Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986
File 001
File size: 10.88 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986 - File 001. 1986-02-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4701/show/4676.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-02-07). Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4701/show/4676

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986 - File 001, 1986-02-07, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4701/show/4676.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 276, February 7, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 7, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Bar Patrons Exonerated of Lewdness Charges news, inside mn11lrose Comedy, Drama and VOICE Silliness Scott Cutsinger, films inside _ "!h? ~~v:s_paper of Montro~e" Friday, February 7, 1986 Issue 276 (713) 529-8490 Montrose Has New Flag and Rifle Corps news, inside High School Production of 'Barnum' Nearly Perfect Montrose Uve, inside Bering Pancake Festival Set for This Saturday news, inside Body of Missing Businessman Found at Airport news, inside GPC Begins to Register Voters, Screen Candidates news, inside, Human Rights Campaign Fund in Excellent Health The Came to Houston or Their Cause By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter They came to Houston from across the country-New York, Atlanta, San Francisco, Denver-18 people committed to pursuing basic human rights and furthering gay civil rights. They took time from their personal schedules to come here, each person paying the cost of their plane fare and hotel room, all for a cause they strongly believe in. But as board members of the Human Rights Campaign Fund, it's acommittmentthey all make. The Washington-based political action committee met in Houston last weekend to discuss the group's budget and fundraising efforts for 1986, in light of what board co-chair Vivian Shapiro is calling a "critical year" for gay men and lesbians. continued inside 2 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 7, 1986 ALL MEDUSA INHALENTS . $12 (thru Feb. 12) Leather by Boots proudly presents their newest location at the Venture-N! FEBRUARY 7 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 3 Body of Missing Publisher Found at Airport Chorus and Choral Directors Association A memorial service will be held for James Reach Agreement D. Chappell on Saturday, Feb. 8, at 2:00 p.m. at Earthman Funeral Home, 2420 Fannin. Chappell, co-owner of This Week in Texas, had been missing since Jan. 1. His partially clad, badly decomposed body was discovered in his automobile in a parking garage at Houston Intercontinen· tal Airport on Saturday, Feb. 1. According to a spokesperson in the city medical examiner's officer, the results of a complete autopsy will not be released until late next week. It is believed that Chap­pell, 39, suffered severe head injuries. Approximately two weeks ago, business associates ofChappell's had offered$2500 reward for infonnation regarding his whe­reabouts. Chappell's business interests included the sale of inhalants and the operation of adult bookstores. Jim Cagle, one of Chappell's business partners, believes that Chappell's death resulted from "a random act of violence." Chappell is survived by his fa ther, Donald James Chappell, of Overland montrose VOICE ANO ll.X.t.S• q.t.FI MONTROSE. TEXAS Popu.iat•on t•t 198S - · Cenlut 1r11Ctl 401 DI. 401 02 ol( .. °'1 402 02. 405 02 403 •ltd 404 01 Zip codes frougn1yi nooe. 11019 tportion). noee Bounded (roughly} Shepherd Or fwftll . Men Parkway tnortll) Main $l (us!) US S9 (south) ..at uOe rMontJOM 81¥(1 al Was1he1M9f Rd) 29"4-t 13 N Long1tu0e 9S' 22 saw Artot...ae 40' ELECTED OfflCl.t.l.S FOf:I MONTROSE G.ofge Qreaniu. Houtton City Council dill CJ 9018egOy/113J222·mJ fl Fr9fte0 -"· Hlmt County Commltto00er (ptt ) 1001Prwtott.<1131221.e111 W•lllot ,._,kin, Con$1.ote (pct 11 'IOI SMI hcmttJ (113) 2'1·5200 Debr1 OMbl.irg. ll•n Ho\iae of Aepr-!al•v• dill 1371 1911 SW Fwy 1713} 510-BOGi Cr•ig Wntungion. T1.u1 Senate ldltt 131 1'J33Ca101me. (113)651-4343 M•tkey Lellnd. US ~ ol FleprHenllhv• td11t Ill) 1919&nitll#820,/713) 739-7339 The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 276Ch ISSUE. FEB 7, 1966 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 0 .STA BUTION 11 .500 ~·H weekly 1n Houslon through 140 tnalOf' dr11110011on points .,, th• Mol'ltl'OU. th• Wlage. ~ Heightl •Sl•mll-.1 pM&-Qn r11e llCkH 2 8 Ntlm•t-.1 r•#!Wlhip 32.200 wHlrly 175 cop111a w.eldy .iaewnere utiM4Jt9d pH..-c>n r11e l1c:tor 2 5 Ht1m1ted rHdersl"llp 440 Wffll/y TOTAL DISTA18UTION (GUARANTEED) 11.&75 cop191 weell!y 10111 es11m11ted rHdtnh•p :12.640 wHlrly Contents copynght 1986 Office ho urs 10am-5:30pm Henry McClur~pcJl'J/1sti•r·9d•tor Linda Wyche-m1"-QMQ' editor Connie Woodstnews Pete Diamond news David RoumfortPtOduction Sean Cutsmger. Bill O'Aourke.re.,1f'ws Steve Warren.nat/Otlll' corr-sP<)fldWll ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Houston. (713) 529-8490 Elsewhere Te:11as (800) 222·1537 ExT 995220 Elsewhere US (800) 225-0227 EXT 995220 Jerry Mulholland at1'111rl•SMQ' d1111etor Rick H1ll1ccounr 111:/ICU/Ne FouridinQ Memo.rt Gr .. ter MOl11roM Bu11nes1 Guild. G1y and Lnb11n PrH• AHOC1&l'Ofl News Sef'llcH Ne>N•On•. P11C1f1c Newt S.l'llice Synd•Ull<I fHture Ser'llces & Wr•ters Bn1n McNaught. Unl­verul Prffl Synd1c1te. Newt America Syndicate POSTMASTER Sofld eddr•u COrTICllOfll to 408 Avon<111e Houlton, TX 77000·3028 SubKripllon fl/I In US lf'I 1e11/ed 91lvelooe S4Q per yn1 (52 i.eu .. J. $29per11• monthtt261HUN), or$1 2Sperweek fless than 26 1ssun1 S.ck 11svn $2 00 each N1t1ot1al «l'letlrs111g ,.preuntati.,• Joe D•Saba10. R1vettde!I M .•, 1i.1t1no Ma &ti .t.vlfflue. New 'f«k 10011 t212) 2•2-&eeJ Adwlff111ng deld. :ne Wect.,esdly_ fi 30pm IQt •tue re1....o frldayev9"1ng Not•c• to Mh•nuers Local •dvt!t't•lll'IQ rate &chedule &w.n·A wa •lftel•'ll Oct 12. •964 and Eight·A .,.,., be•ffect1we Jan 3. "'"' Rnpon1IOll•ty The M)rit1ose Vo1u do. not auume '"Pon· 11btltly !or ~·••ng r:la•lftl ANdeq -"'oul<I lldw1M 1"'9 twwtpepir 10 1ny decepl1"9 edvert1t1ng Park, Kansas, and a sister, Janie Elaine made to the American Cancer Society for Chappell of KansBB City, Kansas. In lieu leukemia research. of flowers, it is requested that donations be GPC Begins to Register Voters, Screen Candidates By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter "Voter registration is the key to every~ thing we do •.. it doesn't stop here," said President An nise Parker at the Feb. 5 meeting of the Houston Gay Political Cau­cus. Speaking to GPC members who com­pleted applications to become deputy voter registrars, Parker encouraged each person to register members of the community whert>ver they were. Following the deputy registrars oath, Parker recognized the newly-elected offic­ers and board members. I n ot her GPC b usiness, Parker announced the appointment of Jof' Wilson to the newly-created position of recording T STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMIITED DISEASES AIDS/KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON· FRI. 8:30AM-5 PM SAME DAY APPOINTMENT MON~ WED.bFRI.EVENINGS AND »ATUR AV MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY 2801 EllA BLVD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX noos (713) 86S-4535 IN lllE HEJGHTS fll -...:;:;. secretary. The major topic of discussion at the meeting concerned the upcoming primary election a nd the GPC endorsement pro­cess. Screening of political candidates will begin in mid-March with GPC endorfle­ment night set for April 2. "We're the largest non-partisan body in this county," said Ray Hill, chairman of the screening committee. "'This is the year to put qualified judges on the bench." Hi11 was elected to the caucus' board of trustees to fill the unexpired term of Dan Pritchett. This term expires January 1987. March 5 waa selected as the date to fill the remaining vacant position on the board. From a Press Release The American Choral Directors Associa· lion and the Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles announced on Jan. 28 that they have successfully resolved pending litiga· tion between them. In its lawsuit, the Chorus challenged the ACDA 's action requiring the Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles to delete the word "gay'' from its name as a condition for performance at the ACDA's Western Div­h~ ion Convention to be held during Febru­ary in San J06e. As a result of the settlement, the Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles will use its full name in oonnec­tion with its performance at the conven­tion. ACDA ·a Exerutive Committee hu al~o agreed to recommend and support at its next board of director's meeting the adop­tion of a nation"'ide policy which would permit gay and lesbian groups to perform at ACDA functions using their full names. 1 ACDA has stated that it does not dis­criminate again~t anyone on the basis of race, religion. Rexual preference or other· wise 4 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 7. 1986 Montrose Has New Flag and Rifle Corps UNBELIEVABLE Own Your Own Condol By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Don't be surprised if this year, amongst the floats and "homecoming queens" of the Houston Gay Pride Parade, you see a flag and rifle corps marching along the parade route. Last week. members of a fledgling organization. which will be officially reg· istered with the Montrose Sports Associa­tion BB the Houston Hard Hat Flag and Rifle Corps, met for their first meeting. The group plans to make their debut at this year's Gay Pride Parade, sporting otainless oteel hardhats and black and •ilver uniforms. Although oeven people attended the first meeting, David Walker, the group's preeident. says he's reached half of his membership goal. He hopes to generate further interest in the corps by holding additional meetings and practices. 'We've got a good thing going. AB we need is some more people to help us," Walker says. Anyone who is interested in the flag and rifle corps, who is in good physical condition and is willing to learn about six routines, may join the group. Walker. who was a member of his high achool's flag corps, has also attended numerous flag and riflery workshops in Houston and Austin . "I saw a real need for JAMES D. CHAPPELL A memorial service will be held for James D Chappell. 39. on Saturday, Feb 8. at 2:00 p m. at Earthman Funeral Home. 2420 Fannm Chappell had many business interests includmg Asylum Enterprises, Montrose Ventures and This Week m Texas Chappell is survived by his father. Donald James Chappell, of Overland Park. Kansas: a sister, Janie Elaine Chappell of Kansas City. Kansas: and longtime friend and busi­ness partner James o _ Cagle In lieu of flowers. 1t 1s requested that donations be made to the Amencan Cancer Society fo( leukemia research. STEPHEN L. GRAY Saturday February 1 1986 In Loving Memory ROBIN L. BUNTING ' ~ January 9. 1957-January 10, 1986 From his beloved friend --~ - OUFI POlJCY The Montrme VOKl9 Wtff COf'nm«tW)tat• tN ~ of MontroM ~end Houston ~ c:ommut1rty ~Wltflan~ Fn.ndaorrN""9ofrt'l<t ct.:eMed ,..., ~ ... W<Jtl lectm 9boul 1f'i9 S*WOt'l I llol•. "'"*oflNcloMet ~- ltld bunal~ts P'roM Of ..... CWlbillf'dud«i ~ ...... ~Vldw.Jlbe ,...,,,., ,...,.,.ol1Nd9c::....cl9hotMbe81tae:f'19dtotN phoeo_ lnfonNbon lflCMd be IW°""9d kt tM Montro. Voce ... .,..