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Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986
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Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986 - File 001. 1986-02-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4675/show/4646.

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(1986-02-14). Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4675/show/4646

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986 - File 001, 1986-02-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4675/show/4646.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 277, February 14, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 14, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Hospice Serves to Comfort Terminally 111 news, inside mn11lrose VOICE "The Newspaper of Montrose" Friday, February 14, 1986 Issue 277 (713) 529-8490 New Woody Allen is Emotional Masterpiece Scott Cutsinger, films inside Westheimer Association Issues Call for Posters Groundbreaking Ceremony March 6 news, inside Junk for One Can Be Art for Another neighborhood, inside~ Counseling Center Sponsors Women's Weekend news, inside New Program Improves Counseling Center's Women's Outreach news, inside Kindred Spirits Celebrates Sth Anniversary neighborhood, inside The Revitalization of Lower Westheimer The site of the new Westheimer Village. (Connie Woods photo) A complete facelift to the building in the 300 bloek of Westheimer will convert what was the Godfather's to La Strada. (Connie Woods photo) By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Plans are underway for the revitalization of the Lower Westheimer area as lots are cleared and an old restaurant remodeled. One of the major changes which will occur during the year begins March 6 with a groundbreaking ceremony in the 500 block. Plans call for the mayor and city officials to attend the event. The ground· breaking will signal the beginning of the Westheimer Village Shopping Center. The 55,000 square-foot center will be constructed of glass, stucco and a steel frame, according to consultant Bob Ryan. It is planned to house specialty shops, boutiques, and restaurants. Available parking will be a 50-car underground gar­age with a 42-car parking lot in front of the building. "Construction will be begin in early March ," Ryan said. "It should be com­pleted by the end oftheyearwithfulloccu­pancy by the spring of 1987," he added. Although there will be an elevator from the garage to the second floor, there will be stairs from the street to the second floor and the garage. The developer of the project is R.J. McConnell. Another project which is giving a new look to the area is the location of the old Godfath er Restaurant on Westheimer. According to Albert Marshall, the archi­tect for the restaurant to be called "La Strada," a major facelift is planned. The Catania family, which owned the Godfather, also own the new restaurant. "I am working with the owners of the building to produce a new look with light stucco and almost as open as it was," Mar­shall said. The Italian food restaurant will be open· ing iii about four months if the current plans continue. FEBRUARY 14. 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 3 Westheimer Association Issues Call for Posters From a Press Release It's time to enter the semi-annual Westhei­mer Colony Art Festival Poster Contest for the Spring show. The winning poster designer will be the recipient of a $500 purchast! award from the outdoor festi­val's sponsor, the Westheimer Colony Association. The dC'adline for entry is noon, March 12. More than 125 posters were submitted to the association for judging for the fall 198.5 festival. The specifications for the poster include a 19")(25'' vertical format with a maxi­mum of three flat colors to be printed on white poster board with black not included. The image area must be con­fined to a 14"x20" area leaving a 2" border on the top and sides and a 21'~" border on the bottom. This alJows 112.. area­separating image area from border. The :'ollowing information must appear on the poster entries: The WestheimerCol­ony Art Festival, Houston, Texas, and April 19 & 20, 1986. (If black type is used on the art design, it must be designated a montrose VOICE ANO TEXAS•STAA MONTROSE. TEXAS p .... 11 ·- C.0.UI tr•c:ts 401 DI. 401 02. 402 01 402 02. 405 02. 403 atl(I 404 01 Zop coc11n <rouohtyl nooe. 11019 tp0rto0nJ 71098 Bounditd (roughly) SF\ephet"d [)r IWHI), Allen P1rkway (north}. Main St leas!) US 59 lsouttlJ Latitude 1~n11ose Bl'td at We1tt1e1mer Rd1W«13"'N L>ng1tudel5•tt5f!'W All1tude 40' ELECTED OFFIC•ALS FOA ~TROSE Qaofve 0-• ~ton City Coul' I st Cl SOI S.g&y. 1713112:H833 ElfrancolM~ffl•COUf'IYC<ll'n""'-• p(L11 1001Ptatton.111JJn1-e111 WlllterRank1n Constable(pc:t I) 301 $an ./KJnlO. (113} 221-~200 o.bra O.nbl,rg Te .. 1 House ot Repr.,..,.tat1"•' (dtal 37) 1'"1SW Fwy.(1131~10-80!58 ':'.<••o Wahington. Te• .. S«>•t• Jd••l 13) n13CtroJ•rl9. r713Je61J-43'J M" ~~ Le...-id. US House of RepreHf"l•1•vn !di•I 18) IQl9 SnMll l#UO. '113} f»T»fl The Newspaper of Montro!le Eslablished 1980 OUR 277th ISSUE. FEB 14. 1986 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 7700&-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 DISTRIBUTION 10,500 eop.- w~ly '"Houlton lhrough 140 rna,or d11tnbtJ1ion poonts WI the MonlrOM. lh• Village_ the Heights Hf1millft/pqt-Ot1rill•f1ctor28 N/>tnillftl r .. d.1"1h1p 29. 400 WHk/y 175 cop1ee weekly elsewher• •'1•rnllftlp;tu-onr•l•l•ctor25 n11mill9d r••O.nh1p 440 wHkly TOTAL DISTRIBUTION (GUARANTEED) 10.675 cop.- weekly IOl•l Hl•m•r9d rHdersh•p 29.8"0 •Hkly Contents copynght 1986 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg /)(lb/1$h••·«Nor Linda Wyche m•nilQ"'Q .c1'/or Connie Woods Mw$ Pete Diamond n•ws Da111d Roumfort prOdutt•on Scott Cutsinger. 8111 O"Rourke lh"•••s Steve Warren ilfiOl'lal corrul)Oftdenl ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Houston (713) 529-8490 Elsewhere Teos (800) 222-1537 EXT 995220 Elsf'where US (800) 225-0227 EXT 995220 Jerry Mulholland -1v"1'11"'Q d'r«.lor Karen Myrow .ccount u.cur,v• "oundmg MtlmMrt Grea1ar MMtroN Bulineu Gulld. Gill' ilnd L•blal'l Preti A110C111t•on Newt S•rvlt:H Nt-w•-One. Pac1hc Nf>wt Serviee $yfldtc•tftl FHtur• Se1v4::H & Writws Boan Mc: Naught Un verul P•9M Synd•c11te. Newi ..,,..,.,,ca Syf'ldk:ale POSlMASTEA Send ilddren correc11on1 to 408 A~ond11e. Houlton TX 7700&-'.!028 Subitcr11Jf10n rat• m US •n H•led •nvillO,,. $49 per year j52 1Uue1) S29pe11111 mOflths /2e1Uun).or $1 25pe•wHk 11eu th•n 21 tUUH) Bilek •noel $2 00 MCh Ni1/10flill ildv•Tf•••tttJ rilptHilflliltive Joe 01Sabato. R•vendeH Marht+ng. Gee ell'I A\'ilnUI, New YOlk 1001 I 1212) 2'1-6883 A~•rt4mg dilild1'M WedlWld•y S 10pm, lor uue reie...o fuday ..,..,,.,..0 Notre• f0ildv•rl1Nf"I loc•l ad\ler11llf'IQ retil Kl'MlduJrt ~~A w·a-sillfkl•"•Oct 12.19&4 11\dE.gtit-.Aw•llb9ell«t~Jiltl 3. RrMPoNiblfJly TM Mor>lroM VOic:il does nol HIUn'lil rnpon 11t111<1y lor 1dvert11u'lg c•a•mt Rsaoers should ildvtM 1ne "•w~toany<tec:ept1v•ildvilrlos•ng color). Poster entrants should have their name, address and phone number on the back of the artwork. The entry must be mailed or delivered to the association's office, 1001 Westheimer (Liberty Bank building), suite 163, by noon, March 12, for thejudgi.ng to be held Friday, March 14. Following the judging, all artwork must be picked up after March 21 and before April 1, due to limited office space. For further information, call 521-0133. Counseling Center Announces 2 New Programs From a Press Release The Montrose Counseling Center recently announced two new programs in its educa­tion and promotional outreach endeavors. Requests continually come into the cen­ter from the gay community, and ever more frequently from out.side the commun­ity, for informational and educational speakers. To address this need, the Mont­rose Counseling Center Speakers Bureau has been established. The function of the bureau is to evaluate all requests, assign the appropriate spea~er or speaker team, schedule all engagements, assist the recip­ient organization with promoting the engagement, and supply any necessary printed materials. It is the bureau's foremost concern to inform the community about the many vital services offered by the center in an intelligent, professional, thorough, coordi­nated, and meaningful manner. It will also afford the opportunity to explain the T STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AIDS/KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON FRI 8.30AM -5 PM SAME DAY APPOINTMENT ~~6's~b~~·~~\~g~ BY APPOINTMENT ONLY 2801 EUJ\ BL VD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX 77008 (713) 868-4535 IN lliE HEIGHTS =-- ..... center's financial need and provide a con­duit for contributions. One of the center's greatest assets is its volunteers. The new Volunteer Bank will be a repository for individuals and organi­zations who can give of their time and their professional abilities or services. The bank will be computerized for greater effi­ciency. The computer will store names of volunteers and their interests, and then assign the volunteer to a specific activity or event. Persons interested in volunteer­ing can ca11 the center's office or a Volun­teer Bank data card is available at the center's office at 900 Lovett Blvd., suite 203. For additional information on either of thet:ie two new programs. call the Director of Promotions at 529-0037 during the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. daily. Letters----------­Check on Registration Status From Bill Jackson Recently, Harris County mailed new voter registration certificates to all voters. lf you did not recently receive one of the new yellow certificates, you are no longer regis~ tered to vote. To re--register, look for one of the GPC volunteer registrars while out this Friday or Saturday night. If you miss them, you may also call the voter registration office at 224-1919, ext. 310. 4 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 14. 1986 Decline in Other STD's Too AIDS Cases Reported in Houston Levels Off By Pete Diamond Montroae Voice Staff Reporter In the &even years since the first cases of AIDS were reported in the U.S., some 16,500 people have been afflicted with the diaease. Each month the number of people diagnosed as having AIDS continues to cJimb. and the national Center for Disease Control estimates there will be between 14,000 and 15,000 new cases this year Despite this grim prediction, there is some encouraging news. According to sta­tistics compiled by the City of Houston Department of Health and Human Servi· cee, the number of reported AIDS cases in Houston appears to be Jevehng off. From 1981 to 1984, the number of new AIDS cases more than doubled each year La.at year was the exception. however. In 1985, 192 new cases of AIDS were diag­nosed, compared to 171 cases in 1984. Houston Health Director Dr. Jam es Haughton says he first began noticing the apparent slowdown of new cases early in 19R5. And although he predicta the trend to continue this year, Hauahton cautions that the AIDS virus may remain dormant for five years or more. Therefore it is diffi. cult to eetimate the number of Houstoni· ans who may eventualJy develop AIDS. Haughton added there is a lag in the reportinR' of new AIDS cases and the total number of cases for 1985 may exceed 200. Even if this does occur. he says the total will otill be far leas than the doubling of previoua years Tom Audette, administrative director for the Montrose Clinic, does not dispute the reported leveling offof AIDS cases. but queetion1 the reliability of the statistics. "We see the figures leveling off, but are they accurate? I'm just not sure." Audette says he is uncertain whether the actual number of AIDS cases is decreasing or if the reporting of new cases is decreasing. Discrimination towards persons with AIDS is no longer suspected, he says. It has been documented. A diagnosis of AIDS may, as in some cases, result in an individual losing his job, being evicted from an apartment or even being shunned by friends and family members. It is this threat of discrimina· tion that Audette believes may be causing some individuals to not tell a person he has AIDS if aome doubt exists in the diag­nosis or not reporting that a patient has AIDS in order to protect the individual. If the city's statistics are an accurate indication of how many people in Houston have AIDS. several ideas have been offered to account for why the number of new cases appears to be leveling off. Haughton suggests one reason for this may be that fewer gay men are moving to Houston, something he believes has resulted from the defeat of the gay job rights referendum and anti-homosexual rhetoric during last November's election Audette, on the contrary, disputes this thought as •·pure conjecture" because it is difficult to prove. However. the two men agree that a level· ing off of AIDS cases could be attributable to safer sex practices and educational materials about preventing AIDS. "People are more conscious of their health today. If their immunity system is depressed, they're seeking help to try to correct it," Audette say1. "Gay men have absolutely changed their sexual habits overall. There's no question in my mind." This change in sexual habits has also had a dramatic impact on the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (S1'D's) among gay men. Audette explained that in contrast to the ever-growing number of people with AIDS, fewer people are requir­ing treatment for STD's. Citywide, the number of cases of gonor­rhea and syphilis has declined signifi­cantly among both the gay and general populations. However, the rate of decline for the gay population was nearly twice as rapid as that of the general population. From 1982 to 191l5, gonorrhea dropped 63.3 percent among gays and syphilis decreased 58.2 percent. This is compared to a 41.2 percent decline in gonorrhea for the general population and a drop of 39.8 percent in the incidence of syphilis. Audette says he is not surprised by the drop in the number of STD cases. " It's directly attributable to safe sex," he says. "Most people have dramatically changed their sexual habits. Relationships are in." But Audette is concerned that some peo­ple may develop a false sense of security about contracting an S1'D because the numbers are down. Audette says it is unfortunate, for example, that fewer peo­ple are taking the Hepatitis B vaccine. Many people are more concerned about spending their money totaketheHTLV-III or PACE (Program for AIDS Counseling and Evaluation) test than the Hepatitis B vaccine, he says. "We need to try to forget AIDS for a while and remember to take preventative health measures such as the hepatitis vaccine." Neverthele88, Audette maintains "it's important to constantly hammer into peo­ple's heads the ways of preventing AIDS." Some of the people most susceptible to being expoAed to the AIDS virus are those who are ignorant of how to prevent expo­sure, he says. Despite the encouraging statistics showing the number of new AIDS cases may be leveling off in Houston, Audette says there is still reason to be concerned. While the number of cases in Houston may stabilize somewhat, they may increase in another city-for a period of time-and then these "trends" may reverse them­selves. "Maybe I'm being too pessimistic about it," he says. "[ hope the figures are true, (but) we are in no way out of the woods. The worst thing we can do is imply that we are " BETTER LAWilS & GARDEilS Total lawn maintenance including mowing. edging trimmmg. prumng ferhli'Ztng. sprclqtng firewood .~. Bed ffiulchmg .t~~ A'Zdled feeding ·?'