINK (Well Drinks) $7 7 DAYS A WEEK-GO GO BOYS BAYOU IANDING 534 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON 526-7519 10 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 16. 1985 Annual Dallas Gay Pride Parade Next Month ThA •Pride III. 85' Steering Committee, coordinators of the "Pride III: 85" events to celebrate Gav Pride m Dallas, have announced the dates for the Second Annual Texas Freedom Parade. The annual event will be Sunday, Sept. 22, and is set to be the main event of the Texas Freedom Festival Sept. 14·22. Dallas' fall celebration bin honor of the federal court decision otriking down Texas' "homosexual conduct law," section 21.06 of the state penal code, on August 17, 1982. The rulmg was made by U.S. Di~ trict Judge .Jerry Buehmeyer. Over 70 gay organizations and busi· nesses and five gay marching bands will step off at 4:00 p.m. on Cedar Springs at Wycliff, near the Oak Lawn Library, they said. The Texas Freedom Parade is plan· ning on marching down Cedar Springs to Oak Lawn Avenue, turning left to Lem· mon Avenue, then right to Turtle Creek Boulevard, then right on Turtle Creek past Lee Park. After the parade, the annual "Celebra· Gay and Lesbian Switchboard Is Swamped with AIDS Calls Calls about AIDS have nearly tripled at the Gay and Lesbian Switchboard of Houston with recent publicity about Rock Hudson and other major new,; stories. Calls about AIDS have rii;en from about 6% of tht' total to 15%. '"The nature of the calls i1m't really any different from those in the past few months," said Rick Grossman, adminis· tratlve director. "The calls range from those with symptoms of AIDS or other non· AID. symptoms to those who are cur­ious or who want to know how to protect themselves. Weare, however, finding that the number of callers with AIDS-like symptoms are much higher than last year at this time. During last year, mo,t of our callers just wanted information." The Gay and Lesbian Switchboard ha;; been sending callers free information about AIDS m o s1mple-to-understond, question and answer format. This mate­nol has been made o\·oiloble by a grant from the U ·~ Conference of Mayors"' hich 1s shared with the KS AID!:-i Foundation and the MontroseCounschng Center C11llcr11 HISD Will Not Screen for AIDS News One Neu s Servu:e Although it is believed that at least some of the Houston Independent School Dis· trict's Hl,000 employees hove had some contact with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), Superintendent Billy Reagan says the diotrict has no plans to screen employees for the dbeose. Reagan says there have been no case" of the disease brought to his attention. However, he acknowledgei; that given the number of employees who work for the district he can not say for certain that none has been exposed to the illness. Reagan says district officials are con· cerned about the problem but have no con­tingency plans to deal with an outbreak of the d1 -ease. He say that an AIDS screening pro­gram in the district would be premature and \\Ould crnate more problems than it would solve. KS/AIDS Foundation to Hold Community Meeting The KS AIDS Foundation of Houston wil hold a community meeting on Monday, August 19, ot the Metropolitan Commun· 1ty Church of the Ressurection Fellowship Hall, 1919 Decatur, at 8:00 p.m. The foundation encourages community members nnd organizations to take thi .. opportunity to address the organization's board of trustees and officer~ with ques­tions concerning the operation of the organization. are sent the mformation, free of charge, with· out any record of the name and addrea.s kept by the Switchboard. Due to the increasing number of calls, par· ticularly during the day, the Switchboard. has scheduled an additional training class for volunteers in September. Gay and lesbian volunteers will receive training in telephone counseling, crisis intervention, and problem solving. More information is available by calling 5293211 Gay /Lesbian Mormons to Meet in San Diego Affirmation Gay nnd Lesbian Mormons has announced that San Diei:o has been chosen as the site for this year's national conference. Every year members of Affir· matlon from around the country gather to discuss issues of importance to the lesbian and gny :'v!ormon. This year's conference wiJJ take place during the weekend of October 11·l4 and will feature Dr. Drew Mattison, co-author of The Male Couple. Dr. Mattison will address the topic of building and main­tammg long term intimate relationships for lesbians and gay men. Many additional seminars will be con· ducted throughout the weekend including, for the first time, topics of interest for par· en ts of gay or lesbian children. Further information is available from John Mitchell at (619) 296-9311, or by writ· ing P.O. Box 80352 San Diego, CA 92138. Greanias Will Not Seek Mayor's Post New• On·· News Seri•1ce Houston City Councilmember George Greanias announced at a press conference on Wednesday that he would not bea may­oral candidate in 1985, but left the door "wide open" for 1987. Greanias will seek re-election to his council District C .,eat. Greanias, who recently conducted a poll to determine what his chances of being mayor are, said the poll showed Houstoni ans agreed with him that the key i8sues are the future of the city, its fiscal sound· ne1111, tranHportotion, crime, a nd economic development. The same poll showed that not enough people knew Greanias, and the 83 days before the election would not be enough to acquaint voters with his polit· ks. Greanias said if these issues affecting the future of the city are not addressed he will be a candidate for mayor in 1987. He plans to spend part of the time over the next two years meeting more people in the city to expand his political base. He also said his poll showed that the race between Mayor Kathy Whitmire and former Moyor Louie Welch is "very close," but refused to say who was Jeadmg m the poll. tlon m Lee Park" will be staged as the final event of "Pride III: 85." Over 60 local gay organizations and businesses and as many as 10 entries from other Texas cities and out-of-state organi· zations are expected to participate in the parade, organizers announced, with floats, cars, horses and marching groups. "In this pot1itive statement from the gay commuity with a celebration of 'Texas Gay Pride,' the Texas Freedom Parade will he augmented with the Oak Lawn Symphonic Band, the Montrose Sym· phonic Band from Houston. the Mile-High Freedom Band of Denver, the Texas A&M Gay Marching Bond, and the National Lesbian and Gay Band of America," organizer~ said. The national band is composed ofrepre­sentotives from 13 gay bands around the Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily 804 PACIFIC country and will be marching for the first time, they said. Grand Marshals for the parade will be author/ humorist Rita Mae Brown, and Dallas community leader Howie Daire. Brown will be in Dallas for the weekend to be honored and to i;peak at the Human Rights Campaign Funds's "United Are We" black tie dinner at the Fairmount Hotel on Saturday evening. Howie Daire is the founder of the Oak Lawn Counsel­ing Center and remains on the board of directors there while working with tlie AIDS Action Project of counseling center. "Celebration In Lee Park" will feature the five gay bands in a combined concert, enteratinment by local singers, the pres· entation of trophies for the winning parade entries. and words from local dig· nataries and the grand marshals. F 1 GENERAL SL,~ REPAIR l\ SERVICE 850-1122 When it leaks .. . Doesn't Open .. . Needs to be Wired Or Just Needs Some Paint ... AND HAD TO BE DONE YES TE RDA Y' Call Us First! Electrical, Plumbing, Appliances, A/C Repair 523-0511 Help Us Celebrate All Month I • 7- Day Bar Tab-Drawing at 10pm every night during August-31 winners. • "Dinner for two" drawing twice each night for customers in our dining room. • Italian Patio Party- Friday & Saturday, 4th weekend in August • A nn iversary Brunch, August complimentary champagne 12-3pm ... by a drag queen tea from 3-7pm 18 with Followed ~ • Monday, August 19- Buy any one item on our ~L menu and get the second of equal or lesser value ,J '.c_' ~free. Jf. ~~ ~- :.> -:v= ~ r c; ',J. . " .); b, ~l·~ .<. )" f :.> ~ " " ' Austin Councilman's Death Sparks Media Controversy By Mark Blazek Montrose Voice Austin Correspondent In late May, Austin City Councilman Mark Spaeth died. According to the Aus­tin American-Statesman, May 28 issue, "The cause of death was listed as pneumo­nia. But for more than a year, Spaeth had battled a viral infection that he said doc­tors could not diagnose." Spaeth was admitted to Brackenridge Hospital in Austin on May 6 after treat­ment at M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute in Houston. According to the un-bylined Statesman story, "Spaeth died of 'pneumocystic' pneumonia in both lungs." The failure of the Statesman to identify Spaeth's illness as AIDS has caused more than one member of the gay community to question the objectivity and political moti­vations of Austin's only daily paper. The criticism began in an article in the June 14 issue of The Austin Chronicle, a bi·weekly publication. Political Editor Jim Shahin wrote a full-page article titled "The (Alleged) Word Is (Sort Of) Out" in which he considers two questions: "Did he (Spaeth), as many believe, contract Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, better known as AIDS? The second: If so, why didn't the prei;s report it?" Rome are willing to give the Statesman the benefit·of-the-doubt, and assume these newspaper mavericks were unable to The failure of the Austin American­Statesman to identify Spaeth's illness as AIDS has caused more than one member of the gay community to question the objectivity ... uncover firm evidence of Spaeth's condi­tion (either from Spaeth's doctors or Spaeth himself)- Without evidence of Spa.eth'• ~ 8'! the theory goee, saying he haaAIDS.cO\lld be libelous. By implication, an AIDS carrier is assumed to be homosexual by the vast majority of Americans, and the courts should hve a field day determining if the labeling ofone as a "homosexual" (either directly or indi­rectly) is libelous in the sense calling one a "racist" has been held to be po ten ti ally libelous. Others, however, have asked Statesman Editor Arnold Rosenfeld for a full account­ing of the handling of this story. In a letter sent to Roeenfeld (and reprinted in the June 24 issue of The Calendar), Troy Stokes writes, "If the information in your May 28 issue is correct, Spaeth had AIDS. The Austin American·Statesman reported that he died of pneumocystis camii pneu- _ monia with no clear cause which would account for the acquired immune defi­ciency. He was under 60 years of age. That, home team, is AIDS according to the Texas Department of Health." Although Stokes argues that "truthful­ness is important for itself," he adds "the public needs to understand that horrible diseases can happen to the rich and fam· ous, not just the dispossessed . .. Mark Spaeth solicited the gay vote by having us imagine that he was our special, albeit very rich and powerful, friend. Then, as he sickened and died of an illness which kills more of us than any other category, he didn't even have the common decency to let the disease be named!' "Since the p11per: d A't gra p the hi~ torical significance of Spaeth 's death," Stokes writes. ''I'll spell it out for you: Spaeth socialized with the A-team of Aus­tin's gays. This crowd hada whole mess of 'rabbit feet' to ward of the dreariness of homophobia. For some it was recognition by the Pope. For some it was celebrity and wealth and being a member of an exclu­sive club on top of a bank. Some had it all." The inability of the Statesman to be honest with Austin's gays elicited letters on this matter, and published in The Aus­~ in Chronicle in the last four bi-weekly issues . . In the June 21 issue, Ronald Sawey, co­d1rector of Austin's Gayline, writes "Spaeth has successfully obfuscated th~ causes of what has been called the disease of the century. Are there now two viruses which cause AIDS: HTLV-3 and the cele­brated mystery virus? The press allowed Mark Spaeth to raise the question of this new virus on paper, but never demanded that he open the records and clear the air. The net result is to impeach the achieve­ments of medical science and alarm tho11e who belong to risk groups." In the same issue of the Chronicle, letter writer David Sonenschein says, "The point is not to note that sexual orientation is an issue, but to see who is making it so, for what reasons, and with what conse­quences. Clearly there are people for whom it is or is not an issue. But for the media of Austin, it is particularly interest­ing to see the ways that orientation is manipulated by playing 'personality' against 'issue' reporting to the extent that it caters to the elites and authorities of the town and to the extent that it reinforces official myths and maintains useful hyste-ria . ... " "Exactly why the American-Statesman refuses to connect Spaeth with AIDS, and consistently refuses to print submitted comments by knowledgeable others to that effect, it is an !!Xtrememly crucial question. . .. The answer has to do not only with the obvious political functions of the official press, but also with the extent to which other media hope to offer any sort of credible alternative." In the next issue of the Chronicle, writer Ginny Ballard criticized the two letters quoted from above. "Mark confided in his close friends about the nature of his dis­ease and thought that he could get better," Ballard says. "It is not up to any of us, lesbian, gay or heterosexual to drag a person kicking and screaming from their respective closet. Some of us are public persona who are wil­ling for the sake of many others to disclose the most intimate details of our lives and some of us are not. It is not a question of right or wrong but of choice." In the same issue, Sarah E. Bass writes, "Must candidates feel compelled to make public their forms of sexual expression and bowel habits? The right to remain silent is not synonomous wit denial. ... One may choose against making particu­lar personal habits a political issue .... I can only hope that I never see the day when private sexual activity becomes a public record; for what would come next?-public records of bowel habits?" The July 26 issue of the Chronicle car· ri~ a letter by Douglas Key in which he tries to put an end to the continuing con­troversy: "I feel sad that Spaeth was so hung up on implications of being identi­fied as a Person With AIDS. To me, that is the real tragedy. I suggest that we let Mark Spaeth rest in peace and get on with the struggle, on the medical, educational and political fronts, to deal with the AIDS problem and other issues that confront gay people today," After all is said and done regarding the motivations of the venerable preRS, as represented by the Ameriean-Statesman, Spaeth may well be remembered only for th.e grand l'ntranres he made, complete with an entourage including at least one (usually more) handsome young man into Austin's gay bars. ' AUGUST 16, 1985/ MONTROSE VOICE 11 STIFF DRINKS COLD BEER HOT MEN Ne"7 Sound Live D.J. Great Music D.J. MARDI COLEMAN -ALWAYS- 50¢ DRAFT BEER NOW OPEN!! 13. Adams~ Ltd. 528-9079 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 16, 1985 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz Are You a Workaholic? --<-/--- time too well. Dr. John Neulinger, profes· sor of psychology at the City University of New York and author of The Psychology of Leisure, finds that many workaholics suffer from leisure phobia, a fear of being idle when they have open time on their hands. By modern standards, it might be said that inventor Thomas Edison was a wor· kaholic. He was a tireless worker who limited his rest periods when he laid down by extending his arm over a metal pan, while clutching an iron ball. If he dozed off, the sound of the ball crashing down would bring him to his feet. It is estimated that one in 20 American workers suffer from a man-made disease of which they are not aware. It cau. es them to fight for overtime, catch late even· mg trains, work hard on weekends, and not incidentally, often rise to the top of the corporate ladder Workaholism is a phrase minted for our time. It reflects the pace of the overly ambitious achievers in our competitive culture. And it exists on all levels of society-mechanics, secretaries, house­wives and executives. Dr Wayne E. Oates, psychologist at the School of Medicine Univer~ity of Louis· ville, KY, author of Workaholics, Make l..azfaess Work for You (Garden City, ~.Y .. Doubleday, 197RJ explain!! that the typical workaholic is a businessman who "is likely to eat, sleep and drink hiR job-his telephone is closer to him than his wife." Organizational psychologists often are called upon to counsel managers who set too intense a pace for themselves and the quiz that follows contains many of the indicators which they use to identify someone who is excessively compulsive in his work patterns. To tell if you might, indeed , be a works· holic, answer each item as follows: Two big, all-male, X-rated hits directed by Matt Sterling SIZING UP THE BIGGER THE BETTER only s549s each For credit card orders call: 1·800-931-7111 (In IU.no" con 1-100·512·21"1 Toordtt b1 m.M. Hnd o~~ t~tll m.o or VISA M.ntn C•d or Ame• """'"' plvl t .-pw.acaot1 dH• »one woeh ~ naumeftC ctut 7ou Jtt owr 2t aftd w+t~her you w~ftt VHS 0t &tuf°"""'' ~t ~cti.arrn (S l orftrttt~ SlfO' loe(ond upt, s.,.4 S t.N ,..,. o eot-'o1ve. ,, ... ,. •crt• ,,._ , ... ., ...... ,. JI. BIJOU VIDEO SALES 17fE ~11f( WOEO EXPERTS _ _ ,_ ... -a..,..1.-10-- Rarely-1; Sometimes-2; Often-3, then read on for some interesting explanations. 1. When I leave my job, I take work home with me 2. I get restless or irritable on my days off or when on vacations. S. I compete hard at most everything I do, including playing games with the fam· ily or friends. 4. My family (or friends) have accused me of being more interested in work than m them. 5. I like to get up early no matter what how late I get to bed. 6. At work or at home, I find it hard to resist 1t when an interesting challenge comes my way which would require effort on my part. 7. I am usually so busy that I don't do routine things like read a newspaper, make personal phone calls or send greet· ing cards. 8. My time for seeing friends has been steadily decrea11ing. 9. I beeomc annoyed at work with those who don't take their jobs as seriously ae I do. 10. I do two things at once, i.e , read and eat, watch TV and read, etc. o Explanation Workaholics are work-addicted. They are driven by a compulsion to always be busy. But often this busyness is a distraction from inner conflicts which are too painful to face. The work addict doesn't tolerate free Y.-..100/o OFF PARTS & LABOR~ ~ PETE GIORGETTI TROY MORAN ~ .-! STEVE WRIGHT ~ {' ) ' Pii~c)~ i~! i ...J t.1_• )14. , _ :::..: ~ ,, ea . " - "D )> ~ COMPLETE ~ ~ AUTOMOTIVE 0 ~ SAL~; -~,~~m~~~~ICE~ ~ AFTER HOUR 0 0 EMERGENCY SERVICE ::D ..- CALL 523-0585 :0 '~$. 1 COUPON PER INVOICE ~~ >: 1901 TAFT 528-1901 -: ,i;.-.~oevi 'i S.LYVd :t:tO OfoO&. ...... As in the case of Edison, not all work a· holies adopt work habits which are detri· mental to their happiness. Much of this judgement will depend on how our loved one11 feel about sharing the spotlight with our job aspirations. In this regard, there is a difference between a hardworking person and a work addict. The latter, ifhe honestly meditates on it, usually is vaguely aware that his life lacks fulfilment and that it is too one­sided. The cure is to take a serious look at what our life goals really are and then to give priority to those which are the most important. o Score Total up all your points to find what your score means. 