~~end bilpubiMedlntN~ ......... "'*"°" n.. .. l'IO cfW9Jt tor""" NIMce establishing &(gay-oriented) flag and rifle corps here in Houston," he says. "There used to be a smal1 flag corps at one time that was part of the Montrose Symphonic Band," but that group has not been in existence for some time. Bruce Herman, owner of the Interns· tional Flag Company, says he's excited about the new organization and has offered his advice and support to help the group get on its feet. The Houston Hard Hat Flag and Rifle Corpt1 will hold their next meeting Feb. 15 in Spotts Park at 4:00 p.m. For additional information about the corps, including future performances planned by the group, contact David Walker at 952-2776. FREE MEMBERSHIP NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE: " Taxi Zum Kio, " "'You An Not Alone, .. " Male Couple," ""Ernesto,·· "EIDeputado"' No Deposit for Membersl • RENTAL GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAii.ABLE • SAME DAY DELIVERY FOR MOST SPECIAL ORDERS • ALL TAPES GUllRANTEEO 1011 Bell Houston 659-0453 -0· Down -0- Closing Costs -0- Mortgage Payment for 30 days -0- Association Dues First 12 months Excellent Security Swimming Pools Secured Parking Laundry Facilities 100% Home Ownership 24 hr. Approval Payments as low as $227 /month P&I MEMORIAL PLACE 915 Siiber 681-3600 FIRE FOX Chimney Rock at Blssonnet 664-9036 • • Texas Oldest Gay Bar The Houston Tradition Valentine's Day, Feb. 14th Annual Miss SWeetheart Contest C) • \) 10pm 11CASH PRIZES" ., ~ • ., M..C. Roxie Starr with special guest ., Open 2-2, 7 days a week Daily Specials- Beer Bust Wednesday, Saturday & Sunday • - Complimentaty Well Drinks and Draft Beer 8-10pm You and your out-of­town guests are cordially invited to attend the Grand Opening of the patio at the Mine. Welcome to Houston all Out-of· Towners Park Once and Party All Night on Pacific Street We Salute the Mardi Gras Finale Party 805 PACIFIC HOUSTON • 529-7488 6 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 7 1986 Patrons Exonerated of Lewdness Charges Arrested at Mary's By Pete Diamond Montrose Voitt Staff Reporter Last September 22, at approximately 2:00 a.m., four officers from the Texas Alco­holic Beverage Commission entered Mary's bar in the 1000 block of Westhei­mer and arrested four people on charges of public lewdness. The men were taken to the county courthouse, but later trans· ferred to the Harris County Jail where they were made to take blood tests to deter mine the presence of the AIDS virus. John Paul Bamich, an attorney repres· enting two of the men, acknowledged that one of hi1 clients did indeed have AIDS. However. a person does not lose all of his rights when arrested, Barnich said. and should not be made a "guinea pig" by being made to take a blood tesL Barnich also questioned the need of the blood test in this case, especially when AIDS tat reeulll aregenera1ly not available for at least five daye. Clyde Williama. the defending attorney for the other two men, said this was the first incident she knew of in Harrie County where an arreeted penon was made to take an AIDS blood test. But as Williams explained, much of the events surround­ing the arrests and the trials of her two clients involved .. inconsistencies ... For example. one of the TABC agents present during the arrests said no "non· agents" accompanied the officer& into Mary'•. However. TABC officers earlier said they brought a photographer with them twho was repcrted to be a friend of one of the agents) ... in case any gang fights occurred along Westheimer,'" Willi· ams said. She maintains that her clients. who had been living together about four and a half years, "were having drinks with friends .• and were not engaged in any type of sexual behavior." But TABC officers testi­fied to the con"trary, justifying their charges that WiJliams' clients were "knowingly engage(d) in an act of sexual contact with intent to arouse and gratify the sexual desire of (defendant) . . by rub­bing his hands on the genitals of(defend­ent) in a public place . .• " Noting further inconsistencies during the trial , Williams said TABC agents were "vague" in describing the layout of Mary's and could not fully agree as to where the defendants were standing in the bar when they were arreti.ted. In talking with jurors following both trials, Williams said they did not believe the agents largely because of the numerous inconsisfencies in their testimony. State prosecuter Al Myrtle claims "it was never an iRsue" whether the alleged incident occurred or not, but says a dispute between witnesses about what they saw created reasonable doubt in the jurors' minds about the guilt of the defendants. The two separate trials WilJiams defended concluded on January 28. Bar· nich's client.a, both of whom had been tried earlier in the month. were found guilty, but given "lenient" probationary periods. In both ofWilJiams· cases, the defendants were found not guilty, verdicts which even Williams &aid surprised her somewhat. Although she said her clients came across as "very credible,'' some of the people on the two six·member juries felt homosexu­ality wu a sin and others were disturbed about the nature of the case. She added that in the second trial, Myr tie became more determined to prove the defendant guilty. Pictures of the leather shop at Mary's and various items sold there were shown to jurors. According to Williams, one juror did not appreciate being shown the pictures and questioned their relevancy to the trial. "The only reason the pictures were Ahown. I felt , was to enrage and shock the people on the jury," Williams said. OeHpite this, •·the jurors were still able to separate the i88ues and fairly try the case." Myrtle Baid while it was acknowledged during the trial that the two defendants were gay and that they were living together, these factors were not an issue. Instead, the itosue was the conduct of the men. which Myrtle said is a crime regard less of the individual's relationship to one another. Until the Texas sodomy statute is repealed, Williams advises that bar patrons be careful about the amount of physical contact they make with others. TAB(' officers work in plainclothes and are authorized to carry weapons, she added For a person facing charges oflewdness, Williams said it can be an embarrassing, stressful situation. When her clients first approached her about handling the case, Williams said they were "upset and dis­traught about the arretits and the AJDS test. ' It's easy to plead guilty and pay a fine, ahe says, but "it takes a certain amount of moral courage" to stand up and fight the charges. ''If more people would do that, it would help in the Jong run for better law enforcement.u 0 Monday-Thursday Rem I llo1"e, Gee Incl Free• MON THURS .. 1Dam-8pm FRI ·SAT 1Dam-10pm SUN 1pm-6pm WE CARRY ADULT FILMS 2016 MONTROSE Houston. Texas 77006 529-5544 0 o THE o 0 LISTKEEPERS 0 0 522-2268 ° O LET US KEEP YOUR LISTS: O o =========o 0 . 0 0 *Business *Invitations *Family *Christmas 0 * Friends *Direct Mail 0 O *Wine *Cassettes O o *Albums *Video Tapes O 0 0 0 ADDRESS LABELS OUR 0 0 SPECIALTY! 0 (Average cost: 10001" stick 0 on labels 1140.00 plus tax) 0 0 0 A Full Service Contractor •Roofing (All Types) •Remodeling •Sheetrock/Painting • Plumblng/Electrlcal •Foundations Repaired •Tree & Trash Removal •Insulation •Water Proofing •Tile/Masonry •Carpet •Cabinets •Decks/Hot Tubs •Room Additions •Concrete •Fully Insured •References Available No Job Too Big or Too Small - 520-9064 OR Emergency Olglt1I P1ger 891-4053 ---=-----1---- - ~---- TICKETS $20. TICKETS & T-SHIRTS AVAILABLE IN PERSON AT DRAMATIKA= . 3224 YOAKUM @ WESTHEIMER HOUSTON, TEXAS (CASH ONLY AFTER FEB. 8) FEBRUARY 7 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 TICKETS AT THE DOOR $25. AIR TRAVEL, HOTEL AND LIMOUSINES BY ADVANCE TRAVEL TEXAS: (713) 682-2002 U.S.: 1-800-292-0500 8 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 7, 1986 Neighborhood o POLITICAL SEASON KICKS OFF Some 60 political candidates and members of the Houston Gay Political Caucus celebrated the filing deadline for the Democratic and Republican primaries Mon· day evening at the Eagle Crest Inn. The event, undampened by the thunderstorms. raised about $500 with proceeds to benefit the 1986 primary projects of the Republican anlf Democratic Committees of the Houston GPC. Of the 31 political candidateo attending. both Democratic and Republican, 10 candidatee will be vying for county positions with about 21 seeking precinct chairs. Bering Pancake Festival Set for This Saturday By Connie Wooda Montrose VoiCt" Staff Reporter Pusersby will no doubt smelJ the sausage and bacon Saturday morning. Feb. 8, as members of the Bering Memorial United Methodist Church begin c0oking for their annual pancake feetivi&]. Beginning at 7 a.m. tomorrow, the doors ofthe 138-yeSN>ld church will open for the 36th Anpual Mardi Gras Pancake Feoti· val The Hall you can eat" feast come_s com· plete with bacon, eauaage, pancakee, and drinb for $4 per person. Proceeda from the event benefit the church building fund. During the day, the festival will feature an array of entertainment including bag­pipee. a fortune teller, a magician, muaic and 1inging. Alao, door prizes will be awarded. The growth of the festival has been .. remarkable," according to Fred Cobbe, a church member and part of the festival's cooking committee. "Laa! year we served about 1200 peo-pie," he aaid. Based on the auccessful growth of the festival from year to year, the festival is expected to exceed last year's attendance. Although the cooking begins about 5 a.m. Saturday morning, church members have been gearing up for the event for about a week, including the preparation of some 200 pounds of sausage to be served hot off the griddle on Saturday. The traditional pancake event was started 36 yeara ago by the Methodist men's group at the Montroee-area church, However, the volunteers are no longer just members of that organization Several other changes have occurred during the years, according to "cooks" Eva Tune and Mary Potthoft. The kitchen has been expanded and, in the last year, new griddles have been added. Bering Memorial United Methodist Church is located at 1440 Harold at Mui berry St., south of Weatheimer and west of MontrOfle. For additional information about the pancake festival, call 526-1017. 808 Lovett ~~f~ 521 - 1015 ___ __,~CA~~ ~-------1 •--- Boulevard Big Bang $1. 99 Breakfast Monday-Friday 2 Eggs, Bacon or Sausoge and 2 Pancakes Complimentary conee with any regular breaklast before 9am r---------------. Mon.·Thun. with coupon I I 1uy One Blackboard Speclal at the I I regular prle9 and g.t one tor $1 I 1----~~en-~~~----~ ~~1! ~ki )~ I ~~/ You< lorr> 11pm Mon ·Thur1 7orr>M>dnighf Friday Som-Midnight Saturday 8om-11pm Sunday The fundraiser began just an hour after the primary filing deadline. The $15 per person donations will aid the two committees as they begin preparing for the upcoming primaries, as welJ as for the general election in the fall. Jn the photo at left, Dauid Jones, local attorney, talks with Ken Lanier, a candidate for district judge. At right (standing l. to r.), Bob Meyer, who is seeking a precinct judgeship, and Clif McSparran, Republican Party chair candidate, pose with Joe Thornton and Cicely Wynne of the Houston Gay Political Caucus. tponnie Woods photos) TOM'S PRETTY FISH INC. Tom Graham Pres. 224 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON Ph. 520-6443 ~~~ <l Give your Valentine a ./\~"'-• Pretty Red Fish in a beautiful heart-shaped 1-foot high vase with red gravel or, if you prefer, in any of our selections of bowls. Human Rights Campaign Fund board members, (left to right) Eric Rosenthal, Vic Rasile and Viuian Shapiro during their recent uisit to Houston. (Pete Diamond photo) Human Rights Campaign Fund in Excellent Health By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter They came to Houston from across the country-New York, Atlanta, San Fran· ci11co, Denver-18 people committed to pursuing basic human rights and further· ing gay civil rights. They took time from their personal schedules to come here, each person paying the cost of their plane fare and hotel room, all for a cause they strongly believe in. But as board members of the Human Rights Campaign Fund, it's a committment they all make. The Washington-based political action committee met in Houston last weekend to discuss the group's budget and fundrais· ing efforts for 1986, in light of what board co-chair Vivian Shapiro is calling a "criti­cal year" for gay men and lesbians. According to Shapiro, the Campaign Fund is in excelJent financial shape. In fact, nearly $50,000 has already been dispersed to candidates in key races, some-­thing she says the Campaign Fund has "never been in a position to do before" this early in an election year. Much of this is undoubtably the result of successful fundraising efforts by the HRCF. The amount of money rai•ed by the HRCF has increased by nearly one third annually since 1983. Last year, more than $640,000 was raised nationwide for HRCF efforts. But thii, year, gay men and lesbians are facing a unique set of challenges. Federal appropriations for the Departments of Labor and Health and Human S!'rvircs were initially set at more than $230 mil· lion. Some of this money was earmarked for federal and state AIDS research, treat· ment and education programs. A $.50 mil· lion reduction of that amount, however, together with the Gramm·Rudman Bill, which •eelui a balanced budget by 1991, poses a se~ous threat to the future of these programs. "This will not be an easy task," says Vic Basile, executive director of the Campaign Fund. "Competition will be more keen than ever and even our strongest suppor ters on the Hill will be facing enormous pressure t-0 cut back on even the most worthwhile programs, including AIDS." Shapiro feels 1986 will also be a critical year for many states, including Texas, because it is an election year. She says that while the current Republican· dominated Administration believes they will have a landslide in the November eleC'­tions, the Campaign Fund hopes to prove them wrong. Campaign donations made early in the season, such as those already given by the HRCF, can often be more val· uable for a campaign than donations made closer to an election, according to Shapiro. In an effort to meet thesechallengeti, the Campaign Fund has set 8. fundraising goal for 1986 of $1 million. While in Houston, HRCF board members met with variou8 representa­tives of the gay community to discuss plans for establishing a Houston-based liaison with the Campaign Fund. "We're in a period of growth and suc­cess," says Eric Rosenthal, HRCF assist· ant for program and development. "But 1986 will be an easy year compared to the cuts that will be made with Gramm­Rudman through 1991. We don't feel it's an appropriate federal response." Rosenthal said it is important to con­tinue lobbying efforts lo guarantee ATOS funding. He warns that if federal funding for AIDS and AIDS-related project.. is reduced, the impact of the cutbacks will certainly be felt in states such as Texas. While AIDS is a "timely, critical issue," Basile says the HRCF is continuing its efforts in the areas of gay civil rights and military and immigration issues. The Campaign Fund also provides support to candidates of both parties, Republican and Democratic, who pledge their support of gay civil rights legislation. Boosting support and strength for the Campaign Fund has been the organiza· tion's recent merger with the Gay Rights National Lobby. Basile says the merger will maximize available resources and be more economical. Furthermore, and most importantly, he believes the expanded organization will also be more effective and influential politically. Alpha II Show to be Held at MCCR From a Press Release Alpha II, a non-profit group which raises funds for organizations in the gay com· munity, will hold its second annual "Fun­( d)raiser'' at the Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection, 1919 Decatur, on Saturday, Feb. 8 at 7:30 p.m. The show will feature 20 of the group's members performing "musical mime." Proceeds from the event will be used to purchase a new sound system for the church. A donation of $7 may be paid at the door. Refreshments will be served and door prizes awarded. 