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Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985
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Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985 - File 001. 1985-10-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 17, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4727/show/4702.

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(1985-10-04). Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4727/show/4702

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985 - File 001, 1985-10-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 17, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4727/show/4702.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 258, October 4, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date October 4, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Montrose Voice "The Newspaper of Montrose" October 4, 1985 Issue 258 Published Every Friday (713) 529-8490 - - ------ - --- Death of Actor Rock Hudson Generates New Attention to the AIDS Crisis o Cathy Lenahan: New Softball Official Cathy Lenahan, a player in the Hous­ton Woml'n's Softball League, has ht-en elected to serve as the first com­missioner of the newly-formed Women's Softball Division of the North American Gay Amateur Athletic Alliance. The election was held in Milwau­kee, Wis., at the alliance's fall meet­ing which took place prior to the Gay Softball World Series. By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Vou·e Film Critic Actor Rock Hudson died in his sleep on Wednei;day at 9:00 a.m. in his home in Beverly Hills. The 59-year-old Hudson had received a tremendous amount of press since it was revealed in July that he was suffering from AIDS. While many were shocked when he revealed his disease two months ago, his name soon became closely linked with the plight of AIDS victims and the lack of funds for research. At a recent Hollywood benefit that raised $1,000,000 towards research, a Jetter from Hudson stated that he hoped that his "misfortune has had some positive worth." The actor later donated $250,000 to the American Foun· dation for AIDS research and requested that any material donationR be made to that organization Gaping Hole in Line of Defense Against AIDS By Barry Vinocur Pacific News Sert icf' Sperial to th•• M"ntrose Voire Bl'hind the fear gripping the nation over Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a gapmg holl' in our only real line of def .. nse against th<' df'adly diseaRe: pub­lic edu<·ation. Whnt is needed, Ray experts like Cali for· nia's AIDS Ta8k Force chairman Dr. Mar­CUR Conant, is a full-scale Madison Av en ue-ty pe effort lo tell the public the facts as we now know them. Thes" facts include: • A massive effort to track the transmis­sion of AII>S has failed lo turn up any evidence that the disease can be transmit-ted cusuallv. • AIDS i; not only not an easy virus to catch, like the cold or flu, we know how it is tranRmitted . "This is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. It rnn also be trans· mitted by contaminat(•d blood products or by Hhanng needles," says San FranClsco General Hospital AIDS rt.>Searcher Dr. Donnld AbramR. • The virus has been found in tear• and saliva, but "there is thus far no evidence sug­gesting that in nearly 13.000 ca•es of the dis1•ase, the route of transmission has hffn via these fluids, .. Abrams llB•erts. • That the disea.e is not f'nsily tran•mitted is borne out by numerous case reports. For continued page R Haughton Wants State to Give Him Quarantine Rights After a nearlv 24·hour search for a male prostitute wh.o said he would continue to have sex although he has been diagnosed with A[J)S, Houston Health Director Dr. James Haughton says AIDS ought to be a quarantinable disease. Fabian Bridges, 30, was admitted to the psychiatric unit of Ben Taub Hospital on Wednesday after police threatened to arrest him on a Class C misdemeanor charge for urinating in a public park. The self-admitted male prostitute had been under 24·hour surveillance by Houston police after it was learned that he could not hi' trusted to keep his promise not to practic!' his trade. BridgeR cam<' to Houston from Cleve­land, Ohio. Haughton said he was in formed of the presence of Bridges by a report!'r from Cl!'veland who had been keeping tabs on the AIDS victim as he travell'd from city to city. Officials in Min· neapolii; had given Bridges a one-way bus ticket to Clevl'iand after he ran afoul of the law thl'fc. A television film crew has been followinl{ Bridge,; while he's bern in Hous· ton. Haughton hopes at th1• next meeting of the St11te Board of Health that AIDS will be added to the list of quarantinable dis· eases. Currently AIDS is only on the list of reportable diseases. Listing AIDS as qua­rantinable would give Haughton the pow!'r to quarantine victims ifhe thought they were spreading the virus. According to Haughton, the need to qua­rantine AIDS victims became a reality when Bridges told a doctor at Ben Taub Hospital that he would continue to prac­tice as a prostitute. Haughton sought help from the State Health Department in seek· ing a method to stop Bridges. Haughton was told by the department that he could not quarantine the man because the condi­tion was not well known when the list of quarantinable diseases was made. Haughton believes health directors should be given the power to quarantine AIDS victims who recklessly spread the virus. Haughton says part of the problem is in identifying the other men who came in contact with Bridges, "because by his own admission most of this contact has been in arcad1•s that city council took some action about rcc·cntly, where part of the gestalt is anonymous sex. So I'm not even 'ure if he knows all the pl'Ople he has been with." Bridges may remain at Ben Taub as long as he wishe.s since he is considered to have "voluntarily admitted" himself. The once stalwart, 6' 4" actor had shown signb of the ravaging disease over the last year when he appeared on "Dynasty" and later at a press conference with Doris Day. After receiving treatment in a Paris hospi­tal using experimental drugs, he returned to a Los Angeles hospital until five weeks ago when he decided to go back to his home. His long-time companion Tom Clark wai; at his i;ide when he died, and the body was cremated the same day. Death was attributed to AIDS-related com­plications. with no specific cause menti­oned. Hud•on was a private celebrity who kept to him•elf, never revealing his homo-continued page 6 Political Novice Enters Race for District C Seat By Linda Wyche Montrose Voice Managing Editor Carl Denton feels that his "deep love for the city of Houston" outweighs the impor­tance of political experience and has filed to challenge City Councilman George Greanias for the District C City Council position. Denton, 27, is a video news technician who lives in Montrose and is openly gay. His only political experience comes from when he lived in San Francisco and worked as a volunteer on the John Ander­son preHidential campaign staff there. He says he is motivated to enter political life becaus~ of "a concern for the rights of all citizens." He also feels that Greanias' recent position in the city budget debate poses manv questions that need to be addressed. "I am baffled by a few thmgs-the budget, flood control, and city services fa). ling apart all around us," he •aid in a recent interview. Denton is also critical of some of Grea­nias' actions including proposing "last minute amendments to the budget." Den­ton feels that these amendment.~ came forth solely for political reasons. "Grea­nias proposes to freeze all city salaries. That's going to do a lot for the morale of city workers ... he said sarcastically. The 27-year-old Denton emphasizes that the city needs to find more creative means of finding revenue 'ources. "You can"t keep raising property taxes and sales taxes. Other sources must be found ... As a Montroi;ian, Denton hopes to bring to the attention of council certain prob­lems hke police harrassment. He ,aid, "When policemen and state agents can enter a bar and just pick out people to take outside, that is harassment of the citizens of Houston. That should be addressed by council." He adds, "Cops should be made to understand that thi~ is our neighbor· hood, not their's." An impro' ement m city sen;a;s in Dis· tnct C is also a part ofDenton's platform. He would hkc to see more streets repaved and better street lighting. Denton does not feel that he ";n ";n the election this time around. He said, "I don't expect to win. I would consider it a miracle thb time around." Although he was the only candidate in the November elections to seek the endor­sement of the Houston Gay Political Cau continued page 3 o Carl Denton: Seeking Greanias' Seat 2 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 4, 1985 pRoudly PRESENTS TltE 41lt ANNUAi MR. GAy HARRis CouNl}' PAGEANT 1ltis TltuRsdAy, Oc1. 101lt OVER $600 iN CAslt AwARds ANd PRizEs $JOO 6 MEdAllioN TO WiNNER $200 6 MEdAllioN To 1 sT RuNNER-up $100 6 MEdAllioN 10 2Nd RuNNER-up A PRdiMiNARY TO MR. TEXAS CONTEST Tltis is A. Body CoNTEST ••• NOT A. T A.lENT Sltow CATEGORiu INcludt:: • STAGE INTERViEw • SpoRTSWUR OR Cuud • FANTASY • SwiMWUR . Ask YouR hvoRiTE BAR to SpoNSOR You! A po1nio-. of tin doo11 will GO 10 1lt£ Tut.u HuMAN RiGltJS FouNdAtioN (21.06 Sup11EMl Cou111 Appul fuNdj. CAll club foR duAib ••• HoustoN's Vidt:o DANCE Club foR Tiu MEN of TEXAS PAcific At GRANT ~21 -9121 Montrose Voice MONTROSE. TEXAS Popu1111on (est 1985) 3~ 000 Cen1u11r1ct1 401 01, 401 02. 40201. •02 02 ">:;02, - •nd .t()4 01 Ztp Codes (roughfyl 70006. 77019 fPort•on) 77098 Bounded croughly) Shepherd Or iWMI), Allen Patkwey (north), Main St (eHtJ, u S 59 (south) L1t1tude (Montre>l'e Blvd at Westheimer Ad) 29•44·13· N Longitude 95• 22·5fJ"W. Alhtude 40' ELECTED OFFICIALS FOR MONTROSE O.Orge GrHnlH. Hou.ton City Counctl (d11t Cl 901 B•pby (113) 222·61133 El Fr•nco l•. Harris Coun1y Commissioner (pct I) 1001 Preston. f113J ?21-611' Walter Rankin, Constable (pct ') JOI S.n Jacmto. 11'3} 221 ·5200 Debra Oanburg Te .. u House ol Aepresentat1v• (d111 137) 1911 SW Fwy 1113J 520-8068 Cr••o w .. htnQton Texu Senete- ld1st 13) 2323 Caroli,,._ {7131669-4343 MitkPf Lel.nd US Hout• ol R@r~tat•v• {d st 18) rgre Smith •820. 17'3J 73»-1339 The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 258th ISSUE. OCT 4. 1985 Published every Friday Montrose Voice Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 CIRCULATION 9.000 coJ)1es weekly lhrough 150 m11or d11tnbut1on Points in Montrose. lhe Village end the Heights Ht1m11ted pau-on r1t• factor 2 8 Ht1meted readef3h1p 25. 200 weekly plus 1,000 copies weekly through 45 other Teus d1Stnbut1on pomts tsl1mtt«1 PHl·on r•tt l1ctor 2 S Ht1mtted rtaderJh1p 2.500 weekly TOTAL CIRCULATION (GUARANTEED) 10.000 copies weekly tot•l tst1m1t•d rtadersh1p 21.700 weekly Contents copyright e1985 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg t>ublratier·ed•tor Linda Wyche managmg editor Roger Lackey ofl1ce man-oer Mark Blazek Ausrin corr.spandflt'lt S..:ott Cutsinger 8111 O'Aourke localcontributou Steve Warren n11t101111 correspandtmt Jerry Mulholland account t1tKut1ve Rick Hill Kcount .. ecut1ve Foundi"'J Members Greater Montrose Business Guild. Gay Ind lesbian Pr~N At10C11t•on Ntwl Services Nf'Wt·One. P1c1f1c Newt Service Synd1C•t«I fHtur• Strvlc•s & Writers Brian McNaught. Unt­¥ 9fHl Preta Syndteate. News America Syndicate POSTMASTER Send addrest correc;11ons to 408 Avondale, Houtton. TX 77006-3028 Sublc;r1pt1on rate ,,., US Jn nit.d envelope $49 per year (5~ "'"'") $29 per aut month• {26 lstuet). Of $1 25 per wMk (lesl lh~ 28 lslUH) Back •auet $200 NCh N1t1on1/ Mfvtrtl31ng r•prH•ntattve Joe 01S.t>1to, R1vfl'del Marhtlng. ee& 6th Avenue. Ntw York 10011. (212) 242-8863 Advertising deMtfme Tuelday 5 30pm. lor ttsue released Fri· day eventng Notice tOMlv9tl1JtrJ Loe.I edvert111ng rate schedule Seven· A was ett.chve °'I 12 1984 Respona1bil1ty Tne Moritroae Vote• does no1 esaume rHpon· 11bH1ty tor ed¥eftt11ng claims Readers t.hOuld alert the f'!ews· paper to any O«ept•v• adven1s1ng OCTOBER 4, 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 3 ~ ':':? ~ STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AIDS;KS DIAGNOSIS SAME-DAY APPOINTMENT OPEN MON FRI. 9-5 PM SAME DAY APf'OffffMENT MON., WED .. FRI. EVENINGS AND SATURDAY MORNINGS 2801 EllA BLVD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX 77<m (713) 868-4535 Southwest Funeral Directors Carl Denton Seeks Greanias' Seat 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas from paRI! 1 cus, Denton did not receive the nod from the caucus. He holds no hostility against the caucus for this action and concedes that he did not follow the screening proce· dure. "That was no one's fault but my own," he admits candidly. He feels that the GPC was wise in not endorsing any candidates. In a time when it is normal for even candidates for municipal offices to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars, Denton admits to running a "shoestring" cam­paign. BecauHe he does not have the name recognition or means to raise the neces­sary large sums of money, he plans to pro­mote himself by helping others. He hopes to organize fundraisers for community charitieH, such as the KS /AIDS Founds· tion and use these activities as a way of getting his message to the public. "I will receive name recognition for down the road and benefit gay services. This is something I beat myself over the head about all the time. How can I get more money for these people?" Denton's message to the gay commun­ity is, "I will never stab you in the back." He makes that statement in reference to the politicians he feels have ignored the .3._ aflemorials Billy D.ean Ingram Billy Dean Ingram of 309 Stratford Sept. 28 in his home. Ed Martinez Ed Martinez freelance photographer and writer, died on Sept. 21 in New Orleans A native of New Orleans, Martinez had lived in the Montrose area for several years He had been active in several organizations includ­ing the Gay Political Caucus. He was a reg­ular contributor to several publications including the Montrose Voice. He is sur­vived by two children. OUR POLICY: The Montrose Voice will com­memorate the passing of Montrose residents and Houston gay community members with a one or two paragraph announcement Friends or r~at1ves of the deceased may provide us with facts about the per­son ·s hfe. names of the closest survivors. and bunal arrangements Prose or -..erse can be included Pie· lures are appreciated and will be returned Name of the deceased should be attached to the photo. community this year. "Someone should have stuck their neck out. They're all going to win," he said with a giggle. Denton joins Straight Slater Charles Carter in trying to prevent Greanias from entering a third term on Houston City Council. Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily TIIE BEST LI'nlE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVAfE BATIIS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 lJRSl1LI NES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 4 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 4, 1985 Montrose Mouth Fall is in the Air By L'Angclo MiRterio!!o, Esq., M.B.E. Greet,ngs fellow residents of Montrose and other areas of Houston. Hasn·t the cool, clean. fall air been nice? Really makes you want to get outside. -o- Rumor has 1t that the bu1ld1ng that for­merly housed Beach·a is to be reincarnated as some type of guest house and a restau­rant. Quite noticeable 1s the recent 1nstalla­t1on of windows 1n the rear of the building And 1ust why was the neon sign above the outside bar turned on? Ghosts maybe? -a- TexH Art Supply ts having a 25% off sale on brushes and paints. So all you artists get down there and stock up -o- Mark Erwin, you are simply marvelous Your dancing was the highlight last Sunday night. -o- Just Marlon & Lynn"s said farewell to Fair­view with a party last Sunday night. The celebration included food and many high spinted partygoers Now it's on to their new location on Richmond o- On Wednesday, November 27. The Rip­cord will present the 1985 Prime Choice. This 1s a contest for men over 40. It will begin at 9pm sharp. Your hosts will be Maude. Mr. Ben Moore, and Rick Howard. Also featured will be Mr. Leather lnterna­t1onal 1985-Petflck Toner. Oh what a hot man, and what a hot event this will be' -a- Has anyone noticed how much trash, bot· ties and general filth has accumulated on the corner of Pac1f1c and Crocker It's dis­gusting Whoever 1s responsible for that area ought to clean 1t up It's not a dumping ground, you know• Everyone should be a little more conscientious of the litter prob­lems 1n Montrose. Maybe we should resur­rect the old values of the early 70's when everyone was ecology minded We're not pigs. you know -a- Vldeotrend. the latest addition to our busi­ness community, is really a wonderful and convenient pace to satisfy your video needs In add1t1on to movie rentals, they also have blank tape. and video player ren­tals They have in stock over 1300 tapes That inventory 1s soon to be expanded, especially in foreign films Newest releases include the recent The Breakfast Club. as well as the great cult film Polyester and Lust In the Dust starring the insatiable Divine. So stop 1n and see Henry and Alvin. -a While we're on the sub1ect of movies. Mary's presents another classic from the past starring those condescending camp queens, Bette Davis and Joan Crawford, Whatever Happened to Baby Jane. Watch those two battle 1t out next Tuesday night at 10pm on the patio at Mary's ••. naturally. -o- Naturally leather-now at Mary's. happy hour prices are extended all day and all night to men in black leather -o- D1d anyone notice the premonitory temperatures on the Liberty Bank clock last Saturday As the Mouth passed by, 1t went from 63° to 53° 1n less than two minutes Of course at that time It was still in the low 80's But as the temperatures actually dropped Sunday night, it seemed the clock must have been issuing a warning -a- Recently noticed an advert for something called "Eugenics" to be held at Numbers II on October 16 Don't know much about 11 except the poster said, "A design for the future " If anyone knows what it's all about. give us a call so we can pass it on to everyone -a- The Houston Guest House has begun its facelift. The rear deck and one of the pools is now gone The 1985 Oktoberfest. a benefit a1d1r.g the Montrose Clinic, KS/AIDS Foundation, Gay and Lesbian Switchboard and the Montrose Cllnlc will be held this Saturday, October 5, at the guest house Invitations have been mailed to nearly 700. All the staff wish to extend their thanks on choosing the guest house for this year's site Also at the guest house. Ef/c Puyo was seen eating pate at a Dynasty party How was 11 Enc? -o- The Mining Company's friendly daytime David recently threw a party He was the first to leave and ended up very close to Mother Nature Oh, dear. -o- The Mining Company has ·a new fall spe­cial. It's called Shooters and consists of a choice between five different drinks-B-52, Kamikaze, Pearl Diver, Russian Qualude, Melon Ball-served in a 10oz. glass for only $1 50. Quite a bargain in light of the recent increase in federal liquor taxes. And, seven days a week, they have schnapps and ama­retto for S 1 25. -o- Wayno Is back at Leather by Boots located in back of the Ripcord. Welcome back. -a- Heaven wlll be hosting the 4th Annual Mr. Gay Harris County, a preliminary to the Mr. Texas contest. All applicants can apply at ls 1t all too much for friendly daytime Dav1d'l Find out at the Mining Company weekdays. Gordon and John inspect the contructwn at Houston Guest House Happy Birthday Jeff Heaven for this coming Thursday's (Oct. 10) event. Call Johnny Mattox for further information at 522-1153. This will be a big event for Mont rose's newest popular nights­pot. And a portion of the proceeds will go to benefit the Texas Human Rights Founda· t1on, the group which 1s fighting to have Section 21 06 re-declared unconstitutional. Categories for judging will include an onstage interview, sportswear/ casual dress, swimwear, and talent/fantasy There promises to be lots of great looking men In all their finest Don't miss ii It could turn out to be the hottest thing to happen in Heaven, yet. o- And, so the Autumn sun slowly sets on the town we've all come to know and love­Montrose. Sparkle City. USA. The 611 's popular crowd on Sunday. Slurp 1t up. presents Fairyland A Halloween Costume Party Friday, October 251/J - 8 PM to Midnight Holiday bw - Medical Center Ballroom Grand Prize Drawing:* Emerson Complere VHS Porrable Video Recording System Fl·.irures AC/ DC Pon.ible Video Cassette Recorder, Player lJ Ir r.1 l.1ghr· \X1e1ght Kon 1c1 Color Video Camera Micro TV Tuner llcd1a rgc.1b!e 11.itre ry Patk Cash Prizes for Three Best Costumes / Cash Bar ADMISSION: $10.00 C.dl (ii)<). )))) or <i<i7-807\ For Ticket In fo rmation • M11rt h,• pre11:11t to u·111 Gr.ind Prize f1'£•c. />111.1tc C111crnl f>.irli11g .ind H11tr.i11c, . Security GuardJ on Duty 6701South 1\ l,u11 / Ure F.i1111i11 \tree/ I:11tra11ce OCTOBER 4, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 We're the Montrose Voice. We're the publication everybody is reading! This is because we're the publication that works hardest each week serving the community with professional news cover­age, mass distribution and the most fea­tures. For advertising information, call our ad sales department, 529-8490. We'll show you that Montrose Voice advertising real­Iv works. It's really effective. It will really bring you new customers- next week. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 4, 1985 Hudson's Death Sets Off New Round of Attention from pa/le 1 sexual lifestyle that was openly known in Hollywood. He was married to Phyllis Gates in the fifties for three years, but it was mainly a publicity stunt to help increase the masculine image that the stu­dio wanted. Gossip magazines hinted at several male romances and even all-male parties (some in Houston), but the public image as a straight, macho movie star per­sisted until the AIDS revelation. In the end, one of his greatestcontribui­tions to society may have been breaking the 'ltereotypical image that the general public has of the homosexual male. The actor will best be remembered by his legion of fans for his 63 films and nu mer· ous television series made over the last 40 year .. Rock Hudson {born Roy Schere in 1925) made his film debut in Fighter Squadron (1984) and made dozens of "tough" films like Sea Devils, Iron Man, and Gun Fury during the early fifties. Fame came with the success of Magnifi· cent Ob:;es:;ion (1954) and the Best Actor nomination for Giant in 1956. When hiH feature film career slipped in the seventies with duds like Embryo and Aualanrhe. he turned to television. "McMillan and Wife" (1971-77) was a big hit series, and later mini-series like "Wheels" and "The Martian Chronicles" helped bring him back into the public eye. Although his "Devlin Connection" series failed in 1982, he made a big splash on the "Dynasty" series and made a thriller with Robert Mitchum called The Ambassador set m the Middle East. That was to be his last film, and it received limited distribu· ti on. While Hollywood was truly concerned with Hudson's recent plight with AIDS, there was also some disgust registered by actressei; who had worked with him that he hadn't revealed his disease sooner. The fear of sprl'ading AIDS has caused panic about intimate contact with known homo­sexuals on Hollywood sets, creating what could be another form of blacklisting of gays. The impact of a celebrity like Hud­son getting AIDS certainly spotlighted the issue, but his death pushes the issue into a realm of ft>ar that could cause unneeded panic. The early sixties found Hudson in hugely successful romantic comedies with Dori.- Day like PillowTalk and Send Me Rock Hudson as he appeared in "Embryo" (Carl Rentz photo) With the passing of Rock Hudson, it is interesting to note that Hollywood did not shun him because of his sexual preference or his disease. Friends like Elizabeth Tay­lor, Doris Day. and even President Re_a\tan sent him their best and Taylor even v1s1ted him in the hospital. When his memoirs come out soon, it ..,,;n be interesting to see how much Hud11on is willing to tell about his private affairs. Being of the "old school" of Hollywood, he might wish to keep his carefully crafted "manly" i~age intact. Then again, he may have decided to 1;hatwr the myths of the leading man forever with tales that will curl everyone's ears. No flowerb. However, films that he made later in the decade like Seconds, Ice Sta-t1on Zebra and Darling Lili only met with mediocre response As Heckler Leaves HHS, Does Work Against AIDS Go With Her? By Linda Wyche On Augu."t 30 of this year, the Houston KS1 AIDS Foundation submitted a prop· osal to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for a $225,000 education grant The grants were to be awarded on Sept. 30. When foundation administrative dire<'· tor Gary Beauregard telephoned a govern­ment official to inquire as to the statu11 of the grant, he wa. told that it had been put on hold-postponed. On October l, Margaret Heckler, secre­tary of HHS and the administrator who termed AIDS "the nation's number one health priority," was relieved of her duties and reassigned a~ Ambassador to Ireland. Heckler's removal from HHS has been rumored for . ome time. She was never ~iewed as being a part of President Rea­gan's inner-circle and many believe that her lack of experience in the executive branch of government limited her ability to manage the department which carries the nation's largest budget, this year in excess of $300 billion. This most recent move oeems to have been spurned by White House chief of staff Donald Regan and other key Reagan advisors. Will Heckler's rt'moval have an effect on the fight against Acquired Immune Defi· ciency Syndrome? One reason for administration displea· sure with Heckler was her differences with conservative$ in the White House Although she cooperated with the admin­istration in budget issues, even greatly limiting HHS spending, she was known to be cognizant of the needs of the poor and disadvantaged. While many viewed AIDS as the "gay plague," she listed it atop the Drug Addiction Topic for Meeting department's agenda. The budget for fis­cal year 1986 allows for $189.7 million for work against AIDS. According to Michael Wilson, president emeritus of the Houston KS1 AlDS Foun· dation, Heckler's removal "puts every· thing in limbo." Wilson says, "There will be pressure from the Right not to fund anthing related to AIDS.· Nobody-not NIH or CDC are going to make a move. Heckler may be a fallen victim." On Sept. 30, just prior to Heckler's ous· ter, the United States Public Health Ser· vice revealed a three-goal plan that predicted, "It is unlikely that a vaccine or therapy to substantially limit transmis· sion {of AIDS) will be generally available before 1990." Heckler had earlier predicted that . uch a vaccine could possibly be available in two years. The future of government funding to fight AIDS rests heavily on the shoulders of Heckler's successor. John A. Svanh, a White House advisor who left HHS after a year of working as Heckler's undersecre­tary, is considered a leading candidate for the post. Another former HHS undersecre­tary, David B. Swoap, now head of the California welfare program, and Pennsyl­vania Gov. Richard Thornburgh are also being considered for the post. Although viewed by many as controver· sial, Svanh appeari; to be the most likely candidate. Svanh is a Reagan ally and popular among conservatives. The new appointee faces Congressional approval. Heckler haH not always been viewed as responsive to the need for a grand-seal!' government AIOS fight. In 1984, differen · ces betwef.'n her and Dr. James O. Mason, acting assistant secretary for Health, were highly publicized. According to Wil­son, although terming the disease the number one health priority, Heckler "did not back it up." Wilson adds that Heckler Lynn Waldman, a 011.1b~•«nce abuse coun· "did not understand the potential of the selor, will speak on drug addiction and problem " It has only been within the last alcoholism m the gay community at the year that ill'<·kler has been swayed bv the next meeting ofThe Houston Gay Health advice of re.searchers and pushed for Advocates. The meeung will be held Sat· increased spending. urday, October 6 at 7:30 at the Montrose With Margaret Heckler off to Ireland, Counseling Center, 900 Lovett, Suite 201 action against AIDS, has been "put on For more information, contact Steve hold " However, over 13,000 Americans RurU>n ~ ----~..!.... :di Qlled wi&h t estimated 500,000 to one million are believed infected by the virus, and the total may be climbing by 1000 to 2000 per day. WE'REREADY WHEN VDU ARE CWhad 'ya wa1tin' for?!ll OPEN 4PM DAILY and NOW SU NOA Y NOON! HAPPY HOUR 4-7PM WITH $1 WELL DRINKS ANO 50ct DRAFT BEER ALL THE TIME! COMING UP; SUNDAY OCT. 6th, .JOIN US ANO "LOVE-IN ... BE-IN . . VENTURE-IN . .. " SHARING SPACE FROM THE SO's TO RIGHT NOW! ANO REALLY COMING UP: SUNDAY, OCT. 27th, V-N PRESENTS "THE NINTH ANNUAL FREAK ER'S BALL" !number 9. number 9 .. .J YEA! PARTY! WE ARE ONE! 2923 MAIN e HOUSTON New Drug Stops Reproduction of AIDS Virus Scientists from the National Cancer Insti· tute say an experimental new drug, in a laboratory setting, stops the AIDS virus from reproducing. Dr. Hiroaki Mitsuya, one of the researchers developing the drug, also stated in a presentation before the Ameri· can Society of Microbiologists that he and his colleagues feel the drug can be given safely to AIDS victims. The drug, code­named compound S, appears to be less toxic in the test tube than other experi· mental AIDS medicines. The new drug alters the chemical pro­cess that the virus uses to copy itself inside white blood cells. Researchers caution that a great deal more work must be done before it can be determined that compound S will play a role in the treatment of AIDS. Lecturer Wigmore to Speak in Montrose Ann Wigmore, a teacher and lecturer, will speak on the "values ofliving food" in the fellowship hall of Bering Memorial Church, 1440 Harold, at6:30 p.m. on Tues· day, October 8. Wigmore will lecture on cleansing and detoxification, overcoming additions, colon hl'alth, and anti-aging and rejuve­nation. Born in Lithuania in 1909, Wigmore's philosophy is that if given the correct nourishment, the body will restore itself. She advises, "Let food be your medicine." The lecture is being donated by Wig· more for the group Aid for AIDS. The pub· lie is invited to attend. Parents FLAG Plan Convention Repre~entatives of Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (Parents-FLAG) groups from all over the country will meet in Atlanta, Ga, for their Fourth Annual Convention, October 25-28, at the Colony Square Hotel, Peachtree and 14th Streets. The theme for this year's convention is "How to" and eight workshops are planned covering a variety of subjects such as helping parents cope, coming out, dealing with AIDS, and involvin g the gay community. Dr. James Curran, from the Centers for Disease Control, will address the group at the plenary session on Sunday, October 27 at 10: 15 a.m. Also planned for Sunday is a banquet dinner, starting at 6:00 p.m., feat· uring speakers and entertainment. A registration fee of $8.'i covers all work· shops and convention materials, lun· cheons on Saturday and Sunday, coffee breaks, and the banquet on Sunday night. To attend only the banquet, the fee is $50 per person. Reservations may be made by contacting Parl'nts-FLAG, Box 55.1, Len· nox Hill Station, New York, NY 10021. exercise regu\ar\Y· If you are an avid fan of THE FAR SIDE cartoons, you'll have to have Gary Larson's newest collection ... And if you missed his first best seller, you'd better be sure you have ... • :,"'11' ~-:s I' ' f<'[;. ' )It !'", ; - S3~5 Order now if you I love humor that f starts from and • remains firmly 1 -fo-o-t-e-d- in- -le-f-t -fie-l-d!