10-19 points-Your work drive is low. There are acitivities in life which are more satisfying than work. You're not a worka· holic. 17-23 points-You balance your work and other activities. You know how to draw the line when your job duties intrude on your personal life. You have no trouble shifting from periods of busyness to relax· ation. ' 24·30 points-You're leaning in the direction of a classic workaholic. Does slowing down mean failure to you? It might be wise to discuss your work patt· ems with your family to help you ease up your drive and enjoy them more. -.:Roberts ~t) Chiropractic · Clinic 1305 Waugh Dr. Houston, TX 77019 INCLUDES EXAM, CONSULTATION & X-RAYS Between Allen Parkway & West Gray on Waugh Dr By Appointment (713) 521-2003 • Bock Pam • Neck Pain • Shoulder/ Arm Pam • Headaches • Hip/Leg Paon • All Types of Insurance Accepted ·' ,. -·! THINKING ABOUT BUYING A NEW CAR? THINK AGAIN If you're thinking about purchasing a new car, perhaps you'd be wise to consider leas Ing. Leasing your new car from Ascot Leasing Ltd. 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Physicians, nurses, pharmacist.;, laboratory t.echni· cians, blood drawer6, medical andfor nursing students, and clerical help are needed on Monday, Tue8day, and Wednes· day evenings. Clerical and maintenance help is needed Monday thru Friday. For. more information, call Tom Audette, administrative director, 528· 5535. In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Vot'e The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE ·----------.. DINNER FOR TWO Take a Friend to Dinner, Order Two (2) Identical Dinner Entrees and Get A 15% Discount with this coupon -----------..l lldvertising Sales for the Montrose Voite Pu•lishing Company The Montrose Voice Publishing Company seeks an additional full­time or partt1me outside advertising salesperson. Commissioned position. Must be attractively presentable & have reliable vehicle. Advertising sales experience not required Should have honest, outgoing personality. Call 529-8490 14 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 16, 1985 The Far Side by Gary Larson c1gss i...NWERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE The shark on the go. Biiiy leaves home to join the zoo, but retums the next day after being told that. as on onirnal, he was just '"too common." ..... -.. "According lo the mop, this should be the place-but ii sure don't look right to me._ Well, we're supposed to die around here somewhere." ' _,.. Cq// of fJ,e Cal( by;zeel: I sen<;ed the mcAman'.5 fear as he opened -theJote It v1aS /,ke ~ warm .stench in the a•r--So fh,c/r;you could cut it w.'fh o. Knife. Suddenly, ~ I. felt myself 9row;n:; diZZ)'_--as ;f ihe fear was Some powerfUI drug. The e ntire ;ard beJan reel1n9. And 1hen 1 heard h;s so(t; plump calves bf>9in cal/in:; lo me: " "Leeeeeeeeek ... zeeeeeeeek. . bite l../S, Zeeeeek . Creative dog writing ~ ~ . ., ,, "We'll ask you one more time, stronger-If you're really a cowboy from the Rio Grande, then why a in't your legs bowed or your cheeks tonr "Coldberg, you idiot! Don"t ploy tricks on those things-they con't distinguish between 'laughing with' and ' laughing at'!'' Fortunes A Weekend Encounter for Aries By Mark Orion For Friday. Aug 16. 1985. through Thursday. Aug 22. 1985· ARIES-Someone new in the city this weekend wants to meet you. Perhaps at a party. Prop yourself on a corner, and look available-for the tall and macho dressed in dark colors. Brief romance may be headlined, with your sister truning in an Oscar-winning performance as both pro­ducer and director. TAURUS- A new person in your hie may want to get too close too quick as far as you're concerned. Proceed at your own pace, or you won't be comfortable. Expect a change in plans and days close with a cozy cuddle. GEMINI- You should plan ahead for next week. Otherwise, you'll go in circles doing a dab here and a tad there. Estab­lish priorities and hop to 'em. Expect news, some company, and a great big hug. CANCER- This weekend. you'll enjoy virtually everyone- and they'll enjoy you Have no fear- the crowds abound with strangers. Grab one. or two, or twenty Your late night desires will be fulfilled. LEO- You may feel as if you're tread­ing water, since there is Jots of talk but little action. You really are making head­way; it's just that you can't get from here to there in nothing flat Be patient, Leo! VIRGO- A project can finally get under way this week. You may well find that the relationships that develop from this are far more Important than the pro­ject itself. Nights hold romance, a visit. and a new discovery. LIBRA-You and your cohorts and all your combined talents will take control of the weekend. Smashing new ideas have already popped out from the wings and their success depends on the cast of characters you bring to 11. Nights close with a kiss. SCORPIO- You have a busy weekend ahP.ad of you. Work-project matters seem to be in such a state of flux that it may be hard to get a handle on them. Do write letters, make calls, and re-do your budget. SAGITTARIUS-Scattered fragments of an idea have just been flirting with each other in your head. This weekend they get it on, and you can proceed with vigor. Do be prepared for one who disagrees with you. The weekend closes with a kiss. CAPRICORN- Small misunderstand­ing with loved one can clear up in the week ahead. It is very important for you to express your feelings. Don't make others guess After all, they don't have crystal balls Later. an S 0 .S AQUARIUS Be flexible this weekend Try the untried. This holiday is full of spontaneous, spur-of-the-moment hap­penings. Domestic matters, romantic affairs. and your current project are all buzzing PISCES- Cupid puts romance at the top of your agenda Grab your favorite partner for a hayride and a do-si-do! Later, a bit of flattery can get you any­place. a meeting holds a surprise, and days flip out. • 1105 Slovv Learner Figuring Out that 'Moment' of 'Coming Out' By Sharon McDonald Special to thr Montrose Voice I've always envied prople who have great moments of truth in their lives. You know, people who have blinding instants of clar· ity after which their lives take, sudden, new, unwavering directions. It Rounds ~o authentic and ethical when som{'()ne says, "I looked in her eyes, knew she was the one for me, and we've been together ever since, these last 54 years." Or, "The moment I saw her flirting with Delilah, it was over between us, and I've never looked back." Or how about, "Yep, I knew when I was five and kisAed my best friend Marsha that I was homosexual." Well, I've looked into eyes and fallen off my chair, and she's turned out not to be the one for me. And I've known it was over between us dozens of times before it ever, anticlimatically, was. And most of all, I didn't know I was homoRexual even after it had hit me on the head four or five times. When someone recently asked me when I did come out, I had to say. "Well, that depends on what you count." Popular Jes· bian theory hns it that fir•t sleeping with another woman, first falling in love with another woman, first knowing you're a lesbian, and first telling the world about it And most of all, I didn't know I was homosexual even after it hit me on the head 4 or 5 times should all happen in pretty close conjunc­tion. If they don't, which event do you call vour coming out? And what if you did a few of those coming-out kind of things, then went back for a while? Oh, for a blind· ing moment of clarity to save my lesbian reputation! In retrospect, of course, I should have known that day on the bus in Buffalo, New York, 1955. There I was, innocently lean­ing forward in my seat, daydreaming and sucking the back of the seat in front of me-well, I was only four years old-when my big sister woke me with a quick jab to the ribs. "Look!" she hissed, pointing surrepti· tiously through the grownups crowding the bus. "Is it a man or a lady?" There, standing in the bus with the air of someone straddling a bucking bronco, was my first flat-out, no holds barred, top drawer butch. Ah yes, I should have known it then by the electric prickle that zoomed up my spine as I took in this •elf. made creature standing unique amidst the gray flann:l 11uits and full cotton skirts of the men and womenfolk on the bus. Her hnir was short and greased back in a.d.a., she wore men's shoes, men's bl~e jeans with the cuffs rolled up, and a man s jacket ovrr a white !