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Montrose Voice, No. 96, August 27, 1982
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Montrose Voice, No. 96, August 27, 1982 - File 001. 1982-08-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4645/show/4612.

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(1982-08-27). Montrose Voice, No. 96, August 27, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4645/show/4612

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 96, August 27, 1982 - File 001, 1982-08-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4645/show/4612.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 96, August 27, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 27, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Montrose entertainer Mickey Rankin, spotlighted in this week's 'Montrose Live' E c E Texas participants not totally pleased over this year's Reno Gay Rodeo. Story in 'Sports' The Newspaper of Montrose Issue #96, Published Weekly Friday August27 1982 Good Evening Moniro.e weather tonight: Fair and warm with a low of 76° ~~~d ~':.'t.:i'th6 !7~h ~~~ Sunset 7:49PM. 2 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 27, 1982 Cancer Center Allocates Funds for Kaposi's Sarcoma Research By Johannes Stahl The president of the University of Texas' M. D. Anderson Cancer Center has allo­cated $30,000 from unrestricted funds to be applied to research on Kaposi's sar­coma, a rare form of cancer whose victims are predominantly gay males. M.D. Anderson's public information office said that Cancer Center President Charles LeMaster used his authority to allocate the money from a fund which is set up for use by reRearch projects, patient care or othe-r uses at the hospitaJ'e discretion A fund has been established by M.D. Anderson to accept donations which can be restricted for use in Kaposi's sarcoma research, according to Glen Johnson, executive staff assistant to M.D. Ander­son's -vice president of administration ahd finance. "We prefer to have the money come directly to us. The money so designated (for Kaposi's sarcoma research) is applied cij.rectly to a separate account." Johnson said that the separate res­tricted accounts are under the scrutiny of the state, and the hospital could not use the. fund for an:I'. other purpose without se~ous repercussions. A group known as the Kaposi's Sarcoma Committee of Houston (KSC) has raised about $15,000 with a series of "five or six fundraisers" in the committee's "~our or fiv .. • months" existence, according to Craig Rowland, KSC member and staff member at M.D. Anderson. None of the moeny raised to date by KSC has been donated to any research project in Houston or other location, said Dr. Did­ier Piot, KSC member. "We are waiting to get a substantial amount and decide what is the beet route to take," said Piot. KSC has donated $7000 toward the pub­lication of a 21-page booklet titled: ''Toward a Healthier Gay Lifestyle." The booklet was produced in a joint effort with Citizens for Human Equality (CHE). Reaction to the booklet has been mixed within the medical community. Some medical professionasl assert that the information contained in it could be a valuable aide in the prevention of KS and other Aquired Immune Deficiency (AID) diseases. Other medical authorities have refered to the publication as a collection of "pop" psychology and, due to the lack of sub­stantial evidence as to the cause of the disease, premature. Rowland said that it would "not have been possible to produce the booklet if money (came) through M.D. Anderson." "It's very likely that money will go to M.D. Anderson's project," he added. Johnson said if an individual would like to make a contributin to M.D. Anderson's Kaposi's sarcoma project, it can be done by sending a tax-deductable check to: Development Office, M.D. Anderson, 6723 Bertner, Houston, TX 77030. He indicated that the donation can be restricted to Kaposi's sarcoma research by making the check payable to: M.D. Anderson / Kaposi's Sarcoma Project. A Drug Deal Gone Bad Implicated in Midnite Sun Shootings By Johannes Stahl Non-payment on a drug deal seems to be the motive for the August5 shooting injur­ing two men in front of the Midnight Sun, 534 Westheimer, police said. According to sources who did not want to be identified, Nathan Simpson Jr., 21, one of the shooting victims, was seen mak­ing a deal to sell one-half pound of mari­juana for a young Hispanic male. He was seen making the deal the weekend prior to the August 5 shooting, a source said. The night of August4, sources identified a "young black male" as approaching Simpson to see if he had given the money from the sale of the marijuana to the suo- AUGUST 27, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 plier. Simpson is alleged to have said that he had no intention of giving any money to the supplier. Detective B. Delany of the Houston Police Department said of the incident: "I'm sure it's a dope deal." He said that HPD was following leads to qu•stion indi­viduals about the incident Sgt. John Donovan, HPD homicide detective, earlier stated that the victims had been previously arrested by HPD and were being uncooperative with police questioning. Simpson and Michael Green, 27, were shot while standing in a crowd in front of the Midnite Sun. The gunman was con­cealed between the Chicken Coop, 535 Westheimer, and the adjacent buidling east of the bar. Perfect with Ice Cream If plain old potato chips strike you as pass~. you might want to try the latest culinary concoction making waves in the Deep South: deep-fried pickle chips. The new taste treat is a featured attrac­tion at the Mid-South Folklife Festival in Memphis, reports the Philadelphia Inquirer. Pickel chip chef Chad Delden says h.is recipes range from spicy to mild. Just mix flour, beer, garlic ealt, pepper, and "any­thing you got around the kitchen," he says, then dip sliced dill pickles in the bat­ter and deep-fry them. The Three 'R's -And a 'C' In what may be a sign of things to come, a southern California school district has announced that in the future, students will have to know how to operate a computer in order to graduate from high school. According to a story in Computer World, Assistant Superintendent John Daywalt says, "We are in the business of educating youth, and we need to be able to provi~e them with the tools they will need to use m every day life." Compulsory computer education, he says, is the result of a survey asking local businesses what skills were most needed in the community. Montrose Mouth Endorsement meeting is Wednesday GPC's big election endorsement meeting is this Wednesday, at the South Main Holiday Inn (4640'Maon), starting 7:30 p.m Anyone can attend but (of couse) only regrstered GPC members can vote. Pam Jones. GPC board member. asked us to ask yov lo be there This is the time they will pick their endorsements for statewide offices. including governor Aaron Fricke will be in Houston. in person. at Wilde & Stem Books. 802 Westheimer. He's the guy about two years ago that-under protection of a JUdge-took a male date to his high school prom. Well, Aaron has written a book about the whole experience. including his ··coming out, and will be at Wilde & Stein next Friday. Sept 3, 7:00-9:00 p.m The Big Mr Gay Metroplex Houston Contest 1s tonight (Friday) at the Copa-a benefit for the Montrose Sports Association from MGM Productions -·- Houston's gay activists have been having a fteld day on TV and radio talk shows these past few days. baskmg in the limelight from this month's federal court ruling overturning section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code Ray Hill was on the noon news Tuesday on channel 11-hve. And Lee Harrington will be on Channel 26 this Sunday at 7pm Lee informs us that if you weren't pleased by the Chronicle's cOt1erage of the federa~ ruhng, you can call them at 220-7425 The Post gave the decision front page coverage. The Chronicle buried it deep in the paper -·- It'll be suds at the tubs when Tea for Two Thousand stages their "Tubs for Two Thousand'' at M•dtowne Spa Sept 4 Ticket prices are $15 at the door but just $12 in advance They ran into complications over getting a hard liquor permit. but had no problem getting a beer permit. for the worthwhile event that will benefit several community public service organizations -·- Where were you m ·527 If you were m Houston you might see some familiar faces at the Hole for the .. first annual reunion of the bars." bemg organized by the Men of Montrose (MOM) It'll be Oct. 9 and 10. and will features VIPs from the Pink Elephant. Tonga. Exile and more The Dixie Kings and Keoki Kona will entertain -·- That party last Friday at the Officer's Club. celebrating the 21.06 decision, turned out to be quite a smash (pardon the expression) It was John Rauscher, by the way, who provided the champagne for the big victory party A stage softly lit and decorated to resemble a mini desert, champagne fountains at midnight and a silk draped dance floor ceiling added festively to the Copa·s annual end of the summer party, ''Midnight at the Oasis " Exotic costumes were present, including sheiks. Arabs and a camel mask worn by Naomi Sims. who helped pnme the pumps that enabled the free champagne to flow -·- That was not Donna Summer Dionne Warwick. Diana Ross. Ann-Margaret. Jennifer Halliday, Tina Turner. Marilyn Monroe. the Pointer Sisters, and others, last Sunday at Numbers 11 was a group of Texas impressionists, on tour with their "Celebrities-An Illusion Extravaganza ... An it certainly was Performing curtain calls. MC Sidney Casair even had trouble remembering the performers' names and the illustons they had done. but no one can blame him It was an 1mpress1ve. professional show This Sunday, August 29th Monday, Se mber 6th LAU RA 13 RAN I GAN * .--.--.-+-+-+-+-+++-! Labor Doy! • In Concert Singing Her No. 1 Hit VIOLA WILLS* In Concert - ~.JL~+----------_:::::!.'.:'.:.~~~~;;:UP-COMING EV TS-------- •Advance Tickets Available a t NUMDEP.S & THE P.ECOP.D RACK Mondoy, August 30th S GULF COAST CONTEST Tuesday, August 31st THE ENGLISH BEAT In Concert Tue y, September 7th TH STRAY C TS* 300 IJESTHE/flER HDUSTDl'I 52.6-6557 Will the Ruling 1 Year Ago on Section 21.06 Sept. 2, 1981: " Mother Ruth," the VD Lady, stepped down Ruth Ravaa, known in Montrose as Mother Ruth, the lady who stuck many a gay male with a needle in the arm in her constant eearch to control venereal disease, and who was instrumental in organizing the Mon­trose Clinic, resigned her post with the City Health Department. But, she advised," Before everyone gets the feeling of being deserted, it ain't so. You won't find me at the clinic on MacGregor, but you will see me at some of theacreenings and sometimes at the Montrose Clinic." &pt.2, 198/ Lalor tried to disperse sex shops City Councilman Lance Lalor, in an effort to disperse sexually-oriented businesses that :it~.;:~C:r!~~~~n~~~~~s;,th~8~si~~1~ ity of requiring that they be separated from each other by a set distance. Montrose gay leaders, including Warren Duncanson, president of the Westheimer Col· ony Association, maintained that blatant heterosexual nude modeling studios at.tract sexually insecure straight males into the area, who then often harass gay people on the111'eeta Sept. 2, 1981 Navy recommended discharge A Navy panel recommended that Melvin Dahl, 21. of Laconia, N.H., a sailor at the Great Lake• Naval Training Center, be honorably discharged because he is homosexual. An ACLU lawyer representing him said Dahl had planned U> make the Navy hie career, adding that they would appeal. Montrose Voice The Newspaper ol Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77o00 Phone (713) 529-8490 Content• copyrrght• 1982 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg publ11h«11Klt/Of Jo~:~:.,~•hl B1UieDuncan ent1r11mment·tpor11ed''°' Ed Martinez Nick Fede AcelCtark griph1u WUllamMarberry """''"1rtg d11«:t0f David Petluck """.,,.,,,," lytHarna ..,.,.,""'" Gene Oliver ~rtrsmg For.pdtttQ M•mt»r G•v Preu A~•hon NHt s.r,.,1i ti lntemllt ")l'l•I Oay New-s Ag«M:y_ P.c1f1 Ntwt -·"' A11•rrnS11tHU C•pttolN-tServ•ce ~~:i~;:!.::::~ u!:t~t~,.~;:~.,~~:"~;:;=:~ Rmndy Alfred Stonflwllil Fu!ur• Syndlute. Brial'l McNaugh1 POSTMASTER Send lddreucontcl•Ol'lt to 33t7 Mol'ltrose 11306,Houston, TX7700i> S1.1tnct1p/1ortr•t•onUS.$49peryNr(52iuu•). $29peran1 IT'IO(llht (291uun).or$125ptrweek ll9Hlhan 29• .. u"J Nahon•ltK1Yerl1tmgr•prH•rtt•ttv• Jot 0 1S•blito. R1Yertdell M• fkehl'lg.Mtl91hAvertut. New York10011.f2 12) 242·"863 AdYtrfltlrtQ dHdlJf'I• TuMday s 31Jpm, lor lllUf r9iNMd Frt· dlly .... nmg Not• ceto~rl11er1Advert111ngr•t•s<:htduleFlv•A w1 U go lntoellect Oct 1, 1912 be Appealed? By Johanne• Stahl Dallas District AtU>mey Henry Wade, defendant in Baker vs. Wade, has openly stated he will not aeek an appeal on the recent ruling by Federal Judge Jerry Buchmeyer, declaring unconstitutional Texas Penal Code section 21.06. This law proscribed consentual sex between adults of the same sex, making criminals of gay Texans. Texas Attorney General Mark White has issued no official comment concern· ing the issue as to whether his office will initiate an appeal U> the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans, said Steve Shiflett, board member of the Texas Human Righta Foundation (THRF). THRF &elected the case of Baker ve. Wade to challenge the constitutionality of 21.06 and funded plaintiff Don Baker's successful case. "White may have to appeal the case," said Shiflett. "By hieU>rical precedent, every section of the penal code which has been overturned by a court has been appealed." Shiflett and others feel that this will jeo­pardize White's endorsement by gay Polit­ical groups statewide in his ~id for governor. Questions have been rrused as whether Houston Gay Political Caucus and Dallas Gay Alliance can support him if h e ch allenges Buchmeyer'e decision. Some people are calling for " no endorse­ment" in the gubenatorial race. THRF Preaident Robert Schwab said, "We're waiting for an appeal, we're pre· pared. If their is no appeal we intend to expeditiously and judiciously enforce the ruling." Many state licensing agen cies have had clauses in their licensing procedures which would deny admission into a prof es· sion or result in explusion of an individual if found to be gay, Additionally, police departments and other law enforcement agencies would not be able to deny employment U> gay indi­viduals solely on the grounds of their homosexuality, as a result of the new ruling. A UGUST 27, 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 Man Found Slain Was Facing Indictment A man found stabbed U> death in hia Mon­trose apartment Aug. 20 was under indict· ment on charges of sexually abusing teen-age boya, including LaPorte High School football players, Houston homicide detectives say. This is according to a report in the Hous­ton Chronicle. Glenn Da•tis, 52, was found stabbed repeatedly about the cheat and back in hie apartment at 1400 Richmond, the news· paper said. Detective D.L. Moreman said Davis' car was missing and numerous coins were found scattered on his bed, but no motive has been determined and no suspects were in custody, the paper reba~.