· ::ii~ Debns Remoudl •'tir_~;....,,"'r Complete Tree Serutce ·· Stumps Remoued Told\ fencmq Sennces (Cedctr, notched Picket. Tredled. etc.) Complete Sprinkler S4slems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN Grab a Heart at O'Briens this Valentine Day with Door Prizes 10pm-$25 bar tab 11pm-1 mo. free cover midnight-2 bottles champagne 0'13tt~~L 608 WESTHEIMER Across from Jim's Gym 528-5953 SUnday, Feb. 16th with The Illusions of Kandilove,Koffie,Jeny Harper and Special Guest Tina Rene Doors Open 8pm- Show Starts 10pm Mon.-Tues.: Happy Hour Well Drinks $1.25 Thurs.: Buddy Night Fri.: Dance until 2am Sat.: Beer Bust 3pm til 2am, Dance until 2am Sun.: Beer Bust 12 noon-2am 50¢ Draft Beer All the Time $3 Cover Wednesday-Sunday FEBRUARY 14, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 6 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 14. 1986 Hospice Comforts the Terminally Ill By Pete Diamond Montroae Voice Staff Reporter You matter because you are you. You mat· ter to the last moment of your life. and we will do all we can not only to help you die peacefully, but also to live until you die. -Cicely Saunders. founder of St. Christopher's Hospice, London Based on a premise of hope, hospices throughout Europe and the United States have committed themselves to improving the quality of life for the terminally ill. The Casa de Nino10 hospice, located on Old Spanish Trail, south of the Texas Medical Center. is one of four Houston area hospices devoted to accomplishing this goal. Originally opened last October as a children's hospice, Casa de Ninos recently decided to expand their services to include terminaHy ill adults-including those who have AIDS Barbara Boyette, vice president of Casa de Ninos, explained that a specialized hoe· pice for children was "a good idea before its time." The decision to expand existing services came after administrators reex­amined the hoepice facility and what it had to offer, as well as the needs of the medical community. Boyett said that aft.er talking with such individuals a.a Nate Sebastian of the KS/AIDS Foundation, it was apparent that persons with AIDS could benefit from much of what a hospice has to offer. The term "hoepice" has its origins in the Middle Agee. During that time, people per· ceived life as a journey or pilgrimage and death was considered a natural part of that journey. Hospices were refuge along the path of life where people on religious pilgrimages could atop to rest. and where the sick and dying, hungry, orphaned and poor were welcomed. Hospices today still serve as "refuge," but their main focus now is aimed at pro­viding terminally ill patients and their families with physical, emotional and apiritual support. The hospice, for many people, is an appealing alternative to dying in a nursing home or hospital. .. We can provide support the person facing a terminal condition need.a." says Gretchen Thorp, Casa de Ninos adminis­trator . ... We can help them go through the dieease process and go through the feel · ings their loved ones are also experienc­ing," Thorp points out the hospice does not take a physician's patient from him or his 1uperviaon of that patient. In fact. after referring a patient to the hospice, the phy­sician will continue his care of the patient. Physicians are also part of the hospice atructure-the "interdisciplinary team" of 1peciali1ts who provide support for patient.a and family members. With hospice patients, the ph_;sician's role changes from that of treating symp­toms aa a means of cure, to one of medical 1uperviaion and consultation. Hospice care doe1 not involve the use of "heroic" meaeures such aa dialysis, respirators or blood transfusions to prolong a person '1 life. Instead. pain relieving drugs and other medication• are given to make patient. more comfortable. Through such pallia· tive means. the hospice aims to relieve pain and maintain the quality of the patient's life without clouding his mind. Furthermore, patients needn't fear the return of pain because control is always one step ahead of the pain. Physically, the Casa de Ninos hospice is much different from a hospital or nursing home. While aome hoepice programs are hospital-based, Casa de Ninos is a frees· tanding inpatient facility. The 60-bed hoe· p1ce i1 actually a renovated apartment complex. Gretchen Thorp, administrator, and Barbara Boyett, vice president, are key figures behind the programs at Casa de Ninos. (Pete Diarnond photo) Unlike the oft.en sterile feeling of hos pi tal rooms, the apartments have a "homey" atmosphere about them. Each of the 40 unit.a are carpeted and furnished with liv­ing, dining and bedroom furniture, as well as kitchen supplies so family members who ch008e to stay overnight can make meals or patients can make their favorite foods whenever they choose. "Today's society is not very attuned to death and dying," Thorp says. "But the hospice environment can help patients and their families be more relaxed and more accepting of death." Most people who are facing a terminal illness would rather be in a home-like environment than a hospital, she adds. In fact, it has been shown that four out of every five people would prefer to die in their home. Boyett points out that while the hospice may be the ideal place for a terminally ill person who has nowhere else to go, it also can serve as a place where patients and family members make the transition from leaving the hospital to moving back home. In such a case, the interdisciplinary team will work with the patient and family, teaching them how to care for the patient, as well as providing other helpful inform&· tion and reassurance. Family members are encouraged to help care for the patient whether or not he is at home or in the hospice inpatient facility. Clinical obRervations have shown that family members who are actively involved in caring for the patient while he is alive are leas likely to feel guilt and self. criticism after the patient's death. Family involvement may also help ease a patient' a auffering. This may range from involving the patient in an interesting activity to just listening to what he hast...'.> say. It may even be as simple as holding the person'• hand. One hospice patient wrote to her doctor, "All I want to know is that there ie aomeone who can hold my hand when I need it. Death may be routine to you, but it's new to me." Home health nursE'8 will also visit a patient and their primary care giver in the home to provide nursing care and monitor the patient's condition. The frequency of the nurse's visits are determined by need, but a contact is generally made weekly. If an emergency visit or advice is needed, nurses are available 24 hours a day, seven daya a week . Casa de Ninos, like many other hospi· cea, offers reapite for families. This short· term service. which may last from a few hours to two weeks, allows family members to take a break in their respons1· bilitiee for caring for the terminally ill per­son. Home health care is desirable for many terminally ill people because it allows them to spend the remainder of their lives at home, in comfortable, familiar sur­roundings, with family members nearby. However, if the family does not feel they are ready to provide fulltime care for the patient. or if they are uncomfortable with having him die in the home, Boyett said the hospice can again serve as a transition from home when the patient is in the final stages of dying. One of the keys of hospice care, accord­ing to Boyett, is treating the family in addition to the patient. Thorp agrees, adding that acute care too often focuses only on the individual patient and not the family . Both women conceded. however, that the majority of the people in the medical profe1uiion have been trained to save lives, and not to give up hope. But there are times, Thorp says, when it must be real­ized that nothing more can be done to save or prolong a person's life. And that, she says, is where the hospice can come in and help improve the quality of a patient's life. Even after a person's death. the hospice will continue to serve as a refuge for the family. Through the hos­pice bereavement program, family members may receive spiritual and emo· tional support for a year or more. Besides providing these services, hospi­ces such as Casa de Ninos also offer a number of other benefits, including unres· tricted visiting hours and brief visits with pets. Because Casa de Ninos is licensed by the Texas Department of Health as a spe­cial hospital, Boyett said most insurance companies will reimburse patients for the standard semi-private room rate of $135 daily. ''There are a lot of people who are in acute care hospitals that don't need to be there," Boyett says. Furthermore, she adds that the cost of hospice care can be a substantial savings over that of a hospital where daily charges may run from $250 a day to more than $400 for AIDS patients. Boyett also said the hospice has estab­lished a non-profit fund to help terminally ill individuals who have either lost their insurance benefits, or do not have insu· ranee, pay for the cost of staying in the hospice. "We hope people are beginning to under stand the needs of people who have AIDS," Boyett said. "Education has really had an impact on this, but a lot more can be done. And 1 think we can help." • • The Finest 24 Hour Dining In Montrose • • come enjoy our fl special " Valentine's Weekend lunch & dinner specials 1102 Westhelmer 522-3332 ~s100°1 I off ! I CLIP THIS AD and attach it to I lI y our next order for S1 0.00 off I any of the following items: I • Letterheads • Postcards I • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing • Hyers • Contracts •Menus •Resumes• Envelopes • Amouncements • Invitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet Copying • Invoices ~ SPEEDY - PAINTING SERVICE . CJF TEXAS Fast Rehabfe SeMc:e. Exc•li<nt Quality. Low Cost 5400 BEUAIRE BLVD. Conv<n..,,t Southwest Locaoon 1 l:*Kli: f'~t ol (twmr'y lh"Kk MM~ CALL 667-7417 PICK UP AND DELIVERY MEMBER GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS QJILD. GREATER BELLAIRE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Plf'<Kr. ont couponrwr custOf'llt'f Mld/Ot ordef. cannot _~ _combint'ft Wflh Olh_et' drscOU_"IU or sptt:1.1I_ offer s_ J ~ /····~·· llappg Mllenfine i Rent a Movif:!y, Feb. 14th and Get a Fl'9e Valentine's Day Candy 2016 MONTROSE Houston. Texas 77006 529-5544 224 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON Ph. 520-6443 ~~ Give your Valentine a Pretty Red Fish in a beautiful heart-shaped 1-foot high vase with red gravel or, if you prefer, in any of our selections of bowls. ~~ FEBRUARY 14, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 ae~ ·CARDS C/FTS -ACCESSORIES· 1002 Missouri Street· · Houston-Texas 711524. 5227- "77006 a division of TLC· •EVERY SATURDAY. .... r • •• ,.JOto 6 Starting this Sat. .. TLC wil I offer mercnanaise at SO% ... and greater discounts .. . on the front porch & yard of the ANNEX. Community Groups, Organizations are invited to join us. To reserve space,cal I Gary at 524.5227. *EVERY SUNDl\YOPEN HousE.J to s Laid back shoppinW,gq;sip1ng wnile s1ppng. muncn1ng on complimentarydrinks & snacks! *lv\on-Tli:10-9 Fri-Sat:10-6 Sundays:1- 5 s A L E 8 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 14. 1986 Few Cities Make it Part of the Curriculum Teens Won't LearnAboutAIDS in School ~w~ w::!::f: By Laura Fraser Pacific New• Service Specia.J t-0 the Montrose Voice The AIDS epidemic won't be stemmed, experts say, without widespread educa· tion about how to prevent the disease. But only a few high schools nationwide-in thoee cities where the death toll is already high-have started teaching about AIDS in claaa. .. High school students need to know rilka,'" say• Dr. Marcus Conant, director of the National AIDS Foundation. "The eeriousnesa of the dil~ease is such that you need to begin education as soon as poRsi­ble." Yet in Houston, for example, there is no curriculum about AIDS, no teaching mate­rial• prepared by the achoo! di•trict. and no teacheT m..aervice training programs about the disease planned . .. AIDS is not spelled out as a 'must teach."' says Rosalind Young, spokesper son for the Houston public school district. She says that since there has been "no public outcry to have AIDS education,'' it eimply has not been taught. School districts in many other cities have taken similar positions to date. An exception is Los Angeles. where the Khool board has made AIDS education a requirement for aJI students beyond ele­mentary Khool AIDS units will be written into health education and social science curricula. and all tea("hertt will attend .flpe­cial AIDS training seesions. And m New York City, over 100,000 pu~ lie IK'hool teachers and staff attended a citywide training sesaion last October, while Schoole Chancellor Nathan Qui· nones has Biked that lesson plans be drawn up about AIDS for students in gradee 7·12. But even in San Francisco, where Alm;. related deaths are the highest per capita of any major city, there is no official direc· tive to teach about AIDS. The echool dis· trict .. doesn't do directives on any eubject." says Joan Haskin, health pro­gram 1pecialist for the city's public echoola, though she believea AIDS will become "another part of our education about aaually transmitted diseases." Some San Francisco school~ are moving ahead with AIDS education on their own, and the results point up the need among teenagers who, as a group, are among the most sexually active and the least informed about Ams After a lea11<>n on AIDS at George Waahington Hiirh School, Anna. a 10th grader. WTOte that she previously had thought "AlD.."i was only in San Fran· cisco" and that "AIDS is easier to catch than it really is." The lesson had not changed Anna's deepeet fee1ings about AIDS, however. That feeling, which she and two thirds of her cl8.88 wrote on their worksheets, is fear. Instructor Donald Leach said he first began including units about AIDS in his family life education classes last year because his students had such "strong phobias" about the disease. Many thought they could get AIDS by sitting next to a gay person on a bus. Some thought it could be contracted from mosquito bites. And some had no idea of how to protect them· selves by usmg "safe sex" procedures. Leach also said many of his students thought the diaeaee was confined to homo­sexual men, a belief that can lead to what he calls "homophobia." A few students wrote that the city should "quarantine Castro," San Francisco's predominantly gay district, or "get rid of fags." Such misconceptions can be traced to feare and prejudices of parents and peers, says Leach ... The media tend to sensation· alize things, and rumors start. A teacher can give studente the whole picture." Gradually, l..t>ach's George Washington class came to see that picture. On questionnaires handed out to the rlass, on" true/ false statement read, ·If an AIDS victim spit on you or sneezed on you or his/ her tears touched you. you could get the AIDS virus." After much conversation. ont> girl am1wered correctly .... FalNe,'' she said. "It takes a whole lot of body fluid." The class then discussed the particulars about which means of sharing hodily fluids-inCluding oral and anal intercou1'8£>. are risky. Leach admit.a that the discuSBion is explicit.. but says, ••we start out in this TIIE BEST LITilE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTIY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVAfE BATIIS FREE PARKING FOR RFA<iERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 URSULINE~ STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 "AIDS is not spelled out as a 'must teach,"' says Rosalind Young, spokesperson for the Houston public school district. She says that since there has been "no public outcry to have AIDS education," it simply has not been taught. class saying there are no such things as dirty words. If you teach about sex, you have to teach it all." So far, no parents have complained, according to Leach. George Washington 1s not the only San Francisco school to teach about AIDS. Last fall, 300 of the r;ity's teachers gathered for a voluntary session on AIDS with the intt>nt of pa.,,.sing on the information to their students. Health professionals answered queRtions students most often ask about the disease. Then MRr<'ia Quankenbush, with San Francisco's AIDS Health Project, provided a suggested cJassrooom curriculum on AIDS. She advised notonlv a fu11 discussion of the heaJth matte;& Murrounding AIDS, but talk about civil rights issues it has raised. Quackenbush flays such information is crucial for teenagers because they are "at an age where they're beginning to experi­ment with sex and drugs, and are setting lifelong patterns." The subject is being broached in class­rooms of at least one San FTanci8CO pri­vate Catholic echool aa well. Cathy Pickerel, a teacher at Presentation High School, says she teaches about AIDS in theology cl8.88e8 on "Christian Sexuality" and "Death and Dying.'' in part to help her student.a understand ''responsibility mvolved in sexual activity." But worries grow that in other plaCC's across thecountry, AIOS education is not keeping pace with the spread of the dis· ease. Says Paul Honeberg, National Coor­dinator of Mobilization Against AIDS in San Francisco, "There's no national effort to educate teenagers. and that's going to cost lives. Where's the PrA?" 24 ~ 15 2 5 w e.5Jlzeim£Jt, 528-4350 4~ COUSINS Let Us Entertain You!! With the Country Express Band and free aroma samples from the "Touch of Leather'' shop We'll have a good time, Yes Sir' Thurs. night pool tournament. $40 prize 817 Fairview 11am-2am 528-9204. Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily . ~J;;a ([}J(otd .In lhe heart ol The City" $44 00 • FRU AIRPOllT SHUTTLE • COMPllMEHTARY CHAMPAGNE • WJNf • • COMPLIMEHTAl!Y COHTINfHTAI. llUAl<FAST (large s1ngle1double occupancy) • VAJ.ET SERVICE Special Weekly and Monthly.Rates R~servatt0ns required ;:>I ..... _ise c.01! loll Free 800·253·5263 (NaJ..:>nal) 800·521·4523 (Cohf J (415)-441 5141 (San fror· ''' :o) 1315 POLK sr., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 Tickets $2000 Tickets & T-shirts available in person at: Dramatika 3224 Yoakum at Westheimer (Cash only after Feb. 8) Ttekets at the door $2500 FEBRUARY 14, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 9 Air travel, hotel and limousines by ADVANCE TRAVEL Texas: (713) 682-2002 U.S.: 1-800-292-0500 10 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 14, 1986 Good reading for you ============from============ A·L·Y·S·O·N P U B LICATION S COWBOY BLUES, ~y Stephen Lewis, $7_()() Jake Ltebcrman ts a ~ay detective in the typical California tradition. When a 45·ycar-old cowboy comes into his Of· hce to report that his younger partner 1s missing;, Jake's first impulse is to gently explam to the guy that he's been dumped But soon is mvestigauon shows that Andy Jones's disappearance is only part of a much wider scheme. The only quest oc t.; W 11 Jake live to uncover it all' SAFE STUD The s•fcscx chronicles of Mu Eundcr SAFESTUD: The safesn chronicles of Max hander, by Max Exander, $7.00. Max Exander's first reaction to the idea of safe sex is disappointment . But with ume, be finds that the change from his old habits can be mv1gorating m unex pectcd way-; . THE TWO OF US, by Larry J. Uhrig, $7.00. A pracucal handbook about how to make a gay or lesbian relationship work, with special emphasis on the reh· gious aspects of gay umons DANCER DAWKINS AND THE CAUFORNIA KID, by Willyce Kim, $6.00. In Ban~or, Maine, Little Willie Gutherie renames hersell The California Kid, stocks up on Rubbles Dubble bubble gum and her father's best Havana cigars and beads west. •·willyce Kim has created a wonderful, rip--roarin.g Western lesbian adventwe that left me warm, tickled and hopmg she writes a dozen more. I loved it,,. wntes Judy Grahn. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M Steward, S7 00. This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas sleuthing through the French coc""Jtrys1de, attemptmg to solve the mysterious disappf'arance of a man who their neighbor and the father of their hand·mmc deaf mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stories STOLEN MOMENTS, by John Preston, $5.00. Who says heroes can't be gay? In the fourth of the ''Mission of Alex Kane" senes, Kane and his partner Danny Fortelli head for Houston. There, they take on a media baron who is intent on using homophobia to build his tabloid's c1rculat10n Also available: Sweet Dreams, Golden Years and Deadly Lies; each star· ring Alex and Danny; $5.00 each . EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan , $7 .00 Johnnie Ray Rousseau 1 · a 22-year-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm. Keith Keller is a whHe banker with a 10 o'clock bedtime - and muscles to die for. This story of their love affau is one of the most engrossmg and funniest you'll ever read THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Friedel, $6 95. Burton Raider's problems begin m high school when he realizes he's in love with bis friend Roman. As he gets older, the problims mcrcase - and so does the humor of his situation, in what Chn.stopher Street calls "the funniest gay novel of the year " MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by I Samuel M. Steward, $7.00. This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Tok.las c;leuthing through the French countryside, aucmpting to solve the ~ mysterious disappearance of a man who is their neighbor and the father of their handsome dcaf·mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stories. THE LIONS' DEN. by Larry Howard, $8 00 As a doseted college professor, Daniel bas resigned himself to a life of loneliness. He even fights off the ad­vances of a gay student, Matthew Reid - for a time Finally, however, he decides to risk ' in order to be faithful to himself HOT LIVING: Erotic stories about safe su, edited by John Preston, $8.00. The AIDS crisis has closed off some forms of sexual activity for health-conscious gay men, but it bas also encouraged many men to look for new forms of sexual ex pression Here, over a dozen of today's most popular gay writers erotically describe those new possibilities STUD, by Phil Andros, with an introduc· uon by John Preston, $6.95 Phil Andros is a hustler with a conscience, pursuing every form of sex -- 10cluding affection - without apology L 111.-n Halegu.1 The Pearl Basta rd THE PEARL BASTARD, by Lillian Halegua, $4 .00. Frankie is fifteen when she leaves her large, suffocating Catholic family in the mner city for Montauk, work, and the sea . This story of her sud· den entry tnto a harsh matunty is told with a s1mpl1city of style remmiscent of The Color Purple MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioli, S 12. SU. Through some 46 photos, Italian yhotographcr Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. (Oversize paperback\ ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $4.00. Twenty-eight young peo· pie from all over the US and Canada, mostly in high c;c;hool, share their coming-out expl·ricnccs. IN THE TENT, by David Rees, $6.00. Seventeen-year-old Tim realizes that he is attracted to his classmate Aaron, but, still caught up in the guilt of a Catholic upbringing, he has no idea what to do about it. Then in the middle of a camp.. ing trip, a storm trap~ the two of them in a tent with two other boys, and the is ues can no longer be avoided ... .. ....... TO ORDER .... .... ... . Enclosed is$_~ Please send the books I've listed below. jAdd S l .00 poSlage when ordering 1usl one book; If you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Please send me these books: I. 2. 3. 4. 5. Visa and mastercard ·accepted, please .vend acct number. exp. date, and signature. name __ address city state zip ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. p.5 40 Plympton St Bo>ton, MA 02118 FEBRUARY 14. 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 11 New Program Improves Counseling Center's Women's Outreach By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter "I'd like to see the lesbian community become more cohesive to support each other and form stronger bonds," said Karen Hanson, director of the Women's Program at the Montrose Counseling Cen­ter "lt's important they talk to each other, support each other, and talk about what's going on in their lives," she continued. And with the efforts and direction of the counseling director, women in the com· munity now have a better opportunity to share their thoughts, lives and even prob­lems Since joining the Center in August, Hanson has implemented several pro· grams and plans to offer even more pro­grams for women. She sees the women's program as pro­viding high-quality counseling and sup­port services for the women's community. Hanson pointed out that it is a needed service to have counseling for gays. The center offers individual counseling as well aa counseling for couples, even families, and lesbian couples with child­ren. [n addition, the center offers weekly Women's Network sessions on Wednesday nights. In the weekly sessions she said, "We've discussed the coming out process, legal iMues, parenting, feminism-what it is and what's going on in Houston." She sees the Women's Network as a ~ ~~ 2303 Richmond 522·7616 Take a Cruise on the Love Boat Friday, Feb. 14th Lovers Bon Voyage Happy Hour to IOpm Set Sail at IOpm with Complimentary Champagne Saturday, Feb. 15th Port of Call Carribean Adventure with $1.25 Pina Coladas Sunday, Feb. 16th Port of Call Acapulco Adventure with $1.25 Frozen Margaritas and Chips All Day, All Night Sunday Steak Night-7-IOpm Monday, Feb. 17th Return Happy Hour 'til 8pm 50¢ Miller Lites 8pm-2am I lpm Male Strip Contest $100 Winner M.C. Victoria West "family-a support system." The structure of the Network sessions is to have a speaker but to break off into small groups to discuss the topics. "Our society has so many secrets­especially sexual secrets like sexual abuse, for example. We need to be able to talk about our lives and what's going on," she explained. "If we can't talk, we can't become healthy, whole human beings." She also pointed out that little research h88 been done about lesbians. She consid­ers it important that women have a place to learn about the issues in their livt>s. Hanson, a native of New York, came to Houston eight years ago. Before joining the staff at the center. she worked at the Houston Area Women's Center in family violence outreach. . She said she came to the counsehng center when the board of directors wanted to get more women coming to the cen~r. "There had been more male therapists than women," . she said. "Bill Scott (Clinical Director) and Ken Vance (Executive Director) wanted to get women's programs going." When she began the program, question­naires were sent to women in the com mun· ity to get an idea of what topics ranked as a priority with them and the method they would like to see the topics handled. She said some 50 women attended the first network session thus proving that women were interested in a program. In citing particular problems that lesbi­ans face, she said that they often have children and "are raising thotJe children with their lovers." She said several network sessions have dealt with lesbian parenting and co­parenting. "It's important for these 1- - - - - - - - - - - - I I I I I MEXICAN RESTAURANT 4701 N. Main Houston 869-1706 2 for 1 DINNERS Not good with any other offer Expires 2128/86 A TASTE OF MEXICO 24 HOURS DAILY CLOSED TUESDAY 10PM REPOEN WEDNES'5AY 10AM Karen Hanson direct• the Montrose Counseling Center's women's program. (ConTIU Woods photo) women to be able to talk with other women and other couples," she added. ''Younger lesbians who want and are· considering having children seek support,''she explained. "'It's a big. choice-a big responsibility with manyt questions to be answered." Hanson, a certified social worker who received her Masters of Social Work from Syracuse University. continuet:> to expand the Women's Program. The Second Annual Women's Weekend will be held the first weekend in March. This program began last year and accord· ing to Hanson was successful. She would like to see more programs offered as well as expand the staff, the services and the client hours. Based on the size of the Houston gay community, she considers it important to offer more social servicee. Hanson plans to go outside the com· munity to speak to other groups. She has provided information concerning gays to the Crisis Hotline and the Houston Chap­ter of the National Association of Social Workers. She has also offered to speak to the Men· tal Health Association concerning homo­phobia. "Homophobia is bad on mental health whether you're straight or gay," she added 524-8601 1901 Taft (at Webster) Gay owned and operated 12 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 14. 1986 Montrose Live Balm in Gilead, Marat/Sade Share Similarities By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Critic There are two supremely theatrical shows playing in town now.That's two experien· ces which would not happen in any other medium. They are Balm in Gilead (at the Alley) and Maralf Sade (at Main Street). Both surround the audience, admit that it'1 there and make it part of the action. At Marat we become visitors to an insane asylum at the time of Napoleon. We are Jocked in a room with the inmates. who aometimee stand right behind us for long periods. At Balm, we stay ourselves but are encouraged to get up at times and dance with the characters. Wearecontinu· ally hit up for money by these spare change artists. Both use live music to enhance and com· ment upon the action . but both rely prim· arily upon the music of the spoken word. In Balm, it is, more often than not, street jive. In Marat, it's a little more courtly. In both, it often descends into a maelstrom of cacaphony. That confusion is used to get gorgeous monologues like gems in filigree or just to comment to them. Both plays are also about the faiJureof a person who sees the horrors of the world of the poor and tries to change it-either for everyone through a revolution 88 in Marat, or just for himself and maybe his girlfriend in Baim. reaJly about Mark Hymen and Alexandra Neil's characters. He's let himself get trapped into selling drugs, but wants out. She'll probably wind upahooker(likeNto­zake Shange's character), but isn't at all sure she belongs there. They should both flee, but the atmosphere is too seductive. It is for the audience, too. [tis repulsive and fascinating. We wind up feeling really at home there and guilty about letting it all happen, but not any more than anyone else. Steven Marcus is Dopey, the narrator of sorta. His performance as this drugged-out philosopher is the best among equals in this ensemble show, well directed by George Anderson. Cockroaches, Dopey explains, have always been with man. They are found in the deepest archeological digs. Not only that, they also have about the best chence of surviving a nuclear war. So they'll be here after we're gone. "The poor," Christ said, uwe have always with us." Or, as the song in Marat, Sade puts it, "Marat, we're poor, and the poor stay poor!" Th full title of that play is Th£ Persecu· tion and Aasassination of Jean Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Aaylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marqul8 de Sade. The title, as they Dopey (Steuen marcus) explains the law of the street to Fick (David Gregory) from his home ma trash dumpster in Lanford Wilson 's "Balm m Gilead" now playing on the Alley's Arena Stage. Balm m G1kad; Kayce Glasse and Ruth Adame play dominant lesbians fighting over a paaaive one played by Luisa Amaral-Smith. Paul Hope and Jeff Ben· nett play the kind of male street proeti· tut.es who are never out of drag. David Gregory pl a yo the kind of drunk who can't 1hut up-a compulsive talker.They are all interesting and believable, but the etory is say. eaye it all. Nearly everyone in this ensemble is playing an insane person playing a character-two levels at least. Again , there are too many good performances to .. credit them aJI. There is Barbara Hartman in a deep dep ion trying to protect her last loved poeseuion-Marat. There'• also Bruce Ellie speakina- only in rhyme as Barbara Hartman as Simonne Evrard tends the ailing Jean· Paul Mrat played by Kent Johnson with Bruce Ellis in the background as the Herald in Main Street Theater's production of "Marat! Sade." the narrat-Or and Roberto Argentina in a straightjacket as a renegade priest. Kent Johnson is in his usual fine form as a paranoic playing Marat, the great instigator of the French Revolution. Vicki Luman trying to fight off her sleep to elo­quently deMcribe the horrors of thatrevolu· ti on James Black is a chameleon. Every.time one thinks he might have seen every facet of this actor'• range, one is easily proven wrong. In this, his dry as dust voice and his hands folded demurely over his chest are the epitome of the failed aristocrat. Jeff Galligan'& direction has subtly brought out the anachronisms in Peter Weiss's script to point out the universality of the situation. Two last points; first, you would probe· bly enjoy either of these shows. Secondly, you could easily enjoy both of them. There are enough differences. o Notes A Is, the William Hoffman play about AJDS, will be taken on a national tour. I tis uncertain if this tour will play in Houston Meanwhile, that has tied up the right8 so that Stages has had to postpone their pro­duction of the play until at least July .. . Celebrate! Today is Valentine's Day! It is also the 50th annivt"rsary of when driv­er's licenses became mandatory in Texas. B'days: 15-Harvey Korman. 