·shirt, still_ a ~pular wardrobe in some die-hard lesbian circles. Revulsion was registering on the faces of the other passengers, while I stared open mouthed and bug-eyed at a vision from my future. . Even at four I knew something of forbid­den passion and its consequences. The unanimous horror around me was suffi­cent deterrent to any impulse I might have had to go over and make friends. It was a moment of feeling, not insight, and though it was my fin1t visceral les~1an thrill it was not The Great Awakening But ~hat the moment lacked in clarity, it more thun made up for in intensity. The nt•xt intense mement when I didn't get tt was years lat<·r, in a college dormi· torv hall fl'hcrc ·ns '8 !Qt of trndit.ipnal Catholic schooling in hctween, which may account for the span of years from one passionate moment to the next.) It was summer, it was Phoenix, that means it was 110 degrees. I was unlocking the door to my room when my across-the· hall neighbor walked by in a microscopic bikini with a towel draped around an unspeakably graceful neck. I'd seen her clothed many times, but had never been confronted full force with the casual lush­ness of her body. By all rights, it should have been a con· version experience. Rut no. all I knew wa~ that there was suddenly no oxygen left on the planet, and I couldn't remember what language I spoke. I nodded hello, got my door open, stepped inside, and sank imme­diately onto a bed that was conveniently close to the doorway, perhaps in anticipa· ti on of just such a fainting spell. "What," I remember thinking, "was that?" Then there was the time I was working the graveyard shift in a factory. My girl­friends and I would arrive just as second shift, "the shift that all the lesbians work on," let out. These were soul sisters of my butch on the bus, tough looking women in men's clothes and swaggers. Each night the two groups would pass in the parking lot, us timid, titt('nng straight ladies and those menacing you-know·what.s. One night, just as we passed each other, the biggest, meanest looking dyke of all turned and pointedly winked at the woman next to me. That v.ink went through my heart like an arrow: Why did she wink at her and not me? I was jealous! No sooner had the feeling flashed through ml' than I set to work convincing mysl'lf that I hadn't felt it, a difficult task since I was simultaneously nursing my still hurt fl•eling. Or how about the time I was in the back room of a shop where I worked when three saleswomen rushed back giggling ner· vously about two new customers who needed to be waited on. None of them would do it. "Why not'!" I asked. "Go take a look," one said nastily, "at the ladies out there." There they were, two unmistakably _les­bians, totally deserted in a shop full of1dle salespeople. I waited on thepi, chatted with them, and did what I would only years later recognize as flirting. When they left I returned to the back room w~ere my co-workers still cowered and smck· ered. "You certainly didn't mind waiting on them " the nasty one observed with a leer. "Why should I? They haven't done any­thing to anyone." It was out of my mouth before I could stop it, not so much the words as the angry tone. "Well, excuse us! We didn't know you all were such good friPnds!" And she saun· tered away, superiority dripping from her sharp edges. For weeks I puzzled over that inexplica· ble burst of anger. I mean, I was liberal. civil rights for everyone and all, but I'd never snapped at my co-workers over it. Why now, and about a couple of lesbians, of nll things? Well, you know the end of this story. Without ever having that earthshaking moment of clarity, it took years, but I finally found myself getting the picture. As you might imagine, research done in the bedroom played a large part in deter­mining my ultimate findings. I guess those of us who never kissed our best friend on the kindergarten play­ground just have to ll'arn the hard way as adults. To tell you the truth, sometimes even today I find I need to refresh my memory about what I've learned. But now I know where to look for darification, and I really don't mind a bit. Sharon McDonald 1 a na11orally syndicated u.1um· nost AUGUST 16. 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 SUNDAY BEER BUST 2:30 tll ? Member 3 HAPPY HOURS DAILY M-F AFTER HOURS NIGHTLY DAVID OLESON, D.J. HAPPY 5th ANNIVERSARY SUNDANCE CATTLE CO.! Play Safe! 1022 WESTHEIMER (WCITEJ MONDAY BEER BUST 9 PM til ? Member HGBG 528-8851 THE PAINT THAT LASTS AND LASTS. Regular Price Sl 3.99 SALE PRICE S] .99 Mtg. Rebate - 12.00 Savings Per SB 00 Gallon • James Bute Paint Company 4920 San Felipe at S. Post Oak Blvd. Houston, Texas Since 1867 Monday-Friday 7am-5pm - Saturday 9am-3pm 627-1120 All Wallpaper 20%-30% BFF till August 31 Light Hardware & Home Improvements 16 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 16. 1985 Skip the Lady, Go See Louie Montrose Live By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Cr1t1c Good plays, like Seranadmg Louie, now playing at Stages, are often difficult to describe. This one has a cheerfully brood ing presence. Sec what I mean? These people are always saying that the whole thing is going to blow up unless they can get a handle on it quickly. I just didn't really bcheve them until it was too late. Good plays are also difficult to predict. Things will be set up and assume their own inevitability. But if it's done well, and this one is, you won't sec them coming. You'll only be able to look back and wonder why you didn't. Good plays are inhabited by complex characters. They must be able to surprise you and still remain consistent. They should, hopefully, be a Lie to surprise e11ch other. A cheating wife say,; somethinl( she hopes will make her husband feel better It makes him feel a lot worse. But by then her honesty impels her to stand by what ~he said I have long thought highly of Claire Hart·Palumbo's and Jame" Clubb's act· ing. Sally Edmundson has shed her overly mannered patina and shows a deft touch with a confused half-sentence. Thomas Baird is new to me. His sweet, ineffective gentleness makes the piece work. When all of the acting is this good, you can tell ther~ must have been an excellent director. That's not the only way Charles Harveson tips his knowledgable hand. He's good So is Greg Roach, the set designer Superb. I expected a !(real play from playwright Lanford Wilson. Remember The 5th of July? How about The Great Nebula in Orion? I wasn't disappointed. I don't want to say anything else. I don't want to give away any more of this pluy's surprises. It should come at you from your blind side. .Just remember: This 1s a play about four yuppies entering their midlife crise{I and it's nothing like The Big Chill. In this summer of musicals and meller· drammers, Stages has set a gem of a drama. Just the reverse of what Houston so often offers-a single good comedy sur· rounded by drama. By the way, I also saw Kind Lady at the Alley. I don't think that you should. This 1935 clunker is hardly surprising. It 1s populated by simplishc one· motivation characters. You see every punch before the playwright, Edward Chodrov, pulls his puppet's arm back. And no real conflict ever emerge,;. Characters either shrug off the blows or roll with them. Nobody fights back It's very easy to describe. A conman takes over n rich spinster and cuts her off from the world while he sells off her objets d'art. She eventually gets someone to call the cops. Midway through the first act n nasty suspicion insinuated its way into my mind. All of the fancy schmancy imported actors are off in r.. YC garnenng well· deserved rave reviews for Season's Greet· mgs. The only actors left in town were talented-gasp-locals like Marietta Marich, Paul Hope, Kayce Glasse and Timothy Arrington Could it possibly be that the Alley brass saw this coming nnd decided to show them up? That way they could pooh-pooh all those whining complainti; they they don't use actual Houstonite actors as much as they should. Sure, give them a nice director (Cliff Fannin Baker) and an impressive i;et (by Byron A. Taylor) and showy lights (by Pamela A. Gray). But then saddle them with a turkey of a script that only a mira· cle could save. Well. it's a good thing that that ruse was only a figgy of my imag. It wouldn't have worked. A, much of a snore as this waR, Sorrou•s of Frederick was worse. This is one of those melodramas that stayed on high (cultural) ground. How­ever, late into the second act, an audience member who had taken all he could stand hissed the villain. From that point on, we nil cheered and applauded whenever the least little good thing happended. It was a lot more enjoyable that way, thoull'h not just what the director ordered. o Notes Rob Feingold, the Alley', publicity director, is leaving that theater as of today, after 20 years of service there When I told the handsome Montrose Clogger that he hardly looked old enough to have been there that long, he allowed as to how he had started there as a mere intern. Happy trails, Bob~ It's bf.en a JOY workmg wtth you! . . How often have we seen fight scenes that were just not believable? Theatrical violence is an art still coming into its own. Thankfully there is now a fairly low-cost school, Morri11 Dance, in town where you can learn it-either barehanded or with a sword. The prof, Charles Morris, also te11ches spor18 swordwork for you non· actors. His phone number is 974-3504. He came to our attention courtesy of The Group, Houston's gity theaterroundtable, which still meets every Thursday at the Dignity Center ... . There's also n group of gay writel's in Houston. They not only help each other improve their writing ... kills, but are very comeroally oriented. They're never hnpp· ier than when they can help each other get into print. They meet every other Sunday afternoon, including this one (18). For more info, call Phil Stent at 9.56·1166 .. . Grease will be the first production in Houston Community College's Erwin Heiner Theater. Due to remodeling delays on thecoversion of the old synagogue, that production had to be postponed. It's now scheduled for August 2'.l ... . Stages hns held Coupl C/ucki; over til August 24 . . .. In NYC, Joel Grey is in rehearsals for The Normal Heart, Larry Kramer's sear­ing drama about AIDS .... Charlton Heston said 1t to Manlvn Beck. "Certainly New York is no longer the stage capital of America-and that's the hl'althiest thing that's happened to theater in the United Stat.cs in 20 years. This country is 3,000 miles wide, with many major cultural centers where theater is thriving." •. Celebrate? A blasl from the past, birth· daywise: Mae West(l 7), Aubrey Beardsley (21 ), Claude Debussy (22), and Monty Wol· ley (16). Also: James Kirkwood (22), the son of two giJent movie stars. whose script for A Chorus Lme will open the TUTS season thi11 year. o Openings Jny Hohm•on and Squeaky (Spellbind· er's. 21)-They played Chuck and Bob on "Soap." Jay's also bringing several other zany characters. LAPO comic Kevin Jor­dan and Austin's Danny Brown share the bill. OW (Opening of the ~eek) The 1940'~ Come Aliue Southwest Ja:u Ballet salutes peace officers the first night and veterans the se<.'Ond. GueRt of honor Vice Admiral Edward H. Martin, deputy chief of naval operations, air warfare, will attend both performances. Dance OW. Freebies. Salute to Count Basie (Miller, 22)-the big band sound of George Hunter and the Fine Arts Consortium of Texas. ONO. Freebies. A UGUST 16, 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 17 Sports Voice Barn Remains on Top in MSA Pool .................. ._.._.. ........ ,._._. ....... ._.~ Large 1 Bedrooms •Bills Paid Professional Psychotherapy The Barn remained in first place in the Associates MSA Billiards League the previous week by defeating last place Hooters. Bacchus I stayed a close second by downing Ranche· roos, while JR's got a forfeit from the defunct Ray's 5 & Dime to move into third place. Last Week's third place holders, Kindred Spirits I, fell to fourth by losing a clo~e match to The 611. •Security Entrance • Burglar Alarms in Each Apt. • 4 Pools Individual, Group and Relationship Counseling Sports Voice Calendar & Standings • Walk-In Closets Family Therapy Stress Management Hypnotherapy Alcohol and Substance Abuse MSA Pool League Standings. Summer League FOLLOWING WEEK 12 TEAM ThlS Weck, Matches so far, Total games 1TheBarn 11·4 11·2 139-56 2 Bacchus I 12~ 11-2 130-65 3 JA'a 15-0 !H 123-72 4 Kindred Spirits I 7-8 9-4 t 10-85 5 Street Ca1s 7·8 9-4 106-89 8 611 Ill 7-8 9-4 10!>-90 7 Ranch Hands 8-7 8-4 101·94 8 Lopsllck 8-7 8-5 114·81 9 BAB Cowboys 8-7 8-5 88-107 10 Bacchus II 8-7 7-6 111·84 11 E/J's 6-9 7·6 93-102 12 Kindred Spori1s 11 9-6 5-8 89-106 13 Sally"s Shooters 8-7 S-8 79-116 14 Too 611 7-8 4·9 102-93 15The611 8-7 4-9 95-105 16 Rancheroos 3-12 3-10 81· 114 17 Al"s Pals 7·8 3-10 73-122 18 Yard Dogs 7-8 2-11 73-122 19 Hooters 4·11 1-12 59-136 Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Aug 4 DOUBLES LADDER 1 Ron Bell & J C Barrera 2 Rock Hadnot & Shy Willy 3 Pal Power & Ric• Massey 4 Arml Alabanze & Thomas Cortez s Rick Dupcnt & David Hackt1eld 8 Donny Kelley A Rich Corder 7 Tim Syers & Ronnie Mauss 8 Stove Bryant A Joe L 9 Paul Brown & Billy Green 1 O Sieve Chesney A Rick Martinez TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 2 Rick Hadnot 3 Randall Dickerson 4 Donny Kelley 5 Rick Dupcnt 1 JC Barrera 2 Richard Pregean1 3 Tim Syers 4 Pet Power 5 Lou Garza 6 Rich Corder 7 Shy Willie 8 Ron Bell 9 David Hackf1eld 10 Arm1 Albanza BLADDER 8 David He1lend 7 Larry Jarvis 8 Ronnie Mauss 9 Eddie Chavez 10 Thomas Cortez CLADDER 1 Paul Brown 2 Rick Knapp 3 Rick Massey 4 Roy Mendiola 5 John Murphy 6 Oscar Ysasst 7 Steve Bryant 8 Steve Chesney 9 JV Klinger 10 Rick Martinez R~gular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Center Houston Tennis Club 9am-Noon, Mac· Gregor Park Women's Bowling League Spm, Stadium Bowl WW B. Bowling League 7 30pm, Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: Frontrunners, Golf Center, Her­mann Park MSA Men's Bowling 9pm, Stadium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA "Fun Volleyball League." 7pm WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7 30pm Homer Ford Tennis Center MSA Pool League, 8pm. 1n sponsors' clubs THURSDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA Mixed Bowling League 9pm, Sta· d1um Bowl Special Events Aug. 16· 18 Houston Outdoor Group camp­ing, swimming, sailing on South Padre Island Aug. 23-25 Houston Outdoor Group canoe & raft on the Guadalupe River m the Hill m monmose. neaRLY eveRyone Qeabs th€ \OIC€ The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE Country Aug. 31-Sept. 2 Houston Tennis Club participates Los Angles tournament Aug. 31·Sept. 4' Houston Outdoor Group scuba diving m Cozumel, Mexico Oct 12· 13: Annual Texas-OU Tennis Clas· SIC, Dallas Oct · Texas-OU Football Weekend. Dallas Nov. 9-11 Houston Tennis Assn. ''Hou· Tex V" OPEN FOR WNCH I lam Happy Hour 4-7 Tues-Fn NOW FEAlURING KIMYVETl'E 830PM-1230AM 608 WESTHEIMIR 524-0105 CONTINENTAl CHATEALJ 5710 Glenmont 667-6593 Exit 59 at Chimney Rock, Go South 2 blks to Glenmont, and Right 1 Block USE SPECIALITY ADVERTISING WHEN: 4622 Walker Houston, Texas 77023 (713) 926-2182 SERVICE LUS * Opening New Accounts * Reactivating Accounts * Motivating Sales People * Stressing Safety Goals * Announcing New Products, New Services, etc. * Gifting VIP's o Executives & Employees Gifts o Incentive Program o Specially Designed G1ft/Aw&rd Program o Convention Items o Decals o Caps o Koozie Cups o Pens o Pencils o Key Chains o Bumper Stickers o Banners o Matches o L111hters o Yard Sticks o Golf Balls & Towels o Balloons o Jackets o Calendars o Bags o Magnetic Specialties o Badges & Buttons o Astrays o Playing Cards o Calculators o Aprons o Clocks o Food Gifts o Buckles o Paperweights o Appllques o Knives D Screwdrivers o Binders o Patches o Charts o Umbrellas o Real Estate Signs o etc. 1STEFFEK adverts n g 933-3333 ........................................ --------------------------------~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ -~-~ 18 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 16, 1985 Good books aren't always expensive! listed m this ad Just $15 g.ets a~y three books Affrrmmg, ~III/I ant! ~mbolJZZ• ~-1 Ldun &/atiti<J.Jup!. THE TWO OF L:'i, I'\ Larry I Uhni;, l IHI A pr.:u 1~.1 hand­houk .1h11111 '10\'o lCI m.1h· .1 i;.I) or Jc,h1.111 rd.1111111,hip \'. urk, \'. llh 'P<<a.11 l mph.1'" on 111< rd1i;11111' l'llLll' of i;.1v 1111111.1' THE ADVOCATE GUIDE TO GAY HEALTH, hy RD F.:n­w1ck, wnh Nathan Fam. $7 00. AIDS isn't the only heahh haz.ml facmx gay people, hen ts mfor­mJuon on many othl"T ,1,p.:c1' of stJymg healthy tl1'1t arc t<K• oftl-n OVl.'rlookcJ. ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank '1o•ca, $5.00. Th<· story of a teen.1i:e lov< .1Han that shoul<l 11'1vc heen stmpk - hm wasn't THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE, hy lkmz Hq;er, S'i.IXI fhe tm<', i;nppmx, hk­. in<l·<lcath story nl a man thrown mto thl l\l ,•z1 conccntra· tmn c.:ilmps !or hemi: i;ay a nearly !ori;otten p1cn· of our •11-iory COMING OUT RIGHT, hy Wes Muchmore an<l W11liJm Hanson, S6.00. Praet1<·al :1Jv1.:c on many asix-cts of lifr tor i:ay men - Imm wh.11 tu l-XJ>o.'ct thc hrst tim<' you enter u i:ay har, to the .:ssen­tial mfnmliltitm you shoulJ know ahout in.surann-. hvmi:·together :immi;emems, and he,1lth . Value., to $28.00! DEATH TRICK, by Richard Stevenson, $6.00. Meet Don Strachcy, a pnvate eyt• in the classic tradmon hut with one difference: he's gay "Death Tnck is a sexy talc wntten with uncommon wit, .i:race and per­ception. As a writer of gay mys­teries, Stevenson is ri.i:ht up there at the top," says author Wallace Hamilton. STATES OF DESIRE, by Ed­mund Vv II•·, SI An cnter­tammi; l<K>k at i;;1y <.ulture an<l hfc,tylcs throui.:hout th<. US jHarJhack l A DIFFERENT LOVE, By Clay Larkm, $~.!XI Billy anJ Hal meet anJ fall m love ma 'mall M1<l­Wl"> llm town. But then they move tu San Franc1,~o. an<l soon have to face the problem' of 1calousy, m1,trnsi, and tcmptauon DANNY, hy M.1rxare1 'iturg1,, $7 (XI. A h1i:h school teacher Marts olll th<· new y<..ir hy challenginx the ;1dm1111,tra110n over censor 'hip 1s,ucs - an<l ends up hy tall· mi: m lnvc wnh his most talcntc<l 'tu<lent LEGENDE, hy k:11111111e AllJrJ. $6.00 El.1hor.mni: on :1 kgenJ that as '1111 wld 111 frnncl', )l'an­mne Allard h;1' crl'iltl'<l a h;1unt- 111i: 'tory ot t WO woml'll 111 the 19th .:entury, who h;1ve to 111· vent thc1r own w;1y w h<' in lovl' FRANNY: The queen of Prov­incetown, hy John PrcsHm, $4.00. A highly-a.:d.umcJ look ;11 gay history ;md pn<l<', through the ey<.,, of .1 wonJntul lhar;1c1cr who h.1, 'ecn 11 ;111 THE AGE TABOO, l'<l by Damcl T ... u1i:. $6 !XI E":tY' explonni: thl' c1>ntron·r,1al 1s,uc of 111;1n fhov love Imm m.my per,pec11ve,. · KINDRED SPIRITS, cd11e<l by Jeffrey Elliot, $7.IXI Twelve science !icuon stone' offer gay an<l lc<h1an characters 111 new contexts. IRIS, hy Janine Veto, $7 00 The r<'tclhn.i: uf an ane1<·nt Greek myth of love, dcvotmn and vengeance tht' ume w11h a lesbian th.:me THE HUSTLER OHN HE~RY MA C KAY T•A" IL ATf IY HUllltT "-l!llN ~ DY THE HUSTLER, by John Henry Mackay, tramlated by Hubert Kennedy, $8 00. Thi\ early xay classic, first published in 1926, tells of Clincher, a 15-ycar·old youth who runs away from home to Berlin There, he discovers hu,tlmi: as his only v1Jblc means of support an<l his story provide' a fascmaung look at gay hie in the Bcrhn of the '20s. THE PRINCE AND THE PRE· TENDER, hv \'mn·nt L.1rdu, )6.110 A nn' nuH·I 111 1111r1i:u<· .111d 10111.111Cl' n ·ntl r111i; .11ou11d the h,u 111 llK R11"1.1111hru11•· - !rum th• .1111hm 11! t:/1111.r 1/111"" ONE TEENAGER IN TEN, e<l . by Ann Heron, $4 ()() Twenty­e1xh1 young people describe their comin.i:-out cxpenenccs. GAY AND GRAY, hy ll;1ymoml M Bcri;cr, $8 00 A t.i-.:111;111111; ponrny.11 ol ho" '1X g;1v 1111.:11 havc i;ottl·n the mo'1 11111 ol g<·ttllli; oldl'l LIFETIME GUARANTEE, hy Alice Bloch, $7 00 The per· sonal and powerful chronidc of a young lesbian faced with her sister's impending death from cancer. THE MOVIE LOVER, by R1char<l Frie<lcl, $7 00 Burton Ra1Jcr"s problems begm m high school when he falls m love w11h hi\ fnen<l RomJn. As he !:<'IS older, the probktn5 m­crcase - an<l so Joes the humor ul his s11ua11on IN SUCH DARK PLACES, hy )1N:ph C.1ldwdl. ~7 00. I hi' w1dd} ,tld;1imn l 11md - Wlllll<'I ot thc R0111<· l'nZl' - tl'IJ, ;1hou1 .1 1:,1>· photoi;r;1phl'T in Nn' York, .1 ho)' h.: llll't.:1', ;till! 1 h.:1r mutl1;1I nl·nl tor hove, !;11th .111d t:nmmll· THE BUTTERSCOTCH PRINCE, by R1char<l Hall, SS 00. When his hcst fncnd is murdered, the only clue i~ one that the police would <:11m1<lu l<K> k111ky pur,ue - so CorJcll <l<-c1de~ to <lo II h11nscll. CHINA HOUSE, hy Vincent Lar­do, $5.00. A gay gothie that has everything. two han<l,ome lovers, a mystcnuμs house on a New FnglanJ hill, an<l a lather-son relatwmhip that's closer than most. SWEET DREAMS an<l GOLDEN YEARS, hy John Preston, SS.00 each Who says heroes can't be gay1 Not Alex Kane. Alex Kane has suffered too much from homophobia· now his only goal 1s to wipe it out, hy any means necessary. These arc the first two hooks in the new senes, "The Mission of Alex Kane." FIRESTORM, by GeralJ Wemng, $6.!Xl Two men fall in love in a mral m1dwestcrn town, only to have relig10us homophobrn dramaucally alter thetr lives. THE WANDERGROUND, hy Sally Gearhart, $7 .Oil. Ab,orh­inx. im3J:111JtiVI.' Stones of 3 future women's culture, cr<·ated in harmony w11h tht.: natural worlJ. ---------, TO ORDER ~ndnst•d " 515.00 plt•Jsc st•nd th"''' lht'l' (1.,,,1-,, fh1r h'\\\'T them \ hnol...' wnd lull pm!' J,ll'd p!" St po,t,1~t· ) \'1 st1 1111d A1,, .. 