- who was free on $30,000 bond aft.er being chargaed July 8 with three counts of sexual abuse of a child, was dis· covered by a maintenance man after Davis' elderly parents, with whom he spoke daily, expreSBed concern at not hearing from him since Wednesday eve­ning, the paper reported. Moreman said neighbors also reported last seeing Davis alive Wednesday, the Chronicle reported. Officers were said to have raided Davis' apartment in July and confiscated numer­ous photographs depicting teen-age boys, including high school athletes, in stages of undress. Police arrested Davis after LaPorte High football players complained they had been sexually abused by him in exchange for pay, the Chronicle reported. Jury Acquits Montrose Man in Stabbing Death A Montrose man who stabbed to death another man in an elementary school field was acquitted Aug. 19 of murder charges, the Houston Chronicle reported. David C. Vetter, 35, of 1574 Indiana, was found innocent by a jury in the March 19 killing of David John Handley, 37, of 11626 Blalock, aaid the newspaper. Yett.er said he acted in aelf-defenae against the victim, whom he met on the street earlier in the day, the newspaper reported. Vetter was represented by attor­ney Donald F1inU>ft, who waa appointed to lhe caae by atat.e District Judge Charles Heam, it waa reported. Prosecutor Chuck Hinton, clang the fact that some of the victim'& property was found at Vetter'• apartment, IUl&erted that Vetter did not act in self-defense, the Chro­nicle reported. The Fat of the Land and Vice Versa Despite all the diet and fitneu craze& run­ning rampant in the U.S., Americans of all ages are f~tter today than 20 years ago reports Science Digest. ' In some groups, the difference is as much ae IO pounda. The magazine says that our current national obesity may be a form of natural evolutionary behavior. Researchers say that historically, homo sapiens stored calories in times of surplus to prepare for times of famine. The magazine says persisting heredi­tary brain signals may still be telling ue to stock up. But for most Americana today, the famine doesn't arrive, just the fat. Rolls-Royce Feels the Pinch While President Reagan is predicting the recession has hit bottom, there's evidence that it has also hit the U>p: Rolle-Royce ie feeling the pinch, reports the Chicago Sun­Times. George Lewie, president of the presti­gious British auto firm, says only about 1000 of his cars wiJJ roll out of American showrooms this year, down from 1200 in 1981. Still, he eaye ealee of the company's $165,000 "Corniche" convertible are up 65 per cent so far this year, from 100 to 165 cani. 6 MONTROSE VOICE / A UGUST 27, 1982 Young Texas Man Tells How He Spent Summer as a Gay Lobbyist on Capitol Hill By Steven M. Clemen t Editor's note: Steven M. Clement, 22, a gay man from Wichita Falls in North Texas , spent his summer as a worker for the Gay Rights National Lobby in Washington, D.C. He spent his youth in Wichita Falls uchasing cou·s and ducking tornados," he says. Working as a gay activist on Capitol Hill u1a.a certainly a change in his life. This fall, Clement is returning as a sen~r JX?liti~al science student at Trinity University m San Antonio. He says he hopes to soon return to Washington and attend law school there, and continue an active career in politics Tnpping down Seventh Street, S.E .• they descended on the unassuming Gay Rights National Lobby office between 7:30 and 9:00 every weekday morning. Marakay Rogers, a second-year law stu­dent at Dickenson School of Law in Penn­sylvania, being consistently the earliest to arrive, makes the first of many pots of coffee. At sporadic intervals, the others also arrive, ambling up the narrow wooden stairs. stumbling into the kitchen t officeJ copy room to appreciate the waiting caffiene fix. U pd.a ting each other on the even ts of the previous evening, one will reluctantly admit to being the day's floater, or "Intern du Jour," and, therefore, responsible for answering the incessant telephones, run­ning errands, stuffing envelopes, cleaning closets. and numerous other, often mun­dane activities. The other interns proceed to take their places and. quickly assessing the day's tentative chores, begin shuffling through the numerous unfinished under­takings, priority projects in progress, and whatever other new clutter has been directed their way. Kent Kruehoffer. staff workaholic and disco freak, turns on his radio locking in on a throbbing local station. Meet the summer interns of the Gay Righta National Lobby, the college stu­dents who have come to Washington to further our collective interests with GRNL, the gay lobby, interest group. and think­tank at the national levelj ' ~ Although Washington has long played host to interns in many Congressional, special interest, bureaucratic and lobby­ing capacities. this is only the second year GRNL has sponsored such a program. I first became aware of the program through a press release which appeaed in the December 24th Advocate appealing to law and pre-law students. After approach­ing my faculty advisor at Trinity Univer­sity in San Antonio, Dr. L Tucker Gibson, to see ifGRNL's program would meet uni­versity requirements forcoHegecredit-he assured me there would be no problem-I applied to Alan Fox. GRNL's administra­tive assistant. After a brief cdnversation between Dr. Gibson and Mr. Fox. I was accepted into the program. Four other interns were aJso accepted, two women and two men, all possessing dynamic, energetic, outgoing personali· ties. Kent Kruehoffer a senior at Clarion Stare College in Penn~ylvania. is a repeat intern from laat summer. when he first joined GR: 'L's efforta. Aside from proving a great drinking buddy, Kent was prims nly involved this summer with th{:! Human R'ghta Campaign F und. a pohti· ca. ac11on commit v.orking dosely wtth 1U1d outoftbesame >ffceas.GRNL. While juggling bookkeepping responsibili· ties, public relations work, and campaign fund correspondence, Kent organized an overwhelmingly successful fundraiser that supplemented the campaign fund's already positive start, and dramatically increased. our ability to influence the out· come of this year's Congressional elections. Recognized for his abilities as an organ­izer and public relations wizard, Kent has been offered a position as a legislative aide with a current member of Congress, pend­ing a successful r~lection this fall. C. Lee Carl. who hails from Milwaukee. is as braB&y as her hair. This suJ111Der, she worked as a staff assistant to Susan Green, GRNL legislative assistant for community mobilization. Lee's work in Field A88ociatecoordination and constitu­ent lobbying greatly furthered GRNL's overall grassroots outreach, which , in turn , increases our Washington visability. Lee has relocated in Washington. D.C .. which allowa her to become active in local politics. She plans to enter George Washington University this fall. Admitted twinkie John Santos has mas­tered the use of GRNL's newly acquired computer terminal. He has been an invalu­able asset as our membership, financial records, and accounts are being put "on­Iine" to increase office efficiency and store information in a manner more expedient than on three-by-five cards. John has also been working diligently on preparation of a slide presentation for GRNL to be used at major fundraising functions. John is a freshman at the University of Michigan. The aforementioned Marakay Rogers, working with Task Force Chair Craig Howell, helped coordinate GRNL'e input at the successful House hearings on the proposed reform of current immigration laws. Present Jaw excludes foreign gay persons from entering the U.S. Working with Congressman Julian Dixpn's office, Marakay asisted in organization of the testimony of over half a dozen witnesses at the hearings, representing GRNL in top form with a great degree of skill and pro· feseionalism. Marakay will return to Dickenson School of Law in Pennsylvania for her second year. My own duties were varied and interest­ing. I worked primarily on expansion of the campaign fund's advisory committee, revision and composition of press releases, constituent lobbying, and pre­paring material for our newsletters. I worked in many other capacities a8 well, from errand running to bartending at a major fundraiser, to pumping palms at local gay social functions and gay orga­nization gatherings, such ·· as the Gay Nurses Alliance convention and the Inter­national Gay Association World Conference. One of the di8tinct advantages to an internship is the opportunity to meet an incredible number of prominent individu­als, such a8 nationally-known gay activist FTanklin Kameny, and Dan Bradley, former president of Legal Services. Also not to be discounted is the exhilirating experience of living in our nation's capital and working on the Hill. The three months' internship allowed me to get acquainted with the unique flavor of Washington and the chaotic rhythm of this vibrant city. Most of all, an internship with the Gay Rights National Lobby helps develop com­munication s!tills, since clarity and effi· ciency are esaential aspects of lobby work Stephen Endean. the executive director of GRNL. is a walking dynamo, an awesome bundle of ener~y with a clear focus and incredible instincts. ram a far more capa­ble person fo r my brief association with . tephm Endean nnd GRNI . In (act, I hope to return next summer, upon comp1ction o!my degree. to continue my y, ork,. th GR Club Houston 2205 Fannin 659-4 98 Join Me ... The Water's Fine Saturday-Beer Bust, 2 till ... , and Sunday-Beer Bust, 4 till ... Monday-Leather Night! Wear your leather and be SERVED with happy hour prices Tuesday's Movie­" The Dragonslayer" The fantasy looks real, the reality looks fantastic! Thursday, Sept. 2 Full Moon Madness with Mr. & Miss Mary's Contest (Contact Adrian or Texas Riders for details) Saturday, Sept. 4 Leather & Rhinestone Party Happy hour prices for everybody wearing rhinestones 1022 Westheimer. natura11 AUGUST 27, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 8 MONTROSE VOICE I A UGUST 27 1982 Houston Professor Attempts to Lay Bare What He Says are the Myths of Professional Boxing CJfaLs,pv 9:,eaM/ Houses & Apartments. By Pat Streilein Sports have played a major role in both domestic and international politics since the tum of the century, but no single sport, according to a Univenity of Houston his· torian. has packed a harder punch than boxing A brutal, barbaric activity that was once considered as criminal as cockfight­ing, prizefighting began moving out of backwoods settings into mainstream America about a 100 years ago, as states began legalizing it and John L. Sullivan B88wned hero status. "Shortly thereafter, boxing, though often run by men of questionable charac­ter, reached national prominence during the Theodore Roosevelt administration," 1ays Dr. Jeffrey Sammons, assistant pro­fessor of history at UH. "Roosevelt. a fitness buff and zealous pugilist (boxer}, clearly understood the value of actual and symbolic displays of strength. He believed that American pres­tige and strength were related to displays of strength by the nation's citizens. Moreover, he perceived boxing as patrio­tic, in the national interest and important to military training," he says. By the advent of World War I, the U.S. military had institutionalized boxing as a spectator sport, recreational activity and training tool, notes Sammons. "Films of Mike Gibbons, of the fighting Gibbons Brothers, whipping the 'doughboys' into shape led the way to military fitness , higher troop morale and public confidence in the boys 'over there."" 'Nhen Germany jumped into the ring in 1930, the relationship of boxing and world politics reached a new level, serving as a barometer of a nation's strength and social climate and a vehicle for promoting propaganda. -• ..~.....~..... . l,l..l.. H..!..m , ~~ T ~ f ~ The Nazis attempted to promote their racist attitudes and court American sup­port through boxing. Hoping to appeal to white Americans' own racial prejudices, the Nazis tried to use heavyweight cham­pion Max Schmeling's subsequent victory over black boxer Joe Louis as proof of Aryan aupremacy, and called for white unification against inferior races. This ploy backfired, however. Louis, through astute international political manipulations by Jewish boxing Czar Mike Jacobs, met Schmeling again. He destroyed the German superstar in just over two minutes to become a powerful symbol to American youths soon to face Germans in combat. Since then, Sammons notes that boxing has served as both friend and foe of Com­munism, a medium for spreading propa­ganda, a vehicle of goodwill, a means of stirring up racial unrest and, most recently, as a wedge in South Africa's bat­tle against anti-apartheid athletic sane· lions in the international sports arena. AB women gained ground in the busi­ness world, politics and other areas, their presence in the boxing world likewise increased noticeably, as writers, specta­tors, promoters and participanta. The profesBOr attempt.a to lay bare the myths of boxing, which have over the years lured the nation's unperpriviledged into a deadend profession. For example, he explains, "Contrary to the myth that professional boxing is a social elevator, is the fact that it merely serves as an indicator of a group's social standing. The first prizefighters in urban American were of Irish decent; then came the Jews, Italians and blacks; and this pattern continues as Hispanics exert influence in the ring, As each group moves up the social ladder, their boxers disap­pear from the ring," Sammons adds. And to those who depreciate boxing's negative aspects by promoting its sup­posed character building qualities with the rational: "a kid can't shoot a gun or weild a knife with boxing gloves on," Sam­mons responds, "Nor can he turn the pages of a book. Montrose & Downtown area Base Realty Inc 330 Fairview 524-1871 Hardwood floors, mini blinds, track lighting adults only .JOHN PAUL BARNICH ATTORNEY AT LAW LEGAL SERVICES 331 7 MONTROSE SUITE 318 (71 3 ) 523-5006 INTERNATIONAL CLUB RESTAURANT 243 WESTHEIMER (in Montrose, near Downtown) i Tel: 523-2795 A GOOD PLACE FOR YOU TO ENJOY "CHINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" ALL YOU CAN EAT ... Only $3.75 (plus drink) Buffet served 11am-2:30pm Monday-Friday **** BAR NOW OPEN All Types of Mixed Drinks Served Happy Hour 4-7, $1.00 Bar Drinks * Professional Bartender ... * Lovely Waitresses ... OYSTER BAR NOW OPEN ~'t_i t **** ~J FREE PRIVATE PARKING AREA DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY 4 to 10:30 pm * TRADITIONAL CHIU-CHOW STYLE (OLD CHINESE) * * Chief cook with 20 years experience-just came from China * We will prepare for you a very special Chinese dinner Good Luck, Houston, in San Francisco! B . the p h nar ate 1294 W. Holcombe 665-9678 HAPPY HOUR 12-8 Everyday Customers Pool T ourney-9pm Monday Spaghetti-7pm Tuesday Pool T ournament-9pm Wednesday Buffet-4pm Sunday AUGUST 27, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Houston's Friendliest Country & Western Bar ' Serving Breakfast 7:30-10:30am Mon.