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Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985
File 007
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Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985 - File 007. 1985-10-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4727/show/4708.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1985-10-04). Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985 - File 007. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4727/show/4708

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985 - File 007, 1985-10-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4727/show/4708.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date October 4, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript 6 MONTROSE VOICE/OCTOBER 4, 1985 Hudson's Death Sets Off New Round of Attention from page 1 sexual lifestyle that was openly known in Hollywood. He was married to Phyllis Gates in the fifties for three years, but it was mainly a publicity stunt to help increase the masculine image that the studio wanted. Gossip magazines hinted at several male romances and even all-male parties (some in Houston), but the public image as a straight, macho movie star persisted until the AIDS revelation. In the end, one of his greatest contribui- tions to society may have been breaking the stereotypical image that the general public has of the homosexual male. The actor will best be remembered by his legion of fans for his 63 films and numerous television series made over the last 40 years. Rock Hudson (born Roy Schere in 1925) made his film debut in Fighter Squadron (1984) and made dozens of "tough" films like Sea Devils, Iron Man, and Gun Fury during the early fifties. Fame came with the success of Magnificent Obsession (1954) and the Best Actor nomination for Giant in 1956. The early sixties found Hudson in hugely successful romantic comedies with Doris Day like PillowTalk and Send Me Rock Hudson as he appeared "Embryo" (Carl Rentz photo) No flowers. However, films that he made later in the decade like Seconds, Ice Sta tion Zebra and Darling Lili only met with mediocre response. As Heckler Leaves HHS, Does Work Against AIDS Go With Her? By Linda Wyche On August 30 of this year, the Houston KS/AIDS Foundation submitted a proposal to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for a $225,000 education grant. The grants were to be awarded on Sept. 30. When foundation administrative director Gary Beauregard telephoned a government official to inquire as to the status of the grant, he was told that it had been put on hold—postponed. On October 1, Margaret Heckler, secretary of HHS and the administrator who termed AIDS "the nation's number one health priority," was relieved of her duties and reassigned as Ambassador to Ireland. Heckler's removal from HHS has been rumored for some time. She was never viewed as being a part of President Reagan's inner-circle and many believe that her lack of experience in the executive branch of government limited her ability to manage the department which carries the nation's largest budget, this year in excess of $300 billion. This most recent move seems to have been spurned by White House chief of staff Donald Regan and other key Reagan advisors. Will Heckler's removal have an effect on the fight against Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome? One reason for administration displeasure with Heckler was her differences with conservatives in the White House. Although she cooperated with the administration in budget issues, even greatly limiting HHS spending, she was known to be cognizant of the needs of the poor and disadvantaged. While many viewed AIDS as the "gay plague," she listed it atop the Drug Addiction Topic for Meeting Lynn Waldman, a substance abuse counselor, will speak on drug addiction and alcoholism in the gay community at the next meeting of The Houston Gay Health Advocates. The meeting will be held Saturday, October 5 at 7:30 at the Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett, Suite 201. For more information, contact Steve Burton. 7-90-9448 department's agenda. The budget for fiscal year 1986 allows for $189.7 million for work against AIDS. According to Michael Wilson, president emeritus of the Houston KS/AIDS Foundation, Heckler's removal "puts everything in limbo." Wilson says, "There will be pressure from the Right not to fund anthing related to AIDS. Nobody—not NIH or CDC are going to make a move. Heckler may be a fallen victim." On Sept. 30, just prior to Heckler's ouster, the United States Public Health Service revealed a three-goal plan that predicted, "It is unlikely that a vaccine or therapy to substantially limit transmission (of AIDS) will be generally available before 1990." Heckler had earlier predicted that such a vaccine could possibly be available in two years. The future of government funding to fight AIDS rests heavily on the shoulders of Heckler's successor. John A. Svanh, a White House advisor who left HHS after a year of working as Heckler's undersecretary, is considered a leading candidate for the post. Another former HHS undersecretary, David B. Swoap, now head of the California welfare program, and Pennsylvania Gov. Richard Thornburgh are also being considered for the post. Although viewed by many as controversial, Svanh appears to be the most likely candidate. Svanh is a Reagan ally and popular among conservatives. The new appointee faces Congressional approval. Heckler has not always been viewed as responsive to the need for a grand-scale government AIDS fight. In 1984, differences between her and Dr. James O. Mason, acting assistant secretary for Health, were highly publicized. According to Wilson, although terming the disease the number one health priority, Heckler "did not back it up." Wilson adds that Heckler "did not understand the potential of the problem." It has only been within the last year that Heckler has been swayed by the advice of researchers and pushed for increased spending. With Margaret Heckler off to Ireland, action against AIDS, has been "put on hold." However, over 13,000 Americans have been diagnoaed with the dieease: ai: estimated 500,000 to one million are believed infected by the virus, and the total may be climbing by 1000 to 2000 per day. When his feature film career slipped in the seventies with duds like Embryo and Avalanche, he turned to television. "McMillan and Wife" (1971-77) was a big hit series, and later mini-series like "Wheels" and "The Martian Chronicles" helped bring him back into the public eye. Although his "Devlin Connection" series failed in 1982, he made a big splash on the "Dynasty" series and made a thriller with Robert Mitchum called The Ambassador set in the Middle East. That was to be his last film, and it received limited distribution. While Hollywood was truly concerned with Hudson's recent plight with AIDS, there was also some disgust registered by actresses who had worked with him that he hadn't revealed his disease sooner. The fear of spreading AIDS has caused panic about intimate contact with known homosexuals on Hollywood sets, creating what could be another form of blacklisting of gays. The impact of a celebrity like Hudson getting AIDS certainly spotlighted the issue, hut his death pushes the issue into a realm of fear that could cause unneeded panic. With the passing of Rock Hudson, it is interesting to note that Hollywood did not shun him because of his sexual preference or his disease. Friends like Elizabeth Taylor, Doris Day, and even President Reagan sent him their best and Taylor even visited him in the hospital. When his memoirs come out soon, it will be interesting to see how much Hudson is willing to tell about his private affairs. Being of the "old school" of Hollywood, he might wish to keep his carefully crafted "manly" image intact. Then again, he may have decided to shatter the myths of the leading man forever with tales that will curl everyone's Wm WE RE READY WHEN YOU ARE CWhad 'ya waitin' for-?!!! OPEN 4PM DAILY and NOW SUNDAY NOON! HAPPY HOUR 4-7PM v/VITH $1 lA/ELL DRINKS AND 50CC DRAFT BEER ALL THE TIME! COMING UP: SUNDAY, OCT. Sth, JOIN US AND "LOVE-IN ... BE-IN ... VENTURE-IN ..." SHARING SPACE FROM THE BO's TO RIGHT NOW! AND REALLY COMING UP: SUNDAY, OCT. 27th. V-N PRESENTS "THE NINTH ANNUAL FREAKER'S BALL" (number 9. number 9 ...) YEA! PARTY! WE ARE ONE! 2933 MAIN • HOUSTON
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