16- Katherine Cornell. 17-Simon Raven, author of Boys Will Be Boys: The Male Prostttute m London. George Washington (observed on the 17th but actually next Saturday). 19-Car11on McCullers. Enjoy! o Openings ONO! means One Night Only Joseph and the Amazing Technicolcr Dreamcoat (Stages, 14, mornings and wee­kend afternoons)-muaical by Rice and Webber • Fear of Ducks.' (Radio Music Theater, 14>-Mort madcap madnefls from the make believe studio high atop Westhei· mer Jeosye Norman (Jones, 14)-The acclaimed soprano joins Comissiona and the HSO for Wagner and Strauss. Johnny Mathis (Arena, 14). Brer Rabbit (Ensemble, 15, 10:30 and noon} Dat·1d Copperfield u·ill dazzle audiences with his magic at Joneli Hall on the 17th. Children '• Collections (Children 's Museum, 15, noon-4 p.m.)-ONO! Robert Frank: New York toNovaScotia (MusPum ofFineArts, 15)-thefirstmajor retrospective of his photographs and films to tour in 20 years. GonP to Texas {Children 's Museum 16 2:00 p.m .)- the Chocolate Bayou produc'. tion . ONO! Matt Ha1movitz (Jones, 16, 2:30)-The young cellist joins Comissiona and the HSO for an afternoon of romantic hita ONO' FEBRUARY 14, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 13 Kindred Spirits Celebrates Anniversary By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Not only is the community celebrating the traditional St. Valentine's Day today, but many will be celebrating the fifth anniver· aary of one of the local clubs. Club owner Marian Coleman, along with the family and friends of Kindred Spirts, has planned a very special evening to honor the anniversary. According to Coleman, "People have been calling me all day •.. to see if they can do something specia1 for the event," she said. The entertainment, so far, may feature the cloggers, the band, and a number of other groups who will "drop by." Coleman considers her place of business as a community center "where women and men can come together-sharing the same space." Marian Coleman's night club, Kindred Spirit.a, celebrates fifth anniversary. .,.,.,.,.,., . .,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,., • Happy Valentine's Day from: • T TAFT AUTOMOTIVE T " 14 11 ' l'AJ<'T, 522-2 190 " FEBRUARY SPECIALS ¥ * * Oil Change $1995 ¥ A/C Check Bi Charge $1995 ¥ r. !_ £h~~ £~!!_ng ~e~ .!~!. _ ¥ J~~~~9£0~3~~~~~~~~ " D ON'T NJ<:GLJ<X"r B J<:'l'SY! " GENERAL REPAIR " AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION • ELECTRONIC TUNEUP AIR CONDITIONING T """"""""""""""""" Her pride in her efforts and accomplish· ments flow through her each spoken word about the club, located on Richmond Avenue. This community center, as she often ret­ers to the club, has featured various activi­ties during the five years including special events and community fundraisers. It was for these activities that Coleman first con­sidered opening a club. "I was very much involved in the com· munity. I had never managed a club but I did own the House of Coleman (a graphics and printing oompany) here," she said. "People knew the quality of House of Coleman and enoouraged me to open a bar," she added. According to Coleman she envisioned. the place to be where "we could educate our own .•. a support place for people in need-women and men." She acknowl· edged the many pe<;ple who helped her get the club started . And Kindred Spirits has been a support place for the community as Coleman related a very special event at the club. "I lost a dear friend, Jerry Kauffman," she began to explain. "We had a goal to have men and women together in this rommun­ity." Kindred Spirits sponsored a fun­draiser for Kauffman and raised more than $7,000. "I want Kindred Spirits to make an impact. After all, if you don't have stars, what's the use of living,'' Coleman com­mented in speaking of her goals for the club. One of the accomplishments she ronsid­en1 important is the fact that Kindred Spir· its was able to get a blood bank for KS! AIDS. As the club celebrates its anniversary, Coleman continues to make future plans for events and activities for the commun­ity center. rn16co1L OT =-C ·A· f · E== AND CABAQET Entertainment Sylvia Reyes, Mabli McGee and Liz Mendez Driscoll St. Happy Hour Pina Colada $5 per lb. Cafe Driscoll (coffee drink) Well Drinks $1.25 Happy Hour Prices on All Drinks 4-Spm Experience a Hand Reading with Susanna, Fri., Sat., & Sun. Brunch All New Lunch Menu, Daily Lunch Special $4.95 Early Bird Dinner Special 6-Spm •696 Feb. 16th Quest for Mr. Right Happy Valentine's Day New Dynasty & Colby Dinner Club $10-All You Can Eat or Drink 6:30pm-9pm Every Wed. & Thurs. (Call for Information) 1834 Westheimer 522-7020 ~tt ~moriam DAVID RILEY David Riley. 36. died Feb. 9. 1986 He is survived by his mother. Nadine Jones Riley. of Kalispell. Montana; father, James Ailey, of Califom1a; brothers. Jim Riley, of Mem­phis, Tennessee; Tom Riley, of Kalispell, Montana. and Mike Riley. of Pueblo, Colorado. A funeral was held Tuesday, Feb. 11. at St Paul's United Methodist Church. with Bishop Finis A. Crutchfield officiating Interment and further services will be held in Kalispell, Montana DANIEL HANEN A funeral was held Monday. Feb 10, at St Lukes United Methodist Church for Daniel Hanen, 30. - - - - ~ POI.ICY The Montn»e Voa I commemorate ..... ,,_.ng ot Montro• reeod9nts attei ~ion gey community memtier. •It!\.,,~ Fnendl « re1111 ...... of tne deOMMd ml)' pRN•de ~ ""th flCtl '°°"1 1he pet'90n°I liole nan'M19oltheeklMltaurvlWOfS #'ldbur11.1wr~t1 Pr'CIM or ¥9fM can bll ll'lduOed P1cturM •• ~ed end will be ••urned ,.,,.,,. of 1he CMIC-.ed shOukl bll etteched to the photo Lnlormation should be ptO¥icled to the Motltrme Vooc. mt the ..,,...t pomible oete end bll put»llhed Ill the "*' evai11ble edltiOft. There 11 oo ct..rge 1et 1n11 ....-ice UNBELIEVABLE Own Your Own Condol -0- Down -0- Closing Costs -0- Mortgage Payment for 30 days -0- Association Dues First 12 months Excellent Security Swimming Pools Secured Parking Laundry Facilities 100% Home Ownership 24 hr. Approval Payments as low as "'ftaVmonth P&I Reduced to $200 MEMORIAL PLACE 915 Silber 681-3600 FIRE FOX Chimney Rock at Bluonnet 664-9036 14 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 14. 1986 The Far Side by Gary Larson farmer Blown lroze in his tracks; the cows stored wide-eyed bock at him. Somewhere, oll In the distance, o dog borked. "Moml Theron's dried his bed ogoln." Across town In the snoke district "Sure, I'll draw, mister-but llrst you gotta say the magic word. _ Dldn1 your mother eV&f leach you the moglc word?" "Listen. You want lo be extinct? You wont them to shoot and trap us Into oblivion? ·- We're supposed to be the animals, so let's gel bock out lhe<e and act like Ill" Fortunes Gemini Prepares For Adventure By Mark Orion For Friday, Feb. 1'. 1986, through Thursday, Feb. 20, 1986 ARIES-Your new relationship isn't moving along as quickly as you'd like. Others sometimes need more of their own space than you do_ Take it easy and let things grow TAURUS-After this weekend, things begin to slow down. You realize yo_u·re a little tired. Others will understand 1f you take a little time for yourself. GEMINI-Now that you've done a little soul-searching, you're ready for some adventure. Your self-analysis has given you new confidence to charge ahead. Go for it CANCER-Strange, almost eery, hap­penings have you perplexed. Don't dwell too long on things you cannot control . Be flexible to changes LEO-You've been in a rut and you feel as though life is passing you by. Get back on board and use the assertive side of your personalitv to grab the best of it all. VIRGO-Your quest for perfection never ceases. You tend to be 1mpat1ent with those not as •·perfect" as you. Relax and enjoy the "imperfections" of human nature. It often holds pleasant surprises LIBRA-You will be included in a cele­bration for a friend or business associate Don't let envy spoil the occasion. Share in the good fortune of others SCORPIO It seems that you are being forced to make too many decisions. Don't carry the burden alone. Be willing to dicuss issues with those nearest to you Listen to their advice but remember you have to deal with the consequences SAGITTARIUS -Valentine's Day becomes more meaningful with contact from someone unexpected Reminiscing old times helps you pull out of a slump. Remember to be grateful to friends CAPRICORN Domestic problems are resolved with honest and frank discus­sion. Be willing to compromise on the issues at hand Look at things in the long run before making a costly mistake. AQUARIUS Now that your birth-day's over. it's time to settle down. Start gefflng organized Make plans for the next year Newly acquired friends will play an important role in your plans PISCES Don't let a conflict at work force you to lose your temper Holding your tongue proves beneficial as those around you admire your self-control. A new project will require more contact with the public. FEBRUARY 14, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 "PulV ¥Ors of Fin mut" •HUGE-A Matter of Size $5995 TO ORDER: Title • HUGE-Like A Horse • HUGE-Sizing Up • Tough competition VHS/BETA • Hot Male Mechanics • Blondes Do It Best These tapes are in stock now and will b~ shipped within 24 hours via 1st class mail. • Sighs P&H is only s2so PER ORDER. not per tape. •Pizza Boy •Windows •What The Big Boys Eat •Below The Belt •Falcon Pac 34-The Winner Takes All • Falcon Pac 36-Bronc Rider •Falcon Pac 37-Take It • Jocks-Ramcharger • SPECIAL! Matt Sterlings $6995 HUGE' ch-By-Inch VHS/BETA call (214) 522·1132 Mail to:L4O00B8O-C Cedar Springs Dallas, TX VHS or Amt Beta [ Check • l M/O [,Visa LI M/Card Sub-total A/C P&H $2.50 Exp. 5% Stole Tax Signature Amount Enclosed 21 Yr. r Ider (si nature r 'd.) - Ship To: Nome Addl'ess Apt. no. City State Zip 16 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 14, 1986 New Woody Allen is Emotional Masterpiece Woody Allen and Mia Farrow in a scene from Allen'• neu: film, "Hannah and Her Sisters." By Scott Cutoinger Montroa~ Voice Film Cr;tic It'• a great wttk for moviea with a auperb Woody Allen and two very good films recently opening Hannah and Her Sisters is Woody'e 14th effort, and euily his most acceseible adult comedy. With an all-star caat that forms a perfect ensemble, Hannah is an emotional masterpiece that picks apart our human experiences. FIX is a taut new thriller featuring the handsome Australian Bryan Brown of "Thorn Birds" fame. Highlighted by spe­cial effects and iUusions, the film is a maze of turnabouts that keep us guessing the outcome. Lastly there io Colonel Redl, a military drama about a man harboring his homo­eexuality. Oscar-nominee Klaus Maria Brandauer (Out of Africa) ia superb aa the driven but inaecure officer who must deal with hi.a sexuality and a crumbling Au&­trian empire in the early 1900'a. o Hannah and Her Sisters Woody Allen isahardmantokeepupwith artistically. Those who loved his early movies like Banana.sand Sleeper were put out by the New York .. in" jokes in Annie Hall. Interior• threw everyone off with its Bergmaneeque family, and then came Manhatten with its cute charm. Lately, Woody has loot most of his sev­enties audience with small efforts like Zelig, Broadu·ay Danny Rose and Purple Rose of Cairo. Each had brilliance and showed 11TOwth by a director who Jikeo to explore, but none were box office amaahee. Moviegoen wanted thrills and excite­ment, not variation• on Woody'• favorite them.ea of love, sex. God and death. actera searching for one thing­happineH. In past films, when he explored the meaning of life, Allen often came to the conclusion that it W88 mean­ingle88. Here he seems to say that humor will come from looking at ourselves. and there ia hope to look forward to the future. Hannah seems like a cross between Manhatten and Interiors, but it's much more lively and entertaining for general audiences. The characters are humorous because we can easily see ourselves in their dramatic situations. We see that we make many of our own desperate situa­tions, but we are also able to undo them. In fact, the high points of the film came when all of the principles gather for two different Thanksgiving dinners. The interaction of the family members and the outsiders becomes a social saga that is hilarious, but still very real. We really care about these people and their problems, and we laugh and cry with them as they solve their difficulties. I could write pages on this film about the screenplay, the actors, and the direction, but this ia a film beyond simple words. Hannah is a movie masterpiece that will definitely highlight the films of the 1980s. Woody is still talking about the same things, but this time he hits us emotion­ally and psychologically right where it counts. o FIX There'• almost nothing like a good thriller, and FIX is a real dandy. Smart and furiously effective, this is one of those rarities that really keep you on the edge of your seat. In the movie business, Fl X stands for the art of special effects. RollieTyleris one of the best effects men in the industry, always adding a special look to every­thing from cheapie horror flicks to space age sci-fi adventures. His excellent craft~ manship and execution have also been observed by government agents, who decide to offer him a job. For a tu-free $30,000, Rollie will stage the fah1e 88SBBsination of a testifying mobster. This hood will then become part of the witness relocation program, and avoid gangland violence. So, the stage is aet, and Rollie convincingly splatters the gangster all over a restaurant wall. Unfortunately, he is not so sure that his killing was a fake. Someone could have switched his blanks for the real thing and he might really be a murderer. Sudd~nly, he finds that the Justice Department has turned the tables on him and he is