-Sat. SUNDAY: Buffet for MOA. KON.SAT: Open 7am KONDAY: Barn T-Shirt Night & MSA Bowlers Night. TUESDAY: Steak & Marguerita Night. WED­NESDAY: White Light'n Night. THURSDAY: Club Color Night & Pool Tourney. 710 PACIFIC 528-9427 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Mustangs Wishing Dirty Sally's the Best of Luck at the Gay World Series BIG LABOR DAY BBQ SEPT. 6 with entertainment by the Montrose Country Cloggers & Ab & the Rebel Outlaws 10 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 27, 1982 JUDGE GRANTS BOY'S REQUEST TO BRING MALE DATE TO PROM Meet AARON FRICKE author of Reflections of a Rock Lobster; A Story About Growing Up Gay Friday • Sept. 3 • 7-9pm Also.,Grand Opening of Wilde &Stem'sspacious new tocation, 5th Anniversary Celebration. and Open House of the Gay Archives of Texas WILDE & STEIN BOOKS 802 Westheimer 529-7014 Serving Montrose ind th• Southwut Ar11 Outside Sales part-time or possible fulltime Established, well-known Montrose business needs out­side sales personnel. Expe­rience preferred but not required. Send letter or work experience summary clo Blind Ad 95-A Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston. TX 77006 America MOORE PIANO Movers prolnslon1l1 In pl1no moving, m tlng 1nd cllm1t11tor1g1, 1lnc11943 302 E. Rogers SL 694-8956 IMPORTANT ESTATE AUCTION Saturday, August 28, 12 Noon Featuring Fine Antiques and Art from the Estate of J.C. Barbour (deceased) 702 Avondale Houston, Texas Auction will be conducted at the above premises Exhibit ion times Friday, August 27, 9am-7pm Saturday, August 28, 9am-noon Included in this sale: Haviland part dinner service, 4 pc Sterling silver tea service, set of Sterling silver flatware, Sterling water pitcher, 2 Sterling silver bon-bon dishes, Sterling silver candlestick, several art deco bronzes signed Chiparus, Priess & others, Victorian lady's chair, several pieces of good American wicker including unusual chaise lounge, 2 rocking chairs, 2 lamps, desk, console table, plus several tub chairs, a 3 pc French provincial living room suite, marble top lamp tables, Grand Rapiels dining room suite of Queen Anne style, Mahogany 2 door bookcase on bun feet, circular walnut American Victorian dining table with reeded center column, several gilt framed mirrors, hand carved firescreen with needlepoint panel, spindle desk, Victorian walnut heavily carved side chair, semicircular credenza with marble top, Flemish style heavily carved gents chair, Cloisonne jardiniere, mahogany turned column sofa table, heavily carved Spanish style buttet, Victorian carved dresser, oak 3-stack bookcase, several bedside cabinets/night­stands. pair mahogany tulip top full size beds with matching chest and dresser, set brass weighing scales, carved oak upholstered stool. walnut glazed front bookcase, spoonback lady's chair, pair of Victorian lyreback dining chairs, cane seat bedroom chair, brass lamps, cedar chest, carved refectory style table, large quantity of books, brass slipper box, various prints, set of brass fire irons, smokers cabinet, pair of speller figures, pair of Daulton vases, pair of art nouveau frames, large lmari vase, bronze figure, sewing machine, bowl & pitcher set, nest of 3 tables, Pembroke table, Westminister chime grandfather clock, pair of pedestals, brass bed, SEVERAL ANTIQUE ORIENTAL RUGS including Karaja runner signed & dated 1872, 2'9"x14' approx Lillihan 32' runner (cut in 3 pcs) Chinese oriental rug 9'x12' C1880, Lillihan 4'x6' C1920, Hammadan rug C1900 3 1/2 x 5'8" aprox. 3 pc R.S. Prussia tea set, Dresden figures, Nailsea epergne. copper & brass items, antique French Staffordshire pcs, marble figure, "Magnavox" stereo cabinet, PLUS A LARGE SELECTION OF HOUSEHOLD ITEMS including: sheets, towels, linens, pots & pans, kitchen utensils, dishes, photo frames, clothes. etc. 100 year old Mahal oriental rug 12'x14', American cut glass, several pocket watches DIRECTIONS: Travel east on Westheimer, across Montrose Blvd 3 blocks, take left on Stanford, 1 block to Avondale. 702 Avondale on corner of Stanford/ Avondale Terms: Cash or check, Auctioneer Don Mudd, Uc No.TXS 0130700 AUGUST 27, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Sports The Sweet and Sour Aftertaste of the National Reno Gay Rodeo By Billie Duncan "The problem is that it's gotten so large and Phil Ragsdale, the founder and organ­izer, doesn't delegate any authority." With that statement, Roger Pillsbury of Montrose Travel summed up the feelings of many Texans who attended this year's National Gay Rodeo in Reno, Nevada. Walter Strickland of the Barn explained , "We really enjoy it and feel we're doing something worthwhile and :hen-the bottom falls out." In trying to analyze why the rodeo had Organizational problems, Andy Mills said, "From 5000 the year before to 25,ooO is a big jump for one person to handle." One of the primary functions of the rodeo (beaides the obvious one of having a good time) is toraisemoneyfortheMuscu· ~;xa~~s~a~:J' s~~a~i;tJ:i:O~fa~r $72,000. Organizaing the fundraising drive in Texas was Terry Clark from the Barn. Terry was also very disappointed as to how the rodeo was handled, but he said, "I'm still not gone on the rodeo. I just want it organized and handled in a professional manner." The three areas that were mentioned by participants in the rodeo that they felt needed to have been put together in a bet­ter way were the judging of the contest· ants for Mr., Me. and Mies National Reno Gay Rodeo; the scheduling of events dur­ing the rodeo; and the behind the chutes handling of the livestock. Jim Collier of Auetin, who was entered in the bull riding, explained the problems thnt the cowboys and cowgirls faced behind the chutes. "Usually in a profes­sional rodeo, the ranch that provides the stock handles the stock." But this was not the case in Reno, where the participants wound up doing most of the stock han­dling as well as riding in the events. There were several accidents. One horse was gored by a bull and had to be put to sleep, according to Jim. The Colorado Gay Rodeo Association sent a large group of contestants to the rodeo, and they did a great deal of the work with the stock. Said Jim, "Their spirit was to help the rodeo run smoothly." Clark and Strickland also credited the Colorado people for doing an outstanding job above and beyon(I the call of duty. Terry added, "The best part of the rodeo for me was the super unity built between Texas and Colorado." As far as the scheduling of the events was concerned, Jim Collier explained, "The rodeo took so long that the last three events were not able to go on on Saturday.'' Besides the time factor, the contestants were exhausted from working the stock all day. As far as the bull riders went, Jim said, "We hadn't eaten all day and we weren 't going to strap ourselves on a bull." So, they were supposed to have two rides the next day, but when they got there in the morning, there was no ambulance. "And we still were not going to strap our­selves on a bull with no ambulance." Finally, they had one ride. Roger Pills bury said that Jim's bull was "a big old butch Black Angus." He also said thatJim only stayed on for three seconds. Jim said that that estimate may have been exager­ated. He probably was only on for two. Jim Collier, Texas bullrider (left) with Roger Pillsbury over 24 hours by then, were rather worn out before the contest even began. Strick­land was irate. "! felt that three people who had raised more than $20,000 for MDA were more important than Joan Rivers." "It was pathetic," added Terry Clark. About the judging itself, Terry said, "Joan Rivers did not even look at Bill Row­lands (Texas candidate for the title of Mr.)." "How can anyone judge a candidate like that,"said Walter. "She had her back to him the whole time and was yakking at someone." Andy Mille had a slightlydifferentpers­pective. "The crowd didn't care about a contest. The judges didn't know how to judge a contest. So they went funny. They picked the one who was the goofiestand he isn't representative of the gay community when CBS goes to interview him." Terry Clark was a bit more vivid when he said, "In plain words, I think Texas got the shaft. I guarantee it will never happen again.' None of the Texas condidates (Ron Sioux from the Barn, Sandra Floyd of Kindred Spirits and Bill Rowlands from Snuffy's in San Antonio) won a national title. But not even disappointments and the organizational problems kept most every­body from having a good time. ''The people were fantastic," said Terry "The gays, the hotel personnel, every­body. They were just great. We were wel­comed into Sands Casino like you The other complaint was the way that the contest was run. In the first place, the contestants are chosen as to how much money they raise for the MOA, but when they are judged in Reno for t_he National titles, the basis for the decision. of the ' judgee is western attire, personahty a nd appearance. The contest was supposed to have been 1tarted at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, but it was held up until 1:30 a.m. so that Joan Rivers, ;:..1t:.~it:h f.~~~=:i:::.o~~u~~~eo,) Terry Clark, Bill Rowlands, Walter Slrictland, Sandra L. Flayd, Marion So, the candidates, who had been up for Coleman wouldn't believe." Walter smiled and said,"! lootabout600 bucks." He pointed at Terry. "He won't even say how much he lost." MSA Monday Night Bowling LAST WEEK'S GAMES HIGH GAMES Mond•y, Au:~' ~IES MarkH1ll 211 MarkHall 594 Bob Muellef 210 LOUIS Schnetder 589 Louis Schneider 210 Dave Gebert ~ , FINAL SUMMER SEASON STANDINGS Dtv1s1onA 1. Daddy's 2 Eurotanlnt'I 3. Lowest Lane 469e<S D1v1s1onB 1. E/J's Protein Suppl1ments 2 Bushwackers 3. FrveEasyPiece& 4 HoleERol\ers Dtv1sionC 1- Coclt-Tailers 2 C1ttzenPa1n 3. Slow Hand 4' SemenRecru1ts Dtv1s1onD 1.HappyTra11s 2 Galleon One 3 Gator-A+d 41nteract ROLL OF AESUL TS Daddy'sover8ustiwackers3-1 GalleonOneoverHappyTrails3-1 TOTAL PIN HANDICAP TOURNAMENT RESULTS 1 Cherry Pickers 585'4 3 Ne.xt-T-Last 5737 2 Happy Trails 5786 4 CBC Steamrollers THIS WEEK·s GAMES (Allg-1tS~Bowl l200er-n) Monday. August 30 Final round Roll-Offs. 9pm Galleon One vs O•ddy"s Fin•I round Tot•! Pin Toumament. 9pm MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League PREVIOUS WEEKS' GAMES Results nut w:a~ursd•y. August 26 Thursday. August 19 HIGH GAMES 5721 BobAkins 242 M1keFoster 205 SteYa McConaughy 234 Louis Schneider 203 MarkHaU 225 LarryLentz 202 ~9;~.~e,;',.~°:cio ~~: Jeanne Blakeway 200 STANDINGS (ThrooghAugusttll) 1. JustMar1on&lynn·s 7. Thursday Knights Tropical FrUtt 8. Chases 2. For a Few Daddi• 9 Thursday Night Mora Tncks 3 The Rocicettes 10_ 4 to 1 4 Kindred Spmts 11 Gutter Sluts Aces High 12 Kindred Spirits 5 Salt & Pepper II Leather & Lace 6Hang10 THIS WEEK'S GAMES (A1l~MStld11..11T18°""82008 ........ tn) Thursday. SepteMber 2 Regular compet1hon. 9pm Pool Tournaments Mon01y. Aupuit30 f<1rad.-ed Sp1rot1 (5245 &itt1lo Speedvr.-ay. 665-11756/ 11 l30pm.11ng11 .. ,m•n1tlQl"\.S2en1ry.vr.-•~llk11r.I R1nchf8620~M11n,~11730)1111pm,11ngle .. 1m1n1bon s2en1ry.w1nnert1k11il 1$50gu1ran1ee1 T~•y.August31 L1'"90llf2•17TttnesBlvd.528-61121)118pm.amgle .. ""'­"''' on. S21H"11ry, vr.-1n'*11k•11 Wedrletd1y. Sin>temb# I Br11r Patch i2294 W Ho6cofnbtl. 995-116781 It 9pm. 1mgltl ... rniri111on.S2entry S50pnt1 GB I (1411 Richmond. 528-l9031 at 8pm. s•ngl• 1hm11"11- bOl\ S2 en1ry. w1~ takl all arod MW poOl a.o9 Thuf'Sd•y.S•pt~2 Batnt710PK•f•c S28-9427Jll9pm, doubl9 .. .mrnation.S2 etrr. S25 first round pnz_e. St5 MCOnd round pn.Z• JuatManonandlyM·a(817Fatrv-.521-9110111tlP"\$2 9tlltylMWl"l'lefta-aall E.J's{1213RIChmond 52Ml071 at 10pm.doutMe .. IT\lna­tOCH\ S2en1rr.""•IW'to9ftak1a1 MSA Tennis LAST WEEK'S MATCHES Sunday. August 22 Donny Kelly over Mike Green 6-3. 1-6. 6-2 Danny Casillas over Peter Lee 6-3. 4-6, 2-1 (lee conceded) TOP TEN STANO!~~!ER 1. Rich Ryan 1 Mike Green 2. Fred Lopez 2 Rich Corder 3 J1mK11ch 3 David Garza 4 Aon Landrum 4 Robert Amaga 5 John Ryan 5 Danny Casillas 6. David Rob1cheau11 6 Peter Lee 7 LeaterVela 7. Eddie Chavez: 8 Jon COibert 8.JimOlsen 9 M1chaei Houston 9 Jim Scott 10 Donny Kelly 10_ Jack Bogan THIS WEEK'S MATCHES (CourtaloailedMal;:G~Part;T_.,.c.r.rT-.•Gulf F,_.,..IOUtl\,U11C.11'10Un_,....peetUH~Ofl*' Sunday. August 29 Regular compet1tt0n. 10-Xlem 12 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 27, 1982 Letters Texas Gay Conference Update From Jenny Wiltingter, co-chair Texas Gay/ Lesbian Conference The annual Texas1Gay Lesbian Confer­ence will be held at the University of Hous­ton Central Campus, Agnes Arnold Hall over the Labor Day weekend. Friday the 3rd of September begins the conference with a hospitality night from 7:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. llA!gistration is $20 in advance and $25 at the door. Advance Harry Britt labot·e! and Lucia Valeska lbewwJ will be keynore speakers at the Te.xa. Gay! Lesbian Conference IX regis~ation is possible by mailing in reg­istration forms which are available in Montrose area gay bars and businesses. Entertainment on Saturday night will include Lyra and Gary Wayne Smith. A series of workshops will be conducted during the weekend which will address subjects such as; the recently overturned state penal code 21.06, relationships, the Family Protection Act, gay health con­cerns and the history of gay Texans. Stheduled apeakera include Lucia Valeska, executive director of the National Gay Task Force, and Harry Britt, San Francisco City/ County supervisor. ~or more informa~on on the workshops or if interested exhibiting art or other aale­able items, contact Rich Wilson at 521· 1115 or Jenny Willingter at 869-7231. GPCers Find Strength in Gay Politics From Pam Jonea, boa.rd of directors, Houston Gay Political Caucua Returning home to "Mama" is usually the best and most popular recourse when a roinance.goes sour, a job falls through, or any and all of life's little tragedies occur. For me, however, there is no chemical depreBBants . 1timulanta so popular among the trendy crowd today. Instead, my most consiatent and effective source of strength during the low periods of my life has been my involvement in the Gay Polit­ical Caucus. Not only have I received pleasure and fullfillment through my work and commit­tment to the GPC, but I have also received much in the way of friendships and good times with the many, many fine people who make up the caucus. After having participated in the caucus since 1979, I feel like I have more personal friend& within the caucus than I do outside ofit. And I still feel close and friendly with people who I met at my first GPC meeting whether they are active participators or not. There is a lot of intermingling and over-lapping of pure, hard work and just plai" old-fashioned socializing. And I per­sonally feel that that is great. My initial introduction and involve­ment in the GPC and in gay politics, in general, began innocently enough during the "March on Washington" back in October of 1979. My sister, Linda, and I participated in the march little realizing what new horizons would be opened up to us and in what new directions our life would take. We had spent several years prior to 1979 being involved in the femi­nist movement and in feminist politics. In looking back, it seems that our emer­gence into gay politics and the GPC was a natural outgrowth of our involvement in feminist politics. Whereas most people think of their lives in terms of wedding anniversaries, births of babiea, graduations, etc .