- !- Please send me: __ copies of The Far Side at $3.95 each. __ copies of Beyond The Far Side at $3.95 each. Total amount enclosed anctude s1 for postage and handling per book ordered.J Ma11 to Far Side Books. clo MOntrose ~ice 4400 Jollnson Olive, Fairway KS 66205 iMake checkS payable to univ~ Press Syndicatel 0 Ct._.i. 0 M•"•Y 0.Hr Q VISA 0 ~cnl•rCouf ... ... --------- AddtHI --------- c •• , ---------- St•t• ----l•P---- EKpr Dot• Looking for LEGAL SERVICES? Looking for a FUNERAL DIRECTOR? Look in the Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory m ei•ery ••sue of the Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE OCTOBER 4, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 -presents- The confuaed cop and Sister Mary Boom Boom. The mardera of Harvey Milk and the Mayor of San Francisco. The candlelight procuslon. The trial of Dan White. The ''Twinkle" defenae. The 7-year sentence, The White Night Riots. ~\~/~ ~ .. , 7,,1 ~ ~t I 'I ,,:.~I~ ~\I/~ ~''' .__ ___ ___::::::::::===--=---~r~i" ~1 October 10-Noveniber 10, 1985 Forreservatums, caJ/ 228-8421. Alley Theatre/Large Stage/615 TexasA venue PR~IEW PERFORMANCE ON OCTOBER 5 with proceeds to benefit Houston Gay Poht1ca~ Caucus, ~S/ AIDS Foundation, Gay and Lesbian Switchboard, and Hazelwitch Productions. For ticket Information, call 529-7014 or the respective organizations. 8 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 4, 1985 Gaping Hole in AIDS Defense Line from page I example, Abrams tells of a health-care worker who stuck himself "''th a needle from a patient who had both AIDS and hepatitis. "He got hepatitis but he hasn't contracted AIDS. Moreover, his AIDS antibody test never turned positive," something experts say happens within eight to 12 weeks after becoming infected with the virus. If knowing these and other facts is our best defense against AIDS. why has no agency aooumed rei;poni;ibility for coordi· nating a carefully planned and executed campaign to educate all segments of society? Perhaps it is becauoe AIDS encom· passes subjects that still make many of us uncomfortable. Sexuality, death, and dying, say .. Holly Smith of the San Fran· cisco AIDS Foundation, are three of the mo. t ~ensitive and difficult subjects for people to confront. PerhapR, as Dr Conant suggests, it is also because editors refused to heed what their reporters were telling them. "I know for a fact that a lot ofreporters were on top ofth1s story from the beginning ... . But a lot of editors pui;hed it aside, either because they thought it was a 'gay dis· ea. e' or because they didn't think one should discuss topics such as anal inter· cour~e m a family newspaper or on televi­i; ion. But the biggest stumbling block has been the failure of government at all levels to deal head-on with educating the public about the AIDS epidemic. Only about four percent of the federal government's 1985 AIDS budget of nearly $100 million targets public education­nowhere near adequate to the task, as the government's own Office of Technology Ass.,ssment itself has concluded. Dr. Harold Jaffe of the Centers for Dis· ease Control agrees that education right now represents the only weapon we have against AIDS, and that more money is necessary-money he anticipated would be forthcoming with the backing of Secre­tary of Health and Human Services Mar· garet Heckler. Children with AIDS are being cast out by society (However, Heckler resigned her position a~ head of HHS this past week.) For some the infusion of dollars will come late. Ryan White, the Kokomo, lndi· ana, youngster who is battling AIDS and hr• local «chool board, is perhaps the moi;t visible victim of public fear. But countless AIDS 'ictims have already been isolated from mainstream society. Many have died, isolated even from their family and friendi;, To date, efforts to reduce public fears through education have been catch-as· catch-can. Nor does the public appear to be reassured by those official pronounce­ments that have been made, even those of AIDS researchers. Some experts believe the problem involves the way doctors and scientists talk about AIDS. their choice of terms, some say, frequently heightens rather than allay. public fears. Every time they say there doesn't "appear" to be any evidence that AIDS can be casually transmitted, or that "under most circumstances" children aren't at risk if they attend school with an AIDS victim, what the public hears is "appears" and "under most circumstan· ces." Those aren't the strongest of terms, explains Dr. Jay Winsten, director of the Office of Health Policy Information at the Harvard School of Public Health. Says Conant, "There are very few things in medicine that are 100%, and the Stein & Toklas DETECTIVES Jom Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories. and a real­life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER 56.95 in b, kstores. or use tlti• c •upon to order by mail He;; is $7.so for Murd;; is Murd;, is Murder, by s~~el Stew;-d. name ________ ----- address city _ <tate • _ .zip--------- Alyson Publications. Dept. P-5. 40 Plympton St , Boston, MA 02118 '~---· • J ........ _ _,_ - ._... j words we use reflect that fact. In the case of AIDS, we use words like 'appears' and 'based on the available evidence' not because there is a lack of evidence but because we are behaving as responsible scientists." There will, of cour11e, never be guaran· tees that what is fact today won't become discarded theory or a fallacy tomorrow. And there will always be some people who will refuse to be reassured. Neverthele11s, as Conant believes, the only thing to do is to mount an effective educational effort. "Whether or not we s!Rm the rising tide of fear will depend to a large extent on whether we make this effort a top priority, not just in words but in actions." COFFEE SHOP 1525 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON 529-2289 BURGER SPECIALS Steakburger-s1.49 Cheeseburger-s1.69 Bacon Cheeseburger­s1 ,99 Californian Wins Judgement Against Falwell A Sacramento, Calif., court has ruled that Rev. Jerry Falwell must pay a former col· Jege classmate $5000 as a result of a prom· ise he made last year. On Sept. 25, Sacramento Municipal Court Judge Michael S. Ullman awarded the Rev. Jerry Sloan $5000 as a result of a lawsuit he filed against Falwell when Fal· well refused to fulfill a promise of a "con· tract" he made with Sloan. The basis of the lawsuit was a confron· talion betwepn Falwell and Sloan on a live Sacramento television talk show on KCRA-TV. On th!' July 13, 1984, show, Sloan asked Falwell about some remarks he made on his "Old Time Gospel Hour" broadcast concerning the Metropolitan Community Church. In his broadcast, Falwell said the church was "A brute beast . . . A vile and Satanic system" ... which would "one day be utterly annihilated and there would be a celebration in heaven!" The Metropolitan Community Church is a Christian church which ministers to the gay and lesbian community. Approxi· mately 85% of its membership is gay. Falwell vigorously denied the state­ments on the KCRA program, saying it was an "absolute lie!" Sloan countered by s&ying he possessed a tape of Falwell making the statements. Falwell continued to deny the state· ments. saying that such a tape didn't exist. He then challenged Sloan to produce the tape, saying he would give Sloan $5000 to produce the tape. Within a week, Sloan took two tapes to KCRA. One was a tape which Sloan made of the "Old Time Gospel Hour" and the other tape was a tape produced by Fal· well's own organization, which Sloan obtained by sending $4 to Falwell's Lynchburg, Va., address. Sloan then had his attorney, Rosemary Metrailer, write to Falwell asking for the money. Falwell refused to do so. When Falwell came to Sacramento on September 30, 1984, as part of a fundrais­ing tour, Sloan filed his suit and met Fal­well with a subpoena as the television evangelist's private jet landed at the Sacramento airport. Judge Ullmlan heard the evidenceofthe case on Sept. 13, 1985, and handed down his decision on Sepi. 24, awarding Sloan the $5000 plus court costs and 7% interest from July 18, 1984. In his seven page opinion , Ullman stated, "The defendant (Falwell) offered $5000 to the plaintiff (Sloan) if he could produce a tape; the plaintiff tendered the tape almost immediately, binding the plaintiff to his unilateral contract." Sloan said, "I am elated at receiving a favorable judgement. This is the very first time Jerry Falwell has been held accoun· table in a courtoflaw for what he has said. He tried to squirm out of being responsible for his vicious attack on the Metropolitan Community Church, but now a judge has said he did indeed make the statement and now he must pay for trying to deny it." Sloan is a former pastor of several Met· ropolitan Community churches and is now president of the Lambda Community Fund, a charitable organization which is in the process of opening a gay and Jes· bian community centt'r in Sacramento. Sloan and Falwell were schoolmates in the 1950s when they both attended Baptist Bible College in Springfield, Mo. Letters GPCMade Right Choice From Carl Denton Did the GPC do the right thing by voting not to endorse a single candidate in this year's city elections? I think they made the right choice, simply for the fact that the Straight Slate and Louie Welch can't beat it over the heads of the people that sup­ported us in the past. After hours of heated debate at the GPC meeting on Sept. 18, a no endorsement pol· icy was handed down. Don't cry about it. This is a bad year for gay rights. The gay community should get out the vote and step back and see what happens. If our supporters win this election, then, and only then, will we know that the gay, albeit morality, is~ue, didn't hold water. Things change and not everyone is going to like the way it turns out. Remember something. Why should Kathy Whitmire campaign in the gay community when she knows she has the gay vote locked up? It is called smart polit­ics. You're not thinking of voting for Louie Welch, are you? Items in tM "Letters" section represents opinions of some of our readers and not necessarily the views of the MONTROSE VO/rg, Readers are encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest to the community. Please keep the letters brief and mail to "Letters to the Editor," MONTROSE VOICE, 408 Avondale, Hou1ton, TX 77006. Offensive Video From Harns M. Miller II, Los Angeles, CA I recently saw the video that MTV is air· ing of the Dire Straits' song "Money For Nothing." The video contains the follow­ing lyrics: See the little faggot with the earring and the make-up Yeah, buddy, that's his own hair That little faggot got his own jet air· plane That little faggot. he's a millionaire I was angered and offended by MTV's broadcast of tho~e lyrics, and have written to MTV expressing those feelings. I wish to bring this matter to your attention, and provide you with the following address so that your readers may write directly to MTV to express their feelings concerning the "Money For Nothing" video. The Address of MTV is: MTV Networks, Inc., 1133 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10036, attention Michelle Von Feld. Getting Back on the Right Track? From Grant Lukenb1ll Isn't it comforting to know that the true guardians of freedom and morality are defining our place in life for us? No longer need we rnncern ourselves with militant ideas of "sexual orientation" legislation, or "freedom from discrimination," and "political oppression "We no longer have to worry about outlandjsh visions of homosexual quarantine, ostrasization from city employment, or public lynch· in gs. Gone are the days of paranoia and anx­iety once connected to the ubiquotous for­ces of bigotry and extremism. We live in a time when the dogmatic steam engine of a vogue morality is finally roaring thunder· ously down the right track. Our public servants and their corporate allies have just begun to recognize their duty to uphold contemporary living values and the foundation of "true Chris· tianity" eo that we may all conduct our lives "freely" but in an "orderly" and "defined" fashion. Concern for unity and understanrung of each others needs is no longer necessary; public alertness and political readiness have no place in the currently evolving society. Close may we now the doors of demo­cracy and representative government; make way for the necessary arm of facism; be grateful we activists didn't go too far. Now children may be properly inculcated with a sense of what is moral and what is perverted, the values of obedience, under· standing of a police state. and the neces· sary repercussion of dissent!! It was a cloBe call but we can now all rest assurred that a perniciously contagious virus, largely sl.'gregating a minority group (whether naturally occurring or oth­erwise), has lead u~ to become a fearfully­o bseq uious community, politically impotent, and benignly, self-oppressed in order to keep things on the "right track." You're never too old to quit blowing smoke. &~ American Heart V Association WE'Rl FIGHTING FOR 10.JRUFE A TOUCH OF ITALY Through some 46 photos taken in the Mediterranean region, Italian photographer Tony' Patrioli has u>ed his camera to explore the homo· erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. MEDITERRANEO by Tony Pacrioli $1 Z 50 in book3tores, or u.1c this coupon to order by mail. - ------ ------- Herc " $13.00 each (postpaid) for copy/ies of Med1terraneo. address----------- City otate _ _____ zip _____ _ Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 OCTOBER 4, 1985 MONTROSE VOICE 9 UNION ~ACK SPORTSWEAR HAIRCUTTING Endleee Summer Suntans $3 With package of ten 30-minute tanning sessions at $30 1 21 2 WESTHEIMER A full service salon Mon.-Sat. 10-7, Sunday 1 2-6 For appointment call 528-9600 £}ff.:. Pihl~' ~ FfJ):U:;J~ "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS: Albert G. Nemer, John J. Adams and Gordon A. Thayer 10 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 4. 