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Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985
File 017
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Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985 - File 017. 1985-10-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4727/show/4718.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1985-10-04). Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985 - File 017. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4727/show/4718

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985 - File 017, 1985-10-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4727/show/4718.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date October 4, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript 16 MONTROSE VOICE / OCTOBER 4, 1985 Glenn Close and Mandy Pantinkin in "Maxie" Glenn Close and Jeff Bridges in "Jagged Edge" Films Glenn Close Shines in Two Mediocre Films By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic If you are a fan of actress Glenn Close, then you should be thrilled with the movie openings this week. A talented Tony, Obie, and Emmy nominee as well as a triple Oscar nominee, Close appears in not one but two new films in roles that are very different than in past films like World According to Garp and The Big Chill. First there is Maxie, a light-hearted, romantic comedy about the ghost of a flapper from the twenties. Close plays two roles in this one: Maxie the outrageously wild spirit, and Jan whose prim and proper body Maxi takes over. This is a lively but predictable tale, but Close has the time of her life as the hootch-drinking, mad-cap "Maxie." There is a distinct downshift in tone to The Jagged Edge, a dramatic thriller co- starring Jeff Bridges as a man accused of killing his wife and the maid. Close is called in to defend him, and ends up romantically involved while still questioning his innocence. The film's courtroom scenes are absorbing and revealing, but the bulk of the movie is undemanding and predictable. □ Maxie Whimsical little films like Maxie rarely see big-screen distribution anymore since TV movies seem to have taken over that realm in recent years. Still, if they can get a few big names to star (like Sally Fields and James Caan in Kiss Me Goodbye), then it is apparently worth the effort to make. This time they persuaded Glenn Close, Mandy Patinkin and Ruth Gordon to star in a film vehicle that seems as ancient as the Model T, but it's a cute attempt anyway. First I have to admit that unless I really like the star, romantic comedies are one of my least favorite films. They usually involve misunderstood love, infidelity, and often spirits/ghosts that are mingled into a simple, fluffy storyline. Maxie contains all the above minimum requirements. We get our first taste of a spirit (Maxie) when Jan and her husband Nick strip the wallpaper in their old home and find this message on the original wall: "Maxie Malone lived here, March 3,1927. Read it and weep." They find out from their landlady (Ruth Gordon) that Maxie was an actress who wrote that on the night she left for her big Hollywood screen test—the same night she drove into a tree and died. Husband Nick is enthralled and rents Maxie's only film (a bit part in "Flapper Melodies"). Suddenly he hears a disembodied voice say, "I was good, wasn't I?". Thinking that he is drunk, Nick heads upstairs and finds his wife (?) in an uncommonly lustful mood. Later when she buys a very flimsy dress for a librarian social, Nick realizes that Jan is not acting like Jan used to act. His suspicions are confirmed when Jan (Maxie) starts guzzling drinks at the social and does a vampy "Bye, Bye Blackbird" that has them yelling for more. Of course, the next day Jan has a severe hangover, the victim of Maxie's uninhibited habitation of her body. The major "misunderstood love" conflict comes when Nick tries to stay faithful to Jan when Maxie pops into her body. He loves Jan, but he sure has a hard time resisting this rowdy woman who loves to have a good time. In the end, he finds himself helping Maxie become the star that she always wanted to be. Will Maxie become a star (in a remake of Cleopatra, God help us) and let Jan fade way, or will true love and marriage conquer in the end. You can probably guess. Maxie is fun, but it's not spirited enough to soar above the mediocrity of the script. Mandy Patinkin (Yentl) is appropriately gentle and confused as the husband, and Ruth Gordon (Harold and Maude) is her usual bubbling self in this final role (although her character disappears abruptly way too soon). Only Glenn Glose breaks away from her usual staid image to make Maxie a delightfully wacky flapper. It's a lot of fun to watch her cavort around after so many roles where she was just warm and glowing. It's just a shame that they couldn't find a more exciting film to wrap around her and the others. □ Jagged Edge This dramatic thriller has all the ingredients for success in popular filmmaking: top stars, a romance, a ritual killing, and even a feuding court battle. All that it lacks is that essential called suspense. Alfred Hitchcock knew how to use it when he manipulated his audiences, but the makers of Jagged Edge merely take you for a ride. The film opens with the ritual murder of heiress Page Forrester and the house maid. Page is found tied to the bed and stabbed repeatedly, with only her husband's fingerprints on the premises. Husband Jack (knocked unconcious) is the publisher of the city's newspaper, and he stands to inherit everything from the wife's family fortune. He is a cool, sharp man with shifty eyes, and we are not sure if he is capable of murder or not. Enter Teddy Barnes (Glenn Close) who reluctantly defends Jack although she severely dislikes the district attorney. He was a former partner who withheld information about a client's innocence, and the convicted man later hung himself in prison. Then the courtroom battle begins, the two go after each other like cutthroats. Witnesses are made to doubt their testimony, objections ring out on every question, and plenty of dirty laundry is displayed on both sides. Strangely enough, the film never manages to build up any suspense or intrigue. We occasionally wonder if Jack is guilty or not, but we really aren't given too many reasons to think that he might be innocent. There is only one other possible suspect (a gigolo type) and all the rest of the evidence points right at Jack. It doesn't help when he starts to act romantically towards Teddy, which makes him seem more suspicious and rakish. Whatever the outcome of the trial, we know that the killer is probably going to come after Teddy in the end. Since the killer had a mask on in the initial killing, it will make a wonderful "unveiling" of the real killer after he is captured. {Of course he'll be caught!) Maybe we've all seen too many TV shows with a similar plotline, but the trail that Jagged Edge takes seems all too predictable. Movies like this often please the general moviegoer, but too bad they didn't try for something a little more challenging here. Director Richard Marquand (Returnofthe Jedi) did much better with his last thriller, Eye of the Needle, a few years back, so we know he has the talent. What is missing is a taut script with suspense and surprise, something that Hollywood seems to be lacking lately. Glenn Close and her co-stars Peter Coyote, Robert Loggia, and John Dehner do their best to make this a class project. The main problem character is played by Jeff Bridges who is also a triple Oscar nominee. Jack is such a cold, mechanical person that we really don't care if he is the murderer or not, and we surely don't care about the romance that he starts with Teddy. Jagged Edge would have made a great "Movie of the Week," similar to the Mean Season earlier this year. It's too bad that after four big movies, Glenn Close should hit a midstride slump with this film and the featherweight Maxie. She said that she wanted to change her image and range from the soft, pure image of her past films. These two films show that she does have range, but she needs to be a little more careful when picking her scripts. HOSPITAL INSURANCE MAJOR MEDICAL Ages 19-34-M5.30 35-49- 50.84 50-64- 70.01 Monthly Bank Draft Insurance Office 523-9822 Group Rates Individual Issue Q^ak(^fyA "...In Ihe heart ol The City" $44.00 (large single/double occupancy) • F_E AIRPORT SHUTTLE ■ COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE & WINE ■ COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST • VALIT SERVICE Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Reservations required please call Toll Free 800-253-5263 (National) 800-521-4523 (Calif) (415)-441-5141 (San Francisco) 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109
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