10 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 7 1986 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. Michigan, Wisconsin, and Ohio). New1 Amnica Syndi<~ate Spttial to th~ Mantrotu? Voice Happiness is an elusive yet constant goal of everyone-yea, even of psychologists. Should you think that these professionals are concerned only with the tragic and remorse aspects of behavior, you'd be wrong. They also probe for the traits of the truly happy man or woman. How Happy Are You? Does happineHe change from generation to generation? Professor Angus Campbell of ISR. reviewing re1rnlts up to 1981, says that it doesn't! Happiness and satisfac· tion have changed only slightly in the past 30 years. Jn 1951, for example, about 35% said they were very happy and today 30% declare they have a high sense of psy· chological w•ll·being. One of many auch studies was done by the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. It involved national polls taken in 1976 and 1978. The questions asked of the respondents were similar to those on our quiz. To find what your happiness quotient is, answer the following items aa objectively as you can. then read on for answers. 1. Mo•t of the things I do are: bonng (!); interesting (3); in-between (2). 2. Life doeen 't seem to give me a chance (!); is usually lucky for me (3); in-between (2). 3. My general level of stress is: high (I); low (3); in-between (2). 4. I am: worrisome (I); pretty secure (3); in-between (2). 5. I am generally: a restless type(!); an easygoing type (3); in-between (2). 6. I have often: felt very lonely(!); had many friends (3); felt in-between (2). 7 I usually feel: dissatisfied with my accomplishments (It; satisfied with my accomplishments (3); in-between (2). 8. As far as how I handle decisions is concerned: I feel mcompetent (!); I feel quite competent (3); I feel in-between. 9. I am generally: displeased with my neighborhood (I); happy with my neigh· borhood (3); in-between (2). 10. I am: discontented with my friends (!);pleased with my friends 13); in-between (2). o Explanation How do you judge auch a subjective state of being as happiness? Is it a balance between desires and satisfactions? A baby? A sports car? A "'thing called Joe?" There are many definitions. The Institute For Social Research (!SR) judged the sense of well-being on six quality-of-life scales (which are the basis for our quiz): outlook on Jife(items l and2); stress level (3 and 4); positive versus nega· tive feelings (5 and 6); feelings of personal competence (7 and 8); and overall satisfac­tion (9 and 10). On reviewing the ISR results, Psychol· ogy Today magazine raised an interesting question: Are there differences in happi· ness in various parts of the nation? To Red 8l. White Party and 5th Anniversary f Guest Appearances throughout tht> evening. Special Drink Prices. ~oomS ~l'1r1t 4902 Richmond A\ enue Houston. T exa 77027 (713) 62.:5-613~ learn the answer PT combined the ISR data with that of the National Opinion Research Center and came up with die· tinct regional differences in feelings of contentment over the United States. The country was divided into nine regions and thm;e who made the highest scores on happiness were found to Jive in the central section of the country (i.e., Min· neHOta and the Dakotas, then directly south to the Gulf of Mexico). Those who scored lowest lived in the north-central and middle-Atlanticstates(i.e., New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Indiana, o Score Ours isn't an official test, of course, but generally speaking the way you answer the statf'ments does reflect your inner state of mind. Total up all your points. Consider that a score of between 18 and 22 is average. Those with 23 and above show more joy in living. ADVERTISING SALES If you make a good impression on people and are conscientious about your job. then consider this: The Montrose Voice is seeking an additional advertising representative 1986 is going to be our year, and we need to odd to our soles staff. On&en-one sales experience preferred For on appointment, call Henry McClurg. 529-8490. THE MAGIC OF comBD LIVE ON STAGE "SUPER NEW ILLUSIONS" JONES HALL MONDAY FEBRUARY17 6pm&9pm ~~) Houston! You are Cordially Invited to the Grand Opening of 0' 13ttieitL 608 WESTHEIMER Across from Jim's Gym 528-5935 Sunday, Feb. 9th with The Illusions of Kandi Love, Koffie, Tina Alexander and Special Guest Champagne Doors Open 8pm-Show Starts 9:30pm Mon.-Tues.: Happy Hour Well Drinks . $1.25 Wed.: Return of Houston's Only 10¢ Well Drink Nights Thurs.: Body Night Fri.: Dance until 2am Sat.: Dance until 2am Sun.: Beer Bust 12 noon-2am $3 Cover Wednesday-Sunday FEBRUARY 7. 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 11 FAMOUS IN HISTORY Candy Is Dandy but Liquor is Quicker -W.C. Fields But Too Much Schnapps Will Rot Your Teeth -Mary Fields LARY THOMPSON, 0 . .J. 1022 WEBTHEIMER 52S-SS5"1 Don't Forget the Wedding of Pickles and Maria. Fn. Feb. 14th. Benetitt1ng the McAdory House. (Coming Soon­The Divorce.I AFTER HOURS NIGHTLY 12 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 7 1986 The Far Side by Gary Larson Saturday morning In the Gorden "You know those teeny ttny llllle birds lhol walk around so trustingly Inside a crocodile's mouth? Well, I just been eattn' those IHtle guys like popcorn." .:.:.­" For crying out loud, Doris. -· You gotta drag lhol thing out every time - all get togelller1" Eventually, the chickens -re able to drive a wedge~ Farmer Bob and Lulu. "Oo, Sytvtal You've got to see this! ·­Ginger's bringing Bobby home, and even though her jaws can crush soup bones, Bobby only gets a few nicks and scratches." Fortunes Taurus Gets Last Minute Invitation By Mark Orion For Friday. Feb. 7, 1986. through Thursday. Feb. 13. 1986 ARIES - Don't abandon yo ur dreams. What seems totally out of reach can become reality with a little effort. Friends play an important role in meeting your goals. TAURUS- Expect a last minute invitation to an impromptu gathering. You'll be surprised at who you find there. Forget past differences and renew the acquaintance. GEMINI-Your attention turns to the domestic front. Get an early start on spring cleaning. A new coat of paint will go a long way for both your environment and your attitude. CANCER-Don't be hasty when considering a job change. The years you have invested should be taken into account before making a deci­sion. Once again, patience proves virtuous. LEO- Honesty is always the best policy. This is exceptionally true this coming week. That new love interest expects nothing less from you VIRGO - Your strong self ­discipline will help you resist a tempt­ing situation. You will be proud of yourself when you realize you almost made a serious mistake. Reward yourself with a safe treat. LIBRA- This Mardi Gras weekend will be your best yet. The revelry seems to center around you. Don't let the attention swell your head Be careful when it comes to overindulgence. SCORPIO- A new work proiect has you baffled. Don't be afraid to ask questions. Neither superiors or co­workers expect you to know everything SAGITTARIUS-Your never­ending concern for the needs of oth­ers has been nagging you for some time now You've been considering becoming involved in a charitable organization. Now is the time, as your energy level and creativity are at its highest. CAPRICORN- Don't let a money crunch limit your social activity. If things are kept in moderation, you should be able to continue having fun while cutting down on expenses. Remember friends are there to help through the rough spots. AQUARIUS- Your heart is in a flut­ter as Valentine's Day approaches. Follow your instincts and plan some­thing nice for that someone nice. At this time in your calendar, it's hard to go wrong PISCES- You've been showing a lot of your quiet side lately. Some people around you doo't understand. Communicate to friends and loved ones that they've done nothing wr.o.n..g . It's just another part of you LUNCH DINNER SUNDAY BRUNCH Serving from 11arn Daily Full Menu 'til 2arn LATE NIGHT BREAKFAST Food SeNice 'til 4am Friday & Saturday FESTl\/E SUNDAY BRUNCH Special Menu. Patio Seating "Fresh Table Buffer· Cocktail & Wine Specials HAPPY HOUR 3-7pm Daily Drink Specials & Complimentary Snacks 804 Pacific 524-07933 FEBRUARY 7 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 13 HAIR LOSS- . NEW MEDICAL TREATMENT Male pattern baldness occurs when the hormone DHT acts on hair folli­cles. Proxidil a is an advanced combination of topical DHT-block­ing agents with the hair growth­stimulator Minoxidil. It commonly arrests and reverses balding when Minoxidil alone does not. Call today for a consultation. Peter H. Proctor, MD,PhD MPB Clinic Suite ID, 5401 Dashwood, Bellaire 661-2321 Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily MERIDIEN LEASING INC. '86 BMW '86 MERCEDES BENZ '86 HONDA 325 309/mo 190E 349/mo Accord 159/mo S2Be 395/mo 300E 4911/mo '"'ludo 17'!/mo 735i 569/mo 560Sl 725/mo '86 CADILLAC '86 PORSCHE '86 JAGUAR Df\lille 329/mo 944 3911/mo XJ6 569fmo RX-? 626 '86 MAZDA 209/mo 178/mo 944 Turbo 498/mo '86 TOYOTA '86 BUICK 11'fmo 27''mo ;;,~~ ~;5~;;~ i--. NO DOWN PAYMENT • LOWER MONTHLY PAYMENT • CASH FOR YOUR TRADE Sunday Februarv 9th Uve In Concert Sylvester * Regular Cover * Showtime 11pm Park Once 3 Song Mini-set of New Material From New Album Coming February 23rd ·- -Divine "-i'dt:~"'{ ""'"' JeN L-~~~~~~~~~~~~~· * Free Draft All Night Party All Night 14 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 7, 1986 Counting Makes a Difference Why Racial Equality Needs Affirmative Action More Than Ever By Ron Takaki Pacific Ntu.'8 Service Special to the Montrose Voice Affirmative action is at a crossroads. Edwin Meese's draft of an executive order on affirmative action proposes to rescind the regulation requiring govern­ment contractors to use numerical goals for the hiring of racial minorities and women. To count or not to count-that is the question. How we anawer it depends largely on how we perceive the problem of inequality in American society. ''Counting by race is a Corm of racism," the Attorney General declared recently. Meese argued that an affirmative action program "that prefers one person over another because of race, gender or national origin is unfair." Government policy, he insisted, should be "colorblind." In his attack on affirmative action, Meese articulates "the culture of meritocracy" -the belief that men and women should be treated as individuals and judged on the basis of merit or lack of it. The function of government should be limited to prohibiting discrimination, leaving the problem of inequality to be 11<>lved in the marketplace. There, racial minorities and women who have merit would be able to find employment and advance themselves. But would such an integration of the work force actually occur? Meese believes inequality occurs as a matter of "taste" discrimination-the employer's individ­ual preference for hiring white men for certain jobs. Once the government prohib­it. a euch "taste" discrimination, he argues, women and minorities would have equal opportunity. Meese's understanding of the problem of inequality fails to recognize the enor­mous transformation of the economy in recent decades and the ways this change has affected the employment of racial minorities and women. Racial inequality is no longer simply dependent on individual employer "taste." Rather, it is largely reinforced by social conditions and economic structures. Living in slums and attending inadequate inner city schools preclude the responsibil­ity of equal opportunity for many people. Occupational stratification based on training and education also limits their employment