11•1, ,,, d rucq•tt•t/ ,.,,,/,,..," 11111'1tlll Htt, t'\J'. dt11<' llll"'f.\!l/lllUI(' n.1nw t•l>--- ''"'e zip ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. l'-5 40 l'lympton St. Bt•~t1•n . MA 02118 _________ _a AUGUST 16. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 New Comedies: 'Pee-Wee's Big Adventu.re' and 'Volunteers' Films By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic AB a fervent moviegoer, I often have cer· tain high or low expedations for an upcoming film. It's depressing when an anticipated film turns out to be a turkey, but exhilerating when you catch an unex· pected delight. This week's films range from a nice sur· prise to dashed hopes. Pee-Wee's Big Adventure stars that strange guy who calls himself Pee-Wee Herman, and I half expected the very worst. The comedian has a very small following, and the film opened in about half the number of national theaters that most films do. Little did I know that this little film would turn out to be one of the most innovative and comical movies so far this year. On the flip Ride, I had been waiting for Volunteers with Tom Hanks and John Candy since I saw the funny trailer earlier this spring. A comedy about Peace Corps workers during the 60s, this project looked like a promising winner. Unfortunately, the resulting movie is full of poor charac· ters with a badly written script, and jungle scenes that look straight out of a Burbank backlot. So, when you see as many films as I do each month, you learn not to expect much before a screening. Walking blindly into the darkened theater, it's better to take each film for what it is and not rely on advance publicity. After all, the studio public-ity is written to sell a product, and my job as a critic is to tell you if it's worth buying-using my knowledge of film and my better judgement. o Pee-Wee's Big Adventure Chances are good that if you watch much late-night telcvision,you'vc"1·en the weird little guy nam11d Pee-Wee Herman. Now, out of the blue, this characU>r shows up us thP ~tar of hie own nutty film - Per· Wee's Big Adventure Pee·W1·1· (actually Paul Reubens) acts like a ninl"-year-old in a man's body. His zany mixture of effeminent giggles, twinkle-toes walk, and whiney personal· ity make him prcaous to some, and a stupid gag to others. Fortunately, wchnve Pee-Wee surrounded by a hilarious script end good direction that make thi" film debut a sparkling treat. I really wasn't all that hyped up about a film with Pee-Wee because, frankly, I didn't find him all that funny on shows like David Letterman. But comedy is often a matter of taste, and Big Adventure deserved a fair shake. I really surprised myself when I found myself laughing madly with the audience at the crazy things this person was doing. We get a hig dose of Pee-Wee lunacy right off the bat. He's a strange one indeed, riding a big bike around town wearing a 6ny red bowtie, white bucks, and sporting a 50s crewcut. He tells this girl that he's different (that's an under· statement) and to just stay away because he's a loner (acting sort of asexual throughout the movie). His home is filled with helping-hand innovations (one fixes the en6re break· fest) and the front yard is a maze of plastic light-up figures and more contraptions. Spare time is spent at the local magic shop examining the latest in kooky gizmos and tricks. However, his main love is his precious bicycle. When the cycle is stolen by a rich, greedy (and obviously gay) bully, Pee-Wee sets out determined to recover it. His search sends him all over the U.S.A., and the adventure becomes so outlandish that it almost comes to resemble a live cartoon. Little did I know that "Pee-Wee's Big Adventure" would turn out to be one of the most innovative and comical movies so far this year It would bt• silly to relate the wild events that make up this adventure, becauoe JI would ruin them for you when you see for yourself. However. the part that will defi· nitcly stay in your mind is Pee-Wee's trip to the Alamo m San Antonio. The tour guide will have you laughing until you cry, and the jokes about Texans will definitely have you hooting. There is also a scene in a Hell's Angel" Bar where Pee-Wee does a funny dance step to "Tequila" which (according to audience response) seemed to be a definite highlight in the movie. The entire last part of the film has Pee· Wee racing through the Warner Brothers Studio backlot in a frantic chase. Racing through Godzilla sets, a Santa _Claus movie, and assorted props, Pee-Wee man· ages to evade the security guards and Tom Hank11 (standing) play~ Lau•rence Bourne Ill, a rich and spoiled Yale graduate who runs away from a gambling debt by joining the Peace Corps. In route to Thailand, he meets Tom Tuttle (John Candy) and Beth Wexler (Rita Wilson) in "Volunteers." Pee-Wee Herman starring in "PPe·Wee's Big Adventure" wreck half of the studio at the same time. Fortunately, the studio likes his adventu· rous story and buys it to make into a movie-the rei;ult of being sort of a Jamei; Bond character looking for hii; bike. If vou think that 90 minute" of Pee-Wee might he too much, you'll probably sur· pnse yourself when you find yourself wanting more at the end. The director, 26- year-old Tim Burton, does a wonderful job kt.eping n tight rein on the antics of Pee­Wee while still letting him perform his childish role. The first 15 minutes of the film prei;ent Pee-We" at his most obnox· ious, but as the adventure kicks into gearit "eemM like he mPllowH somewhat and becomes more likable Thi' production values on Big Aduen turc are wonderful with James Tocci's sets bemg a standout as well as the perfectly lively soundtrack by Steve Barteck. Edit· mg 1s an essential and cirtical device to comedy, and Billy Weber (48 Hours and Badlands) proves once again that he is top notch. Pce-Wee's niter-ego Paul Reubens co-wrote the snappy screenplay with Phil Hartman and Michael \'arhol. Pee· Wee's Big Adventure is a wonderful surprise for filmgoerH, and hopefully they will discover its pleasures for themselves. It might just tum out to be the biggest "sleeper" of 1985 and make a star out of little, lovable Pee-Wee. o Volunteers There are two things that are a clue to critics that a new film might be bad. One is opening a movie without any advance crit· ics screening, and two is when they give away "promo prizes" at a preview screen· ing. At a special showing of Volunteerb this week, they gave out decks of playing cardo with picture.; of the film on them. My theory proved correct again. Actually, Volunteers is not really a bad film. just ill-conceived. The concept of a comedy involving Peace Corps workers building a bridge in Thailand during the 60s seems fun enough. Somehow a lot of ridiculous factors got thrown in along the way that really messed things up. Lawrence Bourne III !Tom Hanks) is a cocky Yale graduate who tallies up a $24,000 gambling debt. When Daddy refuses to help and the bookies' henchmen are hot on this tail, Lawrence switches identity with a friend headed to the Peace Corps. His assignment is to build a bridge with two assistants and some Thai villagers. Tom Tuttle from Tacoma (John Candy) is an oafish know-it-all who never stops talk· ing. Beth Wexler (Rita Wilson) is a sweet but stubborn gal who is constantly fight· ing off advances from Lawrence. Together they make a pretty sorry bunch. If the movie had concentrated on just these three and their interactions with the Thai people, there might have been a neat movie here. The v.Titers went wrong by introducing a vicious opium dealer (with sumo Y.Testler guards). a stupid CIA agent, and a troop of Communist insur· gents. These three groups sv,;r) in and out of the scenario, adding nothing and get· ting in the way The film tries to work off a variation of Bruige on the Riucr Kua1, but it never evolves. The screenplay is too busy with silly subplots nnd quicky one-liners, and eventually devotes only about 10 minutes to the building of the bridge it.