• Linda and I associate events and time intervals with election years. Instead , it is the year Debra Dan burg won, or the year Reagan won, or the year Lance Lalor or George Greanias won. And each year is not divided up in seasons but rather in elections and screen­ings and votf>r registration drives. And then there was the year that a feminist bloc swung the election for the new GPC president. I used to use the phrase, "the agony and the ecetacy" to describe a romantic inter­lude. More and more as romantic inter­lude& become less and less, I find the term is more a pro po for all the ups and downs in gay politics. I will never forget the disap­pointment and angeT that I felt when the Lesbian and Gay Democrats failed in their bid to have a lesbian and gay plank inserted into the state Democratic platform. It was through the GPC that I became a delegate to the Democratic Party conven· tion in San Antonio. It was so frightening to witness the hatred and bigotry directed at us at that convention by many of the delegates. But at the second Democratic convention in September, we were victor­ious in having a lesbian and gay plank inserted into the party platform. And can anyone ever really describe the utter thrill and joy that everyone felt at Debra Dnaburg's victory, or at Lance Lal­or's victory? We are still celebrating Kathy Whitmire'• election long after the fact. And who can forget Mayor Whit­mire's appearance at the GPC rally during Gay Pride Week? And -only today we had the pleaoure of seeing Ray Hill, a member of the GPC board of directors, on the noon new• spot on Channel 11, talking about the recent downfall of 21.06, the Texas sta­tute prohibiting sexual acts between con­senting adults in the privacy of their own home. What a victory for all lesbians and gay men across the state and across the country! [could probably take another two hours detailing to you all the other organiza­tions and eveats and activities that I got into through the GPC. Perhaps one of the most eventful and earth-shattering things that ha• come about was the fact that I got fired from an inotitution that I had worked at for 12 years. And all because I would like to think that I can write. It all started off with me writinv letters to the editor in different newspapers and magazine• and writing some in the gay press here in Houston. My head finally got Cf?;m?J>~ & ct;fl!llluv l<,i,u ~ ~~~~ @(UJ[L[F (C (Q) ffi\~lJ lUJ~~ witJv $600 wJat ~ ff1mWif ~ ct;fl!llluv l<,i,u Jrl)&s, c. W>&ll ~ Jrl)&s, ~e,xmy c. W>sll. CfJJomuv Cf})atA/ Jrl)&s, cJ)<Udfv c. U1 sit. (COMPLIMENTS OF GENE HOWLE) al; Numbers II Monday, August 30 ~ erilluy inUJ, tluv rrtk c.w;&ll <;JJ~ CJQ/(/entut+~C-~' 521-3473 Bo big that I decided that I was going to write an article about the frustrations of ~ing an ICU nurse caring for a terminally 111 patient. And because of that article, I was fired. Oh, well! The ACLU has accepted the case. Who knows? Maybe I'll win a million dollars! All and all, it has been an eventful and interesting time since Linda and I first started coming to GPC meetings. We are now both on the board of directors of the GPC. I would hate to leave you with the idea that life in the GPC ie always plea­sant and easy and rosey, because it is not. There are feuds, and fights, and m1sunderstandinge-just as there are in any organization. We don't always agree on the beet direction the caucus should go. But once we do decide that direction throug.h the democratic process, we all work hke crazy to get there. An Open Letter to Mark White and the Gay Community From Steve Shif~tt. board member Texas Human Rights Foundation Only last week we all celebrated the great­est political victory ever attained by gays at the state and federal levels of government-the Northern District Fed­eral Court of Texas declared unconstituti­onalblatantly the discriminatory statute known as 21.06. In effect this ruling legalizes for the first time in Texas history, homosexual acts between consenting adults in private. A person's sexual orientation can no longer be used as an exC'use by public emoloyers to deny gay men and women employment, housing, equal protection under the law or basic human and civil rights. Thie ie exactly the goal we have organized, worked, and struggled for over the last 10·12 years. Now our greatest of achievements, our virtual emancipation proclamation within the federal judiciary system, may be threatened by the tempor· ary electoral needs of the state's Demo· cratic gubenatorial candidate, "Mr. Conservative," Mark White. As the current Texas Attorney General, he is in an unique position to uphold and preserve ou~ newly won rights by simply doing nothing. The court's ruling will stand as law of the land unless challenged by appeal to a higher court. Some recent reporta indicate that White is planning to appeal and that he ie being encouraged to do so by a few 0 eympathetic" gay leaders in the state. This is a mistake! There is no room for C?mpromise on the central issue of the gay nghts movement. Now that we have finally achieved our cherished goal of equal protection under the law we will never relinquish our hard won constitu· tional rights without a concerted effort to oppose all those whose actions would effectively rescind our newly acquired rights. Mark White would dearly love to be the next Governor of Texas but in the very close race shaping up in November, he will need every Democratic vote he can muster to unseat the incumbent, Governor Bill Clemente. Thia means liberal votes, and, if possible, the established political clout of a consolidated, activist gay community in Texas. White would like ue to believe he ha• to appeal because history shows that all overturned statutes in the past have been appealed, thus setting a precedent he ie unwilling to break. Thie ie hogwash. Mark White doesn't havetodo anything not required by statutory requirement. White maintains that history dictatee an appeal; I say that history ha• perpetuated overt discrimination and legalized the invasion of our privacy prims facia th~dg!i~il~~~n hie part to appeal only serve• to entrench a legal precedent useful for discriminatory purposes and avoi· dance of political responsibility. Prece- SAN FRANCISCO s24g Round Trip Air Call Rick for Details Serving the Gay Community AUGUST 27. 1982 f MONTROSE VOICE 13 r-----------------------, SAVE WITH THIS COUPON LADIES' or MEN'S PANTS Regular.$2.40 Laundered or Dry Cleaned Special $1 .90 One HOUR ''fllUllTID/l/D&n , .. ".... . THE MOST Ill DRY CLEANING Coupon expires Sept. 24, 1982 COUPON MUST BE PRESENTED WITH GARMENTS (NOLIMIT) Good only at 1224 Westheimer location 14 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 27, 1982 denta can be broken. At this critical juncture in the gay rights movement a "friend" of the gay community would readily strike a final blow-by not appealing-in the American tradition of freedom and justice for all. Granted. it will take an act of courage for Whiu NOT to appeal, but Jet's be clear about thia. The atatuu Mark Whiu'a appeal could reinstate in the Texas Crimi­nal Code explicitly staua that it ia not illegal for heterosexuals to sodomize one another or animals but that consensual sex acts between adult.a of the same sex would again be prohibiUd. All members of the minority homosex­ual community would be declared, now and forever, sexual outlaws subject to legalized discrimination, aocial ostraciam with no avenue for redress of grievances in the courta. A deciaion by Whiu to appeal the fed­eral court'• ruling on 21.06 can only be NEVER A COVER CHARGE interpreted as an odious assault on all gays in Texas. Tacit support for such an appeal by gay political organization or officials should also be seen as a serious abrogation of their responsibilities to their constituent&. Gay Jeadera absolurely cannot allow Whiu to believe that it's OK to appeal and atill expect the wholehearUd, undivided support of Texas gaya. If Mark Whiu can­not make a bold political decision in favor of equal rights and equal protection under the law for all citizens without regard to sexual orientation he has no busineas seeking ballot box aupport from thoae his appeal could actively drive back into the cloaet. This is the time and the firat opportun­ity, really, for gays to assert our political power at the state level. We must send a firm meoaage, loud and clear, to our politi­cal alliea and Jeadera of the Democratic Party that we cannot tolerau any atrempt Sunday, August 29 8-lOpm John Day & Company 1213 RICHMOND• 527-9071 Eo~~t~~o1n °£ ID~h~~:J by any official to deny us our long sought after constitutional rights. Mark White cannot have it both ways. The gay community ia fed up with duplicit­oua politician• who seek ballot box aup­port from the gay community while quietly but actively working to manacle gay constituents to a permanent state of second-class citizenship. If White cannot take a clear, unequivocal stand in support of gay rights at this most critical juncture of our struggle he should not expect an endorsement or any sort of enthusiastic support from those whose constitutional interests he. will not publicly support. Up until this point in time, White has never been considered a "friend" of the gay com­munity. While I was president of Houston GPC, White was as much a friend to our commu­nity aa a medfly ia to a California fruit farmer. In his race for Attorney General four years ago, he retreatd from a GPC • endorsement aa if it were political poison. Now we hear that the Christian Right ia threatening hia campaign with political havoc ahould he NOT appeal, and that we are conaidered his friend a. It is very smart, even necessary, for White to attempt to play the gaya against the Christian Right, talk out of both sidea ofhia mouth and (he hopes) march right into the governor's office. Mark White should be put on notice: a decision to appeal the federal court's rul­ing can only be seen as a direct attack upon all gay citizen• in the stare. It would be ludicrous for any gay leader or gay organization to endorse any candidate whose moves to rescind this victory. Gays are an increasingly effective, dynamic political force in the Democratic Party and we cannot and will not support any candi­date whose actions are fundamentally contrary to our Constitutional interests and rights. We can never compromise our 1/2 PRICE Come visit Gita at her booth #768 at the Big Texas Round Up in the Astrohall, Labor Day Weekend Gita's Jewelry 14kt gold, diamonds & sterling silver, all In the Big Texas tradition, and during the Big Texas Round Up. all or the custom made pieces are at a savings to you. a European goldsmith 7728 Longpoint, suite 117 680-3579 Call for appointment METROPOLITAN COMM\JNI TY CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION 1919 DECATUR HOUSTON, TEXAS 77007 (713) 861-9149 I REV. CHARLES W. LARSEN, K .DIV . , PASTOR REV . DEE LAMB, ASSISTANT PASTOR SEPTEMBER 1981 Sunda $ M J WT F iU~~~il 293031 SM T W l F u I 2 J 4 5 6 18 9 10111213141516 17181920212223 24252627282930 31 5 6 Worship Services Offices Closed 10:45AM o!o 7:15PM "God Calling" 9:30AM Sign Class -7 :30PM 1AA Meeting - 8PM 7 CSA Meetings I o!o II - 7 : 30PM III o!o IV-8:30PM Worshl~~ervices !Memberst~ 'Board Hl1ing 10:45AM & 7:15PK Inquirers Class 7:30PM 7 :30PM "God Calling" Sign Class - 7 :30PM 8 Wor ship Services (15PM r 1s Worship Services 7:15PM 9:30AM19 AA Meet~ - BPM I 21 r - 22 Worship Services Member.hip/ IS7t,."3of!.uM 2e•8<'"O 1•70..' l s5hPHlp2S9ervices 10:45AM & 7: 15PM Inquirers Class rr1 7:30PH "God Calling" Sign Clus- 7 :JOPH 9:30AM AA Heetlng - SPH 26 '2:1 Worship Service.a Membership/ Board Meeting Worship Services 10:45AM o!o 7:15PH!;~io~er· ci... 7:30PM 7:15PH "God Calling" Si gn Clau-Z•JOfM 9 :JOAM JM Heetlng - BPH ' -- I Thursda 2 Choir Rehearsal 7 :10PH AA Heetlng - BPHI Choir Re~arsa 1 Covenanf.qaml lies 7 :30PH 7 :30PH AA Meeting - 8A'1. Aytz Chaylm - 8PH 16 Choir Rehearsal 7:30PM AA Meeting - 8PM 23 Choir Reheersa 1 7 :30PH AA Meeting - 8.PH AA Meeting - 8PM 17 Bible Study 7:30PM 24 Bible Study 7 :30PM Aytz Chaylm - SPH I Bible Study - 7:30PH I 11 18 25 2 Pot U....ck Dinner - 7:30PH • ~ · .... . ...... .. . . -~ ""·'' . .... presented by TEA FOR TWO THOUSAND benefiting the KAPOSI'S SARCOMA COMMIITEE and the MONTROSE COUNSELING CENTER at the MIDTOWNE SPA (Elgin at Fannin) on SEPTEMBER 4,1982 from 9:00 p.m. till Dawn (Juice Bar after 2:00 a.m.) D.J. Ken Allan TICKETS AUGUST 27, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 $12.00 in advance and $20.00 at the door (Limited Capacity) available from: Jim's Gym, Fitness Exchange, TLC, Sports Locker and Sponsors. 