poHibilities Thus, millions of racial minorities are excluded from the higher strata of employ­ment because they do not have requisite knowledge, skills and credentials. £.Jff...P/9~1 'FfD£19:.JJJ "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS: Albert G. Nemer, John J. Adams and Gordon A Thayer Employen do not have to discriminate against them in ordei: to avoid hiring them. Affirmative action as a public policy and strategy for social change seeks to address inequality as a structural prob­lem. It generates pressures to educate, recruit, train and employ racial minorities and women across occupational strata in order to assure them equality of opportun­ity. But to do this effectively requires counting by race and gender. Otherwise the government would have no way to monitor and measure the efforts of employers to train and hire racial minori­ties and women. Large American corporations have recently indicated their intention to retain affirmative action programs. "We will continue goals and timetables no matter what the government does," said John L. Hulck. chairman of Merck. To better sen'e your needs ... Whether or not they will do so, should President Reagan sign the executive order, remains to be seen. But after nearly 20 years of affirmative action, corpora· tions do recognize the importance of counting. William S. McEwen, director of equal opportunity affairs at Monsanto and chairman of the National Association of Manufacturers' human resources com­mittee, acknowledged: "Setting goals and timetables for minority and female partic­ipation is simply a way of measuring pro­gress." In fact, it measures both progress and lack of progress. For example, in 1973, American Telephone and Telegraph entered a six-year consent decree with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commis­sion to correct its prior discriminatory employment practices. By 1978, minori­ties in management at AT&T had jumped from 4.6% to 10%, and women in craft from 2.8% to 10%. Similarly, IBM established an equal opportunity department in 1968 to comply with affirmative action requirements. Between 1971 and 1980, the number of black officials and manager at IBM increased from 429 to 1596, Hispanics from 83 to 436, and women from 471 to 23.50. Between 1974 and 1980, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs reports that among 77,000companies with 20 million employees, companies with government contracts and therefore affir­mative action plans had smaller increases of only J 2% and two percent for each respective group. Here, clearly, counting or not counting made a difference. TEXAS STATE OPTICAL announces new hours at these locations TSO-Village 2515 rniversity 528-1589 TSO-South Main 4414 S. Main 523-5109 Tues.-Sat. Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed Monday Closed Saturday Eff--ecl'ItSi4v e Feb. I, 1986 .,.,.,., •• .,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,., ., TAFT AUTOMOTIVE ., 1-111 'J'.u•r, r>:?:?-21HO • FEBRUARY SPECIALS ., M * 011 Change $1995 M T * * A/C Check Be Charge $1995 T Check Cooling System $2795 ., !]§: ~~nJ:e£a~sJo~~ o!ln~~ ~~!!1: ., ., I>o~~E~~~~~~:~~,P~l~rHY! ., M AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION .T ,.,.EL,E •CTR•ON I.C, T U.NEU P AIR CONDITIONING ., .,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,., Sports Voice Four 611, Ranch Hands Down Foes Four 611 solidified their top ranking in Division A of the MSA Billiards League by defeating second ranked Mary's Natu· rally in the ninth week of season play. The Ranch Hands also won a close match over defending champions Bacchus I, moving the Ranch Hands into second place. Mary'• dropped to third. In Division B, The Barn protected its unbeaten status by defeating the Lone Star• 11-4. 611 III moved up to second, and The Galleon claims third place. The Saturday afternoon MSA Pool Tour· ney will not be played this weekend, but will resume next Saturday, Feb. 15, at The 611. Play start& at 2:00 p.m. All league members are invited to play. HouTex Leader Defends Position Jim Kitch, the top player on the Houtex Tennis Club challenge ladder, defended his position against No. 2 player Randell Dickeroon 6·4, 6·0 in Sunday, Feb. 2, action. Kitch has successfully defended the top position on the ladder against opponents for more than one year. Donny Kelley, No. 3 on the ladder, defended his position against Steve Bearden 6-3, 6·2. That wae the first Joss for Bearden in the last several matches played. In other matches, Eugene Brown defeated Tiny Tim 7-6, 6-3 to climb to the No. 7 ranking in the Top Ten ladder. Larry Jarvis defeated Mr. Bill 6-0, 7-5. Rick Mar· tinez defeated Rudy Garcia in a tough three set match 4·6, 6·1, 6-4. Bill Santaiti defeated Rick Massey by default. FEBRUARY 7 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 15 ___ S_ip_o_r_t_s_ Vi_o-ic_e_Ca_l_e_nda_r_&_S_t_a_nd- ing_s__ HOGs to Travel MSA Pool L eagu.e Teem Standings. Winter league. Week 9 TEAM Recent Week. Total Matches, Total games DIVISION A 1 Four611 2 Ranch Hands 3 Mary's Naturally 4 Bacchus I Too 611 6 Bacchus II 7 BAB Shooters 8 Marion & Lynn·s 9 Street Cats 10 Outlaws 8-7 8-1 8-7 7-2 7-8 6-2 7-8 5-3 9-6 5-3 ~ 5-4 15-0 5-4 by• 4-4 6-9 3-6 6-9 2-6 DIVISION B BJ.52 77-58 73-47 70-50 70-50 66-69 65-70 57-73 69-66 61-44 1 The Barn 11-4 8-0 79-41 2611111 by9 5-3 70-50 3 The Galleon 13-2 5-3 67-53 4 The 611 6-9 5-3 64-56 5 lipstick 9-6 5-4 71-64 6 Kindred Spirits I 6-9 4-4 67-53 Kindred Spmts II 9-6 4-4 67-53 8 JR's 9-6 3-6 61-74 9 Hooters I 6-9 1-8 47-78 10loneStars 4-11 1-8 J&.97 11 Hooters II 2-13 0-8 19-97 HouTex Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Feb_ 2 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 2 Rendall Dickeraon 3 Donny Kelley 4 Steve Bearden 5 Pat Powers 6 David Garza 7 Eugene Brown 8 Tiny Tim 9 Sabe Velez 10 Lou Garza BLADDER 1 Thomas Cortez 2 Eddie Chavez 3 Joel 4 Ronn Rodd 5 Larry Jarvis 6 Mark Deardorff 7 Mr Bill 8 8111 Santa1t1 9 Rick Knapp 10 Gabe Herp1n C LADDER 1 Randy Miller 2 Rick Massey 3 Henry Eckhardt 4 Rick Martmez 5 Daiw1d Hendrickson 6 Audy Garcia 7 David Moskowitz 8 Randy Jierscheck 9 Steve Chesney DOUBLES LADDER l Steve Bearden & Sri/ Santa1ti 2 Ronn Rodd & Richard Pregeant 3 Eddie Chavez & Henry Eckhardt Houston Tennis Club to Orange, Challenge Ladder Grand Ciinyon matches through Jen. 26 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Robert Holmes 6 Rich Corder 2 J C. Barrera 7 Oscar Martmez 3 Armi Albenza 8 Edward de Leon "Aon Bell .9 Ron McCauley 5 Rick Hadnot 10 Billy Green BLADDER 1 Randy Miller 2 Steve Bryant 3 Roy Mendiola 4 Daiw1d Hendrickson 5 Oscar Ysassi 6 Rudy G~rcie 7 J.V Khnger 8Joe D 9 Howard Brown R egular Week ly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Center HouTex Tennis Club 10:30am-1:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center Women's Bowling League Spm, Stadium Bowl W W.B_ Bowling League 7:30pm. Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: MSA Men·s Bowling 9pm, Stadium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Center MSA 'Fun Volleyball League." 7pm WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League plays 8pm. various locations THURSDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Tennis Center Whatever Happened to Baby Jane· MSA Mixed Bowling League 8:45pm, Stadium Bowl Special E vents Feb. 14-16: IGBO-afflliated Bluegrass Clas­sic, Louisville Feb. 28-Mar_ 2: IGBO-affiliated Spring Break Invitational. Ft. Lauderdale Mar 27-30: IGBO-affiliated Dixie Invitational. Atlanta Mar. ~31 : IGBO-affiliated M.A.K.l.T .• Kansas City June Oak Lawn Tennis Assoc. hosts Texas Cup Challenge, Dallas. competing with Hous­ton Tennis Club July 25-Aug. 3. 1986· U.S. Olympic Festival, Houston At the February officer& meeting, the Hou•ton Outdoor Group HOGs will begin discussion of the group's spring and summer plans. The officers invite sugges· tions for spring and summer activities. Already scheduled for March 1·2is a trip to the Heritage Art& Festival in Orange. The big events for that weekend include a Se•quicentennial Birthday Party. The party features a parade, entertainment, barbeque and Texas evening at the theater Although the group can no longer take reservations for the March lS.22 Ski Pur· gatory trip. arrangements are now being made for a Grand Canyon trip on May 22-26. The HOGs will fly to Las Vega• Thurtiday night and go to the Canyon early Friday and hike to the bottom. Satur· day will be spent hiking out of the Canyon. On Sunday the group will drive back to Las Vegas and attend one of the Las Vegas shows. The return trip to Houston will be Monday afternoon. The trip will be limited to 12 people. For more information on the Houston Outdoor Group or any of its trips, call 680- 3144 or 521-3641. Front Runners Travel to Bryan­College Station Several Front Runners v.ill travel to Bryan.College Station Sunday. Feb. 9, for the "Straight Shot" !OK run. The organi· zation v.;U field two teams in the event. Other members will remain in Houston for the regular Sunday run in Memorial Park. Coming in February and March ''Scuzz lz Az. Scuzz Duzz'' D.J. David Oleson 715 FaiNiew 521-2792 at The Ripcord will Roast Mary's Tuesday, Feb. 11 at 10pm Ta lk About True Scuzz!! ... naturally D.J. Lary Thompson 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 16 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 7, 1986 Montrose Live High School Production of 'Barnum' Nearly Perfect By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Critic When a play thrills me on an emotional level, I sometimes get cold chillls, then a feeling of electricity running through my body, then I may hyperventilate. Barnum, a musical biography of P.T. Barnum, entering its last weekend at Stratford High School, is not quite perfect. I didn't hyperventilate. But for a high school play to be perfect would be a mistake. At the end, I was crying. Then I wru; laughing. Then I was doing both at once and not wanting to stop So please don't expect me to be too rational about this show. I enjoyed it too much. The light·hearted book by Mark Bram· ble ia very much like a circus. There are clown routines between several of the acenes, and the ringmaster announces several of the songs. There are jugglers and unicyclists. There are people dancing on stilts and swinging on trapezes. The leading man climixes act one by walking across stage on a tightrope. • And there's a moral quietly presented. Why are there no con men lately who can make ua believe in pure bunkum that really hurts no one? Is it because we're too worldly? Too materialistic? Too cynical for our own good? And the score, with music by Cy Cole­man and lyru:s by Michael Stewart. mal<hes tne panache of the book' It spe­cializee in feel-good songs: tongue­twisting patter songs, rousing marches and brasey circus anthems. It also has a few enchanting ballads. The chorus has a beautiful, well-blended aound, almost too pretty. The soloists are dynamite: bluesy Marcee Kerr, lyrical Catherine Watson and guest star Tamara Siler. Scott Behn is a true find. With his great voice, cute face and overall attractiveness, he plays three roles. He especially shines in a show stopping number as General Tom Thumb. Michelle Holliman has perhapa the moat challenging role-Chairy, Mrs. Bar­num. She is the quiet. calming influence in P.T.'a life. She even calls him Taylor. Yet she also secretly believes in his dreams and offers him all the support she can, even when he leaves her for an affair Michelle brings genuine warmth and true depth to the role. Everything hinges on Barnum himself and Todd Banker has all the necessary strengths and then some. Wow. Goose bumps. Bravo. The school is five blocks south ofl-10 on Dairy Ashford. If I had my druthers, that would be a well-beaten path this weekend. Then on Monday, you might want to stay home. At 9:00 p.m. on Channel 8, AT&T present.a Houston Grand Opera's production of Scott Joplin's Treemonisha. In 1981, when it was taped at Miller Theater, this show raised the roof off this entire city before it went on to hit Washington, D.C., and NYC. 1 Jus show is the one with which to intro­duce newcomers to opera. There are no "screeching" sopranos. Carmen Balthrop, who plays Treemonisha, has a full-bodied voice that falls gently on American ears. Everyone is singing in English. The music was written to be sung in English . The musical accents fall where the spoken accents would. The cast enunciates clearly. You can understand what they're saying without working at it. There is no story aboutstar·crossed lov­ers. A young girl. the only educated person in her village, fights the forces of ignor­ance and superstition that keep her people oppressed. That hits home, doesn't it? Real rt-levancy. The viUain in this piece, a voodoo man named Zodezetrick, is played by Obba Babatunde. His dancing is superb. Finally, there is no tragic ending. There is pure jubilation with foot·stomping music, high 1umping dance and excellent camerawork that adds to the gleeful pan· demonium. For those of you who already Jove opera, please excuse me if this review insults your intelligence. I'll try to make it up to you when I review Count Ory. Anyway, anyone who knows any of the music of our fellow Texan, Scott Joplin, knows what a treat lies in store for the lucky viewer. Anyone who doesn't­Where have you been? o Notes The Museum of Fine Arts is showing 50 drawings by Ingres. Most of the drawings are on loan from a museum in Montauban, France and have never before been sttn in America. This exhibition will close March 16. Don't forget the Texas Human Rights Foundation's benefit banquet next Fri ~ day. The guest of honor will be Sissy Farenthold. 