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Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986
File 015
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Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986 - File 015. 1986-02-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4701/show/4690.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-02-07). Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986 - File 015. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4701/show/4690

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986 - File 015, 1986-02-07, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4701/show/4690.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 7, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript 14 MONTROSE VOICE/FEBRUARY 7. 1986 Counting Makes a Difference Why Racial Equality Needs Affirmative Action More Than Ever By Ron Takaki Pacific News Service Special to tke Montrose Voice Affirmative action is at a crossroads. Edwin Meese's draft of an executive order on affirmative action proposes to rescind the regulation requiring government contractors to use numerical goals for the hiring of racial minorities and women. To count or not to count—that is the question. How we answer it depends largely on how we perceive the problem of inequality in American society. "Counting by race is a form of racism," the Attorney General declared recently. Meese argued that an affirmative action program "that prefers one person over another because of race, gender or national origin is unfair." Government policy, he insisted, should be "colorblind." In his attack on affirmative action, Meese articulates "the culture of meritocracy"—the belief that men and women should be treated as individuals and judged on the basis of merit or lack of it. The function of government should be limited to prohibiting discrimination, leaving the problem of inequality to be solved in the marketplace. There, racial minorities and women who have merit would be able to find employment and advance themselves. But would such an integration of the work force actually occur? Meese believes inequality occurs as a matter of "taste" discrimination—the employer's individual preference for hiring white men for certain jobs. Once the government prohibits such "taste" discrimination, he argues, women and minorities would have equal opportunity. Meese's understanding of the problem of inequality fails to recognize the enormous transformation of the economy in recent decades and the ways this change has affected the employment of racial minorities and women. Racial inequality is no longer simply dependent on individual employer "taste." Rather, it is largely reinforced by social conditions and economic structures. Living in slums and attending inadequate inner city schools preclude the responsibility of equal opportunity for many people. Occupational stratification based on training and education also limits their employment possibilities. Thus, millions of racial minorities are excluded from the higher strata of employment because they do not have requisite knowledge, skills and credentials. Employers do not have to discriminate against them in order to avoid hiring them. Affirmative action as a public policy and strategy for social change seeks to address inequality as a structural problem. It generates pressures to educate, recruit, train and employ racial minorities and women across occupational strata in order to assure them equality of opportunity. But to do this effectively requires counting by race and gender. Otherwise the government would have no way to monitor and measure the efforts of employers to train and hire racial minorities and women. Large American corporations have recently indicated their intention to retain affirmative action programs. "We will continue goals and timetables no matter what the government does," said John L. Hulck. chairman of Merck. Whether or not they will do so, should President Reagan sign the executive order, remains to be seen. But after nearly 20 years of affirmative action, corporations do recognize the importance of counting. William S. McEwen, director of equal opportunity affairs at Monsanto and chairman of the National Association of Manufacturers' human resources committee, acknowledged: "Setting goals and timetables for minority and female participation is simply a way of measuring progress." In fact, it measures both progress and lack of progress. For example, in 1973, American Telephone and Telegraph entered a six-year consent decree with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to correct its prior discriminatory employment practices. By 1978, minorities in management at AT&T had jumped from 4.6% to 10%, and women in craft from 2.8% to 10%. Similarly, IBM established an equal opportunity department in 1968 to comply with affirmative action requirements. Between 1971 and 1980, the number of black officials and manager at IBM increased from 429 to 1596, Hispanics from 83 to 436, and women from 471 to 2350. Between 1974 and 1980, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs reports that among 77,000 companies with 20 million employees, companies with government contracts and therefore affirmative action plans had smaller increases of only 12% and two percent for each respective group. Here, clearly, counting or not counting made a difference. "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS: Albert G Nemer. John J. Adams and Gordon A. Thayer To better serve your needs ... Texas State Optical announces new hours at these locations TSO-Village 2515 University 528-1589 Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Closed Monday TSO-South Main 4414 S. Main 523-5109 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed .Saturday Effective Feb. 1, 1986 ^2^^ ¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ ¥ TAFT Automotive ¥ ¥ ¥ 1-+11 Taft, 58S-2190 FEBRUARY SPECIALS • Oil Change $1995 • A/C Check & Charge $1995 * Check Cooling Systemj$27tl ^10 Off On repairs. (Does not Include specials.)' Don't NEGLECT BktkyT"" GENERAL REPAIR ¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION ELECTRONIC TUNEUP AIR CONDITIONING ¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥
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