1985 Montrose Live The Emperor's Nightingale By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Critic The only time I every saw kabuki was on television. That, in n way, is a mini­metaphor for Pacific Oi·ertures now play­ing at Stages. This engrossing musical is about the clash of two cultures. Admiral Perry has arrived in the waters off Japan with four warships. For two and a half centuries. no foreigner has been allowed to set foot on the islands. ~·or has any Niponese been allowed to leave. The two cultures have not mixed or intercontacted. Now Perry "ill change that either through peaceful overtures or through explosive gunboat "diplomacy." Once the threat is there, is there any difference? The story is told from theJnpnnesepers­pective. The first net shows us the tricky machinations of subtle statesmanship which would seem to show that had the terrible Americans been traditional Jnpn­neAe gentlemen, or even devils, the whole matter would have been maneuvered to blow harmlessly over. This impressive Bent. (How's that for starting n few nrgu men ts?) When this man is at his best, he is sublime. As an actor with n critical eye, I nm often cursed with n voice in the back of my head echoing the lines not as they were just spoken but as I would have said them. If I get over that, there is the further hurdle of envy-either wishing I had the role or hoping to equal the man's talent. Either way it means the actor is calling undue attention to himself. It is rare that I can spend an entire evening just emotionally caught up in the show. That happened with this one! OuL~idc of Greg Baldwin, Robert McNe­lis. and Jeffrey Gimble, the style makes it difficult to know which actors to praise. However, I mu.;t mention Jerry Miller, James Clubb, Gary Llvingwood and Daniel Dyer. If you miss this one without n very good reason , you should put that cone on your head and sit on the stool in the corner. o Notes ft>nt was only doomed to failure by the The KS/ AIDS Foundation, the Gay and failure to understand cultural differences. Lesbian Switchboard, the GPC, and Of course, no one really knows what was Hnzelwitch Produl'tions have completely said in that treaty house. bought out the Alley main stage for tomor- The piny unfolds a In kabuki. In that row (Saturday) night's preview perfor· style, everything is simplified, stylized, mnnce of Eucution of Justil'e. If you have ritualized. Often one performer is the body not already picked up your tickets at the of the character while another voices the Houston Area Women's Center or Wilde inner thoughts. and Stein Books, I'm sure there will be a No women are allowed on stage. So nil of few left at the door. I cannot think of an the female characters are enacted by men. audience "ith which I would rather see This style allows for some spectacularly this show. And. this being the first pre- <1imple effects, such as the fierce grimace view, you cannot see it any earlier. with which the shogun's mother moment- This is an examination of the trial of arilyhaltstheadvnnceofwari1hips Itnlso Dan White for killing Harvey Milk and opens the way for some lyrically beautiful Mayor Moscone. The verdict touched off moments, such as the tearful parting of explosive rioting in San Francisco. Con-the young samurai and his wife. sidering n certain person's mayoral cnm- Thnt style is filtered through the most pnign, the piny could prove most modern of musical comedy forms. This is controversial here. not a Jerry Herman traditional musical Ticket prices for this benefit are actually like the Schmidt/ Jones inspired Gold- lower than for the following Saturday. diggers (at MST). And certainly not 8 You're goinl{ to want to see this anyway. revue like A ... Alice(still at the Alley)- SoT~e: i~~0°u"~!. ·the theatrical discus~ion although that influence is also trnct>nhle group that produced One. is having an TheHoustonaudienceiscurrentlyblessed open house this Sunday afternoon. 2:00- with a real choice between three strong 4:00 p.m., at Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin. contenders. So many members are successfully Starting about with Company, Sand- engaged that rehearsals and performan-heim's musicals have been more e"says ces often put a damper on attendance at than tones. True, one is illustrated by a their regular Thursday evening meetings hauntingly touching story on none-to-one So they're looking for fresh blood. Would personal level. Rut the true emphasis is on that we all had such problems! .. . the sweeping panoply of the national The National Endowment for the Arts level. In some ways, 1t is reminiscent of a has awarded Houston Grand Opera n Michener "novel." In otht>rs, it feels like a grant for $1 million, provided they can Kurosawa film. match it with $,'3 million in new or It is n blend musically as well. The uni- increased non-federal donations by June que story and style allow Sondheim to 30, 1989. -· • paraody people as divt>rse as Cohen, Gil- The Massachusetts Bay Transportation bert and Sullivan and Sousa. There is even As. ocintion and the Cambridge Arts a delightful Victorian music hall number Council are looking for art works to pince for a madame trotting down to meet the in remodeled subway stations. For more info on their open competition, call the fleeAt. . fl S dh . h Cultural Aro Council of Houston, 527- maJor m uence on , on e1m 1s t e 9330 . . .. art song. This, hacked up by n quasi- Auditions at Stages for two musicals. Japanese pcrcu"1on section and lute-like The Fantastic:ks (11/ 28-12/29) and Sand counter melodies, could be expected to be Bt>tween Your Toes (1123-219). Resume, difficult to sing. These are beautiful. photo, two songs, one monologue. For though, and soar through the score like appointment (1015&6), call Mark Mitchell multi-colored nightingales. 527-0220 .. . _ I had heard and rend many things about Ct>lebrnte! Wasn't the Chevalier d'Eon the beauties of the original Harold Prince (born the 7th) that military genius who staging of this John Weidman book. 1..t>t died while dancing in n tutu? October 4, me warn you. l..t>nve all such preconcep- 1H92, Alberta Lucille Hart was thrown out t1ons at home of n YWCA gymnasium when she was Director Ted Swmdley wisely took the mistaken for a man. Well, tum·of-the-matenal and redid it to fit his own space. l'entury pederastic poet John Gambrill He did this o superbly that it feels as if Nicholson (horn the 6th) kept his clothes this show might have been commissioned decidedly on when he \O.TOte; by this theater. It IS fully at home here. " I love him wisely if I love him well, Would that l could visit it again ne.xtJnnu- And so I let him keep his innocenc·e; ary, but It cannot tarry n~ long as it I veil my adoration with pretence deserves. After all, it is only one show in a Smee he knows nothing of Love's mys-lnrger season. tic Spell Ca.qt members from "Pacific Overtures" Come enjoy the Texas Renais~ance Festi1•al This J~ the mo~ brilliant ~st di. ci- .. Perchance he wonders wh I shun pHrit!d> di ~. ni~. ~~~.~:iiiiL~~!:!:~.:::t:.:?.~~~~ri;W;fl[ij~iii;'.::~~~==~~::Ec~~i.:,~L~.i_~_.._-'"~·--"'--~_.._-'-_.....;...._.,_J It would be strange indeed if he should know I love him, love him, love him past belier' o Openings Execution of Justice (Alley, officially opens 10/10)-See above. Opening of the Week! Albert King (Rockerfeller's 4)-hot blues. Motley Crue (Summit, 4)-0NO! Foreigner (Summit, 5)-0NO! Houston Symphony (Jones, 5-7)­Pianistlconductor Christoph Eschenbach does both to Bruckner's Sixth. Rehearsal open to the public Friday at noon. Texas Renaissance Festival (Planters­ville, 5)-You've never been to one?! Dress sexy-boots, tights and jerkin-and enjoy food, games, fortune tellers and other entertainers. And cruising, of course. Bill Monroe (Rockerfeller's, 6)­Bluegrass! ONO! The Canadian Brass (Jones, 6)-the five down princes of classical music. City Ballet of Houston (Hyatt Regency West, 6)-shorts as diverse as the Romeo and Juliet pas de deux and the Gaite Pari­sienne can-can. ONO. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (Autrey House, 6)-Chocolate Bayou takes you to Narnia. Schubertfest '85 (Rice U., 6)-chamber music and Austrian dinner. Concert Chorale (First Presbyterian, 7)-Guest Michael Korn of the Philadel· phia Singers conducts Handel and Persi­chetti. ONO! Monday Night at the Movies (Greenway 3, 7)-Three movies-Diua, Tosca's Kiss and Moulin Rouge-combined to fore­shadow La Boheme (opening next week at the HGO). ONO! The Booth (Channel 8, 9)-Dynamic all­star cast in three one-acts which all take place in the same restaurant booth. The Muppet Show (Summit, 9). Dwight Yoakum (Rockerfeller's, 10). END OF SEASON SALE!!! 50% off Swimwear!! 50% off Sleeveless T-shirts!! ALSO Before the cold weather hits Leather Jackets now 35°/o off! Leather by Boots at the 526-1719 LE~~:R ~;) D V I COTO ustom Room 11 Fairview 526-2668 n.&.o . un no. at the 526-1902 OCTOBER 4, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 1411 Taft 522-2190 * Cooling System check & flush $279s * A/ C Charge & Check $26" * O il, Filler & Lube $249s Time to checlr V< iur COOl•ng svstem1 ASK FOR CHIEF BUTTROCK 1411 TAFT- 522·2190 . . Chic thrills HAIR LOSS­NEWMEDICAL TREATMENT Male pattern baldness occurs when the hormone DHT acta on hair folli­cles. Proxidil a is an advanced combination of topical DHT-block­ing aEenta with the hair growth­stimulator Minoxidil. It commonly arrests and reverses balding when Minoxidil alone does not. Call today for a consultation. P eter H. Proctor, MD,PhD MPB Clinic Suite lD, 5401 Dashwood, Bellaire 661-2321 Scoolers mean freedom and fun' And the Spree·· IS the easiest way lo get slarted Ifs easy /-·n on you. with push·bullon slartin~ . no shill· ~~ tng and low maintenance And :t; t easy on your budget In facl. •! s the A ; ~ouw~.st priced scooter you can ~ ir; So 9e1 lhe fun started' Get the \1 1 \ ,... ~~;:_ !!'.~_... .. ~<'-- STUBBS CYCLE 4436 Telephone Rd. 644-7535 ~~ ... 12 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 4, 1985 The Far Side by Gary Larson • 98SUN 'IEASA PR£SSSYNO CATE q30 The Arnolds feign death until the Wagners, sensing the sudden awkwardness. are compelled lo leave. "Here comes another big one, Roy, and here-we-goooooowheeeeeeeooo•" Aller reaching the far side, Tonga cut the bridge­sending the outraged suburbanites Into the river below. Their Idol was now his - as well as its curse. "And now here comes Zubulu. If this Isn't welrd- mlddle of the night, and for some reason we're all restless." "' 'The ghost of Baron Rudolph von Guggenheim, 16th-century nobleman murdered by the Countess Rowena DuBois and her lover (believed to be the Duke of Norwood), falls Into Edna's bean dip. Fortunes The Bull Wants to Take a Trip By Merk Orion For Fr day Oct 4 1985, through Thursday. Oct 10. 1985. ARIES-Recent fireworks may return, but this week finds you in firm control of what happens, when, and how often. In fact, your control could be too much for this fun-loving friend you've found. What a find' Ease up a little and remember the old give and take. TAURUS-You've got travelling on your mind, and your short jaunts haven't been enough. Sit down with your favorite person and plan that ideal long vacation Even 1f 11 doesn't look possible at the moment. mapping it out may show you how you can get there GEMINI-A feeling of being split in half has now turned into something else. It may be iust that you're avoiding the issues, but have you ever felt so sexual in your life? What are you, anyway, some kind of sex machine? CANCER-Feeling slightly schizoph­renic? One of you 1s damned angry and wants to fight It out. The other wants to soothe. warm, entwine, caress. Who's going to win? Head and heart are no­where 1n sync, so don·1 go making Irrevo­cable dec1s1ons. LEO Get away soon for a long wee­kend You'll definitely be in for somo pleasant encounters. They may not bo exactly what you were hoping for, but you'll like what you get. Been looking for some magic moments? They're out of town VIRGO-You're usually so neat and well-balanced' But not this week. You'll go for something in a big way, and the excitement will get you into quite a state. So what? Go running. go dancing, enioy life' Let all this energy out! LIBRA- Business is good-very good You're expanding, moving up the ladder, getting a new position. Think carefully about any major move, and don·1 get into this establishment so deeply that you can't get out Congratulations' SCORPIO Friends-it's a week to enjoy them and be very grateful that you have them. You may want to get them all together (as varied and dissimilar as they may be) You're wealthy in them, perhaps even more so than you think. Commun­ion In the key word. SAGITTARIUS- Well, you've found someone who's as hot as you are. All that prowling around found you someone who knows your kind of action and gives 1t to you- and then some. No, don't say anything Your signals are coming through loud and clear CAPRICORN- Secret love time for Capricorn? I won't tell, but that wrestling you're doing In your soul conflicts with that other kind of wrestling you're doing that feels so good You're going to have to make a dec1s1on, and it's a hard one. no matter how you took at 11 AQUARIUS-The argument you're having with yourself won't let go The secretive side of you has gotten out of hand What others see and what you really feel have little in common Get away and get together. Come back ready for honesty and whatever comes up next PISCES-Don't let a day go by without doing something that you want to do. You have the energy and confidence to turn most anything in the right direction You're in charge, you're in command of your needs, your desires, your life. •19!5 1022 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON TUESDAY, OCT. 8th, 10PM MOVIE MADNESS! BETTE DAVIS JOAN CRAWFORD OCTOBER 4, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 528-8851 SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDA THURSDAY 3 HAPPY HOURS DAILY MONDAY­FRIDAY AFTER HOURS NIGHTLY 14 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 4, 1985 Books Never Too Old to Grow Reviewed by Linda Wyche Young, Gay and Proud; edited by Sasha Alyson; non·fiction; 95 pages; Alyson Pub­lications, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118; softcover; $4.00. As much as many of us regret growing older, few of us care to repeat our teen years. This was the time when our minds and bodies experienced such vast change that we were often overwhelmed. Practi· cally everything we did and every decision we made was affected by the turmoil created by '•growing up." The gay adolescent experiences an even greater trauma. The gay teenager feels dif· ferent from his peers. All adolescent;; have difficulty understanding . exuality and sexual development, but the lack of an understanding society, including family and friends, makes sexual awakenenin11: an even lonelier nnd confusing time for gays. In 1980, Alyson Publications, released a book based on a similar one published in Australia by the Gay Teachers and Stu· dents Group of Melbourne. Young, Gay and Proud was the first gay book by Aly· son and one of the first and most-heralded guides for gay youth. Now with the AIDS crisis, Sasha Aly· son, has re-released Young, Gay and Proud with an expanded section on gay health. This is not a pamphlet, but a well· written, clear and concise guide which covers such areas as coming out to par· ents, meeting other gays, coming out in school, gay sexuality and finding your identity. The book covers lesbianism as well as male homosexuality. Young, Gay and Proud includes illustrations, letters and an extended bibliography. The most important aspect of the book is that it strives to make gay teenagers feel good about themselves. The overall tone of the book stresses that homosexuals are not alone, dirty, sick or bad. It is that aspect of Young, Gay and Proud that makes it must reading for all gays, regardless of age. Sexuality is not something that happens and is over. We are all growing up as we continually explore our relationships with ourselves and others. Alyson Publications should be com· mended for this latest release of YounR. Proud and Gay. In a time when many gays suffer from self-image problems, homo­phobia is rampant in our society, and the community is stricken with a tragic health crisis, anything that makes us feel good about ourselves and our lifestyle should be respected and cherillhed. 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SUPPLIES 8939 BUNNY RUN HOUSTON.TEXAS 77088 713·999·0947 International Printing Specialists If/ J/Oll' need 'Ifni; on f!!Jafie4' w-e can f!