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Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986
File 013
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Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986 - File 013. 1986-02-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4675/show/4658.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-02-14). Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986 - File 013. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4675/show/4658

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986 - File 013, 1986-02-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4675/show/4658.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 14, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript 12 MONTROSE VOICE / FEBRUARY 14. 1986 Montrose Live Balm in Gilead, Marat/Sade Share Similarities By Bill O'Rourke Montroae Voice Theater Critic There are two supremely theatrical shows playing in town now.That's two experiences which would not happen in any other medium. They are Balm in Gilead (at the Alley) and Marat/ Sade (at Main Street). Both surround the audience, admit that it's there and make it part of the action. At Marat we become visitors to an insane asylum at the time of Napoleon. We are locked in a room with the inmates, who sometimes stand right behind us for long periods. At Balm, we stay ourselves but are encouraged to get up at times and dance with the characters. We are continually hit up for money by these spare change artists. Both use live music to enhance and comment upon the action, but both rely primarily upon the music of the spoken word. In Balm, it is, more often than not, street jive. In Marat, it's a little more courtly. In both, it often descends into a maelstrom of cacaphony. That confusion is used to get gorgeous monologues like gems in filigree or just to comment to them. Both plays are also about the failure of a person who sees the horrorB of the world of the poor and tries to change it—either for everyone through a revolution as in Marat, or just for himself and maybe his girlfriend in Balm. really about Mark Hymen and Alexandra Neil's characters. He's let himself get trapped into Belling drugs, but wants out. She'll probably wind up a hooker (like Nto- zake Shange's character), but isn't at all sure she belongs there. They should both flee, but the atmosphere is too seductive. It is for the audience, too. It is repulsive and fascinating. We wind up feeling really at home there and guilty about letting it all happen, but not any more than anyone else. Steven Marcus is Dopey, the narrator of sorts. His performance as this drugged-out philosopher is the best among equals in this ensemble show, well directed by George Anderson. Cockroaches, Dopey explains, have always been with man. They are found in the deepest archeological digs. Not only that, they also have about the best chance of surviving a nuclear war. So they'll be here after we're gone. "The poor," Christ said, "We have always with us." Or, as the song in Marat/ Sade puts it, "Marat, we're poor, and the poor stay poor!" Th full title of that play is The Persecution and Assassination of Jean Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade. The title, as they Dopey (Steven mareus) explains the law of the street to Fick (David Gregory) from his home in a trash dumpster in Lanford Wilson's "Balm in Gilead" now playing on the Alley's Arena Stage. Balm in Gilead: Kayce Glasse and Ruth Adams play dominant lesbians fighting over a passive one played by Luisa Amaral-Smith. Paul Hope and Jeff Bennett play the kind of male street prostitutes who are never out of drag. David Gregory plays the kind of drunk who can't shut up—a compulsive talker.They are all interesting and believable, but the story is say, says it all. Nearly everyone in this ensemble is playing an insane person playing a character—two levels at least. Again, there are too many good performances to credit them all. There is Barbara Hartman in a deep dep_»esion trying to protect her last loved possession—Marat. There's also Bruce Ellis speaking only in rhyme as I / Barbara Hartman as Simonne Evrard tends the ailing Jean-Paul Mrat played by Kent Johnson with Bruce Ellis in the background as the Herald in Main Street Theater's production of "Marat/ Sade." the narrator and Roberto Argentina in a straigh.jacket as a renegade priest. Kent Johnson is in his usual fine form as a paranoic playing Marat, the great instigator of the French Revolution. Vicki Luman trying to fight off her sleep to eloquently describe the horrors of that revolution. James Black is a chameleon. Everytime one thinks he might have seen every facet of this actor's range, one is easily proven wrong. In this, his dry as dust voice and his hands folded demurely over his chest are the epitome of the failed aristocrat. Jeff Galligan's direction has subtly brought out the anachronisms in Peter Weiss's script to point out the universality of the situation. Two last points: first, you would probably enjoy either of these shows. Secondly, you could easily enjoy both of them. There are enough differences. d Notes As Is, the William Hoffman play about AIDS, .will be taken on a national tour. It is uncertain if this tour will play in Houston. Meanwhile, that has tied up the rights so that Stages has had to postpone their production of the play until at leaBt July. ... Celebrate! Today is Valentine's Day! It is also the 50th anniversary of when driver's licenses became mandatory in Texas. B'days: 15—Harvey Korman. 16— Katherine Cornell. 17—Simon Raven, author of Boys Will Be Boys: The Male Prostitute in London. George Washington (observed on the 17th but actually next Saturday). 19—Carson McCullers. Enjoy! make believe studio high atop Westheimer. Jessye Norman (Jones, 14)—The acclaimed soprano joins Comissiona and the HSO for Wagner and Strauss. Johnny Mathis (Arena, 14). Brer Rabbit (Ensemble, 15, 10:30 and noon) d Openings ONO! means One Night Only Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Stages, 14, mornings and weekend afternoons)—musical by Rice and Webber. • Fear of Ducks! (Radio Music Theater, 14)—More madcap madness from the David Copperfieid will dazzle audiences with his magic at Jones Hall on the nth. Children's Collections (Children's Museum, 15, noon-4 p.m.)—ONO! Robert Frank: New York to Nova Scotia (Museum of Fine Arts, 15)—the first major retrospective of his photographs and films to tour in 20 years. Gone to Texas (Children's Museum, 16, 2:00 p.m.)— the Chocolate Bayou production. ONO! Matt Haimovitz (Jones, 16, 2:30)—The young cellist joins Comissiona and the HSO for an afternoon of romantic hits. ONO! -
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