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Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985
File 015
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Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985 - File 015. 1985-09-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/461/show/450.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1985-09-27). Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985 - File 015. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/461/show/450

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985 - File 015, 1985-09-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/461/show/450.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 27, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript 14 MONTROSE VOICE / SEPTEMBER 27. 1985 Meg Tilly, left, and Jane Fonda in "Agnes of God" 'Agnes' and 'Creator' Take on Heavy Issues By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic Two of the three new films opening this week take on the "big" issues like religion, creating and sustaining life, and even virgin birth. One tackles the issues quite nicely, while the other blindly sidesteps any harsh confrontations. Surprisingly, it is the much anticipated Agnes of God that overlooks the questions that it raises. With Jane Fonda, Anne Bancroft, and Meg Tilly (as a nun found with a strangled infant) we are assured of an acting tour-de-force, but the religious topics that appear at its center are never fully explored. Creator does a much better job with its issues as Peter OToole attempts to recreate his wife from cells in a home laboratory. Many provoking questions are raised, and the surprising solutions often make a lot of sense. The third film is a fluffy British comedy with Christopher Plummer and Maggie Smith called Lily in Love. No big message here; just a lively, theatrically-oriented movie about age and marriage that features two very entertaining performances. □ Agnes of God When Hollywood takes on religious topics, it inevitably steps on shaky ground. Recent films like Mass Appeal, True Confessions, Monsignor, and Nasty Habits all fared rather poorly at the box office because people take their religion seriously. They don't like to see priests, nuns and the church displayed commer cially no matter how serious the subject matter is. Now we have Agnes of God, a shocking story about a nun found with a newborn, strangled baby in her room. This one is sure to shake up some Catholics. I thought so myBelf because it deals with the touchy subject of immaculate conception. Apparently the child-like nun thinks that her baby was conceived through God not man. Director Norman Jewison (A Soldier's Story, In the Heat of the Night) is no stranger to controversial films. His movies have explored themes of race, religion and justice in pictures as diverse as Jesus Christ Superstar, Fiddler on the Roof, and FIST. Yet while Agnes of God looks like another risky venture, Jewison has actually played it quite safe. While the saint-like nun Agnes (glowingly played by Meg Tilly) seems to be the center of the film, she is really just a sideline off the major religious confrontation. When Jane Fonda, the court psychiatrist, meets Mother Superior Anne Bancroft, the believers vs. the non-believers showdown becomes evident. Mother Bancroft is going to change Fonda's ex-Catholic mind to accept miracles, saints and Catholo- cism again. Each time Fonda and Bancroft meet, we expect fireworks. Bancroft hams it up with sly and witty comments (not to mention the droll looks) while Fonda fidgets and chain smokes with nervous anxiety. The talk seems to center on poor, innocent Agnes but we sense that the Rev. Mother is more interested in saving a lost soul. Meanwhile, while Dr. Livingston (Fonda) fends off the Mother, she must try Films Maggie Smith and Christopher Plummer in "Lily in Love" Peter O'Toole stars in "Creator" to find out if Agnes is looney or sane. The mystery behind Agnes' saint-like appearance and thoughts do become partially unraveled, but it seems rather flimsy and not needed. It is obvious that Livingston is supposed to think through religious beliefs because of her interactions with Agnes and the Mother, but the point of the film just seems to wander. In the end, the filmmakers have played it safe by sidestepping many moral and religious topics {but still raising them), and dwelling on that aged theme of religious backsliding. While this may please the church-going crowd, they may still be puzzled over the virgin Agnes whose hands bleed like Jesus and who may have killed the "second coming." We are left with many startling Bcenes containing questions that are never answered. Agnes of God is an interesting film with marvelous performances by all three actresses. Yet the film seems so unsure of itself that it seems to come apart at the seams. Fonda makes a gallant attempt to hold it together, but her psychiatrist role seems more like an investigative reporter getting a religious tongue lashing at every turn. In the end, this is an uncomfortable movie that really makes us uneasy for nothing. □ Creator Creator is one of those crazy little movies that looks very simple but ends of up being quite complex. The newspaper ads suggest something on the order of My Science Project, but we actually get something very different. Czechoslovakian director Ivan Passer (Cutters Way) takes a bushelful of heavy, controversial subjects and dumps them all into one strangely mixed film. Everything from test tube babies and euthanasia to God vs. science and the retirement of older, able workers, is stirred up for benefit of review. This is one film that should have a group discussion following each screening. The "creator" of the title Dr. Harry Wolper (Peter O'Toole), a Blightly off- balance professor on the brink of a scientific breakthrough. Using the cells of his dead wife, he is attempting to recreate her in a test tube 30 years after her demise. His love for her has never waned, and he is determined to bring her back to life. His lab assistant is Boris, a young grad student played by Vincent Spano (Rum- blefish). Boris is not pleased with Harry at first, failing to see what he calls "the big picture" of life instead of all the little ones that science searches for. He is actually more interested in a beautiful girl (Virginia Madsen) that he saw on campus— especially since Harry knows her name. Things become more involved when the professor advertises for a young girl to donate an egg for his tests. The answer comes in the form of Mariel Hemingway as a 19-year-old nymphomaniac. She donates her egg, and then hangs around the house falling head-over-heels in love with Harry. Suddenly, we have quite a few thingB coming at us at the same time. Boris gets his girl, falls madly in love, and then she falls into a coma with a brain tumor. Harry is getting a fetus in his experiments, but he is too busy to realize that he could have a beautiful relationship with Hemingway. And then the university comes down on Harry by taking back the lab equipment that he pilfered and therefore ruining the experiment. Some how things start to fall back into place, and we start to get some answers to the questions that are raised. The main question about whether we should attempt to create life is answered simply: Don't bother—let God handle it. Life is precious, but when it's over—then it's finished. Harry even makes his forced retirement into an occasion where he can gleefully continue working. Creator is fresh, funny and even intelligent, because it makes you think. Of course, the wit of Peter O'Toole is always welcome in any film. Bicycling around campus puffing a cigar, he is like Mr. Chips gone a bit mad. He can sense that he could have the power of God with his experiment, but he's not really sure that he could handle the responsibilities to go with it. All he knows is that God and science can somehow work together, and if you have faith in both, then the "big picture" will fall into place. There is almost too much going on in this film to absorb in one Betting, but for some reason this film is actually much
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