18 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 27, 1982 community's primary goals of eliminat­ing this lynchpin of discrimination used against us for any temporary, speculative victory of any political candidate. The integrity of the gay movement in Texas and throughout the entire country demands it. Tea for Two Thousand From Craig Rowland Christened ''Tubs For Two Thousand," Tea For Two Thousand will host its annual fundraising party this September 4 from 9:00 p.m. through dawn at Hous· ton's Midtowne Spa. Advance sale tickets are $12 available at Jim's Gym, Fitness Exchange, TLC, The Sports Locker and from sponsors, or they can purchased at the door for $15. For public clarification, Tea For Two Thousand wishes to outline its purpose and function. The group of about 50 members who contribute their time and talents strictly on a volunteer basis, are organized to conceptualize and stage an annual fundraising event from which pro­ceeds are contributed to various causes and service organizations related to the gay community. Beneficiaries in the past have included the Montrose Activity Center and the Montrose Counseling Center. Last year's $6000 donation to the counseling center served as "seed" money which led to the approval of a $40,000 grant application for an alcoholism counseling program specifi­cally for gay men and women. This is the first such grant approved by the state legislature Each year Tea for Two Thousand appoints a committee to investigate poten­tial recipients of proceeds. This year's con­tribution will be equally divided between the Kaposi's Sarcoma Committee of Hous­ton and the Montrose Counseling Center Tea for Two Thousand is a non-profit corporation and has applied for tax exempt status under the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code. Minister-Elect Welcomed From Carl Owens, Unitarian Universalist Gay Caucus ''Spirituality is an important matt.er in the lives of gays and lesbians; the spirit is what brings us to life." These are the words of Harvard­educated Robert L Schaibly, minister-elect of the First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fan­nin. Besides the "Yahd," Schaibly's beats have included San Francisco, Chicago and New Hampshire. From public relations and church administration in the firat, to congrega­tions and state ACLU chair in the others, his career has been a commitment to civil rights. The Unitarian Universalist Gay Caucus salutes that commitment and his arrival in Houston with a party on Friday, September 10, 7:00 p.m. to midnight at Fint Unitarian Church. Ticket. are available at Wilde 'n' Stein Books, the church office (526-1571), or through a UUGC member. THRF President Salutes Community From Robert &hwab, president Texas Human Right• Foundation Thank.a to all of you, gay Texans are no longer criminals. The splendid decision handed down by Federal District Court Judge Jerry Buchmeyer was only possible aa a result of the broad support that we received from the community over the past four yean. While credit also should be given to the courage and determination of Don Baker and the people who make up the Texas Human Rights Foundation, the signifi­cant contribution of gay Texans to thiA effort made thia victory a reality. My sin­cere penonal thanks to each and every one of you. ) New Hours 11 to 2 New Happy Hours 11-7, 90e drinks Late Nile Happy Hour \ m1drnte to 2 _\..) 90C drinks ' (!"'" THE DEEP Specials for Labor Day Weekend Grant at Jackson 52S.8234 Playgirl Follies This Saturday, Aug. 28, 10:30pm, $1.00 cover:, starring Laura Lee Love with special guests Bunny La Cara, Ramona Sims, Jerisa, Lisa Lawrence and Eydie Mae Happy Hour Saturday mldnight-2am Sunday noon-midnight Mon-Fri 4-8pm Open 10am Mon-Sat, Noon Sunday New Bualneum•n'1 H•ppy Hour, M-F, 10am-1pm A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink Elephant "Oldest & Friendliest in Texas" 1218 Leeland 659-0040 UNDBTECTABLE With your natural weave-you're going to look better,~. and~- You'll be a winner. And everyone loves a winner. What are you waiting for? The Hair Weavers, Inc. Houston Office 1200 S_ Post Oak Rd., Suite 420 Houston, Texas 77056 (71J) 622-3290 Call our Representatives Call tomorrow for a no obligation personal interview. , ______________________ _ I THE HAIR WEAVERS I I Sui1e 420, 1200 South Pos1 Oak Rd., H ouston 77056 I I [ 1 Plcuc lend Cree literature on your hair weaving technique. I I Name I I Address Phone I I Ci1y Stale --ZIP --- I ----------------------- Thanks Houston! I 11'111 * More Montrose community news-than any publication in the world * More national gay news-than any publica­tion in Texas * More major features stories-than any gay publication in Texas * More Houston circulation-than the other Houston gay publication (much more!) * And More Houston advertising space­than the other Houston gay publication For More Information about advertising possibilities in the New Number One publication, call your Montrose Voice advertising representative, or advertising director Bill I M"bmy, e< ''9-am __J AUGUST 27, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 r-----------------------, Any House Special $1 Off With This Coupon offer expire.• Sep t. 10 416 Westheimer, Houston, Texas, 520--0554 L-----------------------J BED HOUSE SALE! SALE! SALE! SIMMONS BEAUTY REST DISCOUNT CENTER Kings, reg. $600.00, now 1198°0 Queens, reg. $400.00, now '18900 Other Si=es Available m4~ ~nl~nu 2303 Richmond, 522-7616 Open 2pm-2am Happy Hour Daily 2-Spm Buffet Thursday Spm Monday, Sept. 6, LABOR DAY OPENING 7AM, with ... 11AM DRAG BRUNCH Wear your favorite daytime (drag) or Cocktail Dress 75¢ Bloody Mary's, Screwdrivers 20 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 27, 1982 Summer's Second Wave By John W. Row berry International Gay Ntew• A8ency Now that the American blockbusters released in June and July have either settled into obscurity or settled down for long engagements, a second wave of releases-mostly foreign-are making the rounds of major cities. The biggest of these 's a film from Ger· many, Margarethe von Trotta'sMarianne and Juliane. Von Trotta is no stranger to interna­tional cinema audiences. While this is only her third film, her work on Volker Schlodorff'a (her husband) Circ/~ of Deceit and The Tin Drum has earned her praise and attention for her ability to utilize the subtle nuances of ecreen dialogue. Along with writing Marianne and Juliane. von Trotta also directed this fictionalized account of one of the Baader-Meinhof ter­rorists and her innocent-bystander sister. Films about terrorists tend to fall into two camps: those that use the cinema to denounce terrorism and films that tend to explore the psyche of the terrorist as a specific role in some larger social context. Von Trotta goes off in an entirely differ­ent direction. That the fictional-Marianne is a bomb-thrower is incidental to the mtemal power·struggle within her sibling relationship with sister Juliane; the act of being a terrorist is played off-screen; we are witness to two women with the same cultural background and a great many of the eame values plying their radicalism in socially polarized ways. Juliane is no less the outlaw: devoted to her work on a feminist magazine, entrenched in a non-traditional relation­ship with a aeemingly-correct male mate (Rudiger Volger)-it ia left to the audience to decide how far a gulf exists between these sisters desperate to overthrow an oppressive social system. Unlike the treatment ofraw-edged fam· ily emotions visible in the cinema as of late, von Trotta seems to draw upon the style and device of an earlier lgmar Berg­man for her exacting focus and shift& in point of view-Marianne and Juliane is much more like an urban Autumn Sonata than it is a German Kramer vs. Kramer. Von Trotta is, without question, a woman to watch. This film, minus the tra· ditional somberness of the New German Cinema-although it is a deadly serious treatment-looks to mark either a turning point in contemporary German film, or to herald a new voice, an anomoly in the already overwhelming symphony of West German cinema. Gard a Vue (Under Suspicion) is Claude Miller's third film. His last seen work, The Best Way, was a huge critical success and featured one of the finer, if slightly aur· realistic, looks at a gay/ non·gay relation· ship between two male teachers. This new film , strictly film noir, is a return to the classic police procedural genre the French adore-next to romances, the French love films about justice and its qualities the best. Michel Serrault, known here for his role as the drag queen in La Cage Oux Foiles, plays an upper~lass attorney who is accusea of raping and murdering two young girls. Nearly the entire film takes place in one room in a police station, and the bulk of the time is spent watching and hearing Serrault play dangerous cat·and- :~~8ha~8~~~~~r!11i~~Yc~~~~ O:fu~ station and ultimately charges him with the dual murders. Shohei lmamura's Vengence Is Mine was one of my favorite films in 1979, a well-constructed and often shocking look at the life of a gangster in contemporary Movies Japan, and I approached his latest film , Eijanaika, expected to be treated to an unusual perspective of the Meiji Restora­tion period in Japanese history, when uprising threatened to unseat and destroy the powerful Shogunate empires. If you are a fan of Japanese politics circa the 1860s and are good at sorting out the char­acters usually found in long Russian novels-then you might enjoy Imamura's complex, unyielding cross section of good guys and bad guys. The Mill Valley Film Festival, held quietly each year in the famous exclusive community in Northern California, is making great noises in 1982 with the world premier of Paul Mazursky's Temp· est, a contemporary film set in Greece fea­turing John Casaabetes, Gena Rowlands and Susan Saradon. If you know Mazur&· ky's work (An Unmarried Woman or Blume in Love) or have seen the particular magic Gena Rowlands and John Cassa­vetes can work, then beta are on that this "comedy" will be the subject of miles and miles of critical debate. Yet another world premiere, Neil Young's Human Highway, brings Young together with the new wave group Devo (in their first feature film), Dennis Hooper and Dean Stockwell. Mail Order Runners The American Running and Fitness Association want& to take the lonelinesa out of long-distance running. The association is offering a ru'l.ner's match-up service, says the Chicago Trubine. All joggera have to do is specify pace, distance. how often they run, the time. of day and whether they want to run with someone slightly faster or of equal speed. EXPRESS YOURSELF FR~~.~~SJ'S JERRY'S INFLATION Fl;HTER PRICES He1rcuVblowdry or haircut & set, $10 Per~=~·~,t :6':o9:n $35 523-0438 WESTHEIMER INTERIORS 1727 Westheimer •Houston 713/520-1357 Optn 10 A.M. 6 P.M. Monday thru Saturday r------------------------ Lowest Prices on Alterations $ 1.00 0 Ff ~i~:on Trouser Waists & Bottoms Regular $3.75-Special $2.75 Coupon Expires October 1, 1982 THE DESIGNER'S ROOM 224 Westheimer 522-7106 Open 8 to 6 Tuesday-Friday 10-3 Saturday (closed Monday) -------------------- -- --~ Appearing Sundays & Monda1! thru August LlUNSHAR.1!; 402 Lovett 527-9866 Our Chef Has Done It Again! Elegant Dining & Wonderful Prices A Few Entrees from our Dinner Menu .. . Fi/et of Sole-deep butter fried ........................................ 7.95 Chicken Chaucer-breast of chicken sauteed in a brown sauce, with mushrooms .................................................... 7.95 Calves Liver-simmered in shallots and red wine with sauteed onions .................................................................... 8.50 Beef Stroganoff-served on a bed of spinach noodles ...... 8.95 Chicken Fried Steak-served with mashed potatoes, corn and black-eyed peas ...................... 8.50 Beef en Brochette-beef cubes and vegetables marinated in a burgundy wine sauce ............ 8.95 Serving Lunch, Dinner & Sunday Brunch Now Appearing Sheila Ceasar and Joe Thalken Tuesday thru Saturday beginning at 9:JO p.m. HAPPY HOUR 4-BPM ALIGUST 27, 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 Quality Dental Care. The Smile Store. At Qua lity Dental Core, we've discovered on important foct: No matter how well we do our job, you're not going to appreciate your beautiful teeth if you hove to go through a lot of discomfort to get them. So we use the latest comfort systems available "Happy gos," premedicotion and 5-<:honnel stereo headphones. And becausP. your time ts important, if you hove to wait more than 30 minutes for your appointment-we'll buy you lunch. It's as simple as tha t. Qua lity Denta l Core. Complete de ntal services in comfort. Now that's something to smile obout Quality Dental Core Southwest 2315 Southwest Freeway at Kirby 523-2328 Bring in this ad and got your teeth cleaned for $5. Offer expires Soptembet- 30, 1982. 22 MoNTROSE VOICE / AUGUST 27, 1982 ~ Jtnigbts b'c9rlrans Ith AnnlnrUfy, Oct. 1, 2 I 3. 1111 4-on-occupoonq) ll'ICludM round t11palrl11te, 2 a.ys. 2nlgl'lls. Freoch Ouarterl'IOtel, round trip 1..-i.r., coctnall pf.riles. poker walk, Cajun brunch, pins. troplllea, benQuet.andd rinkallddlacount tlcket1 lorblrs.res1'urant:a. DENYER WEEKEND 3<111)'1,2nigM• .l>Oi.l-roundtrtpalrl1re, welcomecockt111.manyotl>er 1specJ.i.rtracllon1. HosleclbyCl'larH• '• Baro!O-r 12.te-ondoubleoccupancy.Calllotdetallt. 250!5 RALPH, UZ.fHt Free Validated Parking Greenway Plaza Underground Highway 59 Ill Buffalo Speedwey 625-3339 Midnight at the Oasis LIVE REGGAE BAND DIRECT FROM JAMAICA "THE YARD BAND" Friday • Saturday, Aug. 27-28 Tuudoy l1 lody's nigh1. l'reodrink1 10pm·2om Wednelday li appy Hourallnighl ,Thursday SI Drinks !Opm·2am Sunday-the AOQ Jazz Quutet. 8· 12 428 Westheimer 526-2895 AUGUST 27, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 Mickey Rankin Mickey Rankin: From Cows to Keys By Billie Duncan He had a choice between farm work and practicing the piano, so Mickey Rankin chose to play the piano. "! never liked to milk cows," said Mickey. His father started teaching him when Mickey was six years old. "He taught me by using mathematics. He didn't play." Mickey's mother did play, however. "She played church music and ragtime." Church was very big where Mickey grew up. His home town was Sour Lake, Texas, 20 miles from Beaumont, with a popula· tion of 1600. "It never changes." The church they attended was the Pine Ridge Baptist Church. "Pine Ridge is a suburb of Sour Lake." After a while, how· ever, they moved "to a city church in Sour Lake." His parents were very intelligent small town people who had spent their lives in Sour Lake. His father had moved there from Jennings, Louisiana when he was five years old. He and Mickey's mother were high scliool sweethearts. "Only girl­friend, only boyfriend." One common factor in their personali­ties was that they were both very strong willed. His father still is. But Mickey credits his mother with being the source of hie own will of iron, although he said, "All her flamboyance was in her personality." Mickey and hia brother taught her how to type and ehe went out and started to work. One thing that she taught Mickey was to always be prepared to leave if you eay you are going to leave. "She told me, 'Remember, when you quit a job, have your purse in your hand. And then, out the door."' His high school years were fairly nor­mal. He got good grades, kept up with his piano and dated girls. He also had several steady girlfriends in college. "In college, I was around a lot of gays. In drama and art and music. It took two years of knowing gays before I considered myself as such." Stephen F. Austin was his first choice for co1lege. He went there for two years. "But I didn't have what I wanted. Inspiration ." It was not until he went to Lamar Uni· versity that he found inspiration. He stu­died under Hubert Kaszynski ("Mr. K.") and developed the piano style that he diplaya today. . . Although hie degree was m piano per­formance, Mickey wanted to teach. ·:I'm too people oriented to sit and do eight hours of rehearsing." He started applying all over. He wen ton perhaps a dozen interviews. FinaJly~ he landed a teaching position in the Little Cypress/Mauriceville Independent School District at "the third largestshcool in Orange, Texas." He paused. "There were three of them." The school was not high on his list of places he would prefer to teach. But a job is a job and he went to work with hope in his heart. The firat day, only 18 students showed up for his class. "! went out and started talking people into joining the class." The tactic worked. He wound up with 40 studenta that first time around. Four years later, he