520-8060 . ... Celebrate! Mardi Gras! The main Gal· veston parade will be tomorrow evening, but Fat Tuesday is actually Tuesday, of course. Your last chance to whoo~de-doo .. . .. ,re Ash Wednesday begins Lent. 8-JameR Deans b'day. 9-ChineseNew Year, the first day of 4684, Year of the Tiger. 11-B'day of Florence Kennedy, who coined the phrase, "A woman without a man is like a fish without a bicycle." 12-France Zeffirelli born. 13-Last shop­ping day before Valentines. "My heart holds the sound of your voice, And the soft brightness which is your soul."-Amy Lowell (born Feb. 9). o Openings Bear Talk (Children's Museum, 7, 10- Noon)-Mrs. Sammie Chambliss, largest bear collector in Texas, will read stories and tell children about her collection. All That Jazz (Music Hall, 7)-HSO Pops with Sergiu Comissiona. ONO! The Hasty Heart (Company Onstage, 7)-The convalescent ward of a military hospital in the Orient. Thomas Meloncon (Firehouse Gallery, 7)-The J'O"t and playwright Texas Sings! (Music Hall, 8, 10:30 a.m.)­Toshiyuki Shimada conducts the HSO in a program for children. ONO! 8.5 Amy Saxton (San Jacinto College, 8)­perfonns the Mozart Flute Concerto in G. Program also features Pops selections. ONO! Goodnough: Recent Work (Watson Gallery, 8). The Romanticism of Mozart (MFA, 9, 4 p.m.)-Keyboard conversation with Jef­frey Siegel. ONO! Joan Karfrs New Dance Group and Sev· era I Dancers Core (JCC, 9)-Two of Haus· ton ' s best contemporary dan ce companies. ONO! Memorial Candles (Jones, 12)-a new symphony written by American oompm~er Benjamin Lee to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the end of the Holocaust. ONO! Andre Watts (Jones, 13)-The pianist plays an a11 Liszt program. This was origi­nally scheduled for October 18, but was postponed when Mr. Watts became ill. ONO! The Society for the Performing Arts presents Andre Watts in concert Take a walk on the wild side. on the Alley's ;ntimote Areno Stage, February 6 .. Morch 2. Tuesday throogh Friday at 8'00. Saturday at 4,()() and 9,00 Sunday at 2,30 and 7,30 CALL FOR TICKET INFORMATION, 228-842} z 2-for-1COUPON/ 2-for-1 COUPON/2-for-1 COUPON/2-for-1 n ~ ' Th" coupon, when prosented at the Alley box off"•· 615 Texas Avenue, g 0 , entitles the bearer to 2 tickets for the price of 1 to ~ ~ - - BALM IN GILEAD ~ ~ N J:! for these performances oNy: S-zN ! My perl ... moncebei-nlhundoy. Feb.uory6. and Wednesday. feb.uory 12. (') ~ For further ll'lformohoo and r~flons , coll tt. Alley box offK:e at 228-8-421 . g g Th1s<CH1ponwal1donly~ f«brvory6,7,l,9, 11, 12 . ~ u 2-for-1COUPON/ 2-for-1 COUPON/2-for-1 COUPON/2-for-1 2 NATRAJ Finest lndlan Restaurant 2047 Marshall Shepherd & W. Alabama Top 20 Romantic Restaurants (Houston City Magazine) Special Lunch Platters-under $5 Intimate Spicy Dinners prepared by expert chefs Lunch 11·2:30 Mon.-Fri. 11:30-300 Sat.-Sun. Sun. Brunch also Dinner 6-10:30 Sun. -Tues. 6-1100 Fn-Sat. 150/o off Dinners with Coupon Cash Only-Sun. thru Thurs 526-4113 Friday (Feb. 7) You're never too old to quit blowing smoke. American Heart Association Wll ' " orlTll\G ~ '\C(Ji .J• '. 522·7616 Jazz Party-Live Dixieland Jazz Band-No Cover Saturday (Feb. 8) Costume Ball. Crowning of King and Queen at midnight. $100 Cash Prize for each. Sunday (Feb. 9) Quest for Mr. Right 5-9pm. Steak Night 7-10pm. No Cover Monday (Feb. 10) Male Strip Contest 10pm. $100 Cash Prize with M.C. Victoria West Tuesday (Feb. 11) 8pm Pool Tournament. $3 Entry Fee. Winner ·Takes All!! The Galleon would like to thank all performers from the recent All City Bartenders Drag Show. You all did Real Good!! FEBRUARY 7, 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 17 -,Ir-" ---- {j_J_J _ ____, Ht t1Hht1/e tJ(}e~l~eimer Savings up to 75°/o off For Temporary Location Call 522-1089 1210 Willard 528-4350 1525 24 A"' n,,,; Ca/. ::/Jinner S,,ecia~ StaAing 4:30 p.m. f;;!J. 'IllE BEST LITilE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATF.S PRIVAfE BATHS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 URSULINES STREET, NEW ORLF.ANS, IA 70116 With fine chocolates, gift baskets and treasures of delight, all at great deals. 20%0ff 18 MONTflOSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 7 1986 New Films Off er Comedy, Drama By Scott Cutoinger Montro.r Voice Film Critic This wttk's films are another mixed bag, with everything from the looniness of Robin Williama to the corniness of Roy Clark and Mel Tillis. Robin Williams and Kurt Russell star in a nicely done comedy called The Best of Times where they get to replay a crucial football game that they lost in high school. Richard Gere and an all-star cast attempt to show how politicians get into office electronically thewe days in Power. but aomehow the movie never becomes a cohesive whole. Finally, I have a little chat with Mel Tillio and Roy Clark about their new film Uphill All The Way. The movie is quite a bit or eilJiness that isn't worth viewing unless you like that sort of thing. How­ever, these two country greatM were fun to interview, and can still be commended for at least getting their film made. That's more than a lot of people can say. o The Best of Times Wouldn't it be great to go back and "replay" aome dreaded incident from your past and improve on it? Would your life be different if you had asked that certain per­son out for a date that you could never talk to, or had taken that job that you decided to turn down? Jack Dundee has something in his past that he wishes could be changed. Twelve years ago he fumbled a winning pB.88 that would have given his high school team their first victory against a rival team in 60 years. He equates his fumble with the fact that hia life is leading nowhere, and he's determined to change it around. The problem ia trying to get anyone elae inter· eeted in replaying the game. Since nobody seems to let Jack forget about the game. he becomes enthralled with the idea of a rematch. He devises an ingenius method of getting the townfolk riled up against the rival team, but has trouble getting the star quarterback to return to the field. Reno Hightower is the quarterback who threw the fabled pass to Jack. but hew~ badly injured in the pro­ceB8. Reno I Kurt RuBBell) has little interest in replaying and making a fool of himself 1f he meuea up. Like Jack (Robin Williamo), Reno is atuck in a rut in his life. He spends most of hia time working on can in a grubby shop, and coming home to a wife that isn 'tsatis­fied anymore. The only thing that is kind to him is his history as a football star, and he doesn't want to lose that. We can pretty well apot the direction the film is taking a mile away: Jack and Reno are going to get the whole town excited about playing the garne, and in the pro­cees boost their egos and self-assurance by correcting what was screwed up the first time around. It's a bit contrived, but these guys aeem to grow'and have so much fun doing it we can grin and enjoy it too. ~mehow, no matter how predictable things get, we are constantly entertained by The Best of Times. Either Robin Willi· am~ is charming us with very funny antics, or we are enjoying the excitement of a sleepy town come to life. Even Kurt RusselJ is a pleasure to absorb with a well drawn character who likes his Hfe very low-key. A highlight of the movie is a subplot involving the wives of these two men. Pamela Reed (Right Stuff! and Holly Pal­ance (Under Fire) play the Jong-suffering wivee who both throw their husbands out of the house. In one hilarious scene, they invite their husbands over for dinner. but there can be no talk of sex or football. Robin Williams stars rn "The Best of Times" Sitting around the table, the topics leave much to be desired. "How about that situa­tion in Beirut?'• one of the men asks. "I hear it's very swampy over there," replies one of the wives. Meanwhile, Jack is sneaking back and forth into the living room to eneak peeks at a football game. The whole dinner is a comedy delight. Directo~ Roger Spottiswoode (Under Fire, Terror Train) does an adequate job on hie fint stab at comedy. Fortunately he does not dwell on the obvious like train­ing for the game, but puts more emphasis on the development of the main charac­ters. The final football match is a bit silly, but it is an essential to the plot that must be dealt with. The Best of Times is really a good time at the movies, and the preview crowd cheered long and hard. Your toleration of the siUineea of Robin Williams may have a lot to do with' your enjoyment of the film because he is the main focal point. Still, he ia kept fairly well under control, and fits in Houston DEPRESSION GLASS Show 1986 The once a year opportumt} to !*'e the :argest & rarest selection of DEPRESSIO:\ ERA glass ;n the Country FL Bend County Fairgrounds Hwy. 59 at 36 Rosenberg, Texas FEBRUARY21 CRYSTAL FEBRUARY 22-23 Friday :-.light 6:00-9:00 Champagne Preview Fe'b. 21st 6:00--9:30 pm ldent1ficat1 in Matchmb ~at. 10:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Sun. 12:00-5:00 p.n\. ADVASCE TICKETS O~LY S12 5Q ea {also good S.t. & Sun.) Additional information & Tickets Joy :Saill PO. Box 2Sl Pearian:f. Tx. 17581 71314~H28 Ins Slayton 299 Hoyt Crowley, La.. 70526 31817!18-IS98 Admis>iun $3.00 Good Both Days 3rd Annual Antiques & Collectables Show-Adjoining Bldg. No. 2 Food & Drinks FREE PARKING well with the rest of the actors. Nobody has yet tapped the unique raw talents of this incredible performer on screen, but the glimpses in this film will have to suf· flee until someone does. o Power Power is an attempt to make a high-tech, high-thought movie about the mecha· nisms used to manipulate politicians' image with advertising and advanced marketing techniques. Directed by the man who gave us heavyweights like Net· work and The Verdic-t, we would expect a heavy social statement set in the mood of something like Robert Redford's The Can­didate. Instead. we get a glossy, heavy­handed contrivance that never quite makes much of a statement at all. Richard Gere is Pete St. John, the best politiral media wizard in the business. He boosts the image.s of polit~cal figures with little interest in the political ideas. All he knows are polls, figures, and the image pre.sented on the television screen. Pete's clients are located everywhere, from a South American Socialist candi· date to a New York millionaire running for a New Mexico office. He makes it very clear from the first that he is going to run and change their lives. What they do with their ideas if elected means nothing to him. only getting them into the public's mind and transferring it into votes. Surrounding Pete are people who~e function aeems to be to keep him occupied when he's not busy (which isn't often). J uJie Christie has a nothing role as a reporter who used to be married to Pete. They meet occasionally to go to bed.or talk about why they broke up, but it doesn't ring very true. Kate Capshaw has even less to do as she stands around as his aide and sometime bed partner. The male characters seem to fare a bit better. Denzel Washington (A Soldier's Story) has asmall,meatyroleasa bad guy trying to manipulate Pete and a candi­date. This starts a very ridiculous subplot with Pete being wiretapped and almost being killed by this guy for very vague reasons. E.G. Marshall plays a Senator who is bowing out, but he's involved in this vague aubplot also and his part becomes a bit hard to follow As Marshall's wife, Beatrice Straight (Network) gives another hysteric perfor­mance that g~t her an Oscar back in 1976. Somehow in all the overacting, we realize that she has an important role in the whole thing-but I'm still not sure what it really is. Faring the best is G«!ne Hackman in a small but brilliant role as Pete's men­tor and friend who is on the downward side of his career. An alcoholic, he is sti11. trying to do things in a style that is behind the times. Hackman is so good we almost wish we were looking closely at him instead of Pete. In the middle of this maze of characters stands Richard Gere, !tton~faced and inward as uaual. His character is the usual, cold and ruthless with little time for people. Gere can be likeable when he inte­racts wtll with others (see Officer and a Gentleman), but these .. Gigolo" dothea, Media coMultant Wilfred Buckley (Gene Hackman), left, diacouera he and his former partner Pete St. John (Richard Gert) are working for opposing c-andidates in "Power" and Silliness stances and mannerisms seem stiff and contrived. Pown is a major disappointment because it makes its point about candidate manipulation early, and then fizzles out fast. After the first 45 minutes, we learn nothing new or interesting about