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Montrose Voice, No. 271, January 3, 1986
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Montrose Voice, No. 271, January 3, 1986 - File 001. 1986-01-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4585/show/4564.

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(1986-01-03). Montrose Voice, No. 271, January 3, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4585/show/4564

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 271, January 3, 1986 - File 001, 1986-01-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4585/show/4564.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 271, January 3, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 3, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Do You Live in the 'Perfect Tense'? Dr. Didato, mside Junk Movies: The Very Worst of 1985 "The Newspaper of Montrose" Friday, January 3, 1986 Issue 271 (713) 529-8490 Scott Cutsinger, inside Montrose Nightclub Hit by Robbers News, inside Police Seek Killer of Former Montrose Restaurant Owner News, inside TCLU Blasts Cisneros' Record on Freedom Issues News, p.3 Experts to Actors: No Evidence Kissing Spreads AIDS News, inside For One Gay Native American It's G No-Win Choice '86 AIDS Budget Comes at Expense of Indian Health By John Ross Buried deep in the 1986 Department of Health and Human Services budget is a 10-word request that raises the hackles of both Native American and gay communities. The DHHS will take millions of dollars already allocated for a pilot Indian Health Service program and spend it on AIDS research. Randy Bums is one citizen doubly affected by the shift. He grew up in a large traditional family on the impoverished Pyramid Lake Reservation in Nixon, Nevada, sharing the joys and deprivations of Northern Piute tribal life. As a child, he hunted jackrabbits and learned the old ways from his grandfather, the son of a renowned healer. As he grew into adolescence, Randy Burns began to understand that he was gay. "By the ninth grade, I was going off into the sagebrush. You could never bring your friend home. Being gay is still very much in the closet on our reservation," recalls Bums. continued inside The Tennis Split Controversy Causes Houston Tennis Club to Divide Being unable to dissolve differences among the membership concerning the organization's by-laws and constitution, the Houston Tennis Club has split into two groups. continued inside 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1986 Gay and lesbian reading =======from====== A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS HOT LIVING: Erotic ~tories about ,afe sex, edited by John Preston SS 00 The AIDS CJISls has closed off some forms of xual act1vlly for health-consc1ous gay men but ll has also encouraged many men to ok for new forms of sexual ex pres ion Hue over a dozen of today's mo t p p Jar gay wnt~rs present new short tones that 1m.i m.iuvely eroucize .ife sex Contr.butors mclude Toby John on Frank Mosca, Marty Rubm, <;am 5tew.ird George Whllmorc and TR W1tomsk1 50CRATES, PLATO AND GUYS LIKE ME: Confe sions of a gay schoolteacher, by Enc Rofes, $7 00 When Enc Rofes began teachmg sixth gr.ide at a conser vatlve pnvatc schoo: he soon felt the smun of a spill 1dentuy Herc he dcscnbes his two ye.irs of teaching from wllhm the doset his d1ff1cuh deus10n to come out at ,.ork, and th~ conse­quences of that dec1s10n iSECOOD Ctf flOCf S a novel bv Florine De Ueer SECOND CHANCES, by Flonnc de Veer, $7 00 Is tt always harder to accept what is offered free)yl Jeremy, young and sull naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of hts devoted fnend Roy, yet he chooses to pursue the hand· some and unpredictable Mark ONE TEENAGER JN TEN: Writings by gay and le bian youth, cdued by Ann Heron, 3 95 Twenty .eight young peo­ple from all ova the US and Canada, mostly m high school, share theu coming-out expenenccs STOLEN MOMENTS, by John Preston, $5.00 Who ;ays heroes can't be gay1 In the fourth of the "M1ss1on of Alex Kane" scncs, Kane and his partner Danny Fortelli head for Houston. There, they take on a media baron who is intent on usmg homophobia to build his tabloid's cuculauon Also available. Sweet Dreams, Golden Year> and Deadly Lies, each star­nng Alex and Danny; SS.DO each. EXTRA CREDIT, by Jeff Black, $6 00. Harper King has a bonng teaching job, stagnant relationships, and a tank full of fish named after ex-lovers dying m the same order the1r namesakes were se­duced C'an you blame him for wanung u fresh start! Enter Mick, a lover from the past talkmg about the1r future; Gamck, a first-year teacher lookmg for conjunc uons, and not necessanly m the class· room, and young Dean, an oversexed Denm the Menace makmg all A's in some very advanced biology IRIS, by Janme Veto, $7 00 The rctellmg of an ancient Greek myth of love, devo­t10n and vengeance - this time with a lesbian theme. REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, S4 95 The movmg auto· biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na­tional news when he took a gay date tu h1' high school prom MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M Steward, $7 00 This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stem and Alice B Toklas sleuthing through the French countryside, attemptmg to solve the mystcnous dtsappearance of a man who 1s their neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stones THE LA VEND ER COUCH: A con­sume"' guide to therapy for lesbians and gay men, by Mamy Hall, $8.00. Therapy can be tremendously helpful for lesbians and gay men. Yet how many of us really know ho,. to go about choosmg a thcrap1>t, and how to be sure we can get the most out of therapyl Mamy Hall, herself a lesbian therapist, has wntten the hrst book ever tu address this sub· )CCt. THE PEARL BASTARD, by Lillian Halegua, $4 00. Frankie is fifteen when she leaves her large, suffocating Catholic family in the inner city for Montauk, work, and the sea She tells her story with a combmation of painful mnocence and acute vision, beginning with the man in the fine green car who docs not mourn the v10lent death of a seagull against his windshield The simplicity of Halegua's style 1s remimscent of The Color Purple; it is a powerful story of a girl's sudden entry mto a harsh maturity ·'"EDITF.