had 125 studenta in junior high and 60 in high school. Teach­ing turned out to be just his cup of tea. HI enjoyed the hell out of it." Students would come to him with their problems. "I would get them to consider options and tell them to make their own decisions. I gave my students logic rather than dictatorship." He dated several other teachers (female) and lived alone. "I never went to a gay bar." Except on occasssion in Houston. But then everything crashed in on him. He was accused by one of his students of several things, including sexual miscon-duct. The rumors started flying. "I was supposedly having affairs with both sexes. The lastest rumor had me with five pounds of marijuana in my apartment." The school board started interviewing studenta quietly and they put Mickey on suspension with pay. Soon Mickey left teaching and came to Houston. "I feel I've had problem• straight people haven't had. But I can't say being gay has screwed up my life at all." For a while Mickey was playing at the Inside/ Outside on Westheimer which lat.er reopened as the Montrose Pub. He was playing ot the Pub when it shut its doors. Now he resides at the piano bench of the K.eyboard, 3012 Milam, on Thurday nights. Mickey Rankin's basic attitude is reflected in his favorite quote, which is from Mame. "Life is a banquet and most sons of bitches are starving to death." Mickey does not intend to starve. Linda Clifford at The Copa By Nick Fede Stepping onto the stage garbed in a black sequined tunic with matching leggings, Linda Clifford appeared relaxed, sophisti­cated, but yet explosively vibrant, in her August 20 return to The Copa at 2631 Richmond. She opened by singing "Shoot Your Best Shot," her will known dance hit, as she drew her hands to her sides, and pointed her fingers into representations of pistol­hot Colt 45's. Midway through the tune found her stylishly Popping gum, and she Pointed her finger while crooked and sang the chorus "Come on." The loud crowd applause that followed was met with an "Oh shucks" look and a bow of her head. Performing "Red Light" from the hit movie "Fame," she sang and danced with a dynamite flair and when her mic was inadve\'(antly disconnected she subtlely perormed without it. She was rescued by a crowd observer who quickly plugged the cord back in after realizing what had happened. During the song she clasped her fists signifying rage and moved front-stage and knelt while singing to the enthusias­tic crowd. She met the crowd applause with a curtsy and said, "Oh shucka." Before singing "Don't Come Crying To Me," she asked the crowd "How many of you have had lovers do you wrong." As a sea of hands was raised she said, "Pisses you off don't it?" which brought laughter in response. She then tore through the number and finished looking understan­dably exhausted. She toasted the crowd after asking them to excuse her while she took a sip out of her Hglass of vitamins." She crooned "Runaway Love," one of her first hits while lit by a single spot above that highlighted her softly beauti­ful face. One crowd member noticed her pe'!'piring and handed her his blue hanky, which she dabbed against her forehead after giving him a grateful look. Finishing the number she said,"! don't want to leave you" in reference to the crowd and moved to the front of the stage to meet and shake their hands. Her lastaong was "If They Could See Me !"Jow" and was joyfuHy performed by leap­mg and eweeping her hands upward toward the ceiling. Tht' crowd sang along Linda Clifford Montrose Live on the lyric "rejoice" and she gleefully swirled into the finish before exiting off stage. "I had a lot of family members who wanted me to finish school, they said, 'Linda, don't do it. Don't leave New York'," she said in an interview referring to the song and her decision to begin per­forming. "I made the decision and stuck to it and ti did pay off eventually," she said. Is it disturbing to have crowd members who get grab by, she was asked, by refer­ring to a person who kept lat.ching onto her leg and trying to climb onto state. "I've had people leap up on the stage and it's very frightening (because) you never know what's going to happen." In refer­ring to that crowd member she said, "I'm sure he didn't mean any harm, but look what happened to John Lennon." Throughout the interview she gently caressed a gold heart set with a diamond that she said was a gift from her manager-'husband, Nick Coconato, on "Our very firat Christmas together as more than friends." Noticing the warm loving rapport the two had with each other it is no wonder she refers to him as "My backbone-he does everything for me." Linda and Nick have co-written several songs, including "Don't Let Me Have Another Bad Dream," which Linda has recorded. The crowd at the Copa, she said, "was wonderful, really great, and !feed off their energy." She said in performing that if "you can keep the enugy level up, the audience loves it." Referring to the mic mishap she said, ''There was a time when the slightest little thing would make every hair stand up." When asked how she creates good audience rapport, she said, ''Whe.n I go out on stage I always look for the people who are stone faces-the one's who are saying, entertain me. Those are the ones I work toward first, I want to grab them imme­diately, and if 1 can, I can relax and enjoy myself on stage." Linda has had seven successful albums and her eighth on Capitol Records will be released in November. When asked if there was something she longs to perform in, like a Broadway play, she swd, "I don't believe it. you've hit it on the nose." She has been asked to perform in a hit play on Broadway and said, ''I'm dying to do Broadway and it's very hard when you realize the dream you've had all your life." Her own show? "For that to happen would be the greatest!" 24 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 27, 1982 Patrice Rushen at The Tower By Nick Fede Patrice Rushen embodied a childlike inno­cence on stage reminiscent of a sweet bird in paradise, as the quavering, fragile, yet, resonant tones of her voice filled the Tower on August 25. She performed with her five-piece band and two backup singers at two shows that evening. Her first show was packed with 14 classic, not so classic and possible future claBSic tunes that the crowd recog­nized immediately. Their approval was Patrice Rushen evident as they danced in the aisles and ga...-e her three standing ovations. She moved nicely from downstage cen­ter to stage right to effervescently play the piano while singing, which sent tingles throughout many spines. Among the standout numbers that she performed were: "Get Up," an aroueing and hip-swaying tune; "Haven't You Heard," which is a classic hit; and her unforgettable new smash, "Forget Me Nots." A concise comment was made during the show that Patrice "shone like the sun." He might have added the moon and the stars • Duncan's Quick Notes :A Personal Tribute: David Ayala billed himseJf as "publicity czar" at the Comedy Workshop. He also taught classes in 'improvisation, a technique in which he had excelled when he attended University of St. Thomas. He appeared in many shows both as an actor and as a singer. He exhibited a rare combination of creativity and organiza­tion. And he was a loving, warm person. He took his final bow last week at the age of 23. Olivia Neu:U>n.John The tape is titled "You Can't Be Serious" and features Ben Boykin on bass, David Turner on guitar, Barnet Levinson on drums and Jim on lead vocals, keyboard and flute. The tape is available all over the Mon­trose with the best bet being Infinite Records. Good News for Porno Fans: Stages is now presenting Leonard Melfi's comedy, Porno Stars at Home. The cast includes Tim Palumbo, Claire Hart-Palumbo. Sharon Beck, Donna Whitmore and Dan Barclay (as the gay porno star). The play is outrageous and a lot of fun , and even though I have not seen Stages' production, I am hoping that they pull out all the stops. It will play through October 9. Nick Fede Reports: Numbers will present Laura Branigan ("Gloria") on August 29. On August 30, Numbers will host the English Beat. a nu wave group August 27, Copa will be the oite of the MSA-sponsored Mr. Gay Metroplex contest. And in Nick's own words, "Montrosian fans of singer Olivia Newton.John will have the chance to see her getting physi­cal when she appears at the Summit on September 3. "The 'Physical Tour of North America' is her first in four years, and a specially designed stage has been constructed, according to a press release from her recording company, MCA Records. She is also scheduled to perform some new and unrecorded material in the show. Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose (Friday. A.uguat27, thtovghThuosday September2) • PIANO Zelda Rose 9pm Friday & Saturday; Mary Hooper & 8111 Hud$on 9pm Monday; & Linda Petty 9pm Tuesday-Thursday at Rascals, 2702Kirby, 524-6272 Jim Cater &Jett Long1no8pm Friday: Tom W1lllams & Jett Longino Bpm Saturday, Greg Davis 8pm Sunday & Monday. Tom Williama Spm Tuesday: Lee LaForge 8pm Wednetday: Mickey Rankin & Roxie Starr 8pm Thursday.at Keyboard, 3012Milam, 528--6988 Richard A.skin & Dana Rogers 10pm nightly (except Monday ·a. Tuesday) at the Copa (piano bar), 2631 Richmond. 526-2259 Sheila Ceasar & Joe Thalken 9pm Tuesday through Saturday & llonshare 9pm Sunday & Monday at Baja's. 402lovett. 527-9866 Aleundr1 Haas & Michael Bailey Friday. Saturday, Wednesday & Thursday at Arno's. 4002 MontrOM. 528-2993 Keok1 Kona Spm Friday & Saturday, Jpm Sunday & 5pm Wedn•day & Thursday 11 the Hole. 109 Tuam. 528-9066 • COUNTRY & COUNTRY/ROCK The New Happy Trad Riders Country-Western Bog­g1e S.nd 9 30pm Friday & Saturday at Happy Trails. 715 Fairview. 521-2792 Ab & the Rebel Outlaws 9 30pm Friday & Saturday & 8 30pm Thursday at the Exile. 1011 Bell. 659-0453. & 8 30pm Sunday at Brazos River Bottom. 2400Brazos 528-9192 Flying Bhnd Band 9pm Tuesday-Saturday at Miss Charkrtte·a. 911Orew.528-8840 Mustang Band 9 30pm Fnday & Saturday & 8 30pm Wednesday & Thursday at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos_ 528·9192 • GUITAR 'L" 9pm Friday & Irish Folk 9pm Wednesday at the P1r1our. 2402 Mindell, 529-8069 Stars of "Porno Stars at Home," through Oct. 9 at Stages • SHOW GROUPS ~;::~_K;~rF:'~!".'~~~~~7~epm Sunday at Happy Mata Harl 9 30pm Friday & Saturday & Lee LaForge. Kim Yvette & Dianne Cha1ston 9pm Sunday at Bae· chus. 523Lovett, 523-3396 John Day & Co. 6pm Sunday at E/J's. 1213 Rich­mond. 527·9071 • JAU The ADO Jazz Ou1rtet Spm Sunday at Harrar'1, 428 Westheimer.526-2895 Robert Ceballos Group 9pm Sunday & wilh Jimmy Ford Qpm Friday. Saturday, Wedneaday & Thursday atLas8rLSU.614WGray.5~9959 Windrose930pm nightly (except Sunday & Monday); & Horace Crisby 9 30pm Sunday & Monday at Birc;. watchers. 907Westheimer. 527.0S95 • COMEDY The Best ofComedyWorti;sh1pVolumell8·JO& 1tpm The Noodles Frld1y & Saturday & 8.30pm Wednesday & Thursday; Manuel Labor la the Not the President of Me1uco 8 30pm Sunday & Monday at Comedy Workshop, 2105San Felfpe,524--7333 Stand-up comics nightly at Comm ix Annex. 2105San Fellpe, 524-7333 • IMPRESSIONISTS Donna Day, Naomi Sims & Hot Chocolate Sunday evenrng1ttheCopa, 2631 Rlchmond.528-2259 Uttle Bobby. Tracey, & gueets Sunday evening at Exile. 1011 Bell, 559-G453 Playg1rt Follies"' 10:30pm Saturday at Pink Elephant, 1218 Leeland, 65£HXMO • MISCELLANEOUS Talent shows Tuesday evening at the Copa. 2831 Richmond. 528-2259; Wednesday evening at Midn1te Sun, 534 W•thelmer, 52~7519; & Thursday evening a!Tw1ns, 53SW•ttM1mer, 520-02« OPEN Monday­Saturday llam-2am, Sunday lpm-2am Gay hours Monday­Saturday 4-7pm BYOB Rita "Poppa Bear" and Bird 5731 Kirby, 521-1444 Parking in rear Special Events Coming Next Week &: Watch for Grand Opening Synerfuslon ™ Perm ... the health of your hair depends on It! Synerfusion Perm actually strengthens your hair as it works to create the most beautiful curls you've ever experienced. Never again need .vou fear the fri.zzie.s Synerfuslon promises healthy harr with natural texture, vibrancy and shine. Isn't it nice to know there's a perm that takes your hair's health seriously? Synerfusion by Mat ix now at fi~~ FRIDAY 9:30-1:30 The Happy Trail Riders Country & Western Boogie Band SA TU RDA Y 9-MIDNITE SUNDAY 5-BPM Dixie Kings Sunday Happy Hour 12-3PM 715 Fairview 521-2792 THE proudly presents Keoki Kona at the keyboard, Top of the Hole " Wednesday-Saturday 5-1, Sunday 3-8 Happy Hour 7am-7pm Monday-Friday Join Dee every Saturday morning 7am-1pm Schnapps 50~. Amaretto 75~. 7-10am 109 Tuam 528-9128 AUGUST 27, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 654·4040 UNITED CAB CO. Maryanne Mahoney and Mata Hari Entertaining Every Fri. & Sat. Evening This Sunday, 9 to 1 Lee Laforge presents Kim Yvette & Dianne Christon HAPPY HOUR 4-7 TUES-FRI WELL DRINKS 2 FOR 1 BEER 85¢ Live DJ 4 nights a week Marquerite at the piano for Happy Hour Wednesday-Friday We're open 6 days a week for your drinking, & dancing pleasure (closed Monday) (713) 523-3396 26 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 27, 1982 Advertising in 1982 in Montrose has changed from the days of 1979 and before. The switch is to the Voice because we don't play games with your advertisements by limiting the number of copies we put in circula­tion. We saturate Houston's gay com­munity every week-with news, entertainment, and the ads of commu­nity businesses that are getting ahead. Call your Voice advertising represent­ative (David Petluck •. ~ene .Oliver or. Lyt Harris) or advertising director 8111 Marberry, at 529-8490. We'll show you a difference! If your advertisement is in the Mon­trose Voice, you can relax. Your message is appearing in over 7700 copies (guaranteed) being distributed through 11 O Montrose clubs, restau­rants, shops and stores, and it is getting into the hands of an estimated 21,600 readers! On the other hand, if your ad is elsewhere ... well, you're reaching far fewer people-and paying more money to do it. The Voice brings results for its adver­tisers because we saturate the com­munity every week with more copies through more distribution points. In fact, the Voice now circulates about twice as many copies each week in Houston as does the other publica­tion. Surprised? You shouldn't be. After all, the Voice has better commu­nity news, sports and entertainment coverage, nationally syndicated wri­ters, great comics, a professional attitude-and thousands more copies distributed each week in Houston through dozens more distribution points. AUGUST 27, 1982 I M ONTROSE VOICE 27 Egypt's Golden Age is at Museum of Natural Science By Drorit Szafran Egypt. The mere mention of the word conjures up images of mystique ... golden treasures ... King Tut. Think of one and the others seem to follow naturally. Think again. There is another equally fascinating side to Egypt-one that examines the life of the "common man." Such is the spirit of "Egypt's Golden Age: The Art of Living in the New King· pvm 1558-1085 B.C." now being exhibited at the Museum