/Ju:nt it.I Our Services Include: -~ · * Design & Layout * Business Stationery * Business Cards * Flyers, Brochures * Price Lists * Menus * Office Forms including: * Blank Paper Stock: Continuous Forms, Invoices, Copy paper, letter & legal size Purchase Orders, Mailing * Large Mailing Envelopes Labels, Tabs, Interoffice Forms. * Delivery * Wedding Invitations, Social Announcements & Brides Boutique Please consider us for your printing needs - Call 861-0026 so our Sales Staff can asist you with your next printing order. 2103 Yale• Houston, Texas 77008 •Telephone: (713) 861-0026 OCTOBER 4, 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 15 Sports Voice Rain Shortens Softball Games; Coffee Beans Win Although many of the games scheduled for week four play in the Women's Softball League were cancelled due to last Sun· day's rain, Coffee Beans managed to hand the Latin Express another loss. The Coffee Beans roasted the Express 14-1. Bacchus Boozers in the A Division. Also, before the rains ended the day's play, Ducks and B Division-leading Sport managed a 4-4 tie. unbeaten record at 2:00 p.m. Other A Division action will see Bae· chus tackle Herricanes at 10:00 a.m.; Reb­els meet Coffee Beans at 12:00 noon, and Bears play Bacchus at 1:00 p.m. In the B Division, MCCR Angles face Undercover at 3:00 p.m. and Latin Express at 6:00 p.m. Earlier in the day at 4:00 p.m., the Express will face Sport, and No. 4 Undercover will face third place SoftTouch at 5:00 p.m. All games are played at Heights Lions Field, Shepherd at 13th. With the fall ~eason nearing its end, the league is accepting nominations for 1986 officers. Persons wishing to run for office must tum in their names to league secre­tary Carolyn Collins. Winless with one tie, Latin Express com· fortably holds on to its basement position in the B Division. Coffee Beans, now with two wins, is two games ahead of winless Standings in the A Division are almost certain to change after this coming week's action. Fifth place Coffee Beans will chal­lenge No. 4 Ducks at 9:00 a.m. The Ducks will take on third place Hollywood Bears at 11:00 a.m .. Number two Marion & Lynn's Rebels will try to spoil Herricanes Sports Voice Calendar & S tandings Houston Tennis Club Ready for Their Championship Matches The players are all set for the champion­ship matches for Houston Tennis Club Singles for 198.5. Five champions will be crowned in the following levels of competi­tion. Level I: No. 1 seed Jim Kitch got a default win into the finals to meet No. 2 seed Dick Cotten, as expected. Cotten swept into the finals with a 6-1, 6-0 victory over long-time member Shy Willie. Level II: The tournament committee really missed it by putting Xavier Bazan into this level. He upset No. 1 seed David Robicheaux 6-2, 6-2 last week, and then sent No. 2 seed J.C. Barrera packing this week 6·1, 6·0. Level I II: No. 1 seed Pat Power is ready, willing, and waiting for his cham· pionship match with No. 2 seed Sebastian Velez. Velez won his semifinal match with Joel, 6·1, 6·4 and will meet Power this Sun· day for the championship. Level IV: No. 1 seed Eugene Brown is in the finals with No.2 seed Marcus Lee. They are both coming and going out of town right now, so we don't know when this championship match will be played. Level V: Billy Green got a default win from Paul Brown to meet No. 1 seed Steve Bearden in the semifinals. Bearden pulled it out 6-4, 5-7, 6-1. No. 2 seed Steve Bryant met newcomer Randy Miller in the semis and Miller got his name in the news, win­ning 6-4, 6-2. Bearden and Miller play Sun­day for the championship. o Championship Summaries Level I: Jim Kitch vs. Dick Cotten Level II: Xavier Bazan d. Barrera, 6-1, 6-0 for title Level III: Pat Power vs. Sebastian Velez Level IV: Eugene Brown vs. Marcus Lee Level V: Steve Bearden vs. Randy Miller o Texas-OU Classic Update Rick Hadnot reports that 21 players are already planning to play in Dallas October 12-13. He says there is plenty of time remaining to enter. For information or entry forms, call Hadnot at 526-0315. Downtown Y Hosting Powerlifing Tournament in November The Downtown YMCA, 1600 Louisiana, will host the Sixth Annual Edward S. Hudson Memorial Powerlifting Cham· pionships on Saturday, November 9. The event, formerly known a~ the Gulf Coast Ranch Hands Now 2nd Place Taking advantage of losses by The Barn and Lipstick, Ranch Hands jumped from fourth to second in the MSA Pool League standings. With 20 weeks of play com· pleted and two weeks remaining, Bacchus I remained the league leader. Powerlifting Championships, will consist of three lifts-full squat, bench press and dead lift. Each contei;tant will have three attempts in each lift. The contest.~. for men and women, will begin at 9:00 a.m. with participants check· ing in at 7:00 a.m. The entry fee is $20. Trophies will be awarded to the top three in each weight class, in the open and novice. There will be five awards in the master's and women's divisions. This is the oldest powerlifting meet in Texas and will be open to all spectators. Admission is free. For more information, contact John Dettmann, at the Downtown YMCA, 659- 81>01. R egular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Center Houston Tennis Club 9am-Noon. Homer Ford Tennis Center Houstons Women's Softball League competotoon. 9am-6pm. Heights-Lyons Field, Shepherd at 13th Women's Bowlong League Spm. Stadium Bowl WW B Bowling League 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: Frontrunners, Golf Center, Her­mann Park MSA Men's Bowling 9pm, Stadium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA ·Fun Volleyball League," 7pm WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7·30pm Homer Ford Tennis Center MSA Pool League. Bpm. In sponsors· clubs THURSDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA Mixed Bowling League 9pm. Sta­dium Bowl Special Events Oct. 12·13; Annual Texas-OU Tennis Clas­sic. Dallas Oct .. Texas-OU Football Weekend, Dallas Nov. 9·11: Houston Tennis Assn 'Hou-Tex V" June 1986: Oak Lawn Tennis Assoc. hosts Texas Cup Challenge. Dallas. competing with Houston Tennis Club Summer 1986. United States Olympic Fest•· val, Houston MSA Pool League Standings, Sumrr.er League FOLLOWING WEEK 20 TEAM This Week. Matches so far, Total games 1 Bacchus I 2 Ranch Hands 3 The Barn 4 Lipstick 5 Street Cats 6 611 Ill 7 JR"s 8 Bacchus II 9 Kindred Spirits I 10 E/J"s 11 BAB Cowboys 12 Kindred Spirits II 13 Too 611 14The611 15 Al's Pals 16 Sally"s Shooters 17 Rancheroos 18 Hooters 19 Yard Dogs 1(~5 16-4 185-115 ~ 1~5 173-127 7-8 14-6 196-104 4·11 14-6 176-124 9-6 14-6 165-135 11-4 14-6 163-137 12·3 13-7 184·115 9-6 13-7 177-123 ~10 13-7 16&-132 15-0 1C>-10 141-159 6-9 1C>-10 138-162 15-0 !l-11 14!1-151 8-7 8-12 164·136 3-12 6-14 143-157 6-9 6-14 131-169 C>-15 6-14 11~185 15-0 ~15 127· 172 6-9 4·15 106-179 C>-15 4-16 105-195 MERIDIEN LEASING INC. [)I\ \IOP O!~~.P~~ vVe 1'v1ake Your Automotive \'cec/~ A Ple~sant Experience MERCEDES BENZ BMW PORSCHE Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Sept 30 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim K~ch 2 Randall Dickerson 3 Rick Hadnot 4 Donny Kelley 5 Ron Bell 1 Tiny Tim 2 Oscar Maninez 3 David Heoland 4 Richard Pregeant 5 Ron McCauley 1 Edd•e Chavez 2 Thomas Gonez 3Joe L 4 Rock Knapp 5 Gabe Herpon 6 JC. Barrera 7 Rich Corder 8 Rick Dupont 9 Shy W1lhe 10 Arm1 Albanza BLADDER 6 Sebastoan Velez 7 #007 (Lou Garza) 8 Larry Jarvis 9 Rick Massey 10 Steve Bearden C LADDER 6 B•lly Green 7 Steve Bryant 8 Roy Mendiola 9 John Murphy 10 Paul Brown D LADDER 1 Oarw1d Hendnekson 2 Oscar Yaasso 6 Rick Martinez 7 Mike Holloway 3 St8'te Chesney 8Joe D 4 J v Klinger 5 Ra~dy M lier 9 David Moskowitz 10 Howard SrOYtln Women's Softball League RESULTS Sept 29 Coffee Beans 14. Lalin Express 1 Ducks 4. Sport 4 other games postponed due to rain DIVISION STANDINGS Following Wee!< 4 won Lost A DIVISION Herr1canes Manon & L ynns Rebels Hollyw OOd Bears Ducks Coffee Beans Bacchus Boozers 5 0 3 2 2 ~ 2'~ 217 217 2 3 0 5 B DIVISION SPOfl 3 1 MCCR Angels 2\i t Soft Touch 2 2 Undercover 2 2 Latin Express 17 3'h S~EDULE 1 000 600 500 500 400 000 750 625 500 500 125 GB 2 2 2> 3 5 \', ,1 2 Sunday. Oct 6 Coffee Beans vs Ducks 9am Bacchus vs Hemcanes. 10am Ducks vs Hollywood Bears, 11am Manon & Lynn·s Rebels vs Cottee Beans. 12noon HollywOOd Bears vs Bacchus 1 pm Herricanes vs. Manon & Lynn's Rebels. 2pm MCCR Angels vs Undercover, 3pm Latin Express vs Spon. 4pm Undercover vs Soft Touch. 5pm MCCR Angels vs Laton Express. 6pm l'HI l IRll 'l J..i11 mo f>-l'lmo ;oo '-IE l • 1; mo .?'1-' mo s..i; mo )'lhmo ··~~ 411 .ii; mo ..r n; mo Chimney Rock and Westhelmer area ~---- CADILLAC 't-rl.rn Dt.·\ 1lit fi(-d\''iOOci lldor,uto r·; mu -'fiO 010 "''; 1110 BUICK \cmwr'4.·I ll .. "·' 1..i; mo 18'1 mo TO) OTA (oroll.1 (..litJ 1;..i nm t80mo ! r; mo ( ""''Cl l li'l mo \uf>r.l 2h5 mo 975-1985 CALL LEE BORBA '0 DO\\' l'\)\ll'T • LO\\ ER \10'-. Tl!L' P\,\1['-.I • (\'-ti FOR H)L..R T~ADE 16 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 4. 1985 Glenn Close and Mandy Pantinkin in "Maxie" Glenn Close and Jeff Bridges in "Jagged Edge" Films Glenn Close Shines in Two Mediocre Films By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic If you are a fan of actress Glenn Close, then you should be thrilled with the movie openings this week. A talented Tony, Obie, and Emmy nominee as well as a triple Oscar nominee, Close appears in not one but two new films in roles that are very different than in past films like World According to Garp and The Big Chill. Firs"t there i11 Maxie, a light-hearted. romantic comedy about the ghost of a flapper from the twenties. Close plays two roles in this one: Maxie the outrageously wild spirit, and Jan whose prim and proper body Maxi takes over. This is a lively but predictable tale, but Close has the time of her life as the hootch-drinking, mad<ap "Maxie." There is a distinct downshift in tone to The Jagged Edge, a dramatic thriller co­starring Jeff Bridges as a man accused of killing his wife and the maid. Close is called in to defend him, and end,; up rQmantically involved while still question· mg his innocence. The film's courtroom scenes are absorbing and revealing, but the bulk of the movie is undemanding and predictable. o Maxie WhimRical little films like Maxie rarely see big-screen distribution anymore since TV movies llet'm to have taken over that realm in recent years. Still. if they can get a few big names to star (like Sally Fields and James Caan in Kiss Me Goodbye), then it is apparently worth the effort to make. This time they persuaded Glenn Close. Mandy Patinkin and Ruth Gordon to star in a film vehicle that seems as ancient as the Model T, but it's a cute attempt anyway. First I have to admit that unless I really like the star, romantic comedies are one of my least favorite films. They usually involve misunder~tood love, infidelity, and often spirits/ ghost.; that are mingled into a simple, fluffy storyline. Maxie con· tain.> all the above minimum require­ments. We get our first tai;te of a spirit (Maxie) when Jan and her husband Nick strip the wallpaper in their old home and find this mes11age on the original wall: "Maxie Malone lived here, March 3, 1927. Read it and weep." They find out from their land· lady (Ruth Gordon) that Maxie was an actres who wrote that on the night she left for her big Hollywood screen test-the same night she drove into a tree and died. Husband Nick io enthralled and rents Maxie's only film (a bit part in .. Flapper Melodies"). Suddenly he hears a disembo· died voice say, "I was good, wasn't I?". Thinking that he is drunk, Nick heads upstairs and finds his wife (?) in an uncommonly lustful mood. Later when she buys a very flimsy dress for a librarian social, Nick realizes that Jan is not acting like Jan used to act. His suspicions are confirmed when Jan (Maxie) starts guzzling drinks at the social and does a vampy "Bye, Bye Black· bird" that has them yelling for more. Of cour11e, the next day Jan has a severe han· gover, the victim of Maxie's uninhibited habitation of her body. The major "misunderstood Jove" con· flict comes when Nick tries to stay faithful to Jan when Maxie pops into her body. He loves Jan. but he sure has a hard time resisting this rowdy woman who loves to have a good time. In the end, he finds him· self helping Maxie become the star that she always wanted to be. Will Maxie become a star (in a remake of Cleopatra, God help us) and let Jan fade way, or will true love and marriage conquer in the end. You can probably gue,;s. Maxie i;; fun, but it's not spirited enough to soar above the mediocrity of the script. Mandy Patinkin (Yentl) is appropriately gentle and confused as the husband, and Ruth Gordon (Harold and Maude) is her ui;ual bubbling ~elf in this final role (although her character disappears abruptly way too soon). Only Glenn Glose breaks a way from her usual staid image to make Maxie a delightfully wacky flapper. It's a lot of fun to watch her cavort around after so many roles where she was just warm and glowing. It's just a shame that they couldn't find a more exciting film to wrap around her and the others. o Jagged Edge This dramatic thriller has all the ingre· dients for success in popular filmmaking: top stars. a romance, a ritual killing, and even a feuding court battle. All that it lacks is that essential called suspense. Alfred Hitchcock knew how to use it when he manipulated his audiences, but the makers of Jagged Edge merely take you for a ride. The film opens with the ritual murder of heiress Page Forrester and the house maid. Page is found tied to the bed and stabbed repeatedly, with only her hus· band's fingerprints on the premises. Hus· band Jack (knocked unconcious) is the publisher of the city's newspaper, and he stands to inherit everything from the wife's family fortune. He is a cool, sharp man with shifty eyes, and we are not sure if he is capable of murder or not. Enter Teddy Barnes (Glenn Close) who reluctantly defends Jack although she severely dislikes the district attorney. He was a former partner who withheld infor· mation about a client's innocence, and the convicted man later hung himself in pri· son. Then the courtroom battle begins the two go after each other like cutthroats Witnesses are made to doubt their testim · ony, objections ring out on every question, and plenty of dirty laundry is displayed on both sides. Strangely enough, the film never man· ages to build up any suspense or intrigue. We occasionally wonder if Jack is guilty or not, but we really aren't given too many reasons to think that he might be inno· cent. There is only one other possible su,. peel (a gigolo type) and all the rest of the evidence points right at Jack. It doesn't help when he starts to act romantically towards Teddy, which makes him seem more suspicious and rakish. Whatever the outcome of the trial, we know that the killer is probably going to come after Teddy in the end. Since the killer had a mask on in the initial killing, it will make a wonderful "unveiling" of the real killer after he is captured. (Of course he'll be caught!) Maybe we've all seen too many TV shows with a similar plotline, but the trail thatJaggedEdgetakes. eems all too predictable. Moviet< like this often please the general moviegoer, but too bad they didn_'t try for i:omething a little more challengmg here. Director Richard Marquand (Return of the Jedi) did much better with his last thriller, Eye of the Needle, a few years back, so we know he has the talent. What is missing is a taut script with suspense and surprise, something that Hollywood seems to be lacking lately. Glenn Close and her co-stars Peter Coyote, Robert Loggia, and John Dehner do their best to make this a class project. The main problem character is played by Jeff Bridges who is also a triple Osca~ nominee. Jack is such a cold, mechanical perRon that we really don't care ifhe is the murderer or not, and we surely don't care about the