Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985
File 017
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985 - File 017. 1985-09-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/461/show/452.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1985-09-27). Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985 - File 017. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/461/show/452

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985 - File 017, 1985-09-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/461/show/452.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 27, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript 16 MONTROSE VOICE / SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 Montrose Live Ensemble 'Falls' Into New Theater Season By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Critic Poets can write about Spring. They can call the robin its harbinger. All the plants are budding. There's hope and renewal in the very air. Come to think of it, they can even write about fall. Thank God it's cool again. Many Texans can have nostalgic memories about their first home—where the quaking aspen turn golden. I, of course, am a play reviewer, not a poet. Still, I didn't need the calendar to tell me last weekend that fall had arrived. Suddenly there are more plays than I have time to review. (I just missed Vernonica's Room at Theater Suburbia. You still have time to see it, but you wouldn't if you watied for me to review it first.) Suddenly, too, I am faced with plays which are intentionally depressing, like The Ensemble's Split Second. Personally, I prefer robins. However, there are important, serious issues which need to be discussed and which are being ignored by the mass media. Many of these issues were meant for the stage, anyway. It is where they can best be discussed. Not only do I accept that fact, it makes me proud to be a live-stage professional. So it is not as some flit who can't enjoy a good drama, who has to be laughing all the time, that I feel forced to caution you against going to this show. Nor is it the acting. It is up to The Ensemble's usual high standards. This is a starring turn for Lee Stansberry. He is only offstage for about two minutes of the entire play. He carries it off with aplomb. Yet he is such a good, giving actor. And the rest of the cast is so strong that the evening has nearly a small ensemble feel. Nor is it the direction. George Hawkins is a fantastic director. I have seen several actors who were never much more than good journeymen elsewhere give shining performances under his inspirational leadership. Was it the lighting? Alvin McAfee did what he could with what he had. It was still very dim. This theater, like a couple others I could mention, desperately needs more lighting instruments. (In theater, if you just call them lights, you run into all sorts of trouble.) No. All-in-all it would have been a marvelous production were it not for the script. What could have so blinded George Hawkins that he chose this play by Dennis Mclntyre to open his tenth season? It's beyond me. There are two scenes in the play that are not like every other scene in the play. One of them is the very first scene in which a white punk in handcuffs so torments a black cop by giving him undeserved, prejudiced lip that the cop shoots him. From there on out, each scene begins with the cop lying to another character about the first incident. Then the other character sees through it. Then the cop changes his story closer to the truth. The scene-change music wells up. There are approximately three more sentences of dialogue. Blackout. This scene, with variations only in the characters and the details, is played out five or six times. Theme and variations work well in other, shorter artistic media—music, poetry—but it does not work in theater. Well, maybe in LaRonde, but not here. Everything is so predictable. You know you've come to the climax when there are two people onstage and neither one is the cop. You know that either the man has taken the only honorable way out of the situation—hari kari—thus allowing the playwright to continue on indefinitely with two character scenes. Or else he is probably going to listen to his wife, a close relative of Lady MacBeth—in which case the parallelism will be broken. Three people onstage in this play^can only mean the end is nigh. Pity. Mclntyre writes very good characterization. Now if he can only come up with something for his people to do. Meredith Monk to perform at the Tower Theater Saturday and Sunday. San Francisco Ballet premieres new works in Houston. u Notes Buzz is back out of the hospital. Cheer up! Casts don't last forever. It only feels that way. ... The Group's production of One donated $1750 to the KS/AIDS Foundation. Director Joe Watts is a little disgruntled that he didn't make more for them, but, as I told him, it's the best any art happening has done for them locally. Next AIDS play: As Is at Stages in early 1986. Next gay play: Execution of Justice. Wilde & Stein and Houston Area Women's Center are selling tickets to a special night at the Alley—Oct. 5. That's next Saturday already. Grab those tickets! ... Tomorrow morning Allen Parkway and Memorial Drive, between Shepherd and downtown, will be the site of the fourth annual InterFirst Symphony run, benefitting the HSO. ... Then next Saturday there will be a five- mile fun run benefitting City Ballet of Houston. Pre-run festivities will be Friday (Oct. 4) at the Hyatt Regency West ballroom. ... TUTS has signed hot man Antony Hamilton to do the title role in Pal Joey next May. Anyone who saw Mirrors knows he makes a great heel. ... A special performance of Rocky Horror will take place at Rich's this coming Monday at 7:30 p.m. to benefit the Gay and Lesbian Switchboard of Houston. Celebrate! As September turns into October, take those Johnny Mathis (born the 30th) records off the spindle for some Vladamir Horowitz (born the 1st). Painter Charless Rickets (2nd) was best known for his innovative set designs and art nou- veau book bindings; Caravaggio (28th) for his apple cheeked boys. Vincent Varga's (28th) first novel was the first gay gothic romance, Gaywyck. Robert Patrick (27th) is one f our more prolific gay playwrights, best known for his one act comedies like Angel Honey Baby Darling Dear Believe it or not, he was born just up the
File Name uhlib_22329406_n257_016.jpg