of Natural Science. Enter the exhibit with care, for you will first encounter the garden, and mustn't disturb the calm of fish swimming about the lotus pond, or the gentle swaying of sycamore and palm trees. The garden is the focal point of the Egyptian home-"an oasis of shade and color" then , as well as now. Upon leaving the gardens, you will behold a full-scale model of Premier Vizier Nakht's living room. This room, painted in vivid blues, greens and reds, authenti­cally reproduces the decor popular in the New Kingdom. This progressive decor is probably due to the fact that Premier Nakht lived in Amarna, which was, like Houston, a boom town. The predominant color used in pottery was blue. This blue was also employed in the making of cosmetics. Kohl, the popu­lar eyeliner worn by both sexes, was derived from this blue. Clothing was the one area that did not make use of color. Men and women, for the most part, wore off-white linen tunics, complimented by colorful jewelry for the neck, arms, fingers, or ears. Though Egyptians are shown with bare feet in most illustrations, elegant sandals, woven from palm leaves and grass, were available. Such a pair are part of the exhibit. Upon viewing, it is very difficult to believe that these sandals are actua11y 3500 years old. They are remarkably well-preserved, due to little, if any, contact with man throughout the ages; as well as th&exces· sive heat of the region. Visually, there is little to differentiate them from contemporary sandals, woven just last month or last year. "Egypt's Golden Age" was a captivat· ing and remarkable undertaking. It is the largest Egyptian exhibit to come, either to Houston, or the Southwest, and compo­rises over 426 New Kingdom pieces. It is an exhibit that took approximately 10 years to put together. There are less than 30 days remaining, in which to catch a glimpse of "Egypt's Golden Age." The exhibit, which began in mid.July, will depart on Sunday, Sep· tember 19 at 5:00 p.m. From Houston, it will travel to Balti· more, where it will be housed until Janu­ary 2, 1983. After that, should visions ofEgyptolog} dance in your brain ... worry not. You'll only have to visit 26 different museums and private exhbitors. Just hop the next plane-from Brooklyn to Brussels . .. Coming to Cambridge .. Philadelphia to Paris. At this time, Egypt was experiencing its cultural and economic zenith. The boom town atmosphere not only created the demand for artisans and craftsmen, but the ability to reward them financially as well. The method of payment? To buy a slave girl might cost lOgallons of beer. Incidentally, the Greeks claim that beer was first brewed by the Egyptians. If thio iH true, bt•er actually made its debut approximately 3500 yt>are ago. Bt>er wean 't the Ji:gyptian 'a only in nova· tion. Tht·y exC'f'lled in the makingoffurni· ture and haskE'tH, as well as glass and jewelry Thesr! items comb1nPd utiliwrian fee Full scale reproduction of the living room of Vizier Nakht, an ancient Egyptian premier, is on display Montrose Art Servant girl carrying vessel from late Dynasty 18 on loan from Rijkosmeseum van Oudhetkn, Leiden tures with sheer artistry-creating, for example, a footstool in-laid with ebony and ivory; or a glass flask shaped to resemble a bunch of grapes. This prowess was evident in even the most mundane of objects-hairpins deco­rated with fine]y carved animals; or spoons with elaborate depictions of classi­cal musicjans with lyrical instruments. The Egyptians demonstrated their wit and humor, too. in several of their objects: perfume ~o.ntainers in whi.msical shapes, and sabncal papyrul 1llustrations­including one of a cat curling a mouse's wig New Kingdom pottery was exception· ally beautiful and detailed . Though usu· ally designed in.alabaster; breccia, basalt, or aerpentme pieces could also be found . Craftsmen used color and glaze, as well, to enhan<::f' the overall look. Ancient F,.gypt•an carvin1ts. 28 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 27, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat AUG AUG 27 28 AUG AUG AUG SEPT SEPT 29 30 31 1 2 Selected Events through 7 Days •FRIDAY: Interdct's Commu­nity Coffeehouse 7:30pm­midnight, 3405 Mulberry •FRIDAY: Lambda Alanon meeting at First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin II.SATURDAY: 1982 Gay Athletic Games in San Fran· cisco begin, lasting to Sept. 5 •MONDAY: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •TUESDAY: Gay Softball World Series begins in San Francisco, lasting to Sept_ 4 •TUESDAY: Montrose Sports Vol)eyball League games 7:30 p.m .. Gregory-Lincoln School, 1101 Taft •W,EDNESDA Y: Gay Political Cauclia endorsement meeting, 7:JOpm, Holiday Inn, 4640 Main •THURSDAY: Integrity Inter­national Convention opens in New Orleans, lasting to Sept. 5 •THURSDAY: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Sta­dium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stem gay radio show lOpm-midnight on KPFT Radio, FM-90 Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN I WEEK: "Tubs for Two Thousand" benefit for Montrose Counseling Center and Kapo­si'• Sarcoma Committee at Mid· towne Spa, 3100 Fannin, Sept- 4 •IN I WEEK: Texas Gay Con­ference in Houston, Sept. 3-5 •IN I WEEK: Labor Day_ Sept. 6 •IN 2 WEEKS: Midwest Gay & Lesbian Convention in Chi­cago, Sept. 10-11 UN 3 WEEKS: 3rd Annual Gay American Arte Festival in Chicago opens Sept. 17, lasting to Oct. 10 UN 3 WEEKS: Colt 45s hold Country/ Western Carnival, 8pm, September 18. 2400 Bra­zos, a benefit for Gay Switch­board, Neartown Association, Autistic Children and Kaposi's Sarcoma Committee •IN 6 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 8th national conference and "Discover '82" exhibition and workshops Oct 8-10, Con­rad Hilton Hotel, Chicago UN 6 WEEKS: 1st Annual Conference of National Lesbian Gay Pnde Celebration Coordinators in Boston. Oct. 9-11 •IN 6 WEEKS: Columbus Day, Oct. 11 •IN 7 WEEKS: Gay Atheist League of America national convention in Houston, Oct. ll'>-17, Americana Hotel, 3301 Southwest Fwy. •IN 7 WEEKS: Westheimer Colony Art Festival Oct. 16-17 •IN 9 WEEKS: Halloween weekend, Oct. 29-31 •IN 9 WEEKS: Elections, Nov. 2 BUSINESS OWNERS fl) Wt l••I frMe.e~ 1n th• directory ~•I bu11neu •t•bhahments ~~~~~~ws@Et or~n•nhons e.ndk.91..-MGniio.evoadlttrtbutionpolntl Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES Roommate to share 2 bedroom apt. near Med. Center. $200 month plus deposit_ Call Tony $200 plus dep­osit. 523-2372. HUNTSVILLE. Share home near campus with 27, professional. Dis­crete, non-smoker only {713) 295- 4991. Heights duplex, large 2 bed­room, cent air, security. Available 2oth on 1st come basis. Call Jenny, 880-1869. EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Pianist needed: mature, over 40? Who knows how to tickle the ivory from the ol' days withg love. Call 757-9978. Leave message There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice GAY BARS (.l)Hou1ton Tavern Gu11d n'l9fl'lblr 1nchUl•C>n pYced1ntti11d1rectoryatthe•rrequtoal :,~,,;~~us -523l(;;9n-:5i3-3ieeltVeenter See our ad elsewhere this issue ::~i't~'~.~,,°,;!~;-52Miee ••th r•lal See our ad elsewhere this issue 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment • ABAAN-i10Pac;f,c- ·528-9427 country See our" ad elsewhere this issue eeRAZOS- RIVER BOTTOM-1-2.00" Braze>;: 528-ll1112country ~~=IA.A PATCH --2294 W HolCOm~ See our ad elsewhere this issue eCHASES.. :;,.1s R...:11m0f1o- sii>.1-e..e di.co ~~ICKEN CooP -Sis- w .. -,f'l••mtr--526- See our ad elsewhere this issue :.~n0;!;,2631 R.chnio~a.--22511 di.Co See our ad elsewhere this issue COVE-2912 s-s~herd--52i.ii70 Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 Montrose Classified • THE OEEP-2212 Comoerw-528-8234 • OWRAENT DAUM-1732 WMtM1m.--52&­a528 ltalher See our ad elsewhere this issue • >.DtfllTYSALLY'9-220Avondaie-529-7525 See our ad elsewhere this issue • DOUBLE A SALOON-5731 Kirby--521-1444 See our ad elsewhere this issue • ll¥a-1213Richmond--527-9071 See our ad elsewhere this issue e AEXILE-1011BeH--859-0453country The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice e QALLEON-2303 Rlchmond--522-7818 See our ad elsewhere this issue =•~~~~NATIONAL (G e.l.)-14111 :2~2T IT"ftE.fT ITATION 1111 Fairview See our ad elsewhere this issue • HA~ TRAILl-715 FaiNi--521-2792 See our ad elsewhere this Issue •HOLi HOUIE-109 Tuam-522-!178 See our ad elsewhere this Issue • JR~·-908Paclllc 521-25111 :l~;~o~~~~ & LYNN"S--817 Fairv..­!~~!~~~ 3012 Mil•m 521-8988 piano Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of these styles: 10Cperregular•ord0f15CPERALLCAPITAL WOROtn&-po1nttype.u11"1o'Nnhere (llu11ng 1-wordainlhls1t.1:eorifcenteringonaltne. compute at 80$a ltne. using maximum 1 regular wordt or 5 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a lint.) 25¢ per regular word or 40¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 8-polnt type. as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $1.50 a line, using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) 40¢ per regular word or 60¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 10-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 4 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) 50¢ per regular word or 75¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD In 10-polnt bold type, as 30C per rogulor word or '5• PER 1hown here. (If using few ALL CAPITAL WORD In 8-polnt word• In Ihle elze or If cen- :'!dw~:':~ ~t~~1°;;;e ':,~~~~t~~:~: terlng on a line, compute at on e line, compute et $1.50 0 lino, $2.00 a line, using maximum using mHlmum 4 reguler word• or 3 regular words or 2 ALL 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to• line.) CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) Individual or few words in any one size ehould be computed at the per line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case words, and regu1ar and bold words, provided they are all the same type SIZE (6, 8 or 10 point). Simply compute each word individually. You may NOT mix type SIZES on the same line. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $3 per classified ad. BLIND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra. Run the same classified 4 u·eeks in a row and deduct 15%. If your classified is lengthy, you may want to consider running a "display" ad instead. Call our advertising sales department for information WRITE OUT your ad on a plain sheet of paper. Include your name, address, check and signature, and mail or bring it to the Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. Ads received by 5:30pm Tuesday will be in that week's newspaper. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. Sorry, but we cannot bi11 and cannot accept classifieds over the phone. .r'/tf ,.q urrL.E SvRPRIS,£1) ro 5££ Yt'v IN/? rM'r s~n/ /llflP .rov/l/P O(/'?' r S#Pv'-/J /f"l9Y4' 866/t' SllVfl.lltl~ #"rPS~ "";1'/YSrEllP." All/Ill. 1r /! UKE 1 rH1s..,,.rt1A Y#AHs, ' r SAN~ "PO/ll C-/"Y.4K¥1 ~ /"/f£K /Y.!r' l'f~~.('111(/lfS ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations eKINDRED SPIRITS 5245 Buffa lo Speedway- 665-9756 p1edom1nant1y lesbian See our ad elsewhere this issue :~MP0ST:__2417Tirn;-Blvd -528-8921 . ie.­il. A.Zv J-=312Tuam-s28~9343 ~8~~,.~~~h~~~~K ~ Wffthetmer-~ e..1.MARY'S !022wes1he1mer--52e-.88S1 See our ad elsewhere this issue Support, join your community organizations :~.o:~!~N:-S:J.tw .. the•mer-526-751-9 eMISS- cHARl0rie·S~9ff w Dfew-528- 8840 country ~NTROSE MINING co -805 Pacifie-529- :~M•!RI 2-300 w .. ih•tmer-528-6551 See our ad elsewhere this Issue e0f',tct:l"9 Cl\19-2701 Albany-523-4084 See our ad elsewhere this Issue eONE ON ONE-1018 W Grsy-521--6503 :,r;:.N:~E.-..ANT-1218 LNland-Mt-0040 See our ad elsewhere this issue :~~~:~~al~=l52H272: with r•­See our ad elsewhere this issue Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice eAOcKv·S--3'18--~/0aiiU ·52&-8922 1•bt•n :,~s--S35~W•lhe•rMr-520-02<M. 1~n iVENTURE·N ~ -2923 M••n- :512::ooi)o- There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice ASTRO- Rainbow A 1anr;:e- 524°-°i793 (VO•ce "i TTY) BERING Memorial Methodist Church 14-40 Hawlhornt - 521-1017 Unrted Melhodist WOf­lf'ltp Hrt•ce 10~m8un :,e:f~:,:wowortca-5n:11113 meetsev.,y ~~ .. ~-~~TE MEN TOQeltwll" ! BWMT)-sN-­( Mord1oM)CHURCH-Qf'CHRl5T:_i2Q:i(:-Wftt ~:,rnet"-777-t2MI WOfStup MfYIC .. 1230pm cHuRCH-OF-cHRiST1ANFA1T1-t-:tt3W9.1ht.: ~~.~~.:°!!~n~:~fu"ay ~~1.nf T~!'"'_!t'l1~•:__£ho1tPf'ac1t::.eWed.even1n_! 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment C1T1ZENS F-6R HUMAN EOUALtTY(cHE)­eoeFann1n11J01-- 236-866&·boardmee11ng2nd Tundays OOL T-.. s·s (social ciub)-mMt• •1 BiaiO.-R1v9r Boltom. 2400BrHos-S28-111112 e COMMuNlfY-c0FFEE-H6UsE-·pro;ec1- Ot l/H Inc 730pmfridayaat340SMulbeny CONG AYTZCHAYtM-meel• 11 MCCR-: 11119 Oecl!ur -- S52-1340. 688·8997MtV1Ce&soc:1al 8pm2nd&4thfrtd•)'S ~~~~~;L~:E~~-=- ·~ - Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 ~;~.~r~:Z~':~;,,!?1i~2222 prr f9C1 °'Gav 01iNAF0UNOATiON-2700M..on 524-S7111 DiGN1TY:-rnMta at~Cathohc Stud9nt c.n,-., 17038cllOV8f-S20-92ell.S2&-7&44meettngs 7pmS•turd•v The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice FAMILY & FR1EN05.olG•v•--464-6663----m;.is 2pm 3rd SUndayt 11 Community CollHhouM 34MMulbeuy -~ FIRST UNIT ARIAN Church-5210 Fanntn-S26- IS71 worstup serwice 111 S•m S1.1n 0REENSP01NTIP'M1"° Afea -Flir-Away Fr..,..dl-~_1-Nl1 _ _ _ GAY I ALl\IE Sh•rong Ei:per1~• (GASEl- 621-1311. 528-0891 GAY AACHl\IES ol Tex• pro1ect Ol"imtlr.ci ~.~~TH~~e~1:f~ec:: A~"fA~= H(itet 3301 Southw•tfwy . Houston GAY HISPANIC CAUCUS· ·2722 Newm8" fl12· S21-0037meets3rdThurtd•y• GAYITA"liAN-Group-52&-9944 g~~~2R1~~~ -PHVS1CIANS ol H"Ousion- "cJo GAY.POLl"fiCALCAuCUs-1aF'C1-POB666&4 ~7=,;i!t1~~:ed~~r.ys~ M••n #217 Support, join your community organizations GAY--SWiTCHBOAflO· S~3211 Greater M0nlfod BUSINESS GutL0 sponsor 1ngmembers•r&E!J"sclub.Fr•meo!Relerence. Mon1rose\loice.SpeectyPr•nhng.Spud-U--like TravelTechtr•velagency ~.~~A0~~~~!_~~~\~,~ro1eci 01-GP<:·a M•ii1· ~~~~J_ITTeRFAITH- Ail1anC.~211 Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice HOUs1on ArN GAY & LESiitAN ENGtNEERS& Sci•nllats-528·731!16 meels 7pm 4th Wednesdays ~N1fv-faOwNS-862-8314 HOUSTON DATA PROFESSIONALS-meets In Eut Room. Hohdlly Inn Centr•I. 4640 South Maln-523-e922: meeting 7 30pm 2nd Tundays .H.O.U. STON HUMAN RIGHTS LEAGUE-523- ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment MONTROSE c·1ViC-Club (N .. rtown)-meet• at 8.,.1ng Church. 1«0 Hawthorn.-522--1000 meetlng7:30pm4thTu.days M0Ni.-R0sECL1N1C.:..:-1°" · w .. theim«~U: ~~.! ~~u;;-1opm Fri., 1·5pm Sun , &-10pm ~1':!~~?UNSELING Cente;::-90ol.Overt ~~~~~~B~~EflS-mee1tti MCc·R· 1Dii ~=sE-SF'ORTS-ASSOi::tAT16N tMSAI =:.'~pot,~~~1~1~:r:.·~i~f~3 ~me.Mo.>n IT_!!ur1evenlngs Got a question? Caii the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 Monlrou $ports -S0FTBALL- 52J..881J2 dliY., S23-0413ftvft G9)'SoflbtillWorldS.nee1nSan Fr•nc1scoAug 31-Sept 4 M0ntrose Sports WOMEN"S- SOFTBALL LHgue-72&-9371 McinlrOM- 'SPOrts TENNtS:.524-:-j151 - - Mo-;;tro.