a sus· pect on the run explosives, Rollie manages to stay on top of his aggressors. He is a fascinating char· acter to watch 88 he uses his entire bag of tricks to save his own life. Bryan Brown (Rollie) is a remarkable actor seen in such films as Breaker Mor· ant and television's "Thom Birds." A handsomely rugged man, Brown gives a totally engrossing performance that keeps us at attention. He also gives us plenty of "Richard Gere" shots that show off his nice body. Supporting actors also fare well, espe­cially Brian Dennely (Cocoon) as an hon· est cop trying to figure out exactly what is going on. Diane Venora has a lovely but short-lived role as Rollie's girlfriend, and Mason Adams ("Lou Grant") is great as a ruthless government man. Only Martha Gehman seems ridiculously stupid as Rol­lie's special effects helper. FIX is totally satisfying entertainment that really keeps you guessing. Just when you think you have things figured out, it crosses and double-crosses on you and leaves you amazed. A roller coaster ride of stunning special effects coupled with a clever script makes this a film well worth experiencing and enjoying o Colonel Redl KlauR Maria Brandauer is becoming a star of major importance. He has been nominated for a Best Supporting Oscar for his brilliant part in Out in Africa., His 1981 film Mephisto won Best Foreign Film, and his neweet feature Colonel Redl is nominated this year for Best Foreign Film. Brandauer ia a commanding Austrian actor who comee off shrewed and menac-­ing at the same time. He is the perfect actor to play Red.I, a man who used betrayal and denial of his low origins to rise in the military ranks of Austria· Hungary. A driven man, Redl ia insecure only about one thing-hie hidden homo· sexuality, Now Woody 1prinp Hannah and Her Siatera on us, and thia may be the one that makes his fane return A warm, humanly funny comedy, Hannah has already been praised nationwide by critics aa hie grea­t. eat film yet. Thie time the comedy and relationahips are more readily identifia· ble, and people will be able to follow Woody'• thought.I much more easily than before. Rollie Tyler (Bryan Brown) pretenda to shoot Lipton (Cliff De Young) before taking some shots at Rosebud m "FIX." The etory revolves around three eisters: Hannah (Mia Farrow), Lee (Barbara Her­shey), and Holly (Dianne Wiest). Elliot (Michael Caine) is manied to Hannah, but fallo in love with Lee, Mickey (Woody Allen) was manied to Hannah, and haa dated Holly. Frederick (Mu Von Sydow] livet1 with Lee, but never qtarried her. Sound like "Dyna.sty in New York?" Actually, Hannah involvee a lot of char- What makee Hannah click is the actora. Besides thoee previously mentioned, there is also Lloyd Nolan and Maureen O'Sulli­van aa the girl•' parents, Carrie Fisher 88 a budding caterer, Danile Stem as an unappreciating art buyer, and Julie Kavner as Gail. All of the actoTB form a magnificent enflemble who seem to inter­mingle in each others lives. The second half of the film becomes a terrifying duel between Rollie and several ruthless government agent.I. Forced to use every trick he knows. Rollie must out.trick and outwit theee guya who are out to kill him The cat and mouse game becomes dead· lier and more brutal as the chase boils to a climax. Using everything from makeup to We see glimpses of Redl's preference early in his military academy days. He ia deeply in love with a young man named Kubinyis, but is afraid o.f a relationship. When Kubinyia reject.I him later on, Red.I becomes lovers with his friend's sister The selling of the film is Austria (early 1900s) ~here the emperor's rule ia slowly crumbling. Soon the Archduke Ferdinand Films Alfred Redl (Klaus Maria Brandauer) accuses his young Louer Alfredo Velocchio (Laszlo Gal{fi) of being part of a growing conspiracy against him in "Colonel Red/.'' will be assassinated (1914) and World War II will start. Redl is one of the few officers who remain faithful to his emperor, but his loyalty and confidence in the Arch· duke (heir to the throne) may be mis­placed. The Archduke has Hedi spy on his own men in order to find a man to put on trial as warning to rebellious troops. Actually, the Archduke has set up &!di himself as the patsy, and the Colonel becomes caught in his own web of homosexuality and deceit. A young man he becomes involved with turns out to be an enemy spy, and Redl is ruined. This film is based partly on fact, but the secret life of Alfred &!di was never fully known. He did commit suicide in 1913, probably because of being blackmailed for his sexual preference. Colonel Redl is an attempt to show how a man can rise to power, and then slowly lose it through his own weaknesses. While the gay aspect of &!di is fairly overt, it is not dwelled upon. Instead of so much military and historical background, it would have been much more interesting to delve deeper into the personal back­ground and relationships of Red I. The film does little to examine the man's love affairs, and it seems so important. A rather long film that may bore many with historical relevance. CoUmel Redl is nonetheless fascinating with Brandauer's standout performance. We watch help· lessly as a man climbs to success, and then crumbles down with the very notion that he has supported and defended. Once more homosexuality is used againstsomf-" one, and they suffer because of what they are. FEBRUARY 14, 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 17 MERIDIEN LEASING INC. 325 528< 73Si '86 BMW JO'J/mo 395/mo 569/mo '86 MERCEDES BENZ '86 HONDA l'lOE 300E 560Sl 349/mo Acconl 491lmo Prelude n5Jmo 159/mo 179/mo '86 CADILLAC '86 PORSCHE '86 JAGUAR 329/mo 9« 944 Turbo 398/mo 4'8/mo XJ6 569/mo '86 MAZDA '86 BUICK RX.;r 209/mo 626 178/mo '86 TOYOTA C.mry Celin 1n1mo 185/mo 179/mo 279:mo ~~ CALL LEE BORBA ~~ (n3) 975-1986 r .. NO DOWN PAYMENT• LO\.\ER ~NTHLY PA'tMlf"...T •CASH FOR YOUR TRADE To better serve your needs ... TEXAS STATE OPTICAL announces new hours at these locations TSO-Village 2515 University 528-1589 TSO-South Main 4414 S. Main 523-5109 Tues.- Sat. Mon.- Fri. 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed Monday Closed Saturday Effective Feb. I, 1986 -- - Coming in February and March ''Scuzz lz Az Scuzz Duzz'' D.J. David Oleson 715 FaiNiew 521-2792 at Ripcord, you trashed us!! Just wait 'til March 11th!!! D.J. Lary Thompson 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 18 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 14, 1986 Gay and lesbian reading ======from====== A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS HOT LIVING: Erotic stories about safe «I, edited by John Preston, $8.00. The AIDS cruis has closed off some forms of saua! activity for health-conscious gay men, but 1t has also encouraged many men to 1ook. for new forms of sexual ex· press1on. Here ~ over a dozen of today's most popular gay writers present new short stories that imaginatively eroticize safe sex. Contnbutors mclude Toby Johnson, Frank Mosca, Marty Rubm, Sam Steward, George Whumore and TR. Witomski. SOCRATES, PLATO AND GUYS LIKE ME: Confessions of a gay schoolteacher, by Enc Roles, $7.00. When Enc Roles began teachmg sixth grade at a conscr· vauve pnvate school, he soon felt the Stram of a pin 1dent1ty Here he descnbes his two years of teaching from wahm the closet, his difficult decision to come out at work, and the conse­quences of that decision i SECOflD CHflflCf S • now! bv Florine De \leer SECOND CHANCES, by Flonne de Veer, $7.00 Is it always harder to accept what 1! offered freely? Jeremy, young and till naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted fnend Roy, yet be chooses to pursue the hand­some and unpredictable Mark ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Wri t ~s by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $3. 95 Twenty-eight young peo­ple from all over the US and Canada, mostly in high school, share their commg-out expcnences. STOLEN MOMENTS, by John Preston, $5 .00. Who c;ays heroes can't be gay? In the fourth of the '"M1ss10n of Alex Kane" series, Kane and hie; partner Danny Fortelh head for Houston. There, they take on a media bamn who is intent on using homophob1a to l:>uild hie; tabloid's cuculauon Also ava• hie Sweet Dreams, Golden Years and Deadly Lies; each star­nng Alex and Danny· $5.00 each EXTRA CREDIT, by Jeff Black, $6.00 Harper King has a boring teaching job, stagnant relationships, and a tank full of fish named after ex-lovers dying in the same order their namesakes were se­duced. Can you blame him for wanting a fresh startr Enter Mick, a lover from the past talking about their future; Garrick, a first-year teacher looking for conjunc­tions, and not necessarily in the cJass­room;. and young Dean, an oversexed Denms the Menace making all A's in c;ome very advanced biology IRIS, by Jamne Veto, $7.00 The retelling of an ancient Greek myth of love, devo­tion and vengeance - this ume with a lesbian theme. REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, $4 95. The moving auto­biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na­tional news when he took a gay date to hi> high school prom. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M. Steward, $7 .00. This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Alice B Tokla> sleuthing through the French countryside, attempung to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who is theu neighbor and the father of their hand!lome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stones . THE LAVENDER COUCH: A con­sumers' guide to therapy for lesbians and gay men, by Marny Hall, SB.00. Therapy can be tremendously helpful for lesbians and gay men. Yet how many of us really know how to go about choosing a therapist, and how to be sure we can get the most out of therapy? Mamy Hall, herself a lesbian therapist, has written the first book ever to address this sub­ject. THE PEARL BASTARD, by Lillian Halegua, $4 .00. Frankie is fifteen when she leaves her large, suffocating Catholic family in the inner city for Montauk, work, and the sea. She tells her story wnh a combination o( painful innocence and acute vision, bcgmning with the man in the hne green car who does not moum the v1olcnt death of a seagull against his wmdshield. The c.implictty of Halcgua's style b reminiscent of The Color Purple; tt is a powerful story of a g1rl's sudden entry into a harsh maturity MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioh, S 13.00 Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic terntory in which. since the beginmng of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex {Oversize paperback) THE HUSTLER, by John Henry Mackay; trans by Hubert Kennedy, $8.00. Gun­ther is fifteen when he arrives alone m the Berhn of the 1920s. There he dlS­covers the boys of Friedrich Street, and the men who stroll by and speak with them. Soon he is spotted by Hermann Graff, a sensitive and naive young man who becomes hopelessly enamored with Gunther. But love does not fit neatly in­to Gunther's new life as a hustler . Gunther'~ tory was first published in 1926. For today's reader, it combines a poignant love story with a colorful por­trayal of the gay subculture that thrived in Berlin a half-century ago. DANCER DAWKINS AND THE CALIFORNIA KID, by Willyce Kim, $6 00. A new and very different lesbian novel, which Judy Grahn calls "A wonderful , rip-roaring Western lesbian adventure that left me warm, ticklc:d, and hoping she writes a dozen more.' "The book of the year," writes Feminist Bookstore News. ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, $5.00. The story of a teenage love alfair that should have been simple but wasn't EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan, $7 .00. Johnnie Ray Rousseau is a 22-year-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm. Keith Keller is a white banker with a 10 o'clock bedtime - and muscles to die for. This story of their love affair is one of the most engross-tng and funniest - you'll ever read . . ..... . . ... TO ORDER .. .. . . ... . . .. . Enclosed 1s $_ Please send the books I've listed below jAdd $1.00 postage when ordering just one book; if you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Please send me these books: I. 2. 3. ---- 4. __ _ 5. __ --- Visa and mastercard accepted; please send acct. number. exp. date, and signature. name ----~ address CHY ---- ~ state zip_ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. p.5 40 Plympton St . .... ·----·~~~'.~~:!":.~.~~! !~ .. ·- ·- ..... . FEBRUARY 14, 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 19 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz How Are You at People Reading? By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. News America Syndicate Special to thi' Montrosl' Voice Once, when he was seeking lodging at a small hotel, George M. Cohan was refused by a desk clerk who said, "Sorry, we don't have a room for people like you." Taken by surprise, the famed compol'!ier thought a moment, then retorted: "This is certainly a bad situation. You thought I was Jewish and I thoughty.ou wereAmeri· can. I guess we were both wrong." We all goof grandly once in a while when it comes to judging others. Often our prejudiced perception is colored by a myth or heresay, and it can lead to complica· tions in our dealings with them. If you can size up others in a brief time, you'll have the edge over thoAe who can't, and likely will be more successful in human affairs. Ahead is a quiz which tests your ability to "read" pffiple at first meeting. Answer True or False to each item, then read on for explanations. 1. Smiling is only one trait among many which identifies a succe8sful person . 2. A }X'rson who is prejudiced against one group tends to be prejudiced against other groups. a. Short pt>rsons are usually more ener· getic and aAsertive than those who are taller. 4. An older person is genera1ly lonelier than a younger person . 5. The lastborn in a family tends to have a higher IQ than those born before him t her 6. A couples' social standing is most influenced by the partner with the more prestigious job. 7. Cr('ative persons are usually more intelligent then those who are not crea· tive. 8. Beautiful people are usually friendlier than thos£> who ere less attractive. o .Explanation I. False-ReHearchers Wendy McKenna and Florenre Denmark of the City Univer· sity of New York found that people in high-status jobs exhibit less smiling and nodding than others. Success may not make peOple frown, but it may make them realize they don't have to smile a lotto feel accepted. 2. 'J'rue-Prejudice is similar to a person­ality trait such as dominance or submis­siveness. It can "generalize" and color many ot your attitudes and reactions con· cerning others. 3. False-Although some short people tend to overcompensate for their below­average stature, there is no evidence that they are more energetic, ambitious or assertive than those who are taller. 4. False-Surveys done at New York University and the University of Califor­nia (Los Angeles) show that even though more old, rather than young, people Jive alone, the elderly are more satisfied with their friendships, feel more independent and have higher self-esteem. The young, those who are single, and those recently divorced, were found to be the loneliest. 5. False-Scores on nearly 400,000 ado­lescents in Holland showed that IQ's decrease from the first to the last born. No one really knows why this is. Some experts theorize firstborns benefit from better pre­natal development, or perhaps from hav· ing their parents to themselves for longer than their later-born siblings. 6. False-Studies by sociologist Peter Rossi, Ph.D., find that a man's job counts twice as much as a woman's in detennin· ing a couple's s('cial status. Even when the woman was a doctor and the man a mechanic, it was the man's position by which the couple was rated. 