Pete's manipulation and the movie starts to get sleepy. That's when they try to throw in a little intrigue with the subplot of Pete being followed and harrassed. It's a minor diversion that's really never resolved or pursued In the end, we have a fair idea of a lot of really good actors standing around with littJe to involve themselves in. The director seems to have let this one slip out of his grasp, and it's really too bad. As for the actors involved, they will hopefuJly turn up in something that fits their talent more appropriately-with more power to them. o Uphill All the Way Ordinarily l wouldn't make much men­tion of a film of this nature, but there may be a lot of unknown "Hee Haw" fans out there who get into Roy Clark and Mel Til­lis. These two country boys were in town recently to promote their little, independ­ent comedy/ western, and they were obviously very proud of their effort. Roy had been holding on to this prop­erty about two bumb1ing con men for over 12 years, and when Mel asked him about the same script, they decided to do it together. It's a very basic comedy in the style of Disney's Apple Dumpling Gang or a Tim Conway movie, but with a few madams and fietity language thrown in for laughs. Since the pre~s material seems aimed at a family audienCE', l asked the two why the main town setting Reems to have en abun· Films dance of whores (who everyone seems to service) and quite a few sexual connota­tions. Mel replied that he had watched the families at a preview and they aJI seemed to enjoy it. I guess kids have been suffi. ciently jaded by television. Strangely enough, several other big names appear in this silly little home-spun flick . Burl Ives is the sheriff ("We got him out of retirement," said Mel), and Trish Van Devere is a lady in distress (with very little to do). Glen Campbell pops up briefly as a calvary officer, but the real surprise is Burt Reynold's unbilled cameo as a card s~~{r~st called him up and asked him, and he said yes and showed up the day he was supposed to," said Mel. "He's a really great guy, but he likes to fix his hair in the camera lens too often," he quipped. l wonder if Burt will be in my movie if I just "call him up and ask him?" I asked to myself. Both Mel and Roy seemed pleased with the way New World Pictures is handling their movie, calling them very "young and aggressive." They admit that things would have been a little funnier if they could have left in some of the things they cut out, but they are still pleased with the final product. Mel says that they are not "trying to make a statement at all." That was fairly obvious when watching the film. With a $3.6 million budget, a cu!A! but childish sC'ript, and a lotofte]evision expe­rience, Mel and Roy have produced a pro­duct for what they called their "Hee Haw fans and the outer fringes." Complete with p]enty of corny country songs like "ls We Goin ' Somewheres" and "Stonin' Around," Uphill All the Way comes off as a mild diversion for those that are easily "entertained. Roy Clark, left. and M~l TilllS are two rambling con men in "Uphill All the Way" f;~ .... 1':'· .fl t fl:: '~'J ROCK "N" HORSf ~. ~'--~? d ~\' ~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Newst Women's Bar (Men Welcome Also) Dancing Soon Draft Beer-75¢ Happy Hour $1°0 Regular Well Drinks $1 2 ~ Happy Hour Happy Hour 4-7pm Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 4pm-2am, Fri.-Sun. lpm-2am Narene Kee-owner 5731 Kirby 520-9910 $24A MONTH* FOR 12 MONTHS ·12 monthly payments of $24 each after a Down payment of $48 APR 21% At Olympia you'll have your own personalized pr~ram on the latest M !~~~b?~st,h::i~ ~u~~~e;~ug~~~~:i~~rf~"~hd81~~!~~}o~u~~I~~ whirlpool. Get started on your 1986 shape-up program NOW and SA VE at low 1985 rates OIYMM Latest progressive resistance equipment • Olympic <wetghts • Petaona1tzed prograr .s by trained ~!~:e~~1~ .8L°.~~~!'1~1:a~~~~~."~~~r~~r:dNc;,r,~·ritJ·~~.U~=·~~,~~~~~~c~c~~ children's playroom • Nationwide IPFA reciprocity • Snack bar and 1pot1s shop ®- OLYMPIA Fitness & Racquetball Club CALL1 f98'8~8787 OPEN FOR MEN AND WOMEN 7 OAYS-A WEEK. DIRECTIONS Soulh....,t•::.1 f1N•W1ty 1nhound s•dP nP.ll lo Channel 2 TV T a ~ e S C"ir..;."'" • •·~ 1 l'1!h1>1 <1"'" Tinn In THf C::FNTFR nlforP rnmnfp)I' presents Valentine's Red Hots .•. Music That Is Men Who Know Ragin Cagun Cookin' Let US Entertain You at the Home of Leathe~ By Boots Texas Riders 20 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 7 1986 Montrose Classified Burlington Apartments GREAT LOCATION Close to Downtown in ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose Vatee. a general c1rculat10n iiewspaper having published =~;~='!c~~~t ~8n'ot~~es'°a~~;i1~~ the newspaper's c1rculat10n area of Montrose BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Partners fo purchase equ1t1es m foreclosed 1nd othet properties for tax a.ctvantaqes and growt"' 684-6517 CARS & BIKES FAMILY MOTORS 5211 Bl 1110 Speedway. 667-6804 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MERIDIEN-iEASING Lee Borba. 97~ 1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE Ahef J..2-2~S.-OOO"S~'i)aym8nt :r.~~on!~,~asy Roommate fat beauMUI home 1nc;;,rden Oaks S250 684-6517 Sh.rpstown l--2-2. $61~000$200 dOwn payment '°' fn1.ed easy qual1hcatt0ns 684-4517 Ma1810sti"are large homewrlh W-d: e11b'+e-. :~place. etc $285 plus ~utilities 290t'610 area $37:5oo~2-i-c00do. all appliances maev extras. assume ~lat1ng Join w•th $295 payments MONTROSE A PT .iPOOL-­Ouiet llautt-only bu1ld1ng in the heart of Montrose. Free gas heat for winier. sw1mmmg pool tor summer Central AIC. GE appliances. m1n .... bhnds and more :!:O:.\ !3 ~~~~ICR at $375 plus security 308 Stratford at T.tt Dlecount on 1yr.L.... 523-1109. Luxury Condornin1uns Now Leasing with option to purchase Great locatton Large beaUt1ful swimming pool & Jacuzzi Controlled entry security Remote controlled garage entry High effrciency AC & heating Free cable TV One bedrooms from $375 ($150 deposit) Two bedrooms from $650 ($250 deposit) 2507 Montrose Boulevard Cati for appointment 524-0830 ~SSED PGA•NS1 Hlr NOON SK'/ LIKE A CLOU> OR A JU Sll<EAl'l, I SCl\N "lilt t(JRfZ:.()N BUILDER CLOSE-OUT 100% FINANCING 2206 Driscoll River Oaks shopping oreo. lto lion design. one and two bed­room townhomes. From S70's. 2417 Dunlavy Spacious three bed­room. three bath tONnhouse. S180's. 316 Hawthorne Two bedroom. two bath t ownhouse. Large lot S180's. 810 Marshall Unique four story tONnhouse. Two bed­room. 2'h baths. Out­door Jaccuzzi. From S150's 2421 Kingston Behind St. Anne·s. Beautiful four story townhou se Three bedroom. 2'h baths. From mid S200's. 731 Heights • Two bedroom. two b a th tow n house. From S130's. FOR INFORMATION CALL 523-1532 Roommate J / 212 Sharpstown townhouse 98t 6nll - 1120 WEST ALABAMA APTS 1920 W Alabama. 5~798 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GREENWAY Pl.ACE APTS 3333 Cummins Lane. 623-2034' SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Non-srOok1ng roommate to share home 1n the Heights $235tmonth plus ~ ut1l11fes ~1510 MONTROSE AREA DUPLEX 2nd floor. 2 bedroom. covered parking, share pool $750 4'70-1876 Montrose Area. Small Community, Adults Only, Nice Pool, Now with Jacuzzi, Large Cwsets, Big Windows, Free Movie Channel, Well Maintained 1 and 2 Bedrrn. Effective Rent from $249 (Regular Rent $359) 3502 BURLINGTON 523-024!1 Montrose -Deco duplex. hard-w'Ood. fk>or·to-ceilmg bnghl cheery. newly $~~~,~~- ~:~~~l!s) negotiable BRIARWAY Great location and great price San Feltpe at 610. Cable TV. small compku:. lots of trees. 1 & 2 BR. $225-$360. Call Neva 9-60-0923 (Hylton Realty Co.) - -- Small quiet Montrose comple1t New paint. new double door ice boxes $100 deposit 1 bdrm $285 ptus elec Also available 2 bdrm 529-8178 --volcE A oviAT1s1NG WORKS Rent that house or apartment through a Montrose Voice Classrfied Call 529-8490 And charge 1t on your American E;.press 011ler's Club. Carte Blanche. MasterCard or Visa EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED ADVERTISING SALES Are you currently m the ads sales dept of the Houston Post. Chronicle. Green· sheet. Houston City - or somewhere else? I invrte you to consider a sw•tch to the Montro5e Voice. the · Newspaper of Montrose.·· We are small. but we are aggressive You can have a very profitable rela!fonsh1p with us If you are an ach·er ­t1smg proless1onal. with expenence. you may be able to negotiate a Yery attrachve posrlfon for yourself at the Voice Go ahead. try me. Call Henry McClurg. 529- 8490. lor appotntment ru keep your ~~.U•2'_Slnctl_!. conhden11at ADVERTISING SALES TRAINEE EYery successful salesperson started somewhere. If you have an outgomg per· sonahty, are mtelligent. neat and presen­table, have your own 1ransportat1on. and think you would en1oy representing lhe Monlrose Voice to advert1Mtrs and poten· 11a1 advertisers. you are 1ov1ted 10 apply lor the pos1l10n ol adverttS.1ng sales tra"" nee Make appointment with Henry McClurg at 529-8490 Bar backs, bartenders and D.J. needed for new bar. 528-5953 E;"peneflced drivers for 1ght dt:-1 very Knowledge ol city and key map a must Others need not apply 526- 714'5 SALONOANIEL Ha1r styhst with some lollow•ng Be profes.s1onal. creat1Yecurrent We provide everything for you 1n a fun, modern atmosphere Commiss1001beMf1ts Call or come by 2"31 Brs.sonnet 520-9327 fT IS NO LCN,ER I\ BIEOEN I 1'1.JST C~ ~ t1'1 SH()JLDERS SVT A Sl [ Pf'N; ST~[ INTO EXCITING NEW REIU1S PERFORMING ARTS Ticket office personnel sought lulli part lime Excellent verbal skills required Base plus commission Call Ms Knipp after 11am. 526-5323 (MISC.) FOR SALE FOR YARD SALES See ads under '"Yard Sa.I s· at the end ol the Montrose Class1f1ed MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS SEND YOUR VALENTINE A SWEETISH MASSAGE! Gitt cert1ficatesstartat$10 B111o·Rourke. MST 869-2298. BODY MASSAGE Full body massage. Hot 011 - m or out Bruce 622-0370 GET-THE KINKS OUT Massage. relieve tension and stress Call Ted for appointment 568-254" THE-CADILLAC OF TOUCH Body WOt'k at b be•t O of E.T (713)622-4530 PERSONALS. Hairy merv ha1rfans adhst Info s2·00 Hatr, 59 West 10th. NYC 10011 local 24 yr. 0Tct- 6r1en18T iTiatelookmg lor mature. cute. white professional male. 26-4'0 for a senous llfet1me relallonsh1p Sheldon P 0 Bo>e 10356 Laha1na. Hawaii 96761 NUT°RIOL GROWS HAIR ProYen 1n Europe. Fully guaranteed 526-8213 24' hours GwM.'19. 5.,.~ . -t"iibr"owri eyes~ha1r and moustache Looking tor GWM. 28-40 for a daddy Reply Blind Bo>e 276-R Clo Voice GWM. brlbr. 6". 175.seeksGM101U1111tmy hot. but sate. fantasies and share 1n yours In my dreams you are thm with dark hair Repty Bhnd Bo>e 276-Z Clo Voice AS;n- f~ale sffk.S other G1Fs for friendship Reply Bhnd Box 276-L c/o VO>Ce HOuston-Young 40, protesS1onal. -GWM. 5·5··- 135. considered boyishly handsome. seeks a lovmg relationship wrtt:t GWM •n 30's You. like myself. are sincere. honest intelhgent. healthy. allect.onate. stra1gh1 appeenng. financially secure and no! dependent on alcohol or drugs We share many interests 1nclud1ng travel. theatre. music, dinmg out. films. entertaining at home. sports events and the fellowship of good friends My lllemate and t will also enioy Qu•et evenings with lots ol cuddhng and gentle lovemaking If you are senously interested 1n building a quality hie with a carrng 1nd1v1dual please respond to. Boiehotder PO Box 2n03 Drawer 186 Houston. TX 77027 Dl1Cre1ton required and assured Wanted Young GWM to sh11re cab•n on cruise 2/1~22186 with GWM Reply with phOto and phone no Free for right person . P 0 Boie 664'83 Houston 77266-6483 G"1w1M-. 22. s~ 1SO.-b1d/gr SHSUstudent. attrtc!lve. bright. creative. apen mmded. tot111lly honest. sens11fve, yery allect1onate ana at:voted. Wide range ol heelthy interests Fairly new to gay Ille I do not hke, nor indulge tn drugs or promiscuity Seeking someone compatible with me lor serious dating and friendly relallori,h1p Reply Blind Box 276-H Clo Voice Meen cowboy or other master needed by han<tsome orally umnh1b1ted. 1ubm111rve GWM Reply Bhnd Box 27~G C/O Voice Leather Levi 42-ye:if:old POi1sh gonlla 1nto toys. long hard sex and cuddling Seeks versatile guy 1~25 lor hot sex. ~~~~!1~c?Na0nd1 ~ra~~~=91~epty 1837 G.'WiM, 32 5"10' 165. brown/ green Looking for good fnends who en1oy movies. travel. sports. sale sex. and good company 01shke smokmg. dnnkmg drugs. bars ti interested. please wnte descriptive letter to 7203 Straffordshlfe No 1, 77030 PHONE SEX Our service connects Horney Guys 24' hrs. a day Do it now for less than $3.SOan hour (415) 346-874'7 HORNY HISPANICS CALL 168-4172 Tall man. mid 30s. seeks sensitive guy lor safe sex . sensual developmental relationship. Wnte P 0 Box 701().41, Houston. 77270 MEET CHRISTIAN SINGLES Local/Worldwide· Phone1ma1I Introductions text Let love. datmg. marriage change your life today• Free 1nlormat1on. Wrile Boie 90~850. Van Nuys CA 91409 - PHONE SEX Our service connects Horny Guys 24 hrs a day Do 11 now for less than $3.50 an hour (415) 346-874'7 OuR POLICY on Seieually-E-xph"C1t Advertising The Montrose Voice does not beheve that humans engaging 1n ~so~:';~~~~ ~~~~~:~~~sw~~~ ~~~:~r~~~ to advertise here to seek relat1onshrps. encounters . adventures . etc All advert1smg should. however. not contain language that would offend an unsuspecting reader - A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Fredenck Brandt can show you how to have active fun or play p.