• SPOrli- vOU:.EYBAU=ii0-2930 y~~9;a7fl 30pm Tu•. Gr900ry-Lmcotn school. MONTROSE SYMPHONIC b.nd=-meet'i"9t a;: :~~ ~;Q~·r~!'!° Hawthorne- -527-9669 meet• ~~~~~~~~~-j~cg:~;l~~J_b-~~~s;~u;~ B•rn g~RATION DOCUMENTATION -PfOJe<:I ol ~!~i1~~~,~~g ~~: _:und Comm111ff TEXAS GAY CONFERENCE Ii ~1 con: ~~~!~! 3-5. Agnes Arnold H•tl. Untvers•ty TEXAs~Rc·e~ TEXAS HUMAN RIGHTS Foundahon-1519 Maryl•nd-526-111311 TEXAs RrDERs=cJo M.;y.; -,mw.th .... mer-528-8851 LINITARIANIUN1VER5Ai1sf-G•'v CauCus---cJo 111Un1t1tian Church.S210F•nnin-5~9767. 528-58-42mee11ng3rdSun•lternoons WESLAYAN-FELLOWSHIP-=-~-8899 _- ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations WESTHElMER COLONYARTS Auoc1•toon ~Weathe1mer-s21--0133 1anlestv1elOct 18- PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS Want • fat, dark tin? It's as easy as taking a pill. Safe, non­toxic 80 tablets, $29.95 ppd. Check, MC, Visa. MAIL WAREHOUSE POBoxmg,s (713) 523-ell27 Houston,TXn052 (~Yupon,sulleS-4) Relax your tense muscles in your home. Call Tony, 523-2372 12-noon to 7pm. $25. ARE YOU NEW TO NORTH HAR­RIS COUNTY? CALL FM1960/ GREENSPOINT FAR AWAY FRIENDS, 821-9681. Wanted-Essays on history of Hous­ton 's gay community_ Best will net !he author $50 and recognition (1f so desired) in a new gay publication Please enclose SASE for those manuscnpts to be returned_ Dead­line 1s . Nov 20. Mail to Cowboy Enterprrses Inc., AD 96-G, Clo Mon­trose Voice !Not ... ~ ••led With Montrou Voice.I G~rea- lt- you ' re s1ngi9 . v8i"Ue =t!tetlS:.~':e -.r:k ~av'~• !•h gtl Support, join your community organizations F~PSHERE0Tsoc1•lvanetyand harmony. io1n BWMT, where the emph9s1• IS on ~sh1plFOf1nlorm1t1on.call523-21197or747- BODv MASSAGe. - Your place ,;, mine_ Atternoon or evenings, Bruce, 521-2009 Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice Relax and en1oy the BodyWorks massage. Gitt certificates. Call Bill, 526-2470 PRIVATE GAY CLUBS ::.~x OFFICE- 1m flld'lmond--522-1825 :~u!8~0USTON-8aths=2205 Fannin-859- See our ad elsewhere this issue ~~~: Unov Gayllnb••n Suppon ofOup--524 There's more Montrose t~s~8!~:fl-EA Gi;;--332-J73j -.."G :~fl~:~H ~a::::g;~.t~3:~~~=- - 11\9~!127-(1782 mM The number one source of ::!oToWNe '""- 100 -F•nn•n::s22-°237t community news in See our ad elsewhere this issue Montrose-the Voice AUGUST 27, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 29 Dateline S.F. Sea Air By Randy Alfred The ninth annual Castro Street Fair provided one hell of a party for some 60,000 revelers of every age, race, gender, and sexual orientation August 15. Unlike previous fairs, which took place under hot summer skies and for San Francisco's cold coastal fog, this year's bash enjoyed mild Pacific ocean air. The off-shore remnants of a tropical storm provided high clouds and scattered sun, perfect wather for San Francisco's own Feat of the Un war· ranted Assumption. John Damon, acting captain of San Francisco's Mission Dis­trict police station, estimated the crowd at only 20,000, but admit­ted, "We don't have any valid way of estimating." The fair took place on a half-mile of blocked-off city streets, the streets were plenty crowded, and people were coming and going for eight hours. I've been watching crowd sizes at gay events for nine years, including all the Castro Street Fairs, and the last nine parades. I also spent the preceding Wednesday afternoon in the company of37,500 other fans watching the red-hot San Francisco Giants dispatch the sinking Atlanta Braves, 8-6 in 12 innings. 40~~0a:Jh~.~~I'w~r;,~i;o~~:'~~~.':t':a1::~~~: Castro Fair turnout, and it's time the SFPD returned to tried and trusted methods of crowd-size estimation. If it's not one thing, it's another: The good news is gonor­rhea in San Francisco is at its lowest levels since 1973 and 1974. Health Department statistics show 7310 cases for the first six months of 1982. The bad new is syphillis is atan all-time high, with 1122 cases in the city and county for the same period. Ironically, the two figures may be related. Dr. Erwin Braff, director of the Health Department's Bureau of Communicable Disease, explains when gonorrhea is treated, the antiobiotics wipe out incubating cases of sypillis. Thus, when there is more clap, there is less syph. Whether the reverse is true, and less clap means more syph, is just speculation, Braff notes. Are you sexually active? When did vou last get screened for sexually transmitted diseases? Business Unusual: Arthur Lazere, president of the National Association of Business Councils, writing in that organiztion's newsletter, reports new gay and lesbian business groups are being launched in Denver, Houston and Phoenix. Lazere says NABC is also in touch with new groups in Indianapolis and St. Louis. NABC has l~ member organizations representing about 3000 individual and business members already. In October, Bay Area Career Women will become the 19th member organization, its first all-women organization, and, says Lazere, "we hope not the last.'' He's got a point there: Dr. Sander Breiner, A s• Professor of Psychiatry at Michigan State University, wnws in an article caHed HSexual Misconceptions'': "Homosexuali•y invariably is a symptom of a psychological problem. However. in the absence of a sexual partner of the opposite sex, homosexuality is a normal outlet for a heterosexual man or woman." This prompts Dr. David Kessler, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California-San Francisco, founder of Bay Area Physicians for Human Rights, and imme­diate past president of the Caucus of Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Members of the American Psychiatric Association, to comment: HWhat he's saying is that homosexuality is normal for heterosex­uals but abnormal for homosexuals." Down under and up over: Dennis Altman, author of Homosex­ual: Oppression and Liberation, Coming Out in the Seventies, and The Homosexualization of America-The Americanization of tM Homosexual, made these comments on KSAN-FM in San Fran­cisco not long ego: ".The diff~rences _between gay life in San Francisco and gay life . .. m the Villages m northern Maine are much greater that the differences between gay life in S.F. and gay life in Sydney, "Equally, the differences even within S.F. between the life lived by a 50-year-old, married lesbian with kids and a 20-year-old Iowan, who's moved to Castro Street for six months of sex and drugs, are much greater than the similarities between those two people and people like them in an Australian city." Altman went on to point out that Australia has less "ghettoiza­tion" of gays, less difference in lifestyles from one end of the country to the other, homophobia that is less violent, sex.ism that is cruder, and a gay movement that is more leftist than in the United States. Jargon can be fun: My soci~logical training leads me tochar­actenze bathhouses as institutions for the cooperative distribu­tion of pleasure. 30 MON'TROSEVOICE / AUGUST27,1982 RESTAURANTS ~-=·== :;::·~ ::=::. c:;:::" =~:€~=· ~::-.:.::::~ •• .-c: .... ....._-:; .... - .,,...,.... _ ___ ... ,.,._....._,. __ s.. ........ --- ~~'f;:.. ------------ ...... ' " i' ...... ,_,.,. " Alld....W:., .. ntl.rnen,tlMfattw l p,the _..s;..,_ ....,,....._omot.....,t." Got•question7Callthe GaySwitehboard, 529-3211 ~~..::.-- SERVICES UHIAN PllO•Lf.M IOLWINO ANO~OllOUptAND INDIVIOUAl.loHDlllU.TIOflSHIP COUlO!LINO. Or. Nonoll• -- -• .·..,.-. .,C.lla-Z1IO. ..-.... __ .., __ _ --... --- ~=::::. .. :-.:.:· -~-..- -·-~·--....... s.. ........ --- ~;::..~ Thenumberone1ourceo! community news In Montro-the Volce Q NLYtlwt Volcesaturates Montrosenchweek with over one hundred distribulionlocalioos --... --- :~A.Kl OPTICAl.-1'47 W Gr•y 1101- See our ad elsewhere this issue ~~.~~jEL h•lr car-11529 Cherry- Support, join your community organizations Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice ~Vl!L TICHtr•velagency-!719Klrby-522· See our ad elsewhere this issue UNITED C.U-e64-4040 See our ad elsewhere this issue ~'J,~~1=~~10Cl•t•, ldv9rt111ng­See our ad elsewhere this issue SHOPS & STORES A&A ,URNITURI ~ler-11318WMthelrMf­S31 ·INIOO See our ad elsewhere this issue e ALL·STAA Adult News- -1407 Rlcttmond- 5,._...,. :~~~~ATGLITIER-Sg1tt1-~ ~~;RO AClet{FiOr111-1&.ewes1heuMr- There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice :~~~1 c--1slE- pet ahop- :2011 SWTwy.­• AsY·L-UM Adult Bookstore--1201 Richmond ::ft.LL PARK- AdUit BOOi&iCXH83ilWAl•- ::.~~,!~.f ~JRS ctothing-1220 eHo.HoU1E.:.2115Nort0tk-523-eva- See our ad elsewhere this Issue 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment e BlUE IAIS-3818 S Shephwd 52~1827 e BOOM TOWN BLOOMS n -3210 S ShepMrd-5~110 ~u~~~~~~~~1w.z:-~~~;a.n:oc: FIM e CARGO HOUSE-1902 P•rtl-529-0334 ~6~~NE DANCEWEAR-4704 Monlr • COMPANY e mlllUry WHr-5366 W•thelmer-985-9753 Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 • DOUBRAVA JONES, tl'lt M•nhlm etoctling­t983 W Gr•y~-10MI • DOWNBEAT R.cotd9-2117 Rtchmotld-523- 8341 • DRAMATIKA glftl-3224 Yoekum-52&-5457 • FACETS g!ft1 1412 w .. tMimer-&23-1412 The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice :.:!f~~!~r~~gj1~RENCE -rr.mino=im ~iDAY'S- fl0r1ll-1338 westhelmer-524· GITA'SJewelry--680-3579 See our ad elsewhere this issue • KiA8YNewll•rnt-=3l15--K1rby--520-ii2.ce :;~~i;!~~~~~i.RY -.nd-lu•n- -121i ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations :2~~Y• lMth91' Goodl-912 W•thelmer- ~!n:~~~E reule boutlque-1405 • PLANT HOUSE-112 W<Nttlelmer-526-nes • 0-1 lEATHER-406 w .. rn.imer-&!7-9044 Support, join your community organizations :2~~RO RACK mutlc-3109 s Shepherd ~c:guoH CUT Jewelry-520 w .. 1t1t1m.r-5~ See our ad elsewhere this Issue .•,.I.H..O,_E WA .. t:HOUH 2024 WHlh•lmer See our ad elsewhere this Issue !!~OCKER clott'tlng-311 W•I~ e STUOZAdultNew1-1132W Al.,..,... • TEXASCARAVAN&ArmadlnoF!owwa 2115 Dun~-520-7019 :.=;,:,~ETA CIOlhlng 1823 • TOTALITY STORE 1121 W Gray-526-8790 Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice •TREYMAN 9ifts-407 we11he1m« 523-0228 :2~= JACK clothing-1212 w•lheimer=. ::1~EA MARKe-T -1733 There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice • WILDE & STE1N book 11ore-802 We1ihe1- mer--529-7014 gay TRAVEL KNOXVILLE WORLD'S FAIR Eleanor Guest House, rooms from $28.50. (615) 523-5831 Joan Riuers, grand marshall of the National Reno Gay Rodeo, which was a little contro­uersial this year. See "Sports" in this issue of the Voice. AUGUST 27, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 31 Fortunes ByTycho FO< Frid11y ~ening, Augu3t 27, through Fr1d1y .venmg, September 3, 1982: The Moon is in SAGITTARIUS as the weekend opens, enters CAPRI­CORN at 10:23 a.m. Saturday morning, passes into AQUARIUS at 11:24 p.m. Monday night and enters PISCES at 10:12 a.m. Thursday morning, staying there until the following Saturday evening, Sept. 4. ARIES-Don't get lost in your own thoughts and desires. Need can tum to greed if you don't pay attention. What if the noise of your ambition kept you from hearing that beautiful knock on the door of your heart? TAURUS-Thinking about starting over, trying agam, reconcilia­tions? It's a good time for it. You know what you want this time, and you're willing to make some important changes in order to get it. GEMINI-Your self-improvement project is going great. Congratu­lations! Just keep on examining feelings of guilt and inferiority. Share your deepest secrets with those helping you. Get it all out. CANCER-Someone from your past wants to press your present buttons this week. Just Jet that person know where you are, and go charging ahead. You should find some new thrilJs and excitement. LEO-Still in your sign all week: Venus. That lovelight shining in your eyes could be reflected right back by someoney0t.tnger. Stay open to possibilities, but don't make any promises. This is a week of strong, but transient feelings. VIRGO-Jn your sign all week: The Sun. You're coming on strong. This is your time and season, and there'll no stopping you now. You're like a magnet, attracting all kinda of people, ao don't let the bizarre put you off. LIBRA-In your sign this week: Mercury, Saturn and Pluto. Get out of town before it's too late, my love. You're getting dull, even to yourself. U only for a day or two, you need a change of scene to get back on track. Relax. Recharge. SCORPIO-Jn your sign this week: Mars and JupiU!r. Creative construction is the key this week. Whether you're fashioning a gourmet dinner or a new love affair, you'll be able to make something special of it. Love makes simple ingredients go a long way. SAGITTARIUS-Still in your sign this week: Uranus and Neptune. Heart and mind are out of synch. You'll find yourself saying things you don't really feel, and feeling things you can'tput words to. Watch your friends' -reac;tions, and apologize for the hurts you cause. CAPRICORN-Much fun with the main one in your life goes a long way in relieving tensions that build up in your work. Pleasure for the sake of eacape takes on new meanings. Hot nights ... AQUARIUS-First you want one thing, then another. First a friend, then a lover. You can't quite make up your mind. Perhaps you're too analytical in an area where analysis has little value. PISCES-Give serious thought to any sudden moves. The urge to change homes, lovers or jobs is strong. Have a party instead. An unusual assortment of friends or a strange combination of people may help find some answers. •1912 STONEWALL FEATURES SYNOK;ATE Sick, sick, sick By Henry McClurg Last Word Lo and behold, looks what's in the Sunday newspaper: an in(f!!!a~~~'&~~!g "hunting sale." Kill!Kill!Kill! Of course, "sportsmen" use those guns to hunt animals­for food, they alwa~ say several times on the hunting J~s~r~~'hii:1<:.'j,";ur; ofkifli~~v~~u~e~ci!':ii~ew~0i!TI1kn~! ~~~swii~Ji1e.s~o~.r in America, so it's our duty to track So, accepting ~at argument, let me o?.!!n up this Sunday insert and see what kinds of hunting rifles we have. Uh Oh! First off, page 2, for just $19.95C shaped like a ~~!~tic(bB i:~j.'~t was coming) the" rossman 1600 At least there's some justification to the idea of a BB rifle ~~:r~.~je~~t': fii! ~je~;::e~~tfu/~:lio~eB~ ~WJ handgun? Now you don't use BBs to hunt for animals and you don't use handguns either for that. I g!less this pistol is so that ol' dad can train his yountfi son with a BB pistol so when he ri;n'd~i'i'i':. he can make e easy, switch to the real thing-a We are a sick society. 32 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 27, 1982 L A \ COME SEE WHAT WE'VE DONE AT THELAMPOST Same atmosphere-newly remodeled all over­upstairs, downstairs, patio Same crowd-new friendly management T HIS W EEKEND-DIRECT FROM :NASHVILLE PEGGY SUE (LORETTA l.NNN'S S ISTER) &SONNYRAV This Sunday, 12-6, Beer Bust FREE BEER Plus reduced prices on all drinks, everyday Live Band, Wednesday thru Sunday Cookout on the Patio, Monday Nights Steak Night, Wednesdays Watch for our New Weekly M Schedule of Events POST Under New Management 528-8921 2417 Times Blvd.
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