•elf. Later Lawrence and the others arc convinced that the Communists and the opium deal· ers will misuse the bridge, >O they blow it up. Don't you just hate films where the main goal of the film seems worthless m the end? A maior gnpe about l/olunteers is its rampant misuse of off-color ethnic jokes and characters. Lawrence makes several cracks about slanted eyes and the height of Asians which seem very unnecessary. All of the natives seem like a bunch of Unfortunately, "Volunteers" is full of poor characters ... bad script idiots, and Chinefle actor Gedde Wtanobe is forced to play another ridiculous Asian (like in Ret·enge of the ,\·erds) that is rudely stereoty'.Pical. When will sefi>enwri­ters learn that this is not acceptable any­more. John Candy is very funny, but his part is actually a lot smaller than it should be. He hardly even interact.' with hi' co-star Tom Hanks. Rita Wilson looks like a wooden caricature of Jane Fonda, and her character shifts midfilm from a stubborn conservative to a lovesick fool. The lead actor, Tom Hanks, is charming but often seems too rudely arrogant. His main diffi· culty is with a Boston accent that conspic· uouely slips in and out. Volunteersis a disappointing failure because it had potential and fell flat. We have jungle ~cenes with one monkey and one elephant, and the whole scene ju;;1 looks too faked or staged. Filmed in Mex­ico with a lot of Mexicans u ed as natives, we jui;t never feel like we're in Thailand. The movie was co-produced hy HBO Pie· tures, so you can guess where t.'iis film will show up soon. You would do weil to catch it then. 20 MONTROSE VOICE AUGUST 16. 1985 Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose V0tce. a general c1rculat1on newspaper having published continu­ously for 1 year or tonger. 1s qual1f1ed to accept legal notices affecting the news­paper's c1rculat1on area Montrose For sale, beautiful patio style home tn Montrose 2 bdrm, 2 baths. 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For Leasi New poots7d°e tOwnhOme ~n West U. 2-2'h-2 WIO, fireplace. 523- 7'04. owneriagerit REMINGTON PLACE APARTMENTS * * SPECIAL * * 1/2 Month Free Rent $150 Deposit 1 Bedrooms S199 & up 2 Bedrooms S275 & up 4 Pools, Hardwood Floors, D1sllnct1ve Floor Plans. Convenient Location Call Gail or John 965-D589 2210 Mid Lane (1ns1de Loop 610. near Gallenal ROOMMATE WANTED Responstble GI M to share 2 bedroom =-~l~~:.~~fs\c)5 ~ ul•hlles Jim ~1 bedfOOm m small quiet com­plex wllh pool No pets $285 plus bolls S 100 Mposh ~8178 Exper1e-;;-ced floral delivery person-full tJme Salary open Call 862·3244 --HAIRDRESSER WANTED EstablJShed salon. c11111r lease and com­m1ss1on Plans Great opportunity Antoine and Northwest Freeway area 688-4840 HU VEN Houston s newest video dance club? Now accepting appllcat1ons between 3 and 5 pm Daily Mon. thru Fri Please-bring a recent photograph Contact Charles Armstrong 810 Pac1hc No phone calls please (MISC.) FOR SALE Moving Sal&-n1ce oak/ glass dinette, hide-a-bed. bedroom set. more Priced 10 sell Call Bob 522-8635 FOR YARD SALES See ads under Yard Sa1es at the end of the Montrose Classified MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS LONG HARD DAY? How about a massage from • leg1t1mate welt-trained masseur Call Mr Randolph 81 (713) 528-3147 ARE YOU WORRIED? That your nervous tension w~ll blow that bog date? Be calm and prepared with a massage from 8 111 O'Aourko (Lteenae ~> In your home or my studio. 869- HEAL TH BODY MASSAGE -­Galleria David (713) 622-4:;30 ET CADILLAC OF MASSAGE D'' o! E T (713) 622-4530 PERSONALS GWM. 36. 6"2" 185. brown hair blueey.S. moustache versatJle Wants Jncndsh1p, stable rela11onsh1p 30-40 No smoking or drugs Reply Bhnd Box 251B. Clo Voice BECOMING INCREASINGLY LONELY GWM. 27, Blond. blue 155. 5·9· 5eeks attractive. versat1to. possible boyfriend 24-35 Like music. movies. video. out· doors work out Downtown Y wrestling. body builders Bored with bar scene Rather hnd something better to do Send pertinent tnfo with picture. Jf possible. to Blond Box 251L e10 Voice Attractive. sens1t1ve. mascuhnc. preppy GWM. 29t5h Seeks same 933-7288 Adam CHUBBY CHASERS WANTED Good looking, GWM. chubby wants you for hot times All scenes Send descnp· t1on ol sell and your desires 10 David 2615 Waugh Dr, • 243, HOU$10n. Texos 77006 Photo and phone appreciated All rephes answered rrc; Hf C!X'l'IBION Tll PIDllOC AN AN%lR TO flNI{ QUf.SllON, l.VlN It IT AN~W£R ~ffiNt; RlSOOTIN(] •)1/Ncro1E? rn F\:RE: SPHU.ffilCN Thne ire aome of the ahopa, atorn and community organization• which t an• H dl11rlbu11on point• .. ary Friday for the Monlroaa Voice Appear•nces jeans, sportswear 1340 Westhetmer-521·9"450 As;iUtnAcsU11 BOO.klu:we-1-201 Richmond B&G Plan1 Company-2600 Hou.ton Av=ecz­' 213 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Ball Park Adutt Book11or• 1830 W A11b.lma Bas1Cerotne-;5 c101ntnQ'-122o wesfn;.lner- 522-•626 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE e;;;,,ey·•· -, 136 N511eptierd-862·•2e6 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Book: titop-W Alabama at Shepherd Books -K•rby at w.Sih;'~m - BOulevBrO=-Pt.aza Hotel 5020 Montt~ 3161 Brazos Baek Pocket-BAB 2400 Bruos-524· ee28 Oramat1ka gitts-3224 Yoakum-528-54~7 ThiEaOle~~er 524-1383 ~!&Jaeaihers=-M1ry~. 1072" Wes;m;;:: Erotic Ceb1ret 1222 Weslhelmer-528--4565 fabulous 5o. V•ntaQ;Goods 1733 West· he• .. "'"' Fairv1~- --cq;;;,_1006 FattV..-- ~14'4 ~ MOre 172ifhcttmono-522-W'1 Franc1$CO's Hair Oessgn-901 A1chm0nd .$23- 0-38 Golden Oaks Ant~ 1712 Wftthetmer- 5:5-9259 Hatt Pnce BookS- 1408 Hyde f"'ark 5~1o&i""" ~01Cott8e Beans-2520 Rice 52'-00$7 Hous~HllR--901 Bagby - H®s10'1Hom& & G1rden~01lovef~24 .. 3000 lcentio-Ner Beauty School '327 Wnthe;me,- 520-797c::.2 ___ j'i;i;'n1te Records 528 Wetlhe~621-0187 ~ ~Ltq-UOrs~h.OOnc:1 at ounlavy-528- K.,FT Red.0f~i19Lovelt 81vd-5~00J LNi"h9r9_y_Boot•-111 Fat,.;lf-N-52&-B0oi'­Leath8i L0Cker The 81.1 , Sit ti;-de Park 624· 7355 ~~~ o;;;g;;- "iOtr-Westne1mer~27 .. LtQht Bulbs Unluruted· 1521 WatMuner-$21 ~ 0330 uon;I H,,, Oes.gn -3220 Yoakum-526-44_94_ M 1n1f ~~28K1n0$t~72 Manhote· •983 W Gray-522-1089 -­Metropohtan Community Church Oftii"I Reurrect•or.-1919 Decatur-861-9149 Mr>ntrose Cltnic-803 Hiwttiome-62&-~1 Mon1rOle Ha•r e>esagn-1• 12 westM•mef.:m: 2822 MootroM VO'ce ~paper.:~a~.- 529-8'90 MOSeS'~niques-1637 Westheimer- 527-80•0 A Moveible Fust-3827 Ounl1vy-S2~ tJovem'ast;S-'1925 Wntr,;,;e,~ One0Y1Lffthef~12W8sthe1me' :s2'4· 7859 Po1sen10ns:.W 2 Montroae-52~3094- - - Pr:";ai8f>ostal Systems--=1713 Wnthelmer- 529-3020 RecO;d A.Ck:..:-ii~herd 524~ The Aomt.n=2"602 wh1tn8y-522-i578 -­ROniHalr-& si.:ln ca;;::l310Hawtii0rrie-521· 3000 Siiv'eriUst· '2715 Waughcrnt.=5~40 Studz Aoult News· -1132 W Alabama ~mot~1 Tatt-52M""ifi0~ Twneteu TaHet1-1623 Westheimer-!>29-6299 f1.1: Avenue-1420 Wes-1"'91mer TLC= 2.t2181IS0~5MO The Tit• Ptace--1307 Fa;,;-iew~14 TOm'my I Bar~~moutn-52&­! 218 Next lime you feed your face, think about your heart. Go easy on your heart and start cutting back on foods that are high in saturated fat and cholesterol. The change'll do you good /a American Heart V Association Wl "RI r j..jTING FOR '!O.JRUFE Total ArumaJ C.re-HMO Westhe1~ 9277 Union Jack clothing- 1212 Westhe•mer-528- 9600 ~. S;permarket.:-529WA!eba.mi--:S2a- 239' Village Cheoae Shop-2484 Bolaover -~527-0398 ::;sireen'1 Drug Slore--3509 Montrose 520=' WW'lck al tt1• Park ha7r=-w;;.ck Hotet.5701 s Mam. lower IObby-52&-1991x1209. 5~3706 Waugh On~ ,,Q2welch-529-9964 W'e~r VideOl-1420 W95ihe1mer-S22 .. U85 Wnt Al1t>am• LlquoT"'"'"eoe w Alabama- 528- 230ll Weatheime7F'iU""' Marke1-1733 Westhetmer 5211-1015 weSt'hei'mer Aeco,da-2024-Westheimer- 520- 8800 Wti'Cie'&Sie1n bOOk stor8=' 1103 California-529- 701 • RESTAURANTS AND NIGHTCLUBS are listed in their own categories Cf\Ust '? IJELL, SOCIET'( HAS CHOS£N t11\LE ROt.£ MOOELC, WJ f\LWIWS D:l11BIT TOIFIL CONTROL .•. If fl 1'1P.LE ~~'3. ''I OON\ Kt-Our: Hf5 f\DMITTINC, TO C()-,IV£.R'll\Tl0Nf\L Htl.P\ISSNE.S!I ~D tl\IUN(] TD LIVE. UP TO n 111,1 SOC\E.1AL Slf\NDFIRD On the Town ACCOMMODATIONS (for Visitors to Houston) Hou!lton Gueat Ho111 106 ~ ·523- 2218 . SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Eagiecreat Inn HM Avondale· 520-9767 GAY BARS Bacchus-523 Lovett - 523-3396 lesbian Ba~C1f1c-52&:942Y count,Y -­Bayou Landing - 534 Westhe:imer· 526-7519 oi>ening SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE BNChel 2 IO Al >any wrm Pl SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE BraZ< Arv9f BOtto'TI· .24ci)e;uo1- 5'2M"192 country SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Briar Patch- -2294 W Hotcom~ - -665--9878 Chicken Coop -535 welihe.mer· s2&-22'° Cho•cee-· --,-,-,Magic 01k1. Spring- -35C>-o41r SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Club Lar1don· 12726 North fwy-·876-3565 Copa- 2831 R1chmond--528·2259 d11co. 1mpersonstor1 OiiiYS.liY.i-220 Avondale-5~7525 Jfh- 808 Pac1f1c-521·2519 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE J~1 Manon & Lynna- 811 ~52&-9110 tesbt~ ---~ - - Kindred Sptrits- 4902 Rtehmond -62~6135 Lazy J-31:.?' Tuam- $2&-9343 ~Depot - 2327 Granl --628-8342 The Menagerie t 501 s Hwy 288. Angteton IW>-11315 Mary·1 10Fwe1the.m;;- °5?8-8851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MOntrose Mining Co Pel ~1 5 • 1q& SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Mott'Mlr LOde Cate & $i1c;on--.aoc P11e1hc - 523· 0511 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE .N.·.1.m.b ers 2 300 West~-6551 nu QUij';';', 1.t19 A-chm'Ond5 28_- 89.. 0;.3._;_._ _ Aanch- 9150 S M8tn- 866-3"6.t ~702 Kirby - 52.t ·8272 d1n1ng entef'tainment Rendezvous-11'CiOW91the1mer- 523· 2.t22 ~a:':a 2.t01 San Jat_into~i~d~ A1pcofd 715Fa1rv .. w 521.2792-leather-- SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE A11ky Bu11ne 1 2700 Albany· 528-3611 cabarel SiUdio 13=131'8we1theemer 521·9041. f,21 · 8030 ftMt 611 &11 Hyde Pint 528-9079 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Tw1n1 2053W1rt Ad - ~7- 1113 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ~N- -2923 M.11n 522-0000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PRIVATE GAY CLUBS Club Houaton 8odY Centre ?~Fa~ 49811 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ~arter Thlialtf 0782 ~.-sp;:::l100Farm1n-42~·2379 Ptgasut- 131.t Rosahe- 524-PIGS VACATIONS VISITING SAN FRANCISCO? DOLORES ST BED & BREAKFAST 415-861-5887 OR WRITE MARC 381 DOLORES ST , SF .