romance that he starts with Teddy. Jagged Edge would have made a great "Movie of the Week," similar to the Mean Season earlier this year. It's too bad that after four big movies, Glenn Close should hit a midstride slump with this film and the featherweight Maxie. She said that she wanted to change her image and range from the soft, pure image of her past films. These two films show that she does have range, but she needs to be a little more careful when picking her scripts. HOSPITAL INSURANCE MAJOR MEDICAL Ages 19-34-$45.30 35-49- 50.84 50-64- 70.01 Monthly Bank Draft Insurance Office 523-9822 Group Rates lndlvidual Issue " •• In the heart of The City" $44.00 • FRH AIRPORT SHIJTTU · COMPLIMENTARY CKAMPAGNE & WIN( (large single/double occupancy) • COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST •VALET SERVICE • Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Reservations required please coll Toll Free 800·253·5263 (Notional) 800·521 4523 (Calif l (415)·..14•.514• (So-i f ro'1C1~col 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 Montrose Man Dies in Hanging Houston police officers are seeking to determine if a man found hung in his Montrose home died accidently or as a result of suicide. AC'cording to Liz Amore, HPD spokes­person, the body of Billy Dean Ingram was found at the Stratford Place Town Homes, 309 Stratford, at approximately 2:00 a.m., Sept. 29. There was a rope tied around the victim's neck. There was no suicide note and police officials speculate that Ingram's death resulted from "autoeroticism." Police believe Ingram was engaged in a sex act at the time of his death. Dallas Firm Testing Employees for AIDS Enserch Corp., a Dallas-based energy company, has ordered all employees work ing in food service be tested for the AIDS virus. The AIDS teRt will be included with other tests for communicable diseases given to job applicants and employees handling food. Dr. Charles Alexander, chief of epidemi­ology for the Texas Department of Health, called the Enserch policy "inane" and compares it to tests for syphillis or turber­culosis for food handlers. These tests have been shown to be "just not worth doing." A spokesman for Enserch said the com­pany adopted the policy after consulting members of the scientific community. The test, known as HTLV-3, was approved by the Food and Drug Adminis­tration last spring, primarily to safeguard the nation's blood supply. It detects the presence of antibodies to the virus. Critics argue that the test is inconclu­sive and will lead to unnecessary discrimi­nation. The Enserch policy is believed to be the first involving the private sector. There­fore, it will be watched closely by gay acti­vists nationwide. 'Slaters' Want Special Listing For the first time in 30 years, a group of candidates for Houston City Council are seeking special designation be added to the ballots next to their names. The eight candidates running under the so-called "Straight Slate" banner are asking City Attorney Jerry Smith to allow the words "Campaign for Houston-Straight Slate" liHted next to their names in the Nov. 5 elections. Smith says the group has some rights under the city charter but that he is await­ing the opinions oflegal authorities on the legalities of straight-ticket voting for the candidates. The Straight Slate, whose candidates formally filed for the election on Tuesday, is fielding candidates against each city council member who voted for two city ordinances prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in city employment. The ordinances were defeated in a January referendum. The Campaign Houston-Straight Slate candidates seeking at·large positions and the incumbents they face, are Margaret Hotze, opposing Eleanor Tinsley; David Justus, opposing Jim Greenwood; O.J. Strit'gler, opposing Anthony Hall, and Jim Kennedy against Judson Robinson. In District B, Dr. Leon Spivey is seeking the seat of Ernest McGowen; Charles Car­ter opposes George Greanias in District C; Jimmy James seeks the seat of Rodn~y Ellis in District D; and Tom Pohlmann 1s running again~t Dale Gorczynski in Dis­trict H. Catholic? Gay? So are we. Join us for Mass and a social hour every Saturday night at 7:30 at Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin (upstairs). Phone: 523-7644. W..tM;m" ~. ., 0JJ!1itf.. • to Montrose '/) SERVICE LUS Have a heart to heart with vour doctor ... American Heart Association 1NE'RI F .HTING Fa< 'rCX.X ..;; i_ OCTOBER 4, 1985 MONTROSE VOICE 17 EXPERIENCE THE WXURY!!! DRIVE THE CAR OF YOUR DREAMS FOR LESS!I Cash for Your Trade ... No Down Payment CADILLAC OLDS 'PR Sedan Deville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27800mo. '86 Fleetwood . 32700mo. '86 98 Regency 27800mo. '86 Calais . . . . . 18400mo . TOYOTA NISSIAN '86 Sentra . . . . 12700mo. '86 300ZX . . . . . 27900mo. '86 Cresida . . . 25900mo. '86 Celica . . . . . 17800mo. MERCEDES BMW '86 3181 ....... 26900mo. '86 190E . . . . . . 35400mo. '86 300 . . . . . . . 48000mo. '86 325E . . . . . . 33900mo. Domestic ALL MAKES SANJAC.1Nto MOTOR L EASING Foreign ALL MODELS 10700 Richmond Suite 100, Houston, TX 77042 78 1-8566 Serving You Since 1926 A DIVISION OF SAN JACINTO MOTOR Patio Now Open CALL DEBBIE OR ROBBIE BUSINESS LEASE OUOTES PERSONAL RA-E MAY VARY Nitely Dinner Specials $695 Thursday Prime Rib DYNASTY PARTY AT THE BAR WEDNESDAYS SUPER SUNDAY BRUNCH $5.95 SUNDAY TEA 50¢-Bloody Marys, Cape Cods, Screwdrivers-50¢ HAPPY HOURS 18 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 4, 1985 Good reading for you ==:============~from====:==:==:==:=== A•L• Y • S • O • N PUBLICATIONS DEADLY LIES, by John Preston, $5.00. Who says heroes can't be gay? Ever since his lover was killed by a homophobic coward, Alex Kane has fought for the safety of gay men everywhere. Herc, he takes on an unscrupulous politician m­tent on spreading homophobic propa­ganda 1The first two books in this series arc also avauable, at $5.00 each: Sweet Drwms and Golden Ywrs.) YOUNG, GAY AND PROUD!, $4.00. Gay teenagers have no place to go with their quesuons This candidly-written book addresses such concerns as: Am I really gay: What should I tell my parents? Is it a good idea to come out m schoo11 How can I tell if my best friend is gay? BETWEEN FRJE:-<DS, by Gillian E. Hanscombc, $7 00. In this innovative and widely-praised novel, Hanscombe uses the lives of four very different women to explore 1uq bow strongly our political beliefs shape our everyday lives. SOCRATES, PLATO AND GUYS LIKE ME: Confessions of a gay schoolteacher, by Eric Rofes, $7 00. When he graduated from Harvard, Enc Rofes began teaching sixth grade at a conservauve private school. Soon he felt the stram of a split 1denmy - between "the gay Enc and the teacher Eric," here he tells of two years of teachmg horn w1thm the closet, and blS difficult dcciqon to come out at work I J 'J DANCER DA WKJNS AND THE CALIFORNIA KJD, by Willyce Kim, $6.00. A new and very different lesbian novel, which Judy Grahn calls: "A wonderful, rip-roaring Western lesbian adventure that left me warm, tickled, and bopmg she writes a dozen more " "The book of the year,'' wntes Feminist Booksiore News. .............. ,, .._., IM \t•I •• ltw• \f·.u I II \ 111111 "' ............ EXTRA CREDIT, by Jeff Black, $6.00. Harper King has a boring teaching job, stagnant relationships, and a tank full of fish named after ex-lovers dying in the same order their namesakes were se­duced Can you blame him for wanting a fresh start? This story of his life and loves is the funmest gay novel of the year IN THE TENT, by David Rees, $6.00. Tim, seventeen, has no way of express­mg bis attracuon to bis schoolmate Aaron, so he is left with frustration, humihauon and guilt. But m the middle of a campmg trip, a storm traps the two of them m a tent wnh two other boys, and the issues can no longer be avoided. Faced with a life-threatening situation, the boys must rely on each other THE SPARTAN, by Don Harrison, $5.95. In the days of the first Olympics, gay rela11onships were a common and valued pan of life. The Spanan tells the story of a young athlete and his adven­tures in love and war, rroviding a vivid picture of classical Greece, the early Olympics, and an important part of our history THE LA VEND ER COUCH: A con­sumers' guide to psychotherapy for les­bians and gay men, by Dr. Mamy Hall, $8.00. How many of us really know bow to choose a therapist, or how to get the most out of therapy? Here, in a refresb­mgly readable style, Hall addresses that critical question, as well as what to ex­pect from therapy, danger signs to watch for, and when to get out of therapy. HOT LIVING: Erotic stories about safe sex, edited by John Preston, $8.00. The AIDS cnsis has closed off some forms of sexual acuvity for health-conscious gay men, but it has also encouraged many men to look for new forms of sexual ex­pression. Here, over a dozen of today's most popular gay writers present new short stories that imaginatively eroticize safe sex. Contributors include Toby Johnson, Frank Mosca, Marty Rubin, Sam Steward, George Whitmore and T.R. Wnomski. SECOND CHANCES, by Flonne de Veer, $7.00 Is it always harder to accept what is offered freely! Jeremy, young and still naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet he chooses to pursue the hand­some and unpredictable Mark. THE HUSTLER JOHN HENRY ?ttACKAY R.OtSLATlD IY H IUIT CUUIEDY THE HUSTLER, by john Henry Mackay; trans by Hubert Kennedy, $8.00. Gun­ther is fifteen when he arrives alone in the Berhn of the 1920:. There he soon learns bow to pick up a few extra dollars on the street One of his customers is a sensitive and naive young man who becomes hopelessly enamored with Gunther But love doe> not fit neatly in­to Gunther', new life as a hustler. . . The Hustler was first published m 1926, in Germany For today's reader, it combines a poignant love story with a colorful portrayal of the gay subculture that thrived m Berlin a half-century ago. FIRESTORM, by Gerald Wenmg, $6.00. Most gay fiction takes place in an urban settmg; here b an exception. FIIeslorrn tells of two men who fall in love m a rural midwestcrn town, only to have rehg1ous homophobia dramatically alter their hves. CHOICES, by Nancy Toder, $7.00 A popular novel about lesbian love that depicts the joy, passion, conflicts and in­tensity of love between women. MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Pamoli, S 13.00. Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. [Oversize paperback) by Sa mud M , Steward author l/ 1M Plul Arwlros 'tono MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M. Steward, $7 00 This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Alice B Toklas ,Icuthing through the French countryside, attempting to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who 1s their neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stories ·········································· . TO ORDER . Enclosed is$ __ Please send the books I've listed below. !Add $1. 00 postage when ordering 1ust one book; if you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Please send me these books: l. __ 2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 3._ 4. 5. -----------~ Visa and masiercard accepted, please send acct. number. exp. dare. and signarure. name address city state. zip ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept P-5 40 Plympton St. ... ...........B.o.,.t.o.n.,. .M..A. .0.2.1.1..8. ............ Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTIC~ The Montrose Voice, a general c1rculat1on newspaper having published continu­ously for 1 year or longer, 1s qualified to accept legal notices affecting the news­paper's c1rculat1on area of Montrose CARS & BIKES STUBBS CYCLE 4436 Telephone Ad 644-7 535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba. 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ASCOT LEASING, LTD. 1303 Upland. 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN JACINTO MOTOR LEA~ 10700 Richmond #100. 781 -8566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE CLASSY CLEAN -CONDO 1 1 carport at back door. wid connec­toons Assume $239 payment Safe ne•gh­borhood. 2 storm doors. plush carpet, Italian Ille. Hot! $34.000. 988-0283 2 WEEKS FREE Come have sunshine on your shoulders woth us 800 Heoghts Apts 1 and 2 bed­room Start $285-$410 Adults btlls paid Family units and bolls 862-2885 2007 Brun i&'2!>8droom apts now 188S­lng l mo. free rent limited offer New secuuty. new swimming pool, newty redone complex 861·5556 Heights garage- apt wo~ Appliances $285 956-8671. Leave message ~ ROOMMATE SERVICE For your ideal roommate. call 932· 1363 Established 1n 1979 MONTROSE/ RICE/MEDICAL Unusual 2 br. 2' bath studio apt 1200 sq ft , French windows. patio. Lg closets. ceiling fans Unique 1 br , 900 sq ft Fl P Free ut1lites. cable TV. 523·5028 Height• Houae. 211/1 , d1;ing, CA/H. large kotchen. WID connections. shady ~~ns':.e~Yt:~d.j venehan blonds $425, 528- VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Aenl that house or apartmenl through a Montrose Voice Class1f1ed Call 529-8490 ~~~e~~~?~b1.' ~~rr:~::C~~.c~r;:t~~C8:r5d or Visa EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Professional bartender for your next party Large or small gatherings. John 523-9244 Medical assistant seeking employment. excellent references 933-3121 Dave Cleaning company needs bondable. part­t1me help Good pos111on for dependable and industrious person 528-1369 9am- 7pm (MISC.) FOR SALE LIQUIDATION SALE Mose household items. office supplies. books. church supplies, furnishings. new hot water heater. electric heaters. ceiling fans, etc Sam-5pm Sat & Sun Oct 5, 6. 12. 13 1840 Westheomer 529-8005 FOR YARD SALES - -­See ads under "Yard Sales" at the end of the Montro ,e Class1f1ed MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS MUSCULAR MASSEUR EUROPEAN FULL- BODIED TREATMENT Penetrating professional deep muscle massage In or out. day and evening appoontments avaolable CHASE 880- 4500 MASTER MASSEUR~- At your service by appQ1ntment New cloents welcomed Call Randolf at (713) 528-3147 Thank1 COWBOY LEATHER INSTRUCTOR Will train novices or intermediates Reply Blind BO• 256-B CIO V01ee HEADACHE? HANGOVER? Relief without drugs Ma.,age by Bill O'Aourke 869-2298. Cadillac of Massage Autumn Special, call ET (713) 622-4530 GOLDEN TOUCH MASSAGE Performed by a Greek trained hot. hairy. handsome. well-endowed massuer offer­ing 25 years of experhse. Services to the discreet indrvidual. If size and pleasure 1s important. Call Peter $40 ln/$50-$75- $100 out 524·6337 BODY MASSAGE Full body massage. Hot 011· ·m or out Bruce 622-0370 GOLDEN TOUCH- ESCORTS Offering for the discrete 1nd1v1dual. com­plete tours of Houston available. Also massages Models needed Call Pete 524- 6337. PERSONALS - --;:-ELEPHONE FANTASIES Imagine sitting home alone. the phone nngs •.• Six dollars for fifteen minutes of ;.:F ~~~.~~~hi> ~~~.0~~3~lu~;:r~ ~i Houston. TX 77006 IN SEARCH~-­GWM, 33. 6' 165. br hair/eyes. stable. secure. relatively 9dlking. well humored straight appearing-acting, medical scientist en1oys ouldoors. camping. hok­ing. SCUBA. travel. movies In Se1rch of: down to earth man 25-35 with mutual interests. stable. straight acting, non­smoker, who also thinks "Life's a banquet. but most poor sons-a-bitches are starv- 1ngr' Wnte me. All letters answered Bltnd Bo• 258-L Clo Voice Gw-;=:--£. new m area, seeking friends maybe relat1onsh1p Please respond w1lh interests. addr8$8, phone no to Blind Box 25&-H Clo Voice. Attractive GWM. intelligent. masculine. preppy. 