&S51Ve games with the personal ads. In their new book. '"Classified Affairs. they"lt tell you how to wnte an ad that really stands out, what to expect when you place or respond to an ad. and even whal all those funny httle abbrev1at1ons mean Send $8 to ··c1assil1ed Affairs· Alyson Pub., Dept P·S, 4'0 Plympton. St Boston. MA02118.tAlso1ncludedw1ll bea coupon for SS off on your next Personals 1n your choice ol 25 gay. pubhcat1ons. mclud1ng lhe Montrose Voice.) PLAY SAFE -- Sate se>e is lun. erotic. Play safe. lor your sake. for your partner's sake High blood pressure is serious business. T h a t 's one w ay o f looking a t 1t. A n ot h e r way 1s to ig n ore It and hope 1t goes away. Or tell yourself it's hop e less And tha t 's called playing with f ire. Because the re 's o n e thing we know for certain A nd that is t h a t hig h b lood pressure can u sua l ~ ly be controlled B y fo llow4 ing your docto r 's a d v ice. B y exerc is ing re gula rly to contro l weig ht . B y c utting d own o n salt in your d iet And b y s tic king to your prescribed m e dication B ecause if y o u d o n ' t ta ke 1t serious ly to day. it could ta ke you b y s urprise tomo rrow WE'RE FIGHTING Fm 'y()IJR LIFE &-\American Heart V Association - - Montrose Voice Classified Advertising :.~~ r•~-:;~r;:' ;;.~~ ~C::::::,~~"/,rr;.;"6:},=:,' '~7:'9o,,_,,.' fOI r9{1~ rd" ley a<Mtf•S•"fl THE HEADLINES: Headline words in bold type. centered, are$1 each.word (mmtmum $3 per line). (Centered bold head Imes can also appear w1thm the text or at the end of the ad, and are also $1 per word. with a m1n1mum of $3 per line.) THE TEXT: Each word in regular type is 40¢. (Additional reg~t.ar words in "ALL CAPS" or Bold Words not in all caps are 55¢ each. Add1t1onal BOLD WORDS in alt caps are 70¢ each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE SJ.00 Then each additional word like this 40C THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each additional word like lhts 40C THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLD, $1.00 Then each additional word hke lhts is 40C ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WOROS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE 55C EACH AddftloMI bold wonts like this In teJl:I are 554 ellCh. ADDITIONAL BOLD, A.LL CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EA.CH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Aun the same ad 4 weeks or )onger. make no copy changes dunng the run. pay for the full run in advance_, and deduct 15% Aun the same ed 13 weeks or longer under the same cond1t1ons and deduct 25%. BLIND AO NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number We'll ~;~~~n!ita~~,'gf'ifcS:dA~1::r:f~~;r8:atgti~~=~~~ :g~ubls~~1~~~~~~e~a;1ri1~ forwarded indefinitely, however, for as long as they come m.) ORDERING YOUR AO: You may mail your ad in or phone it in. You can pay by check. money order. Mastercard, Visa, American Express. Diner's Club or Carte Blanche_ Or we'll bill you. DEADLINE: Classified ads received by 3pm Wednesday will be placed in th~t week's newspaper Ads received later will be placed m the followmg weeks newspaper ANSWERING A BLIND AO: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number, clo Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006-3028- It will be for­warded. unopened, to the advertiser Enclose no money ADDITIONAL NOTES: A "word" is considered anything separated by "spa­ces." except hyphenated words are co.ns1dered 2 words when each segment 1s a recogrnzed word 1f 1t stood .on its own. A _complete phone number, tnclud1ng area code. 1s 1 word. City, state and zip 1s 3 words bold line bold llne text words bold line _ Use additional paper if necessary CATEGORIES: 0 Announcements D Accomodat1ons (~od~ i ng for Houston visitors) D Cars & Bikes ~ ~~~~~~:!t :~~;1 ~a~~!!d051~~~cro;ns~~: 0 Models. Escorts. Masseurs D Personals O Pets o Rides 0 Travel D Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AD UNDER . IN THE '"GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY," OPPOSITE PAGE bold headline words at $1 each (minimum $3 per line) regular words in text at 40¢ each ALL CAPS regular words in text at 55¢ each Bold words In text at 55¢ each BOLO ALL CAPS in text at 70¢ each Bhnd ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad m 1t mai led to me, $1.25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Tim" _ - Wffks: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) D Also. I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week I heve ~$~~0~ ~o~~~1:h~o~~~;~0~~a~~~· as indicated below) an additional TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be bolled or charged METHOD OF PAYMENT· D Check enclosed D Money order enclosed O Cash D VISA charge D MasterCard charge o Diners Club charge o Carte Blanche charge D Amercian Express charge O Bill me If chargmg, card expiration date ___ _ Credit card number Signature Name Address Phone(s) for venhcatton of ad. if necessary MAIL OR BRING TO Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale, Houston. TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 10am-5 30pm FEBRUARY 7, 1986 . MONTROSE VOICE 21 MONTROSE RESOl_TRCES SELECTED sTATE NAT OAGANlzATiQNs S... 0..-. .-..., of T• !BOAT)-720 Brwo. ~ A!.ahro-(S12J412-3333 Alg;>g:.~:i~~:~.:.~~!: :'~~ WWl..gk>f'l.DC20003.t212)5-47-3101 Gay & L..,._, Pr.- A.Mn --P08 A. Old Ch911M Sta New YoR. NY 10011- 1212) 911H622 Gay Rightl Nat Lobby- POB 1882. WM1'111'1gloro. DC 20013-!202) S.t&-1801 Huma.tl Rights Campa•gn Fund-P08 1398. w .. h· ngtoro. DC 20013-(202) S46-2025 ~ Lambdl legal Def--132 w '3rd. New York. NY 10039-(212) 9«-9488 L•blwv'O.., Rights Advocltn-POB 1!122. A.USl•n 78767 Med•• Fund !Of Human Rights- P08 A. Old Chel­Sta, New York. NY 10011-1212) ~ Nat Assn ot au- Councill--Bo.l 151'5. S.n F~.CA9'115--"15)1!115-fi313 Na!ANroolGay & Leltlian0emoClub9-17'2M .. Av SE. w .. turogtoro. DC 20003- (2021 S47-SI°' Nill Gay HMl!h Edue Foundal!Oft-POB 78' New York. NY 1003&-- Q12) 5(1..l.4313 or Dr G...,..t.rg (713)S23-620' Nllt Gay RtgtMa ~~Castro. S.ro F,-an­aaoo. CA 1M114-1'151 ~312' ,.,.., Gay Tak FO<OI 1NGTFl-«I 5Ch Av. Mii'# Yori! NY 10011-(21%) 7•1·5800 NGTF's er..e.,...__(l!IOO') 221·7044 IOJllOde ...... Yori! State) Aural C:O.l1!ioro, do Wa!'9r·Zlnghl Box 611. 91um. TX 79827 T• Gly~n Tlltl fOJCl'-·POB AK. Denton 7$201--(11n317-t2te us r,_...,... .... r,_"ar Cont.a Svc 1017·8 E Pili•. S.."le 81!1122- C20SI 124-1266 - AlTE.ffTioN ORGANIZATIONS Check your listing We list here each week name of organtzation. address. pt)one, regular meeting dates and times. and ~:~r:~~=:~=tt~nf~r~~r~~s:~~~! Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006 THE MONTROSE VOICE­INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY Aid fof' AIDS: ·POB6641-4~772io-52&-«117- /4.n A. eap9fl.ChOM. cnui-ch01Ciit111- POe 66734. 77296 A"Pt.C.mt~""&:m-5n-7~~~ ACW=.1236WGriY=S24-5925 - - AIDS Holline--529-3211 {Gay & L.ab18r\sW.i"di­boaird) Amencan Gay Atr.e.11-POeM71Ci1__. 527-925.5 ~bQ;..SOc..ry '°" ihe oeai:-Sio-Oi32 <TTY) ~- POe ~- 71286 mMt; 7 30prn 2Jid Thurs. Wometi'I Ctln1t1an Ctr. 310 Paolic Azui.o womy;;·s MIPzme--t130 _SW __ fwy 1335---266-5237 ~=oJ·1_~ .. '.RObert- Mo0n~209 eer.ng~~ Met°hod1at Chufch- 14'0 Harold--52&-1017 IVC 10 SO.m Sun Chotcee un.1"mi1ed-POe -10996. 112io.=52i= 3211 (Gay & L•blan Switchboard)- rneeta 1pm 3rd SUn. M•terson YWCA. 3615 W1JUa. ·Social M1•er'' 7 .J()pm a11em11e Fnd•ys. Sunday brurich 12:30pm 3rd Sun ~reno1-,t1e~d-1101 Monuoee ave lpm Sun. B<ble att>dy 7 30pm Thu~ ~n,,;11atiFa1ttt~W .. 1hem...-­~- aves 10 451.rn Sun; eibltlaludy 7 3(lpm Wed' Rev Chris A. Ricoa. pastor Citizens fOf' H..;iUi;:;-EqUl.hty (CHfl=-POB XM5 n253-e80-3346. 937-3516 me« 2nd Tu•. Hou. House. 1e11 Fannin. 9th floor activity room Ci;S.Leib----;;; Mothers Group-SatT9473-3708 ~ 2nd & 41h Thurs. o.gl'llty Ctr Ci.ppet'l-342~ - -- eoi--.-.s:;-~ -;t Brazos R..,.., BOnatn 2400 Bra.z09-52&-9192 60mmit1ee- ;o;:--p~,c Health Awal'9MU POB 3045. 77253-~. 522.5094 ·SNnng Group lor the W~n.d W meec Fri 7..aptn, MonlrOM Counsefing Ctr COmmuntty. i>Ohtical - A.cuor1 Commrttei tC­PA. C>- POB 200!, 11m. n&-N6G CDmriiun.tYGospel Ctr-3207 MOtll/'099-- 521- 0511 Svcs ttam Sun. 7;3f)pm Thur• Conoreoat•on AYtt CNy1rn- 18'0 Westheimer 68&-8997. 728-5181 svc & aoclai 8PITI 2nd & 4ttl F" ena.. H0iti•2a: 1505 DemOCOrnmitt.O Ot -GPc- -52&-8434 Dharm9-S:WvarOuP::4iiAvOl'dal9--524-~ ~M-F0undaii0'1~27oo -Mu0n-52-•-Si91 ~~lT~-~~ ~~~~1 F1"n1n ESOPS Pffl918PrOfe.&.On;i--5oc111Club· 96-j":' ..,. Fede.-l1i0n ol'Ch.n1 ... United 1or-$0Ci.1 5-vi- ~~~~~~'.ur:::;~ ·~~o~d~~!:. Montrose Clmic Montrose CounMt1ng Ctr 111 Untta';;;n Churdi.~5210 Faronm-52&-~71 ave 1115.amSun FrOn~~ 52CMOi~~dOr m. 1288 runs Stin. Tues & Thun Memo,.•I Pan: Tenn11 C1r G.Y&Aiov8s.Ni'";inQ E·P-r"fie (GASE) Sa- 1311. 529-0l91 a.y & Leabiarl .-.rCti•moTTi iiii1to•1a 01 vH inc Q.y &LeSboan M;,mon, __ -1]1J WeS!he1met .tfl040. 7708tl-56&-1413 GiY&l.est>1arlSIUden1 AUna1Tu1H-4 -eo:-31'4 4800 Cathoun-529-3211 (Gay & l .. b11n Switchboard) Giy ~LMbi&n"Sw otc~d:-PQ e &6591 772fi6-S29--3211 1nf0fmati0ri. counHflng_ rel errall. TTY. AIDS Hotllne Gay As•n. i. -;:r..;;<.7ie15W.';ghOr1219 - 523-6799. 785-3633 meets 3pm 2nd & Mist Sun Gav F11tw.-3217FW.";;:---S26-011l ~ G.Y~ln H.;°noaLin~ POetlOOi21. 77260----e82- 14711 IM9!1 2nd Mon. Oogruty Cir GiiYNu.rseaAH*'ce-~- -- - Giv-People W. Cfm.11a"5C:~=eOlC8 1-i a;... ••re 77401 -68$-26'2 Gay--~1ca-ueu. (GPC)::-PQe-6eeM n21&--S2HOOO meets 3217 FIM'lf\ln 111 '3rd Wod Gr .. ter Mot'ltroeeBu•.--1 Guild-M1k; Ntrtaon 63()-0308 Of' B!U08 wooney 529-&464 nwe11 7pm, 4th Wed. Brennans Reel, 3300 Smith The Group theat• Worbhop-J08 Watts 522- 2204 meetl 7pm Th"rs. Oogruty Cir. 3217 Fannen Hazelw•tch Pt"oductions-2615 w;-,;h"[)';~ n006 "'""'" concerts. m.e mailing 1111 ,~,,~_n,_~l t;a-riCe~2G~M;;:: Hou A.rH Gay & Lesbian Engineers--& Scient11t1--POB66631, n006-439-187i rn.eta ::: ":rr~:.~.- .. -.~.-.., ~H=oeo1~ Brazoa River Bottom. 2400 BrazOI· 52&-9192 meets 2pm 2rld Wed Hou Commu.ruty Cklwna -862-331• Hou Councit ol CJuba-526-8054 Hou 0a1iiPfOfflUIOria1s- -SZHl922. 664-6459 meets 730pm 2Jid T~ Hou Gay HMlth A.dvoell91· ~ M"'9 730pm 1st Sat Hou Gay Stud«lts .-._,., 747-3088 ~1n18t--Fa.tn A~h•nc.e-coniicithn>Ua;h i;,;- =1:U=.,'--~-.,,..~.- .c ~1u~b-cl......,.~oM •rv·•. 10z2Weat­helmer- 52&-M51 ~ -Norttl p;o-f9U.ona1a--JIOB' 38o&O. Hu;;i,ie 77347·--Btll .. 821-712tl "'"'7 30Pfn 2nd Sat HOUOU.tdOor Group 1HOGJ· 621:Ji;1 Or J-;-,T; 611).3144 ~ rtn": I~:;,!~-=i~~:f. Cen•• ifHlne----POB 16()41. 77222----1732.529-7014 alfohated groups are lnlefact. B'uarno's /4. Plsca 1n the Suri. Montro&e A.rt A.lhlnC9, Gay & La9bla" A.rchrves of T•. Gay & L•bian Sw .. 1chboard. MontroH Symphonic Barid, board meet 7 30c>m 111 Thu111 (vaned k>cat1ons): educational IONm 7-30pm 3rd Thurs 1-;;ge1110U Speaker1i" Bur91U-POB 391. Betlalre 77401-~ ~t'!.~~E=~a=~:~:=· ~:c~~~.a~~~-~.~,..~,~.,~.~ KPrT Rid.a. F~~1ilo~-e~ 4000 ''BrMkthroogh- ~tst pgnt F" a 1s-11am. Wilde ·n Stern" g1y p;m Thurs 7 .lo­O Ollpm In Montrose, Nearlp Everpone Reads the Vot'e KSiA1os "fOOridaliori- -3317 MOnlroee BQ.1-155:' 7700ll-524-2437 A.tOS Rllll ReducluJn IS.le Se•) Wo/11:1hops 8pn 2nd & 4th Mon 111 COf'IJUnG­tion with Montroee CounM11ng c.nter ~ttmaneancer Fund-178-41o& Krewe of Hydra--811 G~nd-&LI M ... Clef 72&-1032 ~A~&Allroon- 1214Jo Annoe-s21-sn2 l'Mi;af'\/Gay-ffMoutce s...C- ~It)" clt--.:4Qu. 4eoc> caitooun. bo•309. 77004- 749>-1253 FT.a 230pm •ltemate Tues, Spnd'91op Room. 2nd noor_ Un.....rs1ty cu Let Us En1ertaon You Weei19nd-pr0f9C! of Hou Council ol Clube:- 52&-8()54 The i;me Ct'!urctl =212F~m:Tii5 ;ci' UOs:>GI Sun ~~~1~:.,~---.;2~:1tif= :.:' Jeanne Legoett Lone Stu Nlold111 GrotiP. POe 74'JS"i2 17274 lower W..iMim;r- POifoe &fi:Statoon «t! W_,_msr- 5~3100 L~herans CQ;ibm9d-meita at Grace Luthe­ran ChUrctl. 251S W-.igh-521-(1163, 453-1143 meet 2nd & 4th T uea ew.,.,lngs, McA<.-OiY'HOUS.----<:.10 KSIA.iOS FouMatlorl 3317 MOfllroH Bo• 115!.-52•-2437 M,,,.. Aoa•nat Deception eoUnny CiUb--POB 5-411171. 172~--§29-32'1 (Gay & L"b1.1n Swilchbo.ardl. rneet1bt--..tt11ty Met-rOp,i,-tin----COmrnunr.v Cl'I~ ollfie R---.M'· rect1on (MCCR)-1919 Decatur-Stl1·9149: Pot­luck dol'I'"" 7 30pm 1SI Siil '"°nthty. IVCI 10 •5am & 7 15pm Sun & 71Spm Wed: memMf'• ship lnQUlfttl'I CIUI 1 30pm Mon eduU11oro ct.Ml Tuee & Wed ev.. iHouJ --o;;o..1.n W1ndE'-"•· '629-i61Ci ~ St Stephens Eposcopat Church. 7 30 Waid MonlroNArtA.l ... ~1132.ee&-1314.1111- 5332 afflhlle lfH tnc. ,,_.. 2nd Mon MoritJOM-BUi.nes.Guild seeGr .. terMontrose BuaGUtkt MSA;;:h. -Niohl 1M1x.dl .. guei Bow11i\g lr.'•ke Weik.n M 173'1~ plly liill)m S1ed1um L9nM. 8200 B~•rt MsAP(.;of1-e-;-n#dl)l~0eot11e sCott 973- 1358 Of Oennlf Lord ~752 MSA!Voti9Yba11-- Me~n.~>22~-~,.~ .-.. ,-.._-~7pm­Tu111. Gregory-LlnCOlln school, 1101 T1rt J.Aonl,;.. Witch subgroup NMrtown Aun M,.1.,;g&~~111nes.rn. 710P9c~ 9427 clubl"tghtTl'lurs N1tton11 G•v 11ei1th'Edua~.o;;:. 523-520ol ~!