7. False-According to research at the University of California (Los Angeles) creativity is not a function of intelligence as measured by IQ tests. 8. True-Work at the University of Geor­gia shows that beautiful people are more sociable, and it's not that their beauty blinds us. Subjects were asked to rate peo· pie for sociability and likeability on the basis of phone conversations. The raters never saw the people they talked to, yet they rated the attractive ones higher than others in social skills. o Score 7-8 correct-You are a good judge of peo­ple and probably should be working with them in fac~to-face situations. 3-6 correct-You win some, you lose some in your daily dealings with others. There's room for improvement here. 0-2 correct-You're socially myopic. Obvious clues about others soar over your head. How about a COUN;e in human rela· tiona at the local college? 0 0 0 THE o 0 LISTKEEPERS 0 522-2268 O LET US KEEP YOUR LISTS: O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 *Business *Invitations 0 *Family *Christmas O *Friends *Direct Mail 0 O *Wine *Cassettes O o *Albums *Video Tapes o 0 0 0 ADDRESS LABELS OUR 0 0 SPECIALTY! 0 (Average cost: 10001" stick 0 on labels I 140.00 plus tax) 0 0 0 HSK CONTRACTING A Full Service Contractor •Roofing (All Types) • Remodeling •Sheetrock/Painting •Plumbing/Electrical •Foundations Repaired •Tree & Trash Removal •Insulation •Water Proofing •Tile/Masonry •Carpet •Cabinets •Decks/Hot Tubs •Room Additions •Concrete •Fully Insured •References Available No Job Too Big or Too Small - 520-9064 OR Emergency Dlgll•I Pager 891-4053 20 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUAR" 14. 1986 We Cover the \Yorld of Mon I rose! The Montrose Voice If Montrose is part of your world too, you should be part of the Montrose Voice. TO SUBSCRIBE, OR TO ADVERTISE, CALL 529-849q FEBRUARY 14, 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 21 Neighborhood Junk for One Can Be Art for Another By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Have you been searching for the right pair of cat-eye glasses? Or do you need that perfect pillbox hat which even Jackie Kennedy would envy? If any of these items could fill your heart's desire, Bob Novotney of Texas Junk Company can help you out. The large warehouse, located at the corner of Taft and Welch, is filled to the brim with unique items. Owner Novotney, a native of Wisconsin, came to Houston in 1968 to visit a friend. He stayed. After having worked for an interior decorator for a while, he started a garage sale business called the "Church Sale" as it was located in an old church on Westheimer. A holdover from the hippie days, Novot­ney said he was "trained in nothing," although he was reared in a family of mechanics. He did and still does enjoy tra­veling. During his travels he worked wher· ever he could find work including Alaska. Novotney has been at his present loca­tion for seven years. He recalls a few really unusual items he has fallen into: stuffed ducks painted gold and silver; a collection of bones painted to look like a ceiling fan; and even a stuffed longhorn head with one eye m188ing. However, all of the merchandise in the store is not as unusual as these. Pointing to several animal skulls hanging on the wall, Novotney said he prefers skulls to stuffed heads because the stuffed ones "look too real." He has accumulated an array of period clothing including old band uniforms and Bob Nouotney slinky dresses representing several decades, not to mention the slacks, slcirta, blouses that even Bette Davis would covet. "I bought the band uniforms from a Houston Independent School District auc­tion several years ago," he said. Some of the uni forms were shipped to New York for use by theaters. He also pointed out that local theaters as well as movie production companies have purchased items for use as props or production wardrobes. HSomeone came through (Houston) from Paris and bought some old license plates for an American-theme restaurant in Paris," he explained. Although Novotney likes "things deal­ing with history" he never researches any of the items he receives. He said he simply does not care to bother with the research or "market value" of an item except for what it is worth to him and the customer. He said that many of the people who patronize his store are artists. "People who come in here must be creative," he said while speaking of some of the items customers have bought. "I had gotten a number of test tubes during a sale. I figured someone would eventually want them. An artist came in and bought all the test tubes-who knows what he'll do with them!" he exclaimed. He pointed out that much of his mer­chandise comes from cleaning out peoples' garages or storerooms. That could cer· ta.inly account for the number of nails, screws, nuts and bolts he has accumulated through the years. He pointed out that most of the mer­chandise he sells is sold "as is." He does not have the clothes cleaned nor doee he ''fix" any of the items. Hedidrelateastory about a buyer- from Sao Francisco who purchased eome of the clothing from him and how good they looked in the "fancy" California store. Novotney is careful about some items in his shop including reoordo and books. He checks the records for scratches and if they are scratched he discards them. The primary books he offers are first editions and classics-no dime store romance nov­els. Novotney quickly pointed out that he does not buy stereos, cameras or bicycles because those types of items could be "hot." He said that he will not buy any items that could be stolen including tools. And what about the man behind all this junk? "I like being my own boss. I only have to answer to Uncle Sam and the governments," he explained ... I like the junk. It's a means for me to make a living. And for artilito it's something they need, want or can make something out of." Although Novotney enjoys traveling at least a month during the year, he spends most of his time at his place of busine88'. He lives in an apartment above the store. His store is not just a place of business "it's a place to socialize," he said. "My friends stop by on their way to work or after work just to talk." Novotney is, no doubt, proud of his busi­ness and the "junk" that artists and other customers seek. "People just keep drop­ping by," he said. But if you do go shopping for that uni­que, unusual or period item, don't look for a sign on the building as there is none. Just watdl for a storefront lined with mannequins, bathtubs, a fonnica and chrome table or even a barrel heater. While standing near the front door, Nov otney reached his hand in a plastic bag filled with numbers wrapped in C<!ll<>­phane. Holding the pieces in his hand he said. "I don't know what someone would do with these numbers, but I am sure some artist will find a use for them-maybe a number collage." Leather by Boots proudly presents their newest location at the Venture-NI I?. ~clanh. Ltd. at the All Medusa Type Odorizers $12 (thru Feb. 19) SllR at the 22 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 14. 1986 Sports Voice City Slates Softball Managers Meeting From a PreH Release The City of Houston Parks and Recreation Department's Athletic Division will hold the 1986 Spring Softball Managers meet­ing on Sunday. Feb. 16, from 12:00 noon until 3:00 p.m. at the Fonde Recreation Center, 110 Sabine at Memorial Drive. AH teams desiring to enter a team in the Spring Softball Leagues should have a repreeentative in attendance at the meet· ing to acquire registration information. Representatives from teams which par· ticipated in last year's leagues wiJI be allowed to draw numbers during the man­agers meeting to determine the order for registration the coming season. Registra­tion for the remaining slots will be held at a later date for new teams and those not represented at the meeting. Call 641-4111, extension 254, for further information Barn, Four 611 Hold Top Spots in Billiards The Barn and Four 611 led their respective divisions for the sixth consecutive week after the tenth week of play in the MSA Billiards League. The Barn dropped from its unbeaten status. however, by losing a challenge match to Four 611. The Ranch Hands hung on to second place in Division A. losing their challenge match to 611111. Bacchus I moved up to third this week ~· defeating The 611. Behind the Barn in Division B this week is 611111. followed by The Galteon, winners over Mary's Natu­rally The February team captains meeting will be held Sunday, Feb. 16, at The Barn at 2:00 p.m. Following the meeting, the MSA Chili Cookoff will be held at Er J's from 3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. Guest entries are welcomed. More information or details can be obtained from MSA Director Nick Escobedo at 777-1823. Sports Voice Calendar & Standings R egular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Center Houston and HouTex Tennis Clubs 10:30am-1:30pm. Homer Ford Tennis Center Women·s Bowling league Spm, Stadium Bowl WW B Bowling league 7.30pm. Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: MSA Men·s Bowling 9pm, Stadium Bowl TUESDAY; Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Center MSA ·Fun Volleyball league. " 7pm WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool league plays Spm, various locations THURSDAY; Frontrunners. Memorial Park Tennis Center Houston Tennis Club 7:30pm Homer Ford Tfnnrs Center Whatever Happened to Baby Jane· MSA Mixed Bowling League 8·4Spm. Stadium Bowl Special Events Feb 14-16 IGBO-att1liated Bluegrass Clas­sic. Lou1svllle Feb. 28-Mar. 2 IGBO-atflliated Spring Break Invitational, Ft Lauderdale Mar. 27-30.· IGBO-attihated 01x1e lnv1tat1onal, Atlanta Mar. 29-31. IGBO-atf1liated MAK IT, Kansas City May 24-26 6th annual ··us Gay Open· National Tennis Tournament. San Francisco June Oak Lawn Tennis Assoc hosts Texas Cup Challenge, Dallas July 25-Aug 3. 1986· US Olympic Festival, Houston Labor Day Weekend. 1986· Women's Softball "86 World Series. New Haven. Conn. MSA Pool League TNm Standings. Winter League. Week 10 TEAM Recent Weetit Total Matches. Total games DIVISION A 1 Four611 1().5 !>-1 93-57 2 Ranch Hands 5-10 7-3 S2-68 3 Bacchus I 11-4 6-3 81·54 4 Mary·1 Naturally 6-9 6-3 7!>-58 5Too611 0-15 s-• 70-65 6 Marion & Lynn·• 11-4 s-• 68-61 7 Bacchus II 7-6 5-5 73-77 6 BAB Shooters ().15 5-5 65-85 9 Street Cats ... 4-6 7&-72 lOOutlaws !>-6 3-6 76-59 DIVISION B 1 The Barn 5-10 6-1 IM-51 2 611 Ill 10-5 6-3 S0-55 3 The Ga1teOn ... 6-3 7&-59 4 lipthck 15-0 ... ..... 5 Kindred Spmts II 15-0 H 82-53 8 Kindred Spirits : 6-7 5-• 75-60 7The811 .... ,, H 66-67 8 JR'S .... ,, 3-7 65-85 9 Hoo1ers II 15-0 1-8 34-95 10 Hooters I 6-9 1·9 53-97 11 looeStars 6-9 1-9 ..... 106 Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Feb 8 TOP TEN LADDER t Robert Halmes 6 Rich Corder 2 JC Barrer• 7 Oscar Martinez 3 Arm• Albanza 8 Edward de Leon 4 Ron Bell 9 Ron McCauley 5 Rick Hadnot 10 Billy Green BLADDER t Randy Miller 2 Steve Bryant 3 Roy Mendiola 4 Da1w1d Hendrickson 5 Oscar Ysass1 6 Rudy Garcia 7 Travis W1ll1s 8 JV Klinger 9Joe 0 10 Howard Brown HouTex Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Feb 2 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 2 Randell Dickerson 3 Donny Kelley 4 Steve Bearden 5 Pit Powers 6 David Garza 7 Eugene Brown 8 Tmy Tim 9 Sabe Velez 10 Lou Garza BLADDER 1 Thomas Cortez 2 Eddie Chavez 3 Joel 4 Ronn Rodd 5 larry Jarv.s 6 Mark Deardorff 7Mr Bill 8 Bill Sant11t1 9 Rick Knapp 10 Gabe Herptn C LADDER 1 R1ndy Miller 2 Rick Messey 3 Henry Eckhardt 4 Rick Martinez 5 De•wtd Hendrickson 6 Rudy Garcia 7 David Moskowitz e Randy J1erscheck 9 Steve Chesney NATRAJ Finest Indian Restaurant 2047 Marshall Shepherd & W. Alabama Top 20 Romantic Restaurants (Houston City Magazine) Special Lunch Platters-under $5 Intimate Spicy D in ners prepared by expert chefs Lunch 11-2·30 Mon.-Fri 1130-J·OO Sat.-Sun. Sun. Brunch also Dinner 6-10:30 Sun. -Tues 6-11.·00 Fri. -Sat 15'1. off Dlnnera with Coupon Cash Only-Sun. thru Thurs 526-4113 I ED:£/~~'D1Y £}:£/:. P/!0~' ED:£/~:JJ.J "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS: Albert G. Nemer, John J. Adams and Gordon A Thayer l The Madness Continues ... Tonight! The Wedding!! ~ Sat.-Sun., 25¢ Draft, 2pm til? 3 Happy Hours Dally Mon.•Frl. After Hours Nightly D.J. Lary Thompson 1022 Westheimer Home of Eagle Leathers if 528-6851 FEBRUARY 14. 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 23 Notlonol/l- Gav - Confef"ence and .ah NaHonat AIDS Club, .kine 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Forum. "Movtng l-and Gav Heolth Ccwe Into the Molnstr«Jl'n,'" Mor 13-16, Geo<go WOlhlngfon Uni-slly, WOlhlngton, D.C mN 19 WEEKS· 11th onn!Y9rsay of SloMwoll Riots, Nerw Vork. June 21 • IN 24 WEEKS: U.S. Olympic Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat FMt:ival opene. Houston. FEB FEB 14 15 FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 16 17 18 19 20 Ct11er1a tor 1nclu11on •n 7·01y C.lendar and Mon I rose Anources 1 EYent or group must apec1l1c•lly pertlll'I to neighbofnood of MontrON or Hous1on·1 gay community urileu m1,orc1ty, 1t1teor n1tt0nal holiday or ma)Or n111onal gay 9'/ent 2 Stnctly commerc111 events not included 3 Bu11!1ffl. c1v1c and aoc .. 1 groups and their events are generally quahfted 4 Pol1t1caJ .,..ents wh91"e only one v~w ol 1 subteet. e11nd1dlle or party 11 dominant !'IOI qualified For 1cklilton11 1nlormat10n or phone numbers. look tor the aponsor1ng organ1uhon under 'A-.ource1 Typestyles indicate events' location: Events in Houston, Events of Local Interest Elsewhere. Events of Aleo lnte<est SELECTED EVENTS THROUGH 7 DAYS • FRIDAY: "Breakthrough" le11bian-feminist program. KPIT ~'M·90, 8:15-t lam WRIDAV.SUNDAY: IGllO-<lltlllated 81uegrou Classic, Louisville, Feb 1ol-16 • FRIDAY: Montrose Country Cloggera meet 7prn, MCCR, 1919 Decatur &SATURDAY: Housum Livestock Show & Rodeo opens, Astrodome complex, Feb. l&Mar. 2 &SATURDAY: KS/AIDS Foundation meets 3400 Montroee, no. 501, 11 am &SUNDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 10:30am-1:30pm, Homer Ford Tennie Center .SUNDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center &SUNDAY: Parento FLAG meets 2pm, Feb.16, Presbyterian Center, 41 Oakdale .SUNDAY: Women's bowling league playe, 3pm, Stadium Bowl &SUNDAY: W.W.B. Bowling League, 7:30pm, Poat Oak Lanes &SUNDAY~ Overrate-rs Anonymous met>t Rpm Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett • MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain wrtJESDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center Sl'UESDAY: MSA "Fun Volleyball League" plays, ?pm wrtJESDAY: Montrose Symphonic Band meets Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm • WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Caucus meets 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm Feb. t9 •WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League competition •WEDNESDAY: Overeatera Anonymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold Sl'HURSDA Y: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center Sl'HURSDAY: "Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:~9pm on KPFI' Radio, FM·90 Sl'HURSDAY: Mixed Bowling League, 8:45pm, Sladium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS • IN 1 WEEK Baytown Lambda meets 73(~m Feb 21 • IN I WEEK: Gay Aaiana & Friend.a: mM 3pm Feb .. 23 • IN l WEEK: Jn~grity meete 7:30pm Feb. 24, Autry Houle, 6265 Main • IN I WEEK: KS! AIDS Foundation & Montro.e Counaeling Center AIDS Risk Reduction (Safe Sex) Workshops, Spm Feb.24 •IN I WEEK: Lutheran• Concerned meete Feb. 25, Grac-e Lutheran Church. 2515 Waugh •IN I WEEK: Howit<•n Atta Gay & Lesbian F.nginl'ftB & Srientiaite mttt 7pm Feb.25 EN 1 WEEK: Montroefo Civic Club tNeartown) meet. 7pm Feb. 25, 1413 Weetheimer •IN I WEEK: Grnatn Monlr"c>W Buaineea Guild meeta ?pm Feb. 26, Brennan'• Re"Rtaurant. 