30 Seeks same 933-7288 Adam --PERCHANCE TO DREAM The love we shall share. rooted 1n quah­t1es of life affording peace ol mind and heart. shall be an enduring resource of strength and commitment from which meaning. growth, vitality define the cele .. bralion of our lives shared together This, our "labor of love." can be perceived of as harmonious. vibrant, beautiful I. an attractive, professional sincere ind1v1dual seek that special young man. 23-33. (slender, smooth) w1lh whom mulual love culllvates, with ever enr1chenmg matur .. lty, our permanent relat1onsh1p I am GWM (5'7''. 147. 38. balding. brnlhzl. masculine, hairy) Should. perchance. your dream be similar to mine please reply Glenn P 0 Box 3182 Galveston, Texas 77551 Professional. stable. GWM, 35. 160. browNbrown. happy but looking lor someone special Like music. theater, long walks. sex. cuddling and lots ol TLC P 0 Box 920957 #118. Houston 77292- 0957 G WiM, 33. 5W. 1i51i)L()Ok;,;g for fun 1n all the right places Looking for you P 0 Bo• 263341, Houston, Texas 77207- 3341 Want lo lose weoght 1~ ;;;o;;;,y back guarantee 528-5443 ---A- CLASSIFIED AFFAiii? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can show you how to have active fun or play passive games with the personal ads In their new book, "Classified Affairs." they'll tell you how to write an ad that really stands out. what to expect when you place or respond to an ad, and even what all those funny little abbreviations mean. Send $810 "Class1f1ed Affairs: Aly· son Pub. Dept P-5. 40 Plympton, St. Boston. MA 02118 (Also included woll be a coupon for $5 off on your next Personals 1n your choice of 25 gay pubhcatoons. including the Montrose Voice l HCT\lt.~. WOOLD 1/00 MIND SCOCITING OJ£R JUST A LITTLE? OUR POLICY on Sexually-Exphc1t Adver­tising The Montrose Voice does not beheve that human beings engaging in sexual acts with one another 1s immoral It is abnormal. 1n fact. for a person not to engage in sexual act1v1ty. Therefore. our readers are encouraged to advertise here to seek relationships. encounters. adven­tures. etc All advertising should, how­ever, not contain language that would offend an unsuspecting reader OCTOBER 4, 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 19 YARD & GARAGE SALES 1710 vasSar-:-- furniture. clothing. and accessoroes Sat • October 5. 9am-4pm ---SUPER GARAGE SALE - Oct S-6. Sam Mostly household goods 3009 Drexel, near W Alabama Apt Sale 1410HydePark•30 ThosSatur- ~'!_& ~unday 1<H> ... HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce 1t here then stand back tor the crowd Call 5~8490 orvosot the Vooce at 408 Avondale to place your yard sale announcement PLAY SAFE Safe sex 1s fun. erotic Play safe, for your sake. for your partner's sake LESTER, WHEN AR£ <{()lJ GOING TU 00 SOME:T\'\\NG ABOUI ®SE: 8\C, P£ST':>? 20 MONTROSE VOICE OCTOBER 4, 1985 The Montrose Voice If Montrose is part of your world too, you should be part of the Montrose Voice. TO SUBSCRIBE, OR TO ADVERTISE, CALL 529-8490 __·_-_\' _:_- - __, __ ":~"~-.----I \ OCTOBER 4, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 On the Town ACCOMMODATIONS (for Visitors to Houston) Hou ~ton Gunt HoOM· 108 Avondale- -523'=' 2218 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE E9g1ecr•l Inn- 104 Avondale Sio-9767 GAY BARS Birn - 710 Pac1tic- 52Pr9427 country ~dmg· -53' -westhe1m9f-=526-151"9 opening SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE BrezOI River Bottom- 2400 Brazos 528--9192- counlry SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE fdd1ngton·1 6121 Hillcroft-981·6121 ~8eU-659-<M53 country G.ueon- 2303 Richmond - 522-7616 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Heaven -·p;C•lt~ 521-91~.aco-­SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE H0;°:1oe Tuam-528-9128 Hootet1- 221~efMS21 -23'10 JR a::eiie Pac•l>e 521-2519 - - --­SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MOfitrose Mining Co- 805 Paciftc-529-7488 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Mother Lode Cate & S.loon- 804 P;G."f1c:S23- 0511 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Nurnbet'I 2 300 Weslheimer- 526-6551 nu wa..,. Aascais- 2702 Ktrby-524-8272 C1mng enter· tainmen.•:.---~~~~-­Rendezvou1- 1100 WHll'le1mer 523·2422 Studt<> 13= 1318 Weetheimer - 521·9041 . 521. llOJO The 911 - 611 Hyde Park 52'8-9079~­SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Twins 2053 Wirt Rd 827 1113 IN \11( COURSE Of T\\£SE. PROCE.t:DINGS, Wt WILL \NTRODIXE 5£.VlRl\L IJ\lN(SSE.5 WHO SA\J THE DffENDANT f\1 T\1E IN f\OOIT~N. W£ WILL SHClJ T\i!\T A SI-OE, IN THE Sfl(\_£. F\ND ':>WL£ \<NO\.JN TO St. Hf\13\TUALLI{ WOON B'< THE DffENDf\NT, l&.S fOO\ID IMt'itDlf\11.LI{ flHER THE CRIME '1'0.J M\1£N'T BEEN TELLING ME £VER{THING. HAVE l/OlJ 9 SCENE Of °™£ CRIME Ventur•N - 2923 Ml•n- 522-0XIO SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PRIVATE GAY CLUBS Ci'U'b'Houston Body Centre 22os Fenn1n· 659- <998 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Fr;ncn (h;;'rtcw Tn.ter-320' L~ill- 0782 M.dto;;nesp;-3;-00 Fa-;-,1n- 512:mg­P- ouus 1314 Aoeahe 524-PIGS VACATIONS VISITING SAN FRANCISCO? DOLORES ST BED & BREAKFAST 41f>-861-5887 OR WRITE MARC 381 DOLORES ST . S F , FOR INFO For Houston travel agents, see •·r;;;ei Agents• in the Greater Montrose Busi­ness Directory. next page - NEW ORLEANS GUEST HOUSE 1118 Ursultnes. (504) 56&<1177 See our display ad monthly in the Montrose Voice SAN FRANCISCO: LELAND HO TEL 1315 Polk. 1-BOC>-253-5263 or (415) 441· 5141 . See our display ad monthly 1n the Montrose Voice ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular class1· lied rates of paying "by the word," you can purchase space here ''by !he inch." When buying by the inch, you can include special art, logos or fancy typestyles. REGULAR RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3" $49 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3" $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3" $39 r 1c(':\ll r;~ -=- = I ~5f \ r1w \ r--- . 'A ;.."'------------------ 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat SELECTED EVENTS o 4 cT o 5 cT IN FUTURE WEEKS • IN 1 WEEK Baytown Lambda meets OCT OCT OCT OCT OCT 7 30pm Oct 11 6 7 8 9 10 Cntena for ..,cluaion in 7·0ay Ct <J end Mo 1tro Rt eources 1 Event or group m ... 1apec1f1c.11y pertain to nefgttbOrhOOd of Montroae or Hooston·s pay cummot1ity urn.. me,or crty state or national holtday or m110r natt0nal gay event 2 Strictly commercial .... enrs not •ocfuOed 3 8...-.neu. civic and aoc-111 groups and tneir events are generaay quallhed 4 P01mca1 events where onty one Vtf'w ol e ~bject. candidate or party ta dom•n.ant not qual1hed For add1t1onal informatt0n or phOne number&. look tor the sponsonng organization undef ' Resources Typestyles indicate events' location: Eventa in Houston, Events of Local Interest Elsewhere. Events of Aleo Interest SELECTED EVENTS • SUNDAY: W.W.H. l:lowling THROUGH 7 DAYS League, 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanes • FRIDAY: "Breakthrough" lesbian-feminist program, KPFI', FM-90, 8:15-llam • FRIDAY: Montrose Country Cloggers meet 7pm, MCCR, 1919 Decatur •SATURDAY-SUNDAY: 11th Annual Texas Renaissance Festlval, Plantersvllle, Oct. S-6, 12·13, 19-20, 2fr.27, Nov. 2-3, 9-10 • SATURDAY: KS, AIDS Foundation meets 3400 Montrose, no. 501, llam • SATURDAY' Houston Gay Health Advocates meet 7:30pm Oct.5 • SATURDAY: Alley Theatre preview "Execution of Justice," Oct. 5, benefit for KS! AIDS Foundation, Gay & Lesbian Switchboard, Gay Political Caucus, Hazlewitch Productions • SUNDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 9am-noon, MacGregor Park • SUNDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center • SUNDAY Women's bowling league plays. 3pm, Stadium Bowl • SUNDAY: Overeat.ere Anonymous meet 8pm Montro•e Counseling Center, 900 Lovett • MONDAY: Frontrunners run from Golf Center, Hermann Park •MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm et Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • TUESDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center • TUESDAY: MSA "Fun Volleyball League" plays, 7pm • TUESDAY: Montrose Symphonic Band meeta Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm • TUESDAY: Lutherans Concerned meets Oct. 8 , Grace Lutheran Church, 2.515 Waugh • TUESDAY: Citizens for Human Equality meets 7:30pm Oct. 8, Houston House, 1617 Fannin, 9th floor • TUESDAY: Houston Data Professionals meets 7:30pm OcL8 • WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center • WEDNESDAY: Neartown Busines• Alliance meets 7pm Oct. 9, Liberty Bank. 1001 Westheimer • IN 1 WEEK: T•ao-Oll football WMkend. DollOI • tN 1 WEEK: Annual l•bian a Gay Pride Conlerence. A. Lauderdale. Fla Columbus Day Weekend • IN I WEEK. Houston North Professionals meeta 7 ;30pm, Oct 12 • IN I WEEK: Gay A111ani; & Fn•nds meot 3pm Oct.13 • IN 1 WEEK· Columbus Day, OCI. 14 • IN 1 WEEK Al!lrmallon;Gay and l•bian Mormons nahonal oonfwence. San Diego. OCI. 14-15 • IN I WEEK: In"'1!rity meel8 7;30pm Oct. 14, Autzy House, 6265 Mam U N I WEEK: Montro•e Art Alliance meet.I Oct. 14 • IN I WEEK: KS/ AIDS Foundauon & Montroee Counoeling Center AIDS Risk Reduetion (Safe Sexl Workshopa, 8pm Oct 14 • IN 1 WEEK: Gay Political CauC'Us meel8 3217 Fannin, 7:.'lOpm Oct.16 • IN 2 WEEKS Fall Wet1theimer Colony Art F°"tival Oct 19-20, 1001 w ... theimf'I' • IN 2 WEEKS Choicee meet<> !pm Oct. 20, MMterson YWCA. 3615 Willia • IN 2 WEEKS. Parenl8 FLAG meet.. ~akd~2D, Pre.b~-t.rian ~nt.er, 41 • IN 2 WEEKS Houston Area Gay&. l.abian Engineers & Scitnti•ta meet 7pm Oct 22 • IN 2 WEEKS: Montr'D<'e Civic Club (l\ear1<1wn) meel8 7pm Oct.22, 1413 Wf'Slheimf'r • IN 2 WEEKS: Grtat.er Montrost Bu•m- Guild meel8 7pm Oct. 23, Brtnnan 'a Reataurant, 3300 Smith • IN 3 WEEKS Partnta & Friendo of Leeb1ans & Gayo national convention Oct. 25-2~. Atlanta • IN 3 WF..EKS Houston Triathlon I\', Oct. 26 • IN 3 WEEKS Full Moan, "Hunt•·· Maan."OCI 28 DINING OUT IN MONTROSE DODD DD DD llWEDNESOAY; Human Rights Campaign Fund mnual awards. Waldorf Astoria Hotel, N-York, Oct. 9, honoring lV host Phn Donahue, publisher Gloria Steinem a lambda legal Defense & Education Fund • WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League competition • IN 3 WEEICS Hati__,, OC1 31 • IN 4 WEEKS Election Day, Nov. 5 • 5 WEEKS Houston Tenn11 Assn. "Hau-T• V" Nov 9-11 RESTAURANTS ALL RESTAURANTS LISTED HERE SERVE AS DISTRIBUTION POINTS FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE Baba Vagt 1- 2607 Granl 522..()042' ---­Bouleverd Cate 808 Lo..,ett- 521 1015 - SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MtSSOuu Street Cale t117 M ISOUn-529-1 264 Mt Bake-I Tafer 2405 s Mpl'lerd 524-3451 Mother LOde C;ate & Satoon"':"aoc Pac1fte ~ 0511 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE O anen"s Oyster- Bar -608 WestM1mer 524 0105 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE P~mond at Kirby 524-0015-­A~ s W AlabarN' ! 2&6900 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Raacats 27o2Kii'.bY !ii2'4 6'n ---­s;;;;;~ 3619 w;;;;;;g.;,n UM773 - SPanish Hower- 392t Main u~ 1100 SpuO-U·L .. o-416 W...,,.lmct~-­Stat P:z:i'I-" 2111 Norfolll - $23-0800 Ste11k n Egg- 4131 Montrose-b2&:i13S Tim~ Shop-~Wetthe1mer ~ 2289 Willie's BBQ WntheUfter al Montroae--52&- 5< 11 • WEDNESDAY: Overeat.ere Anonymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold • THURSDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tenms Cent.er • THURSDAY: "Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFI' Radio, FM-90 • THURSDAY' Avondale Association meet;; 7;30pm Oct. 10, Christian Women's Cent.er, 310 Pacific • THURSDAY: Mixed Bowhng LPague, 9pm, Stadium Bowl, 11200 BraE>Smain • IN 5 WEEICS Velefan's Day. Nov 11 ~WEEKS: T•os Gay ROdeo. Houston, Nov. 15-17, wllh ~dging Mr a Ms Rodeo Nov 1" • IN 7 WEEKS. Thanlcsgtving, Nov 28 ~~~ ~WEEKS Turkey Trot Fun Run, • IN 10 WEEKS Jinglt Bell fun Run, Dec IS • IN 11 WEEKS Chrls!mas. Dec. 25 • IN 12 WEEKS N-Year's he. Dec. 31 • II\ AROIJI' 27 WEEKS 11th annual Southeaet.em Conference for Lesb1ano and Gay Men, spring 1%1l, Ntw Orleans • IN 38 WEEKS 17th annlv9rsay °' Slanewaff RiOll. N-Yat1<, June 28 • 11' 44 WFF.KS Gay Games JI, '1'ri11mp m '86,n Aug 9-17, 1986, San Frant'1sco lllN "5 WEEKS ""1 ann"*5ary °' lederal Ming against T•os· "hamassual cordJct 1aw," Aug 17, 1982 22 MONTROSE VOICE I OCTOBER 4, 1985 TIRES Greater Montrose Service le Shopping Directory ··~ 529-1414 TO AO\i£RTISE ON THIS PAGE OR IN THE MAIN FRONT PAGES Of Tl-fE MONTROSE VOICE. CALL 529-8490 'MEKDAYS 10'\M-5 3G'M ~ .. ADULT VIDEO WE DELIVER VIDEOS Your gay video service 1420West~e•mer 522-4485 AOVERTISINI PROVIDING A SERVICE? -­Keep It hsted here in the Montrose Voice where 1terally thOusands turn each week - VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional ser.;1ce through a Voice c1ass1f 1ed Call 5~8490 Pay by checi< or charge II on your Ameri­can Express. Diner's Club. MasterCard Visa or Carte Blanch AUTO SALES. LEASING MERIOIEN LEASING Lee Borba 97~1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ----- ASCOT LEASING LTD. 1303 Upland 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE - SAN JACINTO MOTORLEASING - 10700 R1cnmond #100. 781·8566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Also see ·cars & Bikes• on Mon1rose Class1f1ed'" page AUTO REPAIF Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Ma1or1M1nor Repairs Gas or Diesel f · :ti al Repa" 526-3723 211· Falfv•ew Gay Owned & Operated ALL PAINT & BODY SHO_P __ 1510 Leeland 659-3131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAFT AUTOMOTJVE __ _ 1411 Tall 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PISTONS UP 1901 Tift. 5211-1901 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE AUTOREPAJR ' BODY SHOP- 2001 Harold 522·5255, 526-1940 CLEANING. JANITORIAi SERVICE PLUS 528-6245 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Becks Cleaning Spec1almng m Bars Professional Service We Care How You Look 528-9427 (S.m-11am) CLOTHING. SENSUAL SENSUOUS LINGERIE 5920 Hwy 6 N 859-2023 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE CLOTHING. MEN! UNION JACK 12t2 Westhe1mer 528-9600 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE COMPUTER-RE LA TEO COLUMBIA RIBBONS & SUPPLIES 8939 Bunny Run. 999-0947 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE CONSTRUCTIO~ WILMARK CONSTRUCTION co. We do remo d eling. ro om ad d it ion s, minor plumbing . electr ica l. No job too small or too large. 521- 1377 DENTISTS Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhe1mer Hou~t on. TX 7~ Monday thru Saturday Hours by Appointment (713) 524-0538 lmlMJillH - A-1 DOMESTICS ERVICE Dally maids. party helpers. and all domes­tic services provided In tx..s1ness since 1981. 932-1363 FORTUNE: NANA'S Psychic Reader and Advisor Card and Palm Reader 521-2941, 804 Waugh Dr. Readings 1/2 price with ad HAIR SALON~ BARBER SHOP: UNION JACK 1212 Westhe1mer, 528-9600 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE - RON'S H AIR STUDIO 1310 Howthornt 521-3000 Your Barber/ Stylist in NW Houston ls Hank Wierzba 680-3166 682-9495 Barchus Barber Shop 727 N.W. Mall LEGAL SERVICES J)AVIJ> So~EBEE ' ATTORNEY AT LAW -a lawyer who cares about Montrose .. H21-Hf)HH NO CHARGE for mlfla/ consulta1'0n. AFFORDABLE FEES-quoted uplront Evenings and weekend appomtments o DWI o Possession of Drugs ~ o Prostitution o Lewd Conduct o Debt Rehef a Bankruptcy a 1n1ury Claims a Job & Accident and otner areas _ J)\\' J-Jo"HOM ~:..?00_ 3816 W Alabama. Suite 212 ~ber Hams County Criminal Lawyen AUOCilltK>n 0.11td SosebH (SOZ BEJ ii hcMHd .,:~~·.so:=: ~:1ce NI Cert by TX 8d of Lg Spec. FUNERAL DIRECTORS - IM3l!lif!1llJ!1;11- sTEvE 0 . MARTINEZ. M.0. 2801 Ella Blvd suite G. 868-4535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch. 528-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GYMS FITNESS EXCHANGE --- 2900 Richmond, 524-9932 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPB CLINIC 5401 Dashwood #10. 