Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986
File 017
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986 - File 017. 1986-02-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4675/show/4662.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-02-14). Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986 - File 017. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4675/show/4662

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986 - File 017, 1986-02-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4675/show/4662.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 14, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript 16 MONTROSE VOICE / FEBRUARY 14, 1986 New Woody Allen is Emotional Masterpiece Woody Allen and Mia Farrow in a scene from Allen's new film. "Hannah and Her Sisters." By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic It's a great week for movies with a superb Woody Allen and two very good films recently opening. Hannah and Her Sisters is Woody's 14th effort, and easily his most accessible adult comedy. With an all-star cast that forms a perfect ensemble, Hannah is an emotional masterpiece that picks apart our human experiences. F/X is a taut new thriller featuring the handsome Australian Bryan Brown of "Thorn Birds" fame. Highlighted by special effects and illusions, the film is a maze of turnabouts that keep us guessing the outcome. Lastly there is Colonel Redl, a military drama about a man harboring his homosexuality. Oscar-nominee Klaus Maria Brandauer (Out of Africa) is superb as the driven but insecure officer who must deal with his sexuality and a crumbling Austrian empire in the early 1900's. n Hannah and Her Sisters Woody Allen is a hard man to keep up with artistically. Those who loved his early movies like Bananas and Sleeper were put out by the New York "in" jokes in Annie Hall. Interiors threw everyone off with its Bergmaneaque family, and then came Manhatten with its cute charm. Lately, Woody has lost most of his seventies audience with small efforts like Zelig, Broadway Danny Rose and Purple Rose of Cairo. Each had brilliance and showed growth by a director who likes to explore, but none were box office smashes. Moviegoers wanted thrills and excitement, not variations on Woody's favorite themes of love, sex, God and death. Now Woody springs Hannah and Her Sisters on us, and this may be the one that makes his fanB return. A warm, humanly funny comedy, Hannah has already been praised nationwide by critics as his greatest film yet. This time the comedy and relationships are more readily identifiable, and people will be able to follow Woody's thoughts much more easily than before. The story revolves around three sisters: Hannah (Mia Farrow), Lee (Barbara Her- shey), and Holly (Dianne Wiest). Elliot {Michael Caine) is married to Hannah, but falls in love with Lee. Mickey (Woody Allen) was married to Hannah, and has dated Holly. Frederick (Max Von Sydow) lives with Lee, but never -parried her. Sound like "Dynasty in New York?" Actually, Hannah involves a lot of char acters searching for one thing— happiness. In past films, when he explored the meaning of life, Allen often came to the conclusion that it was meaningless. Here he seems to say that humor will come from looking at ourselves, and there is hope to look forward to the future. Hannah seems like a cross between Manhatten and Interiors, but it's much more lively and entertaining for general audiences. The characters are humorous because we can easily see ourselves in their dramatic situations. We see that we make many of our own desperate situations, but we are also able to undo them. In fact, the high points of the film came when all of the principles gather for two different Thanksgiving dinners. The interaction of the family members and the outsiders becomes a social saga that is hilarious, but still very real. We really care about these people and their problems, and we laugh and cry with them as they solve their difficulties. I could write pages on this film about the screenplay, the actors, and the direction, but this is a film beyond simple words. Hannah is a movie masterpiece that will definitely highlight the films of the 1980s. Woody is still talking about the same things, but this time he hits us emotionally and psychologically right where it counts. d F/X There's almost nothing like a good thriller, and F/X is a real dandy. Smart and furiously effective, this is one of those rarities that really keep you on the edge of your seat. In the movie business, F/X stands for the art of special effects. Rollie Tyler is one of the best effects men in the industry, always adding a special look to everything from cheapie horror flicks to space age sci-fi adventures. His excellent craft- manship and execution have also been observed by government agents, who decide to offer him a job. For a tax-free $30,000, Rollie will stage the false assassination of a testifying mobster. This hood will then become part of the witness relocation program, and avoid gangland violence. So, the stage is set, and Rollie convincingly splatters the gangster all over a restaurant wall. Unfortunately, he is not so sure that his killing was a fake. Someone could have switched his blanks for the real thing, and he might really be a murderer. Suddenly, he finds that the Justice Department has turned the tables on him and he is a suspect on the run. explosives, Rollie manages to stay on top of his aggressors. He is a fascinating character to watch as he uses his entire bag of tricks to save his own life. Bryan Brown (Rollie) is a remarkable actor seen in such films as Breaker Mor- ant and television's "Thorn Birds." A handsomely rugged man, Brown gives a totally engrossing performance that keeps us at attention. He also gives us plenty of "Richard Gere" shots that show off his nice body. Supporting actors also fare well, especially Brian Dennely (Cocoon) as an honest cop trying to figure out exactly what is going on. Diane Venora has a lovely but short-lived role as Rollie's girlfriend, and Mason Adams ("Lou Grant") is great as a ruthless government man. Only Martha Gehman seems ridiculously stupid as Rollie's special effects helper. F/X is totally satisfying entertainment that really keeps you guessing. Just when you think you have things figure, out, it crosses and double-crosses on you and leaves you amazed. A roller coaster ride of stunning special effects coupled with a clever script makes this a film well worth experiencing and enjoying. □ Colonel Redl Klaus Maria Brandauer is becoming a star of major importance. He has been nominated for a Best Supporting Oscar for his brilliant part in Out in Africa., His 1981 film Mephisto won Best Foreign Film, and his newest feature Colonel Redl is nominated this year for Best Foreign Film. Brandauer is a commanding Austrian actor who comes off shrewed and menacing at the same time. He is the perfect actor to play Redl, a man who used betrayal and denial of his low origins to rise in the military ranks of Austria- Hungary. A driven man, Redl is insecure only about one thing—his hidden homosexuality. Rollie Tyler (Bryan Brown) pretends to shoot Lipton (Cliff De Young) before taking some shots at Rosebud in "F/X.' What makes Hannah click is the actors. Besides those previously mentioned, there is also Lloyd Nolan and Maureen O'Sulli- van as the girls' parents, Carrie Fisher as a budding caterer, Danile Stem as an unappreciating art buyer, and Julie Kavner as Gail. All of the actors form a magnificent ensemble who seem to intermingle in each others lives. The second half of the film becomes a terrifying duel between Rollie and several ruthless government agents. Forced to use every trick he knows, Rollie must out-trick and outwit these guys who are out to kill him. The cat and mouse game becomes deadlier and more brutal as the chase boils to a climax. Using everything from makeup to We see glimpses of Redl's preference early in his military academy days. He in deeply in love with a young man named Kubinyis, but is afraid of a relationship. When Kubinyis rejects him later on, Redl becomes lovers with his friend's Bister. The setting of the film is Austria (early 1900s) where the emperor's rule is slowly crumbling. Soon the Archduke Ferdinand
File Name uhlib_22329406_n277_016.jpg