• FOR INFO ---EL RANCHO VISTA Counlry Guest House for Lovers. F irends and lhe Single Man Advance reserva­tions required PO Box 245, Glen Rosu, TX 76043 (817) 897-4982 For Houston lravel agents. see "Travel Agents" in the Greater Montrose Bus•· ness Oireclory, next page - NEW ORLEANS-G-UEST HOUSE 1118 Ursulones. (5041 566-1177 See our display ad monthly on the Montrose Voice. - SAN FRANCISCO: LELAND HOTEL 1315 Polk. 1·800-253-5263 or (415) 441 - 5141 See our display ad monthly on Iha Montrose Voice Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE AUGUST 16, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar canoe & raft on the Guadalupe River in the Hill Country Aur. 23-25 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat AUG AUG 16 17 AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 18 19 20 21 22 Critena for 1nclu11on 1n 7· 0ay Calendar incl MontroM Ae.ourca 1 E"Went or group must specrhc.a~ pertain to netghborhood of Montron or Houston·• gay community unlffa maror city. state or natt0nal hohday °' ma,or national gay '"'ent 2 Strictly commercial events not 1netuded 3 Busmeu. Cl\llC and IOCtal groups and their '"'ents are genefalty quahhed .t Political events where only on. "W•ew of 1 aub,ect. candidate or party rs donunant not qu1l1f1ed For add1t1ona1 mformation 0t phone numben. look for the IPOf'llOrtl'tQ organ.zatton unoer •·AeM>urces " Typestyles indicate events' location: Events in Houston, Events of Local Interest Elsewhere. Events of Aleo Interest SELECTED EVENTS THROUGH 7 DAYS SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS • FRIDAY: "Breakthrough" lesbian-feminist program, KPFT, FM-90. 8:1 5-J0:30am •FRIDAY-SUNDAY: Hou1ton Out.door Group camping, swimming, sailing on South Padre Island Aug. 16-18 • FRIDAY.SUNDAY; Sundance Cattle Co. 5th Anniversary. Aug 16·18 llSTAllTING FRIDAY: s...nth Blennlol ~~511y Convenflon, N-Yori<, Aug • FRIDAY: Montroae Country Clorgeni mPet 7pm. MCCR. i919 Decatur llSATUl!DAY: 3rd annlvenory al r.derol Nling against lfcSe's "homo ... uol conduct low,• Aug 17, 1912 llSATURDAY: KS/ AIDS Foundation meeta 3400 Montro..-, no. 501, llam llSATURDAY & SUNDAY: KS/ AIDS Foundation trainina weekend Aug. 17-18 • SUNDAY: Montroee Tennie Club plays 9am noon, MacGregor Park llSUNDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center llSUNDAY: Choices meeta lpm Aug. 18, Maaterson YWCA, 3615 Willia llSUNDAY; Parenta FLAG meeta 2pm. Aug. 18. Presbyterian ~nter, 41 Oakdale llSUNDAY· Women's bowlinr l•arue playa, 3pm. Stadium Bowl • SUNDAY· WW.B. Bowling Learue. 7:.30pm, Poet Oak Lanee • SUNDAY· Overeaten Anonymou• meet 8pm Montroee Counoeling Center. 900 Lovett •MONDAY Frontrunner• run from Golf Center, Hermann Park •MONDAY· MSA Bowhnr. 9pm at Stadium Bowl. 8200 Braeemain rI'UESDA Y · Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tenni1 ~nter rJ'UESDAY:. MSA "Fun Volleyball League'" plays, 7pm rruESDAY· Montroee Symph<>n1c Band meeta Digmty Center, 3217 Fannin, 7;3(\pm • WED1'ESDAY: Hou.ton Tennis Club play1 7:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis ~nter • WEDNESDAY. Gay Political Caucua meeta 3217 Fannin. 7:30pm Aug. 21 • WEDNESDAY MSA Pool League competition •WEDNESDAY: Overeaters Anonymoua meet 8pm Berinr Church. 1440 Harold rJ'HURSDAY: Frontrunnen run from Memorial Park Tennis ~nter rJ'HURSDAY: "Wilde 'n Stein'" gay radio ahow 7:30-9pm on KPFT Radio. FM-90 rrHURSDAY. Mixed Bowlinr League, 9pm, Stadium Bowl, 8W<l Brae1main • 11' 1 WEEK Houston Outdoor Group • IN 1 WEEK Baytown Lambda meets 730pm Aug 23 •IN I WEEK: Gay Aaiana & Friends moet 3pm Aur. 25 • IN I WEEK: Inte(rity meets 7:30pm Aur 26, Autry HoUM, 626.5 Main •IN I WEEK: KS.' AIDS Foundation I: MontroR Counoelinr ~nter AIDS Riak Reduction <Safe Sexi Worltohopa. 8pm Aur26 •N 1 WEEK: Seri. 9, Men's Sollboll Gay World Seri.&. MllwaukM. Aug 27-s.pj. 1 • IN 1 WEEK. Leebianl Gay Resoun:e Servicr. Univ. of Howiton, meete :?-.30pm Aug. 27. Spmdletop Room, Univ. Cenler, Uruv Park • IN I vtEEK. Lutheran• Concerned meet. Aujl.27. Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh • IN I WEEK. Hou1ton Area Gay & Iab1an Engmf'ttll & Soenu..ta mttt 7pm Aug.27 • IN I WEEK: Montroee Civic Club <Nearwwnl meete 7pm Aug.27, 1413 Weethtimer • IN I WEEK. Great<>r Montroee Bu1meu Guild meets ~pm Aug. 28, Brennan'• Reot.aurant, 3300 Smith •IN 1WEEK:111 Amuol Gay W<>n*i"S Sollboll World Seri. Aug 29-Sepl. 1, MllwouUe lllN 1 WEEK: N<Slonol AMuOI ConvenllOn ol Chubblel and Chose<s. Seotti.. Mavftow• Hotel. Aug ~- 2 • I!li 2 WEEKS 149th birthday of City of Houston, Aug. SO • 11' 2 WEEK!:' Houston Outdoor Group acuba diving m Cozumel, Mexico, Aur 3!&pt. 4 •IN 2 WEEKS labor Doy, Sept. 2 •IN 3 WEEKS Houston Gay Health Advocateo meet 7:30pm Sept. 7 •IN 3 WEEKS· Montroee Art Alliancr moeta Sept.9 •IN 3 WEEKS: Citi.urui for Human Equality moeta 7:30pm Sept. JO. Houaton HoUM, 1617 Fannin, 9th floor •IN 3 WEEKS: Howiton Oat.a Profe...ionala meets 7:30pm ~t.10 • IN 3 WEEKS Neartcwn Bu.'!lne Allian<e meets 7pm Sept.11. Liberty Bank, llKll Westheimcr DINING OUT IN MONTROSE Looking for a • IN 3 V.T.EKS Avondale ~tion mf<'tl 7:30pm Sept.12. Christian Women'• Center, 310 Pacific •IN 4 WEEKS T•m Freedom -al. "'!'ride Ul: 15." Dollm. Sept. 14-22. wtlh T•m Freedom Porode and RESTAURANTS "Celebrollon in LM l'or1t" Sept 22 ALL RESTAURANTS LISTED HeRe­SERVE AS DISTillBUTION POINTS FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE Baba vag1·1- 2«17 Gra;;r-6"-00.2 __ _ 8ou'-"a1d Cafe- eoi LO¥ett 521 1015 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE L8 JelC'8nM- 130I Mont,OM-5.2.t .ee1e M•s;ou..I StrMt Cafe -1117 MiMOUrt -sn-12i.c ~~~1 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ~~~en~Oyster B~westt1e1mer 52.t· SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Perky' R•chmo~ ~t ~Y 52.t-0075 ___ Ralph·a 515 w Alablima- !>2&-8900 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ~2702 Kirby 52.t-6272 ~--­~~- Verse -~19 w.iihtnoton: 86~8773 Sc>enl.Sh Flower--3921 Main M9-l706 Spud-U-L1ke- 4;&Westh-;;;;- $20-<>5S:C­Star P1u1 -2~k-5iioi>-o S1eak ·n· Egg - .C231 MOO'irote-=i28-~ ~.,.. Mex.c;;;-Cate- 521WA .. ma- 528- Toyto< 1 C.l• lA· ·Z-3 W•t"°'mer -~- SEE OUR DISPLAY AD JN THE MONTROS£ VOICE,_ Tims Coffee Shop-1525' Wnthelmer -529- 2289 W•H1e'a eBo-wesi'iiet,M;""il Montroee-52S.. !>4 11 PEST CONTROL SERVICE? Are you MOVING? Look in the Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory in t>very LS•ue of tht> Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE --L....--- --~ !........ • 11' 4 WF..EKS Houston North Profe...ionala meets 7;30pm, Sept. 14 • I1' 4 WEEKS GPC'1 10th Anniversary Dmntt Sept. U •IN 5 WEEKS ]{.<: AIDS Foundation training weekend Sept. 21 ·22 •IN 5 WEEKS Yom Kipper, Sept. 25 •IN 7 WEEKS. Human Rights Campaign Fund annual awards. W<Sdol! Astoria Hotel, N-York. Oct 9. honoring 1V host Phi Donohue. publlshef Gloria SI..,,_, l lambda legal ~ l EcM:ollon Fund m1N a WEEKS T•Ol-OU Foolbotl WMkend. Doilm mlN a WEEKS Annual lesbian l Gay Prlde Conlerenc.. R l~dcff. Ao. Columbus Doy Weekend mH a WEEKS Co11.mbus Doy Oct.14 • IN 9 WEEKS: Fall Weatheuner Colony Art F.Uval Oct. 19-20, 1001 W..iheimer 22 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 16 1985 Greater Montrose Service le Shopping Directory illm----- ••• TO ADVERTISE ON THIS PAGE OR IN "'.HE MAN FRONT PAGES OF THE MON'lROSE VOICE. CAl.L 52Q-8490 'Wffl<DA VS 1QAM.5 30PM .(;, 529-1414 ADULT VIDEO RENTAL 522.4495 - AU MALI - VIDEO MAOft,._S - 1LANt TAI'£$ AN> A.CC!SSOfUlS - DfJ.IVIMD IN MONTROSE AND ...... O<H>ING AlllAS - l"tCK·l..I' I DlltOP'-OFF Ar: DiVIP-JOlflt u ·-- ... VlSA ' MC I AICX PROVIOING A SERVICE? Keep It hsted here In tile Montr05e Voice where t~terally thOUsar'lds turn each week --V01CE ADVERTISING WORKS - - Advertise your professional servtce tnrough a Voice Classified Call 5~8490 ~=~ ~=~ ~.~~~9~1~r lA~;e':C::~ visa or Carte Blanche STEFFECK ADVERTISING 9~3333 (See our display ad on tne front aectoon ot the Voice) AUTO SALES. LEASING ASCOT LEASING. LTD. t303 Upland 973-0070 (See our display ad on the lront secliOn of tne Voice) r.t•1111;tutm1 _____ _ ALL PAINT & BODY SHOP 1510 Leeland. 65~3131 (See our display ~In tne front section of tile voice) TAFT AUTOMOTIVE '41' Tall. 522-2190 (See our display ad on the front section of t"e Voice) PISTONS UP 1901 Taft 52&-1901 (See our display ad in the lrOf't section of t~c Voice) Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Ma1or M·nor Repairs Gas or D1ese• Electncal Reparr 526-3723 2110 Fa1rv.ew Gay Owned & Operated CHIROPRACTIC CARE ROBERTS CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC 1305 Waugh 521·2003 (See our display ad on lhe ••oN section or the Voice) CLEANING. JANITORIAL SERVICE PLUS 52&-6245 (See our d splay ad o~ the Iron• Sect On Of ll'e V~oce) Becks Cleaning Service Specrabz ng,,, B•r$ Prof.UIO#'t_, SIHVIC• Hon.at Rates We Care How You Look 528-9427 (8am-11am) COMPUTER-RELA TEO -- -- DIMENSIONS IN SCANNING - 1820 Heights Blvd 864-7845 (See our display ed "' the front •ectoon or the Voocel !Bnml\iHHIH ------ PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOTHERAPY ASSOC. 4622 Walker 926-2182 (See our display ad on the front section of the Vooce) HG PUNT CO 2600 Houston Av 862·1213 (See our dis­play ad n the front sect on o• the Voice) !Bml\11;1111111m1 ____ _ WILMARK CONSTRUCTION co. We do remodeling, room additions. minor plumbing, electrical. No job too small or too large. 521-1377 RONPETERS. 0 .0.S. EXAM, X-RAYS. CLEANING $25 523-2211 Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westheimer Houston, TX noo;; Monday thru Saturday Hours by Appomrmenr (713) 524 -0538 FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch. 52&-3851 rB----- FITNESS EXCHANGE 2900 Richmond 524-9932 'See our d••· play ad on the front section or the Voice) HAIR LOSS SERVICES - - - - MPB CLINIC 5401 Oas~woo<I # 10, 661-2321 (See our display ad on the front section of the Voice) RON'S HAIR STUDIO 1310 H-lhom
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