661-2321 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HOME AIR CONDI f IONING TIME FOR A/C REPAIR? $25 pl,;t' perts. CALL 643-0391. ----- MldTownAlr Buy & Mii window AIC Strvlct •II brtndl AICa 521--7 dooya IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MOVINI MOVEMASTERS Boxes. too• Visa. MC. AMEX welcome 1925 Westhe1mer 6 I0-6555 PEST CONTROL PEST CONTROL 993-0663 COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL TPCL #05640 VISA MASTERCARD !QfdmllJ'f\imM - Openings ava1labl for students of all ages and levels. Member Music Educa4 tors Natrona! Conference, Music Teachers National Assoc1at1on, National Guild of Piano Teachers. For more mfor· mat1on and registration call Carey Jones at 749-7530 or 527-0660 PRINTINI ---SPEEDY PRINTING 5400 Bellatre Blvd 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE INTERNATIONAL PRINTING SPECIALISTS 2103 Yale. 861--0026 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE THE tlllf Pt.ACE _ ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview 3 Blks West of Montrose TRAVEL --TRAVEL COMPANIONS Want to go to Hong Kong. Rio or even San Antonio for a weekend. or go by motor home. No one to go with Call now for more 1nformat1on and brochures 932· 1363 TRAVEL CONSULTANTS­Complete tra\tel arrangments. All services FREE Open Monday through Friday 9am-5 30pm 2029 Southwest Fwy Houston. TX 77098 (713) 5~8464 VACATION IDEAS? See 'Vacations" following ·on the Town" on the previous page VENDING The Far Side GALLERY At lost. The For Side Gal "r1 1s here All the material from Gory Larson's previous three books. The For Side. Beyond The For Side. and his newest bestselling collection. In Search of The For Sido - n<:NI together 1n one omni bus collection. Containing over 6CXl comic panels plus 8 full-colOf mini-posters. The Far Side Goll91Y bnngs us the beastly world where oni­mols often make monkeys out of people. Only $8.95 208 pages 8~11 Order a copy for your favorite Far Side Ion! -------------- Pleose send me: __copies of The Far Side Gallery at S8 95 per copy plus $1 postoge Ond handling Total amount---- (If check. make poyobte to Andrews. McMeel & Por1<er ) Please allow 4"6 weeks fOf deliver{ 0 Check D Money Order 0 VISA D Moster("..ord : Nome ----------- 1 Address I City State _Zip I Credit cord '------~i!~~~·~ I : Signature O> ,,.., credit cord EXp1r Dote I Send to The For Side Gallery c/o Montrose Voice 1 ____ I 4400 1ohnson Drive. Fairway. KS 66205 I '---------------------------· I THINK SO. AT AS UlNG At; U:P.ST. I KNa.J lM:RE l(()IJ KNOW TO START. •• AND I UW l/OlTR£ BEGIN 111\S VER\{ GETTING P.FT£RNOON ~ INTO .. Montrose Voice Classified Advertising :.~:•: :~0 • ~,r ':'.'{ ~dv-:::~nf.',:~hiJ.s,:r:':'en"/ ~J:;:;t•per F0t rt1Qul d1'fpity tdwr11 ,ng THE HEADLINE: You get up to 3 words in bold, all capital letters and centered on 1 line, for a total cost of $3. (Or up to 6 words, $6. Or up to 9 words, $9. Etc.) THE TEXT: Then, each additional word in regular type 1s 40¢. (Additional regular words in .. ALL CAPS .. or Bold Word• not in all caps are 55¢ each. Additional BOLD WORDS in all caps are 70¢ each.) If centering Imes m the text or at end of ad, compute the cost of the words individually, then add $3 for each line centered EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each add1t1onal word like this 40¢ THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each add1t1ona1 word like this 40¢ THESE THREE LINes­ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLO, $9.00 Then each additional word like this is•°' ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WORDS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE 55' EACH AddHlon•I bold wordo Ilk• this In IHI .,. SSC each. ADDITIONAL BOLD, ALL CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 7M EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer, make no copy changes during the run, pay for the full run in advance, and deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same conditions and deduct 25%. BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number We'll confidentially forward all responses to your ad to you by mail. Rate 1s $3 for each week the ad runs (Responses will be forwarded indefinitely, however, for as long as they come m.) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail your ad in or phone 11 1n. You can pay by check. money order, Mastercard, Visa, American Express, Diner's Club or Carte Blanche. DEADLINE: Class1f1ed ads received by noon Wednesday will be placed m that week's newspaper Ads received later will be placed in the following week's newspaper ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number, clo Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006-3028 It will be for­warded, unopened. to the advertiser. Enclose no money $3 bold line---­$ 3 bold line $3 bold line----- text words·---------- ~----------~--- ------ ----- Use add1t1onal paper 1f necessary CATEGORIES. DAnnouncements O Accomodations (lodging for Houston visitors) 0 Cars & Bikes · O Commercial Space D Dwellings & Roommates O Employment & Jobs Wanted 0 Items For Sale o Models, Escorts, Masseurs D Personals D Pets D Rides 0 Services O Travel D Yard & Garage Sales _ bold lines for headlines at $3 each: regular words m text at 40¢ each: ALL CAPS regular words m text at 55¢ each: Bold words In text at 55¢ each: BOLD ALL CAPS in text at 70¢ each: Add11ional Imes centered w1thm the ~at the end of the ad. add $3 per line (in addition to the per word cost): Blind ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad in 11 mailed to me. $1.25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Times weeks: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) : o Also, 1 wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week. I have enclosed (or will be billed or charged. as indicated below) an add1llonal 0 $29 for 6 months or D $49 for 1 year. TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged: METHOD OF PAYMENT: D Check enclosed D Money order enclosed o Cash o VISA charge 0 MasterCard charge 0 Diners Club charge o Carte Blanche charge 0 Amercian Express charge If charging, card exp1rat1on date---------------­Credit card number ~ Signature Name -~ ----------------- Address - Phone(s) for venhcat1on of ad, 1f necessary MAIL OR BRING TO: Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006- 3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 108m·5 30pm OCTOBER 4 , 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 23 MONTROSE RESOURCES .... SELECTED $TATE NAT ORGANIZATIONS Bar o-n.. A.an 01 Tx fBOAn -720 &&Zoe '902. Aultll'I C512~ 472-3333 AIDS Achon CounetVF.;er-•Ol of AIDS Rel8ted 0,garuz.ationt. 1115._. Independence Av SE, WWungton. DC 20003. {212} 5'7"'3101 Gay & Leis.bi.an Pr.-Aan-POB A. OktChelMI St• New York. NY 10011-(212) 919-&622 Gay Rtghts N•t lobby-POB 1892. Wur11ngton, DC 20013-(202) 54&-"'" Human Reghll ~n Fund--POB 1398. W~ lflijton, DC 20013-(202) 546-2025 lambd• legai Def.,.._ 132 W 43td. N9'# YM. NY 1003$-(212)944-11488 Le.btan/Gay Rights Ad'lloe.8111-POB 822. AUllln 78767 Med .. Fund for HurMn Rtghtl-POB A. 04cl Chel ... Sta, New Yor1l. NY 10011--(212) ~ Nat A.an of Busu~ Counci"-Box 15145. San F'anasco. CA 94115-( .. 15) 88S-e3e3 Nat Assn of Gay & L..t>~ Demo Ctubs-1742 M .. Av SE. WuhengCon. DC 20003-(202) 5'7·3104 Nat Gay Hee"h Educ Found•hon-· POB 7&4, New York. NY 10036-(212) 563-6313 or o, GrMnberg (713) 523-5204 N8t Goy A.tghts Ad'tlocat•-540 Castro. Sain Fran· CISCO. CA 94114-1415) 883-3624 Nat Gay TMlt Force (NGTF)-80 5th A'll New York. NY 10011-(212) 741-5800 NGTF"s er.&sbne-f800} 221·7044 (outsec:M NflW York Stele) Awai ColilrUon Clo W8ht'-bngN. Box 811. Blum. TX 7&1JV Tx Gsyl\..t.n Tesk Forc:»-POB AK. Denton 18201-•e1n 387-8218 US T,...,,....it•TranMlluaf Cont8Ct 9¥<. 1017·8 _E~. S.ttie. 98122 EO&J_ 824-829& ATTENTION ORGANIZATIONS Check your listing We list here each week name of organization. address, phone. regular rooeting dates and times, and ~n~~;,~~~~;~o8::~tt~nt~r~a~r~~s:~n~~! Voice, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 THE MONTROSE YOICE-INVOLYED IN THE COMMUNITY Aod for AIOS- POB66952·257. 77006 526-8077 An A Capell• Chorus. Church or Chnst POB 611734. 77266 AP~he-Su-n--~5~22~-7~695=--~ ACLU-1136 W Gray-52.f.-5925 AloSHOt11ne ·52&-321i'(Gay &~ Switchboard} Am;'"""teatt -G.y Atneeatl-POB 66711, 77266 527-9255 Astro Rainbow AU.anc.-520-073.f (TTY) A.1ro Ralf\bow SOc..ty tOT'ihe 0..f -924-5074' (TTY O< •ooce). 645-007< (TTY! Avonda6e Aasn-POB 8805.f. Tr266:-rneell 7 30pm 2nd Thurs. Women·s Ch"sun Ctr, 310 Poe>foc: Azulao Womyn·s Megaz1ne --8130 SW Fwy •335-2E&-5237 ~,~J~i~~-ROO.rt Moon. d.,, 209 Bering Memorial United Methochst Church- 1«0 Harokj--526-1017 svc 10:50am Sun Choic• Unl.iN&ed-POB 70G88, 77270--~ 3211 (Gay & L•bten Switchboard) meets 1pm 3rd 3un. Masterson YWCA. 3615 W1lll1. "Soc11I Mixer" 1-30pm alternate Fridays. Sunday brunch 12.30pm 3rd Sun Christian Ch~h of th• Good-Shephercl- 1707 Montrose IVC lpm Sun, B1~e study 7 )()pm Thurs , Church or Christian Fa•th-18'0 WMthe1mer 529--8005. svcs 10 45am Sun Bible study 7 30pm Wed. Rev Chris A Rtee, pastor Citizens tor Human Equality (CHE)- POB 304S. 77253-680-3346. 937-3518 meet 2nd Tues Hou House_ 1617 Fannin. 911'\ noo, ectu,"ty ,oom Olazens for UnUed Hou (CUH)-3317 Montrose "632~1'8 cu_.. 342-6502 CO."i4st="meeis At e;azc; Anter Bottom ~400 Brazos-528-9192 COmm1ttee tor Publte Hearth Aw-.;;;;;;.,-=roB 3045. 772S:l-~. 522·5084 "Shanng Group for the Worried Wetr moot Fr1, 7·8pm. MontrOM Counsehng Ctr ~c)~roi =~l~,~~m~miu;{c- Commun1ty Gospel Ctr -3207 Montrose- 521~ 0511 Svcs 11am Sun. 7.30pm Thurs Congreget•on Aytz Chayim-18.fO W811hetmer-68tr8997, 728-5181 111c & social Spm 2nd & .. th Fri 0111na Foundation-2700 Muon-52,.·5791 o.g;;;tylttOU-=:3217Fann1n- 52&-0111, 523'-7644 rn-.s 7 30pm Sat ~Private Prol ... t0n•I Social CiUb- 961- 81176 ~.t~On Ot Charil•• Uniled fo, Sooal S.Vt- ~~~~~~=r~tu~~A~hl a~~u0r!cs~~~ ~troee Clm.e. MontrOH eoon. ... ~ Ctr lit Un.tanan Church-fl210 Fannin-~1571 l'IC 1 t 15am Slln Frontrunnerw-R.tidy 681-5879 or Joe 520--8019 runs Sun. Tun & Thuf'S Memorial Park Tennis Ctr; runs Mon. Golf Ctr. Hermann Perk Gay &.'FA1-;;'9$hanng Uper1ence (GASE)-528~ 1311, 52&-089'-'1---~-~­GAY& L8abtan Archive. of Tx aff111ate of l!H Inc Gay & L•b•an Mormons-17t3 W•the1mer 16040. 77098-56&-1'13 Gay &. LM~an SW1tc.hbo.-d-POB 66591. 772fi6-529-3211 .,..rorrnatK>n. counHhng. ret­.,,. ala. TTY. AIDS HolloM GrMtet MontroM Bu11ne11 Gu1td-M•k• Neuon S30-030ll O< Bruc<i Woolley 521l-M&I ,,_, 7pm. 4th W«I. Btemart1 R•t 3300 Stntth The Group theeter workshop- Joe Watts 522· 2204 meets 7pm Thurs Dignity Ctr. 3217 Fanrun Haztiw1tch Productions-2615 Waugl'\ Of •2tl. 77006 letb1.,, concerts. tree rna1hng hat Homophde lnterla1th Alliance--729 Manor- 523-6968 Hou A,ea Gay &. Lffb1an Engineers & 5ceenh1t1-POB 66631, 77006-771-6488. 7 .. 10pm rMell 7pm ,.th Tuff Hou Bar Owners Assn (HOBO)-c/o Ventur•N m3 Mam-522.0000 Hou Community Clowns-862-831,. Hou Council of Clubs-526--8054 Hou Data Professk>nals-523-6922. 664--&459 meets 7:30pm 2nd Tues Hou Gay Health Advocal•-790-9448 Meets 7 30pm 1st Sat Hou Gay Students Asln-7.fJ-3098 Hou Inter-Faith Alltance: contact th,ough lntegntylHou Hou Motorcyeie Club-c/o Mary's. 1022 W•t­heuner- 52&-8851 Hou North Prof....anal:a-POB 3840. Humble 773.f7-81R at 821-7126 meet 7 30pm 2nd Sat Hou Outdoor Group-Ken 522--0698· scuba dr¥­mg. Cozumel. MexlCo. Aug 31·5ep .. llH lnc-POB 16041, 77222--694-1732. 529-701 .. aft1llated groups are Interact, B'zzamo's A Place tn the Sun. Montrose Art Alliance. G~ & L11btan Archi11• of TK. Gay & l.elbtan Sw•tchboarcl. Montrose Symphomc Band, board m•I 7 JOpm 1st Thurs (vaned locations); educational ton..m 7 30pm 3rd Thurs ~eiio11 Spea--,k-.-,.-." "'Bu-.,--.u --"'PO=s~39'"'1-." "'s..-t•ir• 77401-E6~4064 lnlegr11y"'1H7 o_u_<-=E-p•-sc_o_p_a.,..11a_n..,.l---=p-=o-=-s 68008. 77266-52.f-1489 meets 7.30pm 2nd & ,.th Mon. Autry House. 6265 Main Interact POB 16041, 77222-529-701' KPFT Aa~M-90-l19 Lovett Bt'lld-52&­. fOOO ·-sr•kthrough'" lesb1a,,..femint1t pgm Frt 8 1S-10 30am: • w1kie 'n St•n'" gay pgm Thurs 7 30-900pm KSIAIDS Foundalt<>n-3317 MonlrOH Bo1t 1155. 77006-52.f-2"37 AIDS A•lk Reduction (Safe Sex) Workshops 8pm 2nd & 4th Mon except Dec. 1n con1unct1on w1tti Montrose Coun1&11ng Cen· ter, tratning weetc:end & Sep 21-22 Jerry-K1uifman Cance~,-=Fu~n-d~--=1==1-=-e.-..,•'"'106=--- Krewe ot Hydra-811 Gra<;ejand- BID Mere; 7:16-1032 ~Gay Ak:ohohcs & Alanon-- 1214 Jo Annie--!>21·9772 L•biantGay Resource Svc-Unrver.1fVCifiiOU .f800 Calhoun, bOx 309. 77004-749-1253 meets 2 30pm alternate Tuea. Spandietop Room, 2nd ftOOf, Unrvet11ty Ctr let Us Entertain You Weekend-pro;ect of Hou Council ol Clui.-526-l!05o0 l"he ume Churcn-212 Fargo- '522 .. 7695 iVCi 230pm Sun LOn;itar Nudest GrouP=-~140512. n27• Lutherans Concerned-meets at Grace lutne­ran Chu,Ch. 2515 Waugh-521~ ,.53--1143 meet 2nd & ,.th Tues evenings McAdory Hous&-c10 KS'AIOS Foundation. 3317 Montrose Box 1155-524-2437 Men Against o9cept1Cin COOrtesY Club POB 5,.1871. 77254-529-3211 (Gay & i.eab1an Switchboard) meets bi--weekly MetrOPohtan Community Church of th9 R•u,. rectt0n iMCCR)-1919 Oecatur-86M~t .. 9 pot luck dinner 7 30pm 151 Sat montnty. 1vcs 10 45em & 7 15pm Sun & 7 15pm Wed. member· ship inquirers ciau 7 30pm Mon. educahon CIUMI Tues & Wed 9'\/M (Hou) Met,opo41tan Wind Ensemble--529-9610: Meets St Stephens Eptscopal Chu,c~ 7 30 Wed Montrose Art Alhence-694-1732. 888-931 ... 869- 5332 affiliate VH tnc: meets 2nd Mon Montrote Busrneu Guild see G,..f., Mantroee B-us Gutld -=---~-c- ---~-- Montroae Church of Chnst-1700 Mont,OM- 777~9286 l'llC 11am Sun MQ;;lrose~c;;.c C.Ub lee Neutown Aun MontrOMt ChnlC--803 Ha'#thome-S2&-SS31 open Mon.. Tue. Thurs &-9pm ~~'rn-8c3C';;t~9f:;;~ meet,_ Montrose Coons.;,ing Ct,-900 Lovett •203- 5~7 AIDS lllCtlm support group & J()pm Mon; Women's SupJ)Ort Group 7pm Tuel. AIDS Risk Reduct.on (Safe Sex) Worbhopi &pm 2nd ~S:l7o~Fou~c;r~ Dec. In eontunct•on with MQ;;i,ose Smgers-C•r1 Lawrence n4--3$91 ~U(; ~~~ehea,sal Mon ev•. S.nng Church ~ttbaiil.eaQU.-POB 22272. 77227- 524-3144 Ser•• 8. Gay World Series. M1twau~ koo. Aug 26-Sep 1 MontrOM Spo. -.-.. ....,~-l-M0SA~-)-· ----speci-he aubgroup Mont,OH Symphonic Bend-POB &U13. 772611-527-9454 me« 7 30pm Tuoo. O.gnoly Ctr, 3217 Fanrun. partic1p.nt Teu frNdom Parade. Dallas. ,.pm Sep 22: affll.ate l/H Inc MORE-526-MORE. 529-0037 proioctMontroM CounM11ng Center MSAIMon Night Bowltng-i)lay Si.dUn Lanea 8200 er .. rna;n-st .... 892-.f587 MSA/Thurw N.ght (Mixed L .. gueJ Bowting­M• k• W• kert et 87~1358 play 9pm Stadium Lan¥ "'°° • ...,.,..,,, • • • • • • • • • • • ~~~'!:~dl=s20e~~= c:ornpe1.1tton >tanoul ~oons Spm Wed MSA/VoUeybllU-Ma,k 522-1469 games 7pm Tuee. Gregory·Ltnee>ln schOol. 1101 Taft MontroM Watch subgroup NNrtown AS.Sil MIJltengs-meets at tM Barn. 710 Pec1hc-S28- SM27 dub night Thurs National G•y Health Education Foundetion- 523-5204 =~~=hc;i=~l~~~~r"..:3..~~~1~-.. Near1own Awn (Montrose Crv1c Club)-1,.13 W•thetmer meet 7pm 4th Tues Neertown Business Alliance-529-7010'. meets 7pm 2nd Wed. Liberty Bank. 1001 W•the1mer New Freedom Ch,ist1an Chu,ch-829 Yale- 863-83n_ l'llCI 10.m Sun OvefNters Anonyrnot1s-e/o Montrose Coun· ~~-~t~ett~~=n~~:n~ Benng Churcll, 1440 Ho- Perents & fnencll of Lesbians & Gays (Parents FLAG)~ meets 2pm 3rd Sun, Presby­terian Ctr. 41 OakdaHt ~People-c10 Neartown Community firwhaoM-741-2524 ' Paz y L1berac.on -POB 800063. 77260--862- 147& Prnbyte,,ans for L•b1anlG•y Concems­Prelllbytenan CU. 41 O•d•ie-5~2584 meets 7 30pm 2nd Tuea "'°'"'°"'" Club (put p<ea<dents GPCl-POB -. 772611-523-802• RecrHbOnal Land Fund Comm1ttee-._.ustaog Club Protect Rice Urw Gayfl.eab1an Suppcrt Group-529-- ::~:~6~:;:es~;cti~R-=-~~d5°">2•"·""983=9-- Sh
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