3300 Smith • IN I WEEK: CleiB, Lesbian Mothen Group, OPf"n meeting Feb. 27, Dignity Cu 81N 2 WEEKS• IGIO-alfllkhd Spring Bree* lnvHallonol, R. Loud9rdole, Feb 2&-MCI'. 2 • IN 2 WEEKS: Hou1t.on Gay Health Advocat.ee meet 7:30pm Mar 1 • IN 3 WEEKS: Houet.on North Profeuionale meete 7:30pm, Mar.8 • IN 3 WEEKS; Montroee Art Alliance meet. Mar.10 • IN 3 WEEKS: Gay&. 1..abian Hispanica Unido. meet ?pm Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, Mar. 10 •IN 3 WEEKS: Citizene for Human Equality meeta 7:30pm Mar. II, 2.fl.f G...,....,, • IN 3 WEEKS: Hou1ton Data. ProfMBionale meet. 7:30pm Mar. 11 • IN 3 WEEKS; Hou1ton Bar Ownen A.n. meet. 2pm Mar. 12 llIN 3 WEEKS: Neartown Bueinea Alliance meet.I ?pm Mar 12, Liberty Bank, 1001 We1theimer - • wmcs: Nallonol L-and Gav Heotth FoundaHon P'9Mf\tl 7th • IN 3 WEEKS; CleiB, LHbian Mothfill Group, cloeed meeting Mar. 13 • IN 3 WEEK$; Avondale Auociation mfft8 7:30pm Mar. 13. ChrWtian Women'• Center. 310 Pacific eJN 5"-6 WEEKS: IGl!IO-offt11ated Dix._ lnvttollonol, Allonto, Mew. 27-30 • IN 6 WEEKS: tG90-affilloted MAK.l.T .. Konsos City, Mew. 29-31 • IN ABOUT a WEEKS: 1 Hh onnuol Southeastern Conference for lesbians ond Goy Men. spring 1986, Nerw O.leons •IN A90UT 17 WEEKS: Oak Lown Tennls As.soc. hosts T•os Cup ChollenQe. Dellos. competing wtth Houston T.-in1s July 2.5-Aug. 3 elN 2S Yt'EEICS Goy Gon"l9I II. "Jrlump in "16,. Aug 9-17, 1986. Son ffanci5CO • IN 26 WEEKS .ah onniYen<l'y of federal rut~ ogoinst T•os' """"'°'41<uof eon<tJct law." Aug 17. 1982 • IN 28 WEEKS women·• Softball '86 WOlld Sen•. Nerw Haven, Conn. Lobor Oay-ond • IN 88 WEEKS: 150th birthday >f City of Houetcin, Aug. 30 •IN 73 WEEKS UnfveBol Fellowship of MetropolHon Communtty ChurchM I: Dignity lntemotlOnol smuttoneous lnternohonol eonferences Juty 19-26. 1987. M1arru/ R loudel'do .. Remington Place Apartments •• special ** 1 Month Free Rent 1 Bedrooms $265 & up $100 Deposit 2 Bedrooms $290 & up $150 Deposit 4 Pools, Hardwood Floors, Distinctive Floor Plans, Convenient Location Calf Teresa or Pam 965-0589 2210 Mid Lane (Inside 610 Loop, near Galleria) Welcome Back to Houston­L. U .E.Y. Weekendersl We've Been Expecting You ... SUNDAY is Our day to Entertain You! 12 noon: Colt 45's Cocktail Party 1:00: BAB Brunch (Muy Bueno!) 2:00-4:00: Show Time! Let the Flying W, Branding Iron, and special guests entertain you ! Donations to TCC Land Fund and HCC. 4:00-7:00: D.J. David Royalty Houston DEPRESSION GLASS Show 1986 5:00: Sunday Steak Nite (weather permitting) 7:00: Brazos River Band-Dancing The once a year opportunity to see the largest & rarest selection of DEPRESSION ERA glass in the Country Ft. Bend County Fairgrounds Hwy. 59 at 36 Rosenberg, Texas FEBRUARY 21 Friday Night 6:00·9:00 Champagne Preview Ft"b. itst ti:IKl·!l.30 p.m CRYSTAL FEBRUARY 22-23 Identification Matching Sat. 10:00 a.m.·5:30 p.rn. Sun. 12:00-5:00 p.m. Al)\'A'.\CE TICKETS O'.\LY $12.50 t'a. (also gooJ Sat.&. Sun.) Additional information & Tickets Joy Naill P.O. Rox 251 Pf'ariand, Tx. 77f>81 713148~4728 Iris Slayton 299 Hoyt Crowley, La. 70526 3181788-1$98 Admission $3.00 Good Both Days 3rd Annual Antiques & Collectables Show-Adjoining Bldg. No. 2 Food & Drinks FREE PARKING Portrait artist John Gittins will be at the 8R8 all weekend. Single portraits and couples. W;!~!''Nit;,!i•i&;.tU•JliSt•>·'· 2400 BRAZOS 24 MONTROSE VOICE/ FEBRUARY 14. 1986 Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS EX-2308 MEMBERS Call 5~8091 LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose Voice. •general c1rcu1at1on newspaper having published conhnu- :p:o~8Y~~t~o~~:~9q~~·f~~~ parn r's circulation area of Montrose CARS & BIKES ·a5 Toyota pickup. k>w nutes. s299-and aaaume payments 78&-6565 - -FAM1LY-MOTORS 5210 Buffalo Speedway, 667-6804 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MEAIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba. 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE ~1a1 -Montrose/ Gieenway -Pfaza $100olf rent_ low deposit. beaul1ful smat garden complex. balcony. patio. disposal. dishwasher Must see to appreciate 524- 0o492 For Saia Duplex w•th garage apartment Heights area. large IOts. updated. good emh ttow owner financed. easy terms $115.000. MJ..118& Fred or Da..-1d 'Soec1al'" $100 oft rent. Montrose, k>w depoart bus llne. pool, well maintarned Must to aprr..-1ate 524-9351 Luxury Condominiums Now Leasing with option to purchase Great location Large beautiful sw1mmmg pcol & Jacuzzi Controlled entry secunty Remote controlled garage entry High efficiency AC & heating Free cable TV One bedrooms from $375 ($150 depos,t). Two bedrooms from $650 ($250 depos,tJ. 2507 Montrose Boulevard Call for appointment 524-0830 Montrose Oup•x •Pt large 2BR. centr•I A/C. RemodeH!d kitehen. dtshwashet', washer/ dryer connections. refinished hardwOOds. fireplace. fenced yard Beau­tduny rna1nta1ned M•Jstsee1510&512W $aulm1er $550/mo 4fW.6197 H~hts New IOVrnhOuse 2/2'611 Stove. ref dishwasher washer. dryer. central ath. f1replaee. eeiltno !ans. sec::unty sys· 1em Must see $575.. 888-4757 Ahef Responsible person to share cteanly furnlShed house $145. ~uflli1tes 8~6945 M•1e to share 18fge home with llf-d. cab'9. den. flrecptace, etc. $285 plUs 'h utilities 88CHl53a MONTROSE APT JPOOL =r=~-;:~:i;:.~nw~~:.=::i~ rnm9 poot for summer Central AJC. GE apph•nces. m1nt-bl1nds and more. 1BRat $315. 2BR at $375ptussecuntydeposlf & Oiec1"C 301 Slrattotcl 9t T•ft OKounl on 1yr.LMM 523-8109. 1i20 'WEST ALABAMA APTS. 1920 W Alabamai. 529-6798 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE BUILDER CLOSE-OUT 100% FINANCING 2206 Driscoll River Oaks shopping area. Italian desig n, one and two bed­room townhomes From S7as. 2417 Dunlavy SpociOus three bed­room. three bath tCMtnhouse. S180's 316 Hawthorne Two bedroom. two bath townhouse. Lcrge lot S180's. 810 Marshall Unique four story tCMtnhouse Two bed­room. 2'h baths. Out­door Jaccuzzi. From S150's. 2421 Kingston Be hind St Anne's Beautiful four story townhouse. Three bedroom. 2\? baths. From mid S200's. 731 Heights Two bedroom. two bath tow nhouse From S130's. FOR INFORMATION CALL 523-1532 GREENWAY PLACE APTS. 3333 Curnmms lane. 623-2034 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE BAIARWAY Great klcation and great pnte San Fehpe 81 610 Cable TV. small complex. lots ol trees 1 & 2 BR. S22S-$360 Call Neva 960- 0923 (Hylton Aelrty Co I Smail ci~iet Montrose complex New pamt. new double door tee boio:es $100 deposit 1 bdrm $285 plus e'ec Also avatl4 abie 2 bdrm. ~8178 VOICE .iOVEATISING WORKS Rent that house or apartmenl through • Montrose Voice Claas1hed Call 529-8490 And Ch8fge 1t on your American Express. Omer"s Club. Carte Blanche. MasterC•rd or Visa. EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Telemaikelers Top p•y NO cold callmg Paid weekly Nahon•I company Call St8'11e 600-96n Barber. sty11St with fol10w1;\°g for Hie1ghts Blvd shop 86&-47&4 ---P£Af0fHllNG AA'f.6 Ticket office personnel sought full/part time ExcelMmt verbal slulls required Base plus commru.an Call Ms Kn+pp after 11•m 526-5323. SALONDANIEL Hair styhst with some lonowing Be pro­fesst0nal. creative current We provide everything for you in a fun. modern atmosphere. Commmion/beneflts Call or come by 2~1 Brsaonnet 52().9327 (MISC.) FOR SALE King size(f maittreu. box sprtngs and frame. $100. 527-06&4 Mon -Fn &-9pm Sat and Sun 9am-6pm ESTATE SALE 1506 Fairview Ffl., Sat., • Sun. 9;30arn-6pm Ffench, Vlc:toltan, Ct.lppel tdale and lklc> a-8rac~ MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS PAMPER YOURSELF $10-$60 ($15foronehour rub. 1ncall. &-5. M-F. appointment made the day before) em O'Aourlle. 869-2298 (24 Hours, m or out) - - THE CADILLAC Of TOUCH Body work •t its best 0 of ET (713)622-•530 BOOYlu.SSAGE Full body rn..sage Hot Oil- in Of out Bruce 622--0370 GET THE KINKS OUT Massage. reheve lert$10n and stress C•ll Ted fOf appo1ntrMflt ~2544 PERSONALS GHM. 30.6tt darkbrbf.llr••ght·acting. sincere See«! s11mlar GWM. 25-35. non­smoker. sincere. conserval1ve/ mora~ values, for lnendsh1p. pou.1ble r&lahon­sh1p P 0 Box 92"811. 77292. - NUTAIOl-MEDtCAL MIRACLE Nutnol--Europe's fastest Nlllng. proven ~r growth product now av•ilable Also Nu Skin skin care prodlJCls. D1stnbu1or- 5hlps ava•~ble 527-9801 8flyt1me RESPONSIBLE iNDIYIDUAL See«mg a 2yearloan ol $6.000-$12.000to establish a well planned Montrose bus1· ness For mforma!lon or details cal 7•7- 2659 Cut. GWM. 25. 5·9··. 153. brO¥wn hair. bi;:;e eyes Seeking cut or unclJt GWM. ~35 EnJOy• camping. country western. disco. rnov1es. and also the quiet limes as fnends TeU me about yourself and I'll reply. All letters answered Reply Bhnd Box 277-G c/o Voice - --- HOT ~~~·be~;~ ~~:s ~m?i·a,1 ~r'~,~;·.~~ possible relationship Only real men need apply Reply Blind Box 277-S c/o Voice P!8y-out -,~- tantaSY~ ;et~8's1re-that turns you on with handsome. uninh1b1led GWM Wntenow lel'sgettogethersoon Repty Bhnd Box 277-G Clo Voice GIW1M~· 44. -57,cr., 110: healthy. hairy horny Seetts similar tor dating. possible relationship. Wnte with phone no to Blind Box 277-K - GAY LESBIAN PARENTHOOD GWM. 33. attractlV9. prolessKHlal Seek· •no a GWF. profess10nal. 25-32. pretera· bty Jewish. to establish a family w1t_h Oex1bthty for other relahonsh1ps Lets talk. Reply to Bhnd Box 277-C c/o Voice - ----JUST ONE I Mt lookmg for JUST ONE outrageously over.ndowed, extremely htghly sexed Greek active (or veniahle). nicely built man. any race I'm rel•honship-onented. well hung. mascuhne. sexually versal1le, educated. stable. tall, dark and hand· some Sincere responses from over­mners only No phone sex or phoneys1 Call 526-6695 II no answer. send stat1s­t1cs to P 0. Box 66608. Houston. TX 77006 May answer will include photo Two GwMS. boih2-1andatlrachve. new to scene Both seeking attractive. mascuhne GWM. 2&-35 who can show us a good time. No fats. lemes. freaks or drugs Reply "'1th photo and phone answered promplly P 0 Box 53102 Houston 77052 Gdlk. GrW1M. 27, 6· 200 lbs. bfn/brn Seeks relat10nsh1p "'1th chubby llfh1te or Mexican male Must be honest. 25-45yrs 04d Would rekx:ate tor right person or help them relocate to AUanta Be.,ds and balding 8fe pluses. Reply with photo and phone if poss1bte to Bhnd Box 277-H c/o V0tce CiasSfcal mus1c.-lf you play violin. vio'i• or •ny wind instrument. we play regularly for en1oyment Join us Non-smokers. please 8111- -529-3122. 520--0133. GwF, eve;.ng walks 1n the parX, Italian wine and gourmet food by candehght Campmg amid the stars lingering bub­ble baths. intricate novels and 1nt1mate conversations l'm a brown-haired. blue­eyed. 110 lb Texan looking for love and :~~t!~te11 g1a~ ~~~:ie~~: ~~t~~ Houston. 77008 leather master. 36. seeks rnasoehrst 25- ..0. mto ufe and sane S&M Send photo and letter descnbmg fantasies and ltm1ts Nov.cea considered Reply Bijnd Box 277·A c/o Voice LESBIAN AND GAY COUPLES Volunteers needed for Master's th9Sls sludy on dec1s10n making m lesbian and g•y couples 1·1'~ hours of your time completely conhdenlJ81 interview by ie.~ btan student (512) 690-1693 evenmgs or weekends John, Hap~ Valentine's Day Lo~ Chns J I' I &earn how to play the accord1an 1f you'll be the pnze M1sa Amenea Happy Valenttne·s. Day. Jerry From Lows and the kids. Trnue and Jean Pierre Happy Valenllne's Day. Ron from Sam and the kids, Precious and Susie Pete. L_!>_ve yo~ lots. Dad Louis. Happy Valenhnes1 Love you lots. Jerry Roger I love you. Eartt ChWs to all ;ny V•lenhnes at D s L w To my honey Ricky. only you know how much I ~ you. Roy 6JH-Home 1s "'here the hei'rt 1s. and mtne will ••ways be with you H•PPY Val· enhne's D•y with IOve. Daddy·s Boy Aon Moss. "loving you - nlore on Va1en­t1ne ·a Day . Daddy H;ppy V81eni1ne·s 08y. David Morales from Doug Segur ~i~r1?~~'r-all my loveanc:frharlks. we·11 ToLATony HappyVaJertl1ne'SDaytrom teacher to student Lynn St.Ve W , -Happy Valenllne's Day and good luch with your husband search Love. Jerry & Louist Happy Valent1ne·S Day lo my next ex­husband. whomever you may be. Love Davtd Bob. I'm ready toranew.exc1hngHazard· us experience Happy Valentine's Day. love Gary Here's to our l1rst With love to• sexy old man from our favorite hot dog HAPPY YALENTINFS DAY I Ion you with ... my hffrt. To Tina. I love you more today than yes­terday. but leu than tomonow -Karen G10f1a.-Happy-V81entme·s Day I love you OJ To Diana. 'hi dentures or death. I will always love you Love. your llf1le. carolyn To my lova~e lizard Happy Valen1100·s Im love you. Kevin Ripcord. Happy Valentme·s Day Wes- 1he1mer Cafe To Mike from Douglas Entreat me not to leave thee Happy Valenttne·s Day Mane. love Ron WM. 19. French & Mid-Eastern nobleman. 5'9". 140. brollfn hair. brown eyes. good lookmg. 1ntell1gent. fun gomg. educated Lookmg for relationship with WM. 22..:38. professional. good looking. preferably tall and mucuhn.k1nd. from good back­ground. conservative acting and senous abotJl kmg lasttng relahonsh1p No soJic ittng No husllers Leave messaqe and phone no 713-783-0818 To my father. G11zard~ I love you Happy v.ien1rne·s Day See you at home Lav.. G1zrno To Joe. HappyVaJentme·sOay I love you Bob <enny. Happy vaieni1ne's Day Love Scoll Chns (my b•by), will you be my Va1en11ne today and unhl the end of time. I love you Please call. Beau Mark. I'm crazy about you• Happy v81en- 11ne·s Day Dr Dan Happy Valenlmes. I love you Larry Happy 6th love Dusty Bryan B Happy Valen1me·s with hearts trorn your friend. MarX To Kenny. a Valentine's poem Roses are Red. Violets are blue, there's nobody tn the world. I love rnore than you. Yours I or ever, Marc Hawy Va"'nt1ne·a Day to the entire &tall ol the Votce Lorm• Mcla~hhn Lonn•. Happy Valentine's Day to my very special lady I love you. G~e Dear Max A. Be my Valenhne Love Sur· lock To my Pook1e. Ferces may keep us apart but our live will always rerna1n I love you. from your Pooh• NUTRIOL GROWS HAIR Proven m Europe. Fully guaranteed 526- 8213 24 hours GWM 19. 5·4· 133. brown eyes. hair and moustache Look mg tor GWM. 28-401or a daddy Reply Blind Box 276-R c/o Votee Leather. Lev• 42-year-old Polish gorllla into toys, long hard sex and cuddling Seeks versatile guy 1~25 lor hot sex. Cud· dhng and maybe more Reply 1837 Bra~ nard No 1 or 713-526-015 PHONE SEX Our S11rv1ce connects Horney Guys 24 hrs aday Oo1tnowlorlessthan$3.50an hour (415) :M&-8747 fa11 man, mid 305. seeks sens1trve guy tor safe se•. sensual develOpmental relation· ship Write P 0 Box 701041. Houston. 77270 MEET CHRISTIAN SINGLES Local!Worldw1dt• Phonetma1l introduc­tions text Let love. dating. m•mage change your hie todayt Free inlormahon. Wnte Box 90~850. Van NuysCA91409 YARD & GARAGE SALES Hou hold Sale Sears Coldspot refr191 • ~~%r.~-r.~r! ~ ~~~~!3u~~. r:Cd hner. IBM lypewnter. desks. ctui1rs, atands, lamps. rugs. IBM PC. Epson prin­ter and stand. hie cabinet 52(}.9111 HAYING A YARD SALE? Announce 1t he<e lhen stand back fOf thecro"'d C•ll ~8490orv1s1ttheVolce •t ..o8 Avondlile to pl•ce your yard u~ •nnouncement Montrose Voice Classified Advertising 1,. i.' Ir• 1y11 rverl•s'ne' ·1r11,,,, ·f•Jtll)fth•Mwtp r.F11rr1"g1 rd w•dv• '9 AO'v~ll1'• tg 5alH 0.ri.irt,,,.nf. 5n.'14 THE HEADLINES: Headhne words in bold type. centered. are S 1 each word (mm1mum $3 per line). (Centered bold headlines can also appear within the text or at the end of the ad. andarealso$1 per word. w1tha mm1mum of $3per line.) !