~~11':~:f:':~~~~o~~}."· N."°""'r.i -.-.un 1Mon1rose Civic Club\ i•13 W•tlletrner: ~ 7pm "11 Tues Ne.r10 .... ,, eut.neu-.-.11~-529-7010. meet• 7pm 2nd W«S, Ltberty 8-nk. l001 W•theimet N;;fr..dOm Christ~ Church-129 Ya'9~ ~~v;:r~"-__.,~.~-~,.=-~eoon. ::m~r ::=~~~:,,":~ 8enng Chureti. 14'0 HarOld ~::C:~~~~~:rdG=·(=~ ~ -W.;,::.~~~ N.-.~rt•-•- .~c•~ . ,~. ~.u ,,lty Firehouse- 7'l-~4 P&: -.., L•beractC>n- -POB iooo6:£772e0-862- 147tl p;n-tJY19r11nl IQi-LnblllVGly Co.-.c.r'11· Pr•byter'-n CU '1 OU.cill-S26-2!>84 rrle«I 7~2ndTum Pi-esu:tenr. Q~.~ .,.- -~,-.-"~.,-~-,0 GPC=-,. -POe 6U44 7726&-62l-602• Aecr9at10N1l Undfund Comm11tee-MuSlanQ Oubpro,ect R.C9Unrv ~i~OUP-529- 3211 {Gly & LIHb1an Sw•!Chboard) ROfii'ko Chape6-1'<>9 SUI Ross-S24-9838 Stiinti -o,- ~lif'lg tor aite-ttueatemng 111"191 ... --522-50&4 SOCi;t..,IOr~t-Es'i).~t !!~-~~~~ Society lot the Promol:IOf'I of A.mazon s.oo­M.. oc *'" (SPA.SMJ- POB 70996. n210--·Gay & L9lb11ri Sw tchboard 5n-3211 ~ C.ttle Co social cklb-clo The eam 710 Padhc-62&-IM27 y,;---a;y ~ j,i;;._ Orawet , 19' P08 66973. 17006-~50CJ'I ~~~~oundatiori"- 1i1i T.Rde ... -c1o Ripcord_ 714 F._,"""'-:__521-2192 WWB~M:trt 12i14S5-bow1 1~ SUn. Post O• Bo...ln'loQ Lanes w.aii.y;;;T.!lowlh~-889Q =~~~:sf~· 1001 w;;tn .. Wh91E~ Ha~- to Baby Jerie M1.ed =~1 . ~~~'.1 ~tac1~t:!°243 l\'99 wom;.,:; 50..,;rmg -1..e.g~t,;;97~ 1359 SprT'l Sun Stlldium Lann. 8200 Br-.na•n wo;;;;:s-l.Obb;-Al1taric.--4Chel ... 521-0439 v;,,,m;;;;:-, Softball- .. L.gue-6431 Pinesttaoe. 77!X19:;9ittt_y_or ~.!." 968-6256 ___ BAvroWN-..:-- e.vro....n Lambda G1oup- -427-1378 meets 7~oddfri CQN!i'of.::- - ConrWA*l~AA=--1409) 3"'-6-470 CoNo. Ar..ie.cw.-Kattiy •t 1'6081156-00Si fnM1 8pm 2nO & 4th Fn GALVESTON= - LamtldaAICOhOliel~-763-l4Cl M.fOPoi!Un COinmuntty Chun:tl Of Ga~ tal&nd· 1~4 ero.ow...,-165-7626 QUICK REFERENCE (Tear Out & Pott by Phone) Aios ~hne--- s5-32t1 AMBULANCE- 111 Orv Halt-222-JOn ~~321 FIRE- 111 G;y Poirtica• C&ucu1---52-1--:1<XiJ- - Grf&L-..n S.11ct'lb0ard-529-3211- i(s,..A10S Founcta~-52..._2Q7- L8....,;. _ ilcsS ·°' 5~32,,_----­Ut:; i,Y- 22..._54.41 - -- ~Ci~-62&----W-1 ~~-;;g--C1r-52M)()37 MONTROSE VOICE--$29-MiO PoL1CE-i11 --- 'lower W•"'*,,., Po6ice Sta· 52-3,oc· - T .. , -654-4040 cw 236- m :r,;.. "f'C.W Mr---644--J'17! ADS BY THE INCH In addition to o u r regular c lassified rates of paying "by the word ." you can pu rchase space here "'by the inch." When buying by the mch, you can include s peci al art. logos o r fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3·· $49 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3" $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3" $39 22 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 7, 1986 Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory To advertise 1n this page. col 529-8490 during business hotxS ADVERTISING PROViD1NG A SERVICE? Keep n listed here in the Montrose Voice where ltterally thousands turn each week VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS - Advertise your professional service through a VOiceCtas.s1!1ed Call 5~8490 Pay by check or charge 11 on your American Express. Diner's Club. MasterCard. V1111 or Carte Blanche APPLIANCE REPAIR MlcroW'ave ser:.ce. p.cked~pTrom Your home S62 50 plus parts_ 520-5665 AUTO SALES LEASING FAMILY MOTORS - 5210 Buffalo Speedway. 667-6804 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MEAIDIEN LEA~NG Lee Bo~. 97~1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Afso see Cars & Bikes .. on Montrose Clasa1fiecf p,ge AUTO REPAIR ALL PAINT • aciov SHOP '110 Leeland. 659-3131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE WEST GRAV AUTO (TEX STATE INSPECTION) 238 W Gray. 528-2886 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Ma1or/Minor Repairs Gas or Diesel Eleclflcal Repalf 526-3723 2716 Taft TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1411 Taft. 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE NEARTOWN KAAZ 1901 Taft 524-8601 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE AUTO REPAIR • soovSHoP- 2001 Harold. 522-5255. 526-1940 BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS Tommy's Barber Shop. Hair cuts $10.00 House calls S 15 00 & up For info 528- 8216 BOOKKEEPING CONSTRUCTION HSK CONTRACTING 520-9064 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DATING SERVICE Lambda's Unl1m1ted Dating Service 496- 3371 or P 0 Box 7418 Houston 77248- 7418 DENTISTS Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westheimer Houston, TX 77006 Monday lhru Saturday Hours by Appomtmer1t (713) 524--0538 EYEGLASSES TEXAS STATE OPTICAL ~~~ ~·,~·~~rn 1;2~,~~ 52e..1 se9 & SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch, 52Pr3851 SEE DUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PICTURE FRAMING "'"'THE FURNITURE-STR"'iPPiNG SHOP Stripping. ref1mshmg. repair 913 Willard 1Montrose). 529-7833 GIFTS PARTY Gaaas TIS THE SEASON 1966 W Gray (R1over Oaks). 5~5700 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GOURMET SHOPS SAY CHEESE 3626 Westhe•met' (Highland Vi.lage). 621 • 1825 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GYMS Ol YMPIA FITNESS I RACKETBALL CLUB 8313 SW Fwy. 988-8787 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPB CLINIC 5401 Dashwood IJIO. 661·232, SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HOME AIR CONDITIONING TIME FOR A/C REPAIR? $25 plus partl. CALL MJ.-0391. MEDICAL CARE STEVE 0. MARTINEZ. M.O 2801 Ella Blvd , suite G 868-4535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PROCTOLOGY CLINIC OF SOUTH TEXAS 210 West Greens ACI. 872·7876 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voice PROCTOLOGY CLINIC OF SOUTH TEXAS DR. C.E. FONTAN I ER Diseases of the Colon & Rectum * Colonoscopy * Hemorrhoids * Constipation * Rectal Bleeding Medical & Surgical management 872-7676 Answered 24 hours 210 West Greens Rd. Houston, TX 77067 MOVING MOYEMASTERS Box too• Visa. MC. AMEX welcome 1925 Westhe1mer 6»6555. PEST CONTROL RESULTS PEST CONTROL I SANITATION 223-4000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PLUMBING D&Y PLUMBING Residential and commercial repairs and remodehng Sewer and drain aerviee Gas. water and sewer lines, water heaters. disposals and dishwashers. Licensed and nsured Work guaranteed 699-8239 Wsa/ Mastercard PRINTING RINN'S SPEEDY PAINTING 1617 W, Alabama, 527-0027 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SPEEDY PRINTING 5400 Bellaire Blvd. 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAX PREPARATION TAX RETURNS We can save you tax dollars and a lot of frustration_ 468-6199 anytime TAX-ACCOUNTING SERVICES 20 years experience. tax returns prepared and returned to you in 2 days. Computer checked {713) 78J..6717 1-NCOME TAX SERVICE Professional computer checked Reasonable rates Tax deductible. 713- 784-1266 TIRES ... •ci~ 529-1414 ' 1'11111tlf PUICE ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview J Btks West of MontrOM1 TRAVEL TRAVEL CONSULTANTS Complete travel arrangments_ All services FREE Open Monday through Friday 9am-5 30pm 2029 Southwest Fwy Houston. TX 77098 (713) 529-8464 VACATION IDEAS? See "V11t:at1ons" following ·on the To'wn" on the previous page TV SERVICE JACK FROST T.V. SERVICE 7DAYS A WEEK 621-9136 $5 off Repairs with this Ad VIDEO VIDEOSCOPE 2016 Montrose. 529-5544 SEE DUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE VIOEOTRENO 1401 California. 527-0656 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE WE DELIVER VIDEOS Your gay video service 1420 Westhe1mer 522-4485 GOLDEN WEST VIDEO Rent v•deoe at 40¢ each NO late charges time hm1ts or deposit Adult videos available 541-3485. Free delivery C.O 0 Also see "Adult Video'' category Shake the habit. m~ Salt. It's responsible for a lot more than seasoning your food. It can also contribute to high blood pressure, a nsk factor for stroke and heart attack. It's a habit you can't afford not to shake American Heart Association W'ERf Fl ~I-HIN-, Fcr. "°" lft VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Ren! Iha! house or apartment through a Monlro1e Votee Class1fted Call 529-8490 ~:.~~Cf:b1.t ~J~~:"~~~.~na:~c~ or Visa Photos by Jerry Mulholland Montrose Soap The Gal I eon 'Drags' It in For KS/AIDS, FOCUSS O'Brien• is opening this Sunday with the Hy t he staff of t he Mon t r ose Voice Illusions of Kandi Love, Koffie, Tina A/ex- The All City Bartenders Drag Show, held ander and Champagne. last Sunday at The Galleon netted $700 for -o-the KS/AIDS Foundation and FOCUSS Bar- JR'• stars this Sunday will be Sadgh1, Kandi tenders represen t_ing nearly every co~- Dellght and Charlie Summers. Two shows: munity bar entertained a pack~d house with 1 Opm and midnight. acts which ranged from high camp to -a-serious theatrics_ The management of the Guess who's patio is finally opening? Rome Galleon. thanks all the performers for doing wasn't built ln 8 day, right? And the Mining a great JOb Company's patio certainly w~sn't either. In - a- fact, it seems they took their own sweet Floyd. formerly of the Brazos River Bot- time. But the wait is worth it This Thursday tom, is now behind the bar at Chutea .. Steak (the 13th), you're invited to the gi~nt Patio Nights at Chutes are Thursdays, beginning Party with complimentary well drinks and at 7pm, with 25¢ draft draft beer 8-10pm. The Montrose A-crowd -a- (that Includes you) will be there Question of the week· Why is Michael at -a- The EKlle trying to lure people into his back The incomparable Sylvester will be live in room? Watch out Bill.I concert at Heaven THIS Sunday (the 9th). - a- That's the day Heaven normally has its Sun- Maria's Stag Party will be held at Chute.s day beer bust, right? Well, they still will. on February 13 Films and special drink pn- Free beer all night. And no increase in ces are included for a $1 donation to the cover. It's like getting Sylvester fc:>r free McAdory House. Speaking of Sylvester, our national gay a- treasure will be performing material from a The Sundance Cattle co. Bake Sale and new album. Don't miss him. Showt1me Barbeque will be held th is Sunday. Feb 9, at 11pm the Barn. -o- Thanks to the T ABC. the Krewe of Hydra's bus trip to Galeveston will be BYOB with complimentary set-ups 0 Ron of the Ripcord will be serving his nearly famous burgers at the Barn on March 3 - o - Telk about putting a smile on your face. the Or11coll StrHt Cafe is serving margari­tas for $5 a pound during Happy Hour. - o- Condolences go out to Tom Ml his recent loss of Sugar Sugar, general manager of Tom's Pretty Fl1h. -o- Let U1 Entertain You Weekend is nex.t: weekend (Feb 14. 15. and 16). And you thought it was still weeks away? - o- The Voice is giving away FREE PERSON­ALS in neJCt week's paper in honor of Valen­tine's Day So send your sweetie a love note Just call us at 529--11490 Mo~day (all day), Tuesday (all day) or Wednesday (before 2pm) J Don't forget the wedding of Pickles and Maria on Friday. Feb. 14. benefitting the McAdory House. The new Venture-N opened to packed crowds last Wednesday night. Dig out your chaps and vests and check them out this weekend BETTER LAWns & CiARDEns Total lawn mainte nance mcludinq mowtnq, edqmq. trimming, prumnq, ferhlizinq sprdying Firewood ~. !led mulching {.~ A2d\ed Feedioq -;~;;:h~ Oebns Remo1MI •",r.i.,J~ Complete Tree Sen.Hee ' Stumps Removed Total Fenc1nq Services (Cedar , notched Picket. Tredted. ek) Complete Sprinkler S~.slems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN -C'- The EKlle.'Texas' longest-running gay bar, is presenting the Miss Sweetheart Contest next Friday, the 14th, Valentine's Day, with MC Roxie Starr. Cash prizes and lots of crazy th ings. Thre are sooooo many places to be this month 0 The softball season is almost here and first to present their .new softball team is the BRB this Sunday (the 9th), so come see Magnolia Spints. Miss T. Marilyn and Patsy Cline. (These are ball players?) The show starts et 6pm so don't diddledaddle around Get there early -o- The Ripcord will be presenting "Valentine's Red Hots" next weekend with "music that is" and "men who know. ' -o- Yes, another new bar, The Rock~ Horae for wommen (men welcome too) 1s open at 5731 Kirby Go visit them' 0 Tonight (Fnday, th.e 7th) 1s the Galleon's Jazz Party- Live D1x1eland Jazz Band and no cover Tomorrow night (Saturday). the Galleon's annual Mardi Gras Costume Ball $100 cash prizes (t_w,o, _of 'em) Now entertaining a~ the Drl1coll Str.eet Cafe and Cabaret are Liz Mendez. Sylvia Reyes and Molly McGee. .,_ We've saved the scuzz news for last. The Ripcord will roast Mary's this Tuesday (the 11th) et 10pm. And they promise notto be kmd (Mary's retaliates on March 11.) GENERAL AUTO REPAIR TUNE-UPS OIL CHANGES BRAKES Bartenders from the Ranch performmg at the All City Bartenders Drag Show Sunday-Feb. 9, 6:00 Ballteam Show Come See: * Magnolia Spirits *Miss T *Marilyn * Patsy Cline Donations at Door Benefits Ballteam also _____ _ Our Sunday Denim Dance & Wrangler Roundup Steak Niie 4:00 this week Showtlme 6:00 Brazo1 River Band 7:30-11:30 Dining-Dancing-Devilish Decadence WHERE ELSE BUT THE BRAZOS! 2400 BRAZOS (713) 52&-91~ . 24 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 7, 1986
File Name uhlib_22329406_n276.pdf