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Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986
File 019
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Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986 - File 019. 1986-02-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4701/show/4694.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-02-07). Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986 - File 019. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4701/show/4694

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986 - File 019, 1986-02-07, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4701/show/4694.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 7, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 18 MONTflOSE VOICE / FEBRUARY 7, 1986 New Films Offer Comedy, Drama By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic This week's films are another mixed bag, with everything from the looniness of Robin Williams to the corniness of Roy Clark and Mel Tillis. Robin Williams and Kurt Russell star in a nicely done comedy called The Best of Times where they get to replay a crucial football game that they lost in high school. Richard Gere and an all-star cast attempt to show how politicians get into office electronically these days in Power, but somehow the movie never becomes a cohesive whole. Finally, I have a little chat with Mel Tillis and Roy Clark about their new film Uphill All The Way. The movie is quite a bit of silliness that isn't worth viewing unless you like that sort of thing. However, these two country greats were fun to interview, and can still be commended for at least getting their film made. That's more than a lot of people can say. a The Best of Times Wouldn't it be great to go back and "replay" some dreaded incident from your past and improve on it? Would your life be different if you had asked that certain person out for a date that you could never talk to, or had taken that job that you decided to turn down? Jack Dundee has something in his past that he wishes could be changed. Twelve yearB ago he fumbled a winning pass that would have given his high school team their first victory against a rival team in 60 years. He equates his fumble with the fact that his life is leading nowhere, and he's determined to change it around. The problem is trying to get anyone else interested in replaying the game. Since nobody seems to let Jack forget about the game, he becomes enthralled with the idea of a rematch. He devises an ingenius method of getting the townfolk riled up against the rival team, but has trouble getting the star quarterback to return to the field. Reno Hightower is the quarterback who threw the fabled pass to Jack, but he was badly injured in the process. Reno (Kurt Russell) has little interest in replaying and making a fool of himself if he messes up. Like Jack (Robin Williams), Reno is stuck in a rut in his life. He spends most of his time working on cars in a grubby shop, and coming home to a wife that isn't satisfied anymore. The only thing that is kind to him is his history as a football star, and he doesn't want to lose that. We can pretty well spot the direction the film is taking a mile away: Jack and Reno are going to get the whole town excited about playing the game, and in the process boost their egos and self-assurance by correcting what was screwed up the first time around. It's a bit contrived, but these guys seem to grow*and have so much fun doing it we can grin and enjoy it too. Somehow, no matter how predictable things get, we are constantly entertained by The Best of Times. Either Robin Williams is charming us with very funny antics, or we are enjoying the excitement of a sleepy town come to life. Even Kurt Russell is a pleasure to absorb with a well- drawn character who likes his life very low-key. A highlight of the movie is a subplot involving the wives of these two men. Pamela Reed (Right Stuff) and Holly Pal- ance (Under Fire) play the long-suffering wives who both throw their husbands out of the house. In one hilarious scene, they invite their husbands over for dinner, but there can be no talk of sex or football. Robin Williams stars in "The Best of Times" Sitting around the table, the topics leave much to be desired. "How about that situation in Beirut?" one of the men asks, "I hear it's very swampy over there," replies one of the wives. Meanwhile, Jack is sneaking back and forth into the living room to sneak peeks at a football game. The whole dinner is a comedy delight. Director Roger Spottiswoode (Under Fire, Terror Train) does an adequate job on his first stab at comedy. Fortunately, he does not dwell on the obvious liketrain-. ing for the game, but puts more emphasis on the development of the main characters. The final football match is a bit silly, but it is an essential to the plot that must be dealt with. The Best of Times is really a good time at the movies, and the preview crowd cheered long and hard. Your toleration of the silliness of Robin Williams may have a lot to do witfryour enjoyment of the film because he is the main focal point. Still, he is kept fairly well under control, and fits in well with the rest of the actors. Nobody has yet tapped the unique raw talents of this incredible performer on screen, but the glimpses in this film will have to suffice until someone does. n Power Power is an attempt to make a high-tech, high-thought movie about the mechanisms used to manipulate politicians' image with advertising and advanced marketing techniques. Directed by the man who gave us heavyweights like Network and The Verdict, we would expect a heavy social statement set in the mood of something like Robert Redford's The Candidate. Instead, we get a glossy, heavy- handed contrivance that never quite makes much of a statement at all. Richard Gere is Pete St. John, the best political media wizard in the business. He boosts the images of political figures with little interest in the political ideas. All he knows are polls, figures, and the image presented on the television screen. Pete's clients are located everywhere, from a South American Socialist candidate to a New York millionaire running for a New Mexico office. He makes it very clear from the first that he is going to run and change their lives. What they do with their ideas if elected means nothing to him, only getting them into the public's mind and transferring it into votes. Surrounding Pete are people whose function seems to be to keep him occupied when he's not busy (which isn't often). Julie Christie haB a nothing role as a reporter who used to be married to Pete. They meet occasionally to go to bed or talk about why they broke up, but it doesn't ring very true. Kate Capshaw has even less to do as she stands around as his aide and sometime bed partner. The male characters seem to fare a bit better. Denzel Washington (A Soldier's Story) has a small, meaty role as a bad guy trying to manipulate Pete and a candidate. This starts a very ridiculous subplot with Pete being wiretapped and almost being killed by this guy for very vague reasons. E.G. Marshall plays a Senator who is bowing out, but he's involved in this vague subplot also and his part becomes a bit hard to follow. As Marshall's wife, Beatrice Straight (Network) gives another hysteric performance that got her an Oscar back in 1976. Somehow in all the overacting, we realize that she has an important role in the whole thing—but I'm still not sure what it really is. Faring the best is Gene Hackman in a small but brilliant role as Pete's mentor and friend who is on the downward side of his career. An alcoholic, he is still, trying to do things in a style that is behind the times. Hackman is so good we almost wish we were looking closely at him instead of Pete. In the middle of this maze of characters stands Richard Gere, stone-faced and inward as usual. His character is the usual, cold and ruthless with little time for people. Gere can be likeable when he interacts well with others (see Officer and a Gentleman), but these "Gigolo" clothes. Media consultant Wilfred Buckley (Gene Hackman), left, discovers he and his former partner Pete St. John (Richard Gere) are working for opposing candidates in "Power" Houston DEPRESSION GLASS Show 1986 The once a year opportunity to see the largest & rarest selection of DEPRESSION ERA glass in the Country Ft. Bend County Fairgrounds Hwy. 59 at 36 Rosenberg, Texas FEBRUARY 21 Friday Night 6:00-9:00 Champagne Preview Feb. 21st 6:00-9:30 p.m. ADVANCE TICKETS ONLY $12.50 ea. (also good Sat. _ Sun.) Additional information & Tickets Joy Naill P.O. Box 251 Peariand. Tx. 77581 713/485-4728 Ins Slayton 299 Hoyt Crowley, La. 70526 318/788-1598 CRYSTAL FEBRUARY 22-23 Identification Sat. 10:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Matching Sun. 12:00-5:00 p.m. Admission $3.00 Good Both Days 3rd Annual Antiques & Collectables Show-Adjoining Bldg. No. 2 Food & Drinks FREE PARKING "T SPECIALS WESTHEIMER CAFE 1525 Westheimer 1 From Midniqh $1.99 Huevos Rancheros with bacon or sausage, toast and hash browns or Scrambled Eggs with diced ham, toast and hash browns Bring your favorite bartender and receive 10% off total price1
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