~CL "'Jf:S·~~~~~~r~~~~=9n~~~~Y:i~ d!P~0~r~~~gi~~c0h81 ~d~~t1i~rn~0~'i;Li~ WORDS in all caps are 70C each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each add1flonal word like this 40C THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each add1t1onal word hke this 40C THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED. BOLO, $9.00 Then each add1t1ona! word hke this IS 4()( A00tT10NAL CAPITAL WOADS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE 55¢ EACH Addlllonal bold WOt"d• Ilk• thl• In texl •r• SSC Heh. ADDITIONAL BOLD, ALL CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer. make no copy changes during the run, pay for the full run in advance. and deduct 15% Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same cond1t1ons and deduct 25% BLIND AO NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Bhnd Ad Number. We'll f~;~du~n!~a~~/gftfc8:~~1:~~:$3~~r8:atgt{~~~~~~Xg~ubls~~i!~~~~~ecsa~i?ii~ forwarded indefinitely, however, for as tong as they come in.) ORDERING YOUR AO: You may mail your ad in or phone It in. You can pay by check. money order. Mastercard, Visa, American Express, Oiner"s Club or Carte Blanche. Or we'll bill you DEADLINE: Classified ads rf!Ceived by 3pm Wednesday will be placed in that week"s newspaper. Ads rece1Ved later will be placed m the following week"s newspaper. ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number. clo Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 7700&-3028. It will be for­warded. unopened. to the advertiser Enclose no money ADDITIONAL NOTES: A ··word" is considered anything separated by •·spa­ces." except hyphenated words are considered 2 words when each segment 1s a recognized word if it stood on its own. A complete phone number, mclud1ng area code. 1s 1 word . Cny. state and z1p is 3 words bold line bold line text words bold line i:t~g'p/~~~~1 ~~n'n~unne~~~c:;(s O Accomodat1ons (~od~ing for Houston visitors) o Cars & Bikes ~ ~~~~~~~t f~~~;1 ~av;,~~nOs1~~~~~:S~f: 0 Models. Escorts. Masseurs D Personals 0 Pets O Aides O Travel O Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AD UNDER ____ . __ :____ IN THE "GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY ' OPPOSITE PAGE bold headline words at $1 each (minimum $3 per tine) _ regular words in text at 40¢ each -- ALL CAPS regular • words m text at 55¢ each Bold words In text at 55¢ each· --- BOLD ALL CAPS in text at 70¢ each Bhnd ad number assigned for $3 7 Complete issue of newspaper with my ad in it mailed to me. $1.25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Tlmn Wt)ltk•: Less 15"9 di§count for 4 to 12 weeks or 25,,. discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) D Also. I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week 1 have enclosed (or will be billed or charged. as md1cated below) an add1t1onal O $29 for 6 months or O $49 for 1 year. TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be. billed or charged _ METHOD OF PAYMENT 0 Check enclosed D Money order enclosed o Cash O VISA charge D MasterCard charge 0 Diners Club charge O Carte Blanche charge D Amerc1an Express charge O Bill me If charging, card exp1rat1on date Credit card number -- - --- - Signature Name Address Phone(s) for venf1cation of ad. if necessary MAIL OR BRING TO Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 10am-5 30pm FEBRUARY 14. 19861 MONTROSE VOICE 25 MONTROSE RESOl_..,.RCES SELECT(O STATE. NAT ORGANIZATIONS S..r O.--. ANn of T• !BOAT}- 720 BratOI •602. A ... M-{S12)47l..:3333 Alg~g=o~~:.~~~:: ~·~-: ........... ngt0tl.0C20003.(212)~7-3101 Gay & l.tosbo.., p,._ AN"- POB A. Oki ChellM Sta New Yor11. p('( 10011 1?12l Mt-91122 G•r Roghtl NII lobby-P08 1'82 Wllli•nglon. oc 20013-(202)$46-1801 Hum•n A.grits C.mpaign Fund-POB lJIMI. Wash· ll'lglon.OC 20013-·!202/$46-2025 • lambd1 L91 o.f- 'l32 W 43fd. N,.w York. NY '!0039-(212)944-IMM L•b....VGay Roghll Ad¥OCllM-POB 112'2 Aut!•n 711757 Meld•• fund l0t Hum•n Aoghtl- -POB A. Old C~ ... St-. New Yori<. NY 10011-!2121 M9-e522 Niii Alln 01 &.11.--s ~-Bo• 15145 s.i f•WICllCO.CA9'tl1!1-i41S!~ Niii Aun of G•y l L~,, o.mctC!Ubl- 1742M•• AwSE.WHl'ungton 0C~(202)5"'7·310ol Nit Gmy HMlth Educ foundlloOft-POB 7M Nlw Y0tk NY 1()036.. (212} M>6J1) Of Or ,,._.,~ 1713)523-5204 ,,_,Gay Rqft AdYocll•- S40 CH1l'O. San Fran­CIKO. CA 9't'14-!41SI 863-311<'4 Niii Gey TUii FCWC9 1NGTfl «I $1h Aw.~ YOtk NY 10011-(2121 7U·5800 NGTF1 O.rstlne- (800 121·7044 OUt1iOe "'-""' Yortsi..1e) Ru.;:1 7~~rb0tl. t"Jo W1ller-Z..rtghi. Bo• 511 Blu"' T• Gllyilnb " Tmsll F<vr-.-•POB AK. Oentro<I 7S201·-(11;· '<'"·!211 us T,.,."91'. , •• ~ . .,, ... ,.1 Coritmct S..r 1011-8 EP1k•. Se.1• .. ¥1122· IXlf\1 824·8298 ATTENTION .ORGANIZATIONS Checkyourlist1ng Wel1sthereeachweek name of organization. address. phone. ~~~!8~1 =~~f ~=~: ~,"~o~~"1~~in an,~ incorrect. mail correct information to ~he Voice, 408 Avondale, Houston. TX 77006 THE MONTROSE YOICE­INYOLYED IN THE COMMUNITY A Pl1ce in the Sun-522- 76~ ACLU-1236 w Grmy-52"·-=,.'-,.--­~~~ throe· :S&1211 (G•i aleib •• "5W.1Ct1- ,;;;;;;;;c.n Gay Atheliii"-~11. 7720&­~ 7-9255 Alt~~ &:iC~ty to;.1,;.o;..1 -52C).()732 (TTY) ~i;- A..n-POe 66054. 77296 "'"'' 7 30prn 2nd Thurs. Women"s Chn1111n Ctr. 310 Pacolic ~~~t"' M;.;;;::~wFWY ~l~:~=-~·Rober1 M~d.;:20i Bering Memor11t United M91h0ci~ 1440 Hirold-52&-1017 swc 10.SO.m SUn Ctloicet Unlimoted-POB 7099$--:"7727o=52~ 3211 (Gay & L•blan Sw•tchbo•rdl meets 11=.,.. 3td Sun. Masler.oro YWCA. 3615 Willol. 'Soc••~ M••ltr" 7 .30pm 1ttern1te Fndlyt. Sunday brunch 12 30pm 3rd Sun Chflstl1n ChufCh-ofth8 Good-sh.ptterd.=i7o7 ~~OM 1wc 1pm Si.In. B•ble study 7 30pm OiUfcii"OICJ,;;1;.lnF1Tth=-lMC-W .. 1he.mer~ 6~ hCI 10 •~m Sun. B•Clestucty 7 30pm Wed. Fl~ Chf• A Rice. petof Cilm11is T0t Hum1n -Equ.ll,ry-(CHe')-Po83(}..5_ 772S3-e8()-J346. 937-3516 rMel 2nd Tun. HOu HouM. 1617 F•nt11n. 911'1 ftoof ~tiw•ty room Cie.s.-Lffb11,.· MotiWs---0,oup- S.rri4iJ:370& lflHtS 2nd I 4th T'1url; Dignrty Ctr C Wers--342~ - C011"4o;"i-·.;e.11----.1Bral:cilRi*B01t.OiTI 2400 Brazos ·-52&-9192 CommittN ,;;--f>Ubiic HN1m Awlren...- ·~ 3045. 77253-5~. 522.flOM "$hanng GrOl.ip for the W0tried Well" meet Fri. 7-8pm Momrose CounMtrn9 Cu Commu;.-tY-POh1lc.9l AC1oo,; -comm,11M (C­PACI- · POB 2005. 77252- 236-MIM Commun•ty Got!* c1r~:3207 Mon1ioH. 521 0511 Svcs 11•m So.Jn. 7 30pm Thun Cc>nOr&Ql~Oil 11.-ytzCt11y1tn----il40- w.theomer-·'68&-8997 7211-51111 SVC I IOClll 8prn 2nd & _.ti'! Fri CnNH01i.~&-1505 Demo eonim.nMOIGPC- 526-1834 Dh•rm• sill<!YGroup· 4Q8A;°ond•le·-~52•:S5'54 D..,.,• FoUiid.uon-=2100 MilOfl- 52•~57i1 ~i/1~WL =T~m32d:~FMn1n· ESOPS Pr•w-l1.IPr{ll1t.a;ofi8-1 Socli1C1ub-9el· .. ,. F;i;,i:t~oft-O!Ctl.rlti9Urm.ld 10r &oci.16.rv1- L:~~~~~~J:r~'.~$tiO'I •~~:!::, Mol'llroM Clonic,, MontrOM Coul'tMltng Ctr 1st IJM1n1n Ctlyrch----$210 hnnm---:W.1$71 IVC111S.m&..1 Ff0n1f"Ur1fters-Joe-520-8019 or S.lwldor Sn. 1288 nms Sun TUM I Thl.ors Memorolll Parlot Tenn11 Cir GiY"a A~e$N.ITT;g e:.Pltf~ (-GAse)--528- 1311. S2S-Ol91 G.y i L9.b..; A;c;;;;t ot T01fl~lnc G•y a Leib •• n Mor~13-w•1h.1mer !Jfi,)40, 77098 .... 568-1413 G1y ilfiSt;."51~ A.1111 •I UofH- BoX314 _.800 C•lhoun, 529·3211 f01y I L1t1b11n Swolchboerd) G.Y ,-·leibilfl Swrtchb08rd -PoB 66591 77296-52e-3211 ml0tm•hon. counMhng. rel: err•il. TTY. AIDS Hol:Ur>e G•y ...,-;;nS-i.Fr-;nds. "iii1Sw.iOhDfS211~ 52~7611. 785-0633 "!Mts 3pm 2nd I 1Ht Sun Grt Fit.h.ni--.:1211 F•rin,n~ 628-<1111 G.i I L..--nH;~ UrlidOl~I00921 77~-14711 rnMtl 2nd Mon. Dignity Ctr· ~-~· An-;-nc.. -aeM4e6 - -- G1YP80p1e"" cnnlt1an sc:;ence- -80Xe13: a.. 1 •• ,. 77401-68$-2642 ~C11 C.llOA (GPC1--POB 8608.i ~;:e-521-1000 1M1tt1 ~17 Fannon 111 I 3rd 1~ou1G v-p;-.c,;-we;kCOmm•tiM= =OB .7.7.2.6.6,-.--.S lln F0td 523-764-4 or C.ttly l9nahlri Gr .. 1M MOrllrose BusinessGUiid_:_M,k4t-~n 630-0309 or Bruce woouey ~ "'"'' 7pm. 4th Wed. BtenNns Rest. 3300 Sm4h The Group 1"611• wOfklhop-JCMI W•lls 522 220' "'"II 7pm Ttlun.. D.grnty Ctr. 3217 hnnltl Hazltl""•lch ProductiOns-2&15 W•~ll Or •2fi6 77005 lesb11n conatr11. free m1•1ng list HOlnOPh11e 101erf••ll'I A~oance--729 M•~r ~~'-.,~o-.,~.~,-.,-b1an ·eng,-,;e.,:. -& Scient111t1-POB 66631. 77006-·'31-1879 meets 7pm 411'1 Tuea HOU- Bir 0w'l9rS Aun (HQBO)--C/f)-·8raz09 Ro.....- Bottom. 2400 Brazos· ·528-9192 tneets 2pm 2nd Wed ~mu-"~rty-c=1o-.-"'-_..,=..,=,. Hou Council ol Clubs-~ Hou 0.ta ProfftalO,,llS -52U922. 164-6459 ~ 73Qpm 2nd Tues Hou Gay Heetttl Ad\ocltn--ii0-9«8 ~ 73Qol't'll'1Set Hou Gay Stvo«itlAsan=-147~ Hou-Wef-h111'1 All••!\U C0n11C1 t!'lrough Inte­grity~ Hou Mo1orcyde cn..~O M•rv·.-,022 -w.,: '*mer-528-1151 ~~1e;;o;;-.11..:._POe ~Humble 77347-B•n 11821-712& meet 7 30pm 2nd Sii Hou Outdoor Group (HOGJ-521-3641 or Jim 681).3144 1-H lnc-POB 1&eM1. 77222--69"·1732. sii--1014 •fl•h•ted groups ara 1nterlct. e·znrno'1 A Pll09 '"the Sun. MontroseArtAl111nce.G•y llnb11n Arch•vn ol Tx. Gay & l•bian Sw•tch~rd Montrose Symphonic Bind. board rneel 7 30pm ls1 Thurs (vaned 10Cl!1ons). educmtion11 tOAJm 7 )()pm 3rd Thurs lngel'IClll Sc>e•kers' Bureau-POB 391. e.tlaire 77401· --~ lnt99roty1Hou (Eposc~POB- 6iOOi" 77266-52+-1499 meets 7 Xlptn 2nd a 4th J,lon. Autry Houle. 6265 Mllt'l ;;;ler;ci-POB 1tl041. 77222-53'7014 KPFl Rlodlo. FM-~ 19 Lovet1 Blvd~ 526- 4000 '1'rNkthrough·· lel.b .. n-f~ln1'1 pgm Fri a1~111m. W1JOe·ns1ein-pypgmThur.7.lO­• ooom In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Votce KS'AlDS Fwnd&toon-3317 Montrose Box 1155 7700S.-~'-2437 AIDS R•~ Reduction (SI,.: Se•) WorlotlhOPS Bpm 2nd & 41h Mon in COnjUl'tC­l• Ol't ""''" Mot1t•ose Counseling Cen1..­J; r,y-K1ullmln Cancer Fun~ .. 108 Kr.t-;;;-o!Hydra::a11G~~S.u-Merd.r 726-1032 U.mbdl cSG;y~ i'i.tanon- 1214 Jo Annoe-521-9772 Le;bi.n,.Gly A~ Swc---t.Jl't•vn.iYOt"Hou. 4800 Celhoun. bo• 309. 77004-74i-1253 meets 230pm •hrnate Tun. 5".ndtltot:I Room. 2nd ftoor Unr.-•rsrtyCtr lei- .n Ent.rt.W!Ytiiv;9.k~-'Pro,K1°" ot ~ CourteolofC Jt.-52&4JOS' ~l~urctt- 212 Fargo--~ mvc:e L.~.nQwu..-cnvrcn--211-Mnts-1e»m1 ~ fipm Sun. Hohday Inn Ma1n I Btodgett. R"" Jeenne Leggett Lone s1er Nui;-~.~, a~.-~---~PO=e~1..o572. m;:t LO;e;--w .. 1hlt•rner -Police SuJ).511itio';i :a.... W ... hetmer--529-3100 l~1tMtans concemec1~mMts----.tGrlc:e LUth• r•n Chvrct\. 2515 W1ugh-52l--0963. 453-114J meet 2nd a ,.th Tu• ev•11,,g1 Mc:Ado(yH~s;.~.1ton 3317 Motltro.e Box 1155-524-2437 M91"1 AQ1mS1 Oecepl•Ot'I eoUr1ny C1u1>-P68 ~411171. 772!>4-529-3211 (G1y I L1t1b1u1 s .... tctiboerd' ~' bt-weettty Met;oPOMen Community Church Ol theRa.ur­r9CUon iMCCRJ-1919 Oec.ltur--t81-91_.9 POt· luck d•nnfll' 7 30pm 1st Sii monthly. 1vcs 10 ,.s."' a 7 15f>m Suri a 115pn1 Wed. memti1r. ship 1nqu1rers ci.. 7.30pm Mon ltduClfion CIUHa TUM I Wed- ("'°"' M.iropolttan Wif!d E,...,,,1>69-529-961()' Meets St Step"-11 EpoK:QP91 Ch...-c 7 30 Wed MontrON"Arl-Aii ..~ -1732 eaMJ14.iii" 5332 '"' 11le I H Inc "-*' 2nd Mon ~. -.. ;;.Gultd .;;-or;;; Montro,; Bu1Gutld Montrt>M Ctlvrch of Chtist"'.1100 Montroie- 777-t296•~e11am&ur\ MootrGH Clwic Club N.N.i~o,Z-,,-As.., MontroM Clll"l~hom& 5ie-55J1 open Mori. Tue. Thurs 8-9pm =~~~~'t~;9=·rnHlr: M~ COUnM!ing etr-900 Lo .... tt-~•203- 52i-0037 AIDS WICt•m aopport grouo 6 30pm Mon. Womet1"1 Suppor1 Group 7pm TUM AIDS ~·~h ie:,uc~~~l~':.::x!:o~~ ,,O:,~ '"'" ~1rQ..54ng9~giy--,;;ef,•1£.hOn,; -M1"852tJ: MOM".oH 5of1beU LMgue-- :-p0g 22272 77227 52 .. ·31"'4 Motltl'OM $ii.ort. A.an rMSA! ... -·lp.cli( I• group Monlr"ose---s;;ipt;0n;c-88nd- P08"6.13. g~f:~:~ .';;:'187~ Tuea. Dignity MORf-sa&....ORE. 529-0037 pro,Ka Moot'°" Counseh"G Cef'ter MSA.·MOnN~ 8ow1tng-O&liy Sted;t; Lane. 8200 Breetma•"-St .... 1182~ MSA. - l\j M••ecl Leaguel 80w ing­M &e W9*er1•I173-1~ pll)' 9Pm Sl:adlutl'I LIMI. 8200 Br...,,,_,,,_ MSAliOOJ {8.ii1rc:$) LM~o.bblllt! SCott 973- 1.358 or o.ttn• LOrd ~752 MSA.'Vo"A.yblil ·liA•rt.-$22~ .JPm Tues. Gregory-L•ncoln school, 1101 T•ft Montrose W•tcl'I subgroup Nu~ M ,,.11r1is· -:m.e1ilt.~1he Blrn. 710 P.Cd.C...:.S2e- 9427 ctub n.ghtTt\urs N111on•I G•y HN1thEduiii1tOnFound•toon- 523-520C ~!~~~~~~=~,~~~~~k~.-- Ne.nowl'I -"-,,- ,-.;.or;t;;;-.;-c.~ic ClubJ:t .. 13 W•th-elrner: ~ 7pm •th Tu. Nui1ow1 jj~,n.D -Att.a..ce- -~7010 "IMl'S 7pm 2nC1 W.CS. beny e.nll 1001 W•tieuner N.. ... F~ Ch,.t.-n CtlUl"ch-=i29 Ylle· 116H377 -=- 10lm Sun ~ Ano11ymoua- <:lo MOtitm.i eouft.. ;'m~r,.:';g:tt~~~~:,,n: Benng Church 1444 H.lrold P9ren,i1 I Fr..nds ot L•ib.an1 I G8ys. {P-.r91"\tS fLAGl·-4M~ meets 2pm 3rd Sun PrHOy· ien1n Ctr 410.11dale Park P90p1.-:--c-o Ne1r1ow" CcmiTWnity Flrenou ... - 741-252• Paz y "Cberacoc>n- P6B. too063. ~ 1416 Pre,t;y,e;.anttOr- Le;b.1--;c;.y eonce7'n;:... Prelbyl•'8n Ctr. 41 0.kdlle-526-~ meet• 7 30pm ~nd T 1111 Pf.M~den11 Cluti(s*t P,-.S.oen11 GPCI -POB IBM• 77~--623-6024 RW9a1loNi1 -Lind FunciCOmm:ii&.--~u111,,g ClubprOjecl Rice u-,,rv G1y7"Lest111n SuPt>ort·G;oop---lii29= 3211 (Gey a Leab••" Sw1!Chtiol•dl Ro1Mio."O~l_:~40i5UI-~ StiintiOtr:-~mg tor~ unes .. -~22·50&4 SQO~Se!' (Tr1~EuTCfu1t COU1 Tr1"""'1Stlte C,.,_,.-POB 90335 77090 Society lor~IO"I ot Amazon Sldo­Muoclllam tSPASMl--POB 70996. 77270- -Gay a LesbaMI s .. 11ctiboerc1 521-3211 &..nciance Cettle COIO(;,-r~h98i;i" 710PKtttc......azt.-'427 f.o_,.Rode(j"~•.;;,1194 POeM873. 77008---526-5001 ~~':.~~~2'ti~ound1t1on 1915 ~"-""<)o Ripeord. 714 F11rv,....-S21-2792 WWB BOW!lng-Myn 723-1455 bowt1730pm Sun. Poll OU Bowh"G~L"'°'~=---­W• t!!_·n~.p_.,.-1199 - :e~,~~~cra Art• Ass"-1001 w.th.,... Wl\at ~Happen.ct 10 Baby J1ne Mixed =~1.~~~'.1~tad~,;-L!.!°2'3 ev. Women·• Bow11ng Lugue-Oetob;°973-1358 5pm Sun S11dlum Larin. 8200 Brlltlm••n w-c)merl.• LOW,y Ar-i"°9--4Chltlsea:.521-0i39 women·, s0ttbai_1_LMi~~­naC11- Cathy or Carol):" li!S&Q56 BAYfi.>WN Baytown L•mbda Group---427-1378 rnHts 7,JC»mOOdFn Conroe ArM 1..mbcui G:;y AA- '°9! 3"..M N cCwoe•••tMt>oan1 K11t1y11 ~ 17~ "'"'11rpm 2nd a .tth Fn GA.LYE TON ~•rnbdl Alcohollcl Anony~- 763-1401 MdroDO.-tan cOmm~rtY-Churcn of Gatvestcl't >4 Bfoedway- 7~7626 QUICK REFERENCE (Tear Out & Poat by Phone) AIOS Ho!l.t>e· 5~3211 AiiBULANCE-111 ~_!Y Hal ·-2~ii°11 Doctor· .... ldlcw529-3211 FiRE-111 - - - -- Q'my POtt~ .. 1000 Gay-&L8.bt.ns_;~,, KS°AIOS Fo...-acs.tion- -52•·2437 L.awv• eee aos"'" Sli-32,, lbr•ry 2-14='5441 - - - - Monifoae t: .c 526-5531 ~~°:8~~~T137- POLICE-111 i:-'~Zitts.a- ~3~ T -&U-11 ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular class1f1ed rates of paying "'by the word."' you can purchase space here '"by the inch." When buying by the inch. you can include special art, logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1' $29 2" $39 3• $49 4 WEEK RATE 1' $24 2" $34 3• $44 13 WEEK RATE 1' $19 2" $29 3• $39 26 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 14. 1986 Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory To o:Nert1S0 in this page. con 529-8.aQO dmng business hours ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep •t 11sted here in the Montrose Voice where 1tera11y thousands !urn each week VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your profess1ona! service through a Vo1cec1ass1hed Can 529-8490 Pay by check or charge 1t on your Amencan Express. Diner's Club, MasterCard Visa or Carte Blanche APPLIANCE REPAIR Mlerow•w• service. p1'""' ltd up from your home S62 50 plus parts 520-5665 AUTO SALES LEASING FAMILY MOTORS 5210 Buffalo Speedway 667-6804 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba. 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Also see ··Cars & ·Bikes" on Montrose c1ass1!1ed·· page AUTO REPAIR Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates Ai. Work Guaranteed Maior/Mmor Repa1rs Gas or Diesel Electncai Repair 526-3723 2716 Taft NEARTOWN KARZ 1901 Tait. 524'"6601 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE AUTO REPAIR I BODY SHOP 2001 Harold. 522-5255, 526-1940 ALL PAINT I BODY SHOP 1510 Leeland. 659-3131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE WEST GRAY AUTO (TEX STATE INSPECTION) 238 W Gray. 528-2886 SEE DUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1411 Tait 522·2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS 6a1es Barber Styhng. 94f1 He:Qhi"s 81vd 868-4784 Tommy·;· Barber Shop. Hair cuts $ 10 00 House calls $15 00 & up For info 52&- 8216 BOOKKEEPING See also ··rax Preparation· category 1a:1it11!11 Mkftown Air 521·9009 HSK CONTRACTING 520-9064 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONT
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