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Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986
File 009
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Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986 - File 009. 1986-02-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4675/show/4654.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-02-14). Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4675/show/4654

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986 - File 009, 1986-02-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4675/show/4654.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 14, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript 8 MONTROSE VOICE / FEBRUARY 14, 1986 Few Cities Make it Part of the Curriculum Teens Won't Learn About AIDS in School By Laura Fraser Pacific News Service Special to the Montrose Voice The AIDS epidemic won't be stemmed, experts say, without widespread education about how to prevent the disease. But only a few high schools nationwide—in those cities where the death toll is already high—have started teaching about AIDS in class. "High school students need to know risks," says Dr. Marcus Conant, director of the National AIDS Foundation. "The seriousness of the disease is such that you need to begin education as soon as possible." Yet in Houston, for example, there is no curriculum about AIDS, no teaching materials prepared by the school district, and no teacher in-service training programs about the disease planned. "AIDS is not spelled out as a 'must teach,'" says Rosalind Young, spokesperson for the Houston public school district. She says that since there has been "no public outcry to have AIDS education," it simply has not been taught. School districts in many other cities have taken similar positions to date. An exception is Los Angeles, where the school board has made AIDS education a requirement for all students beyond elementary school. AIDS units will be written into health education and social science curricula, and all teachers will attend special AIDS training sessions. And in New York City, over 100,000 public school teachers and staff attended a citywide training session last October, while Schools Chancellor Nathan Qui- nones has asked that lesson plans be drawn up about AIDS for students in grades 7-12. But even in San Francisco, where AIDS- related deaths are the highest per capita of any major city, there is no official directive to teach about AIDS. The school district "doesn't do directives on any subject," says Joan Haskin, health program specialist for the city's public schools, though she believes AIDS will become "another part of our education about sexually transmitted diseases." Some San Francisco schools are moving ahead with AIDS education on their own, and the results point up the need among teenagers who, as a group, are among the most sexually active, and the least informed about AIDS. After a lesson on AIDS at George Washington High School, Anna, a 10th grader, wrote that she previously had thought "AIDS was only in San Francisco" and that "AIDS is easier to catch than it really is." The lesson had not changed Anna's "AIDS is not spelled out as a 'must teach/" says Rosalind Young, spokesperson for the Houston public school district. She says that since there has been "no public outcry to have AIDS education," it simply has not been taught. deepest feelings about AIDS, however. That feeling, which she and two thirds of her class wrote on their worksheets, is fear. Instructor Donald Leach said he first began including units about AIDS in his family life education classes last year because his students had such "strong phobias" about the disease. Many thought they could get AIDS by sitting next to a gay person on a bus. Some thought it could be contracted from mosquito bites. And some had no idea of how to protect themselves by using "safe sex" procedures. Leach also said many of his students thought the disease was confined to homosexual men, a belief that can lead to what he calls "homophobia." A few students wrote that the city should "quarantine Castro," San Francisco's predominantly gay district, or "get rid of fags." Such misconceptions can be traced to fears and prejudices of parents and peers, says Leach. "The media tend to sensationalize things, and rumors start. A teacher can give students the whole picture." Gradually, Leach's George Washington class came to see that picture. On questionnaires handed out to the class. one true/ false statement read, "If an AIDS victim spit on you or sneezed on you or his/her tears touched you, you could get the AIDS virus." After much conversation, one girl answered correctly. "False," she said. "It takes a whole lot of body fluid." The class then discussed the particulars about which means of sharing bodily fluids —including oral and anal intercourse-^are risky. Leach admits that the discussion is explicit, but says, "We start out in this class saying there are no such things as dirty words. If you teach about sex, you have to teach it all." So far, no parents have complained, according to Leach. George Washington is not the only San Francisco school to teach about AIDS. Last fall, 300 of the city's teachers gathered for a voluntary session on AIDS with the intent of passing on the information to their students. Health professionals answered questions students most often ask about the disease. Then Marcia (Juanken bush, with San Francisco's AIDS Health Project, provided a suggested classrooom curriculum on AIDS. She advised not only a full discussion of the health matters surrounding AIDS, but talk about civil rights issues it has raised. Quackenbush says such information is crucial for teenagers because they are "at an age where they're beginning to experiment with sex and drugs, and are setting lifelong patterns." The subject is being broached in classrooms of at least one San Francisco pri- vate Catholic school as well. Cathy Pickerel, a teacher at Presentation High School, says she teaches about AIDS in theology classes on "Christian Sexuality" and "Death and Dying," in part to help her students understand "responsibility involved in sexual activity." But worries grow that in other places across the country, AIDS education is not keeping pace with the spread of the disease. Says Paul Boneberg, National Coordinator of Mobilization Against AIDS in San Francisco, "There's no national effort to educate teenagers, and that's going to cost lives. Where's the PTA?" We&tAeune*/ Welcomes 24 1525 We&lkeimms 528-4350 COUSINS Let Us Entertain You!! With the Country Express Band and free aroma samples from the "Touch of Leather" shop We'll have a good time, Yes Sir! Thurs. night pool tournament. $40 prize 817 Fairview 11am-2am 528-9204. Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Dai'/y THE BEST LITTLE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVATE BATHS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 URSULINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70116 ■Q$^(§f(ctd ■ .In the heart of The City" $44.00 FREE AIRPORT SHUTTLE COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE & WIN. 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