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Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985
File 009
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Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985 - File 009. 1985-10-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4727/show/4710.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1985-10-04). Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4727/show/4710

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985 - File 009, 1985-10-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4727/show/4710.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date October 4, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript 8 MONTROSE VOICE / OCTOBER 4, 1985 Gaping Hole in AIDS Defense Line from page 1 example, Abrams tells of a health-care worker who stuck himself with a needle from a patient who had both AIDS and hepatitis. "He got hepatitis but he hasn't contracted AIDS. Moreover, his AIDS antibody test never turned positive," something experts say happens within eight to 12 weeks after becoming infected with the virus. If knowing these and other facts is our best defense against AIDS, why has no agency assumed responsibility for coordinating a carefully planned and executed campaign to educate all segments of society? Perhaps it is because AIDS encompasses subjects that still make many of us uncomfortable. Sexuality, death, and dying, says Holly Smith of the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, are three of the most sensitive and difficult subjects for people to confront. Perhaps, as Dr. Conant suggests, it is also because editors refused to heed what their reporters were telling them. "I know for a fact that a lot of reporters were on top of this story from the beginning. ... But a lot of editors pushed it aside, either because they thought it was a 'gay disease' or because they didn't think one should discuss topics such as anal intercourse in a family newspaper or on television. But the biggest stumbling block has been the failure of government at all levels to deal head-on with educating the public about the AIDS epidemic. Only about four percent of the federal government's 1985 AIDS budget of nearly $100 million targets public education— nowhere near adequate to the task, as the government's own Office of Technology Assessment itself has concluded. Dr. Harold Jaffe of the Centers for Disease Control agrees that education right now represents the only weapon we have against AIDS, and that more money is necessary—money he anticipated would be forthcoming with the backing of Secretary of Health and Human Services Margaret Heckler. (However, Heckler resigned her position as head of HHS this past week.) For some the infusion of dollars will come late. Ryan White, the Kokomo, Indiana, youngster who is battling AIDS and his local school board, is perhaps the most visible victim of public fear. But countless AIDS victims have already been isolated from mainstream society. Many have died, isolated even from their family and friends. To date, efforts to reduce public fears through education have been catch-as- catch-can. Nor does the public appear to be reassured by those official pronouncements that have been made, even those of AIDS researchers. Children with AIDS are being cast out by society Some experts believe the problem involves the way doctors and scientists talk about AIDS; their choice of terms, some say, frequently heightens rather than allays public fears. Every time they say there doesn't "appear" to be any evidence that AIDS can be casually transmitted, or that "under most circumstances" children aren't at risk if they attend school with an AIDS victim, what the public hears is "appears" and "under most circumstances." Those aren't the strongest of terms, explains Dr. Jay Winsten, director of the Office of Health Policy Information at the Harvard School of Public Health. Says Conant, "There are very few things in medicine that are 100%, and the words we use reflect that fact. In the case of AIDS, we use words like 'appears' and 'based on the available evidence' not because there is a lack of evidence but because we are behaving as responsible scientists." There will, of course, never be guarantees that what is fact today won't become discarded theory or a fallacy tomorrow. And there will always be some people who will refuse to be reassured. Nevertheless, as Conant believes, the only thing to do is to mount an effective educational effort. "Whether or not we stem the rising tide of fear will depend to a large extent on whether we make this effort a top priority, not just in words but in actions." Stein & Toklas DETECTIVES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real- life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6.95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail. Here is $7.50 for Murder is Murder is Murder, by Samuel Steward. _ address. city . Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 BURGER SPECIALS Steakburger—*1.49 Cheeseburger—s1.69 Bacon Cheeseburqer— '1.99 Californian Wins Judgement Against Falwell A Sacramento, Calif., court has ruled that Rev. Jerry Falwell must pay a former college classmate $5000 as a result of a promise he made last year. On Sept. 25, Sacramento Municipal Court Judge Michael S. Ullman awarded the Rev. Jerry Sloan $5000 as a result of a lawsuit he filed against Falwell when Falwell refused to fulfill a promise of a "contract" he made with Sloan. The basis of the lawsuit was a confrontation between Falwell and Sloan on a live Sacramento television talk show on KCRA TV. On the July 13,1984, show, Sloan asked Falwell about some remarks he made on his "Old Time Gospel Hour" broadcast concerning the Metropolitan Community Church. In his broadcast, Falwell said the church was "A brute beast ... A vile and Satanic system" ... which would "one day be utterly annihilated and there would be a celebration in heaven!" The Metropolitan Community Church is a Christian church which ministers to the gay and lesbian community. Approximately 85% of its membership is gay. Falwell vigorously denied the statements on the KCRA program, saying it was an "absolute lie!" Sloan countered by saying he possessed a tape of Falwell making the statements. Falwell continued to deny the statements, saying that such a tape didn't exist. He then challenged Sloan to produce the tape, saying he would give Sloan $5000 to produce the tape. Within a week, Sloan took two tapes to KCRA. One was a tape which Sloan made of the "Old Time Gospel Hour" and the other tape was a tape produced by Falwell's own organization, which Sloan obtained by sending $4 to Falwell's Lynchburg, Va., address. Sloan then had his attorney, Rosemary Metrailer, write to Falwell asking for the money. Falwell refused to do so. When Falwell came to Sacramento on September 30, 1984, as part of a fundraising tour, Sloan filed his suit and met Falwell with a subpoena as the television evangelist's private jet landed at the Sacramento airport. Judge Ullmlan heard the evidence of the case on Sept. 13, 1985, and handed down his decision on Sept. 24, awarding Sloan the $5000 plus court costs and 7% interest from July 18, 1984. In his seven page opinion, Ullman stated, "The defendant (Falwell) offered $5000 to the plaintiff (Sloan) if he could produce a tape; the plaintiff tendered the tape almost immediately, binding the plaintiff to his unilateral contract." Sloan said, "I am elated at receiving a favorable judgement. This is the very first time Jerry Falwell has been held accountable in a court oflaw for what he has said. He tried to squirm out of being responsible for his vicious attack on the Metropolitan Community Church, but now a judge has said he did indeed make the statement and now he must pay for trying to deny it." Sloan is a former pastor of several Metropolitan Community churches and is now president of the Lambda Community Fund, a charitable organization which is in the process of opening a gay and lesbian community center in Sacramento. Sloan and Falwell were schoolmates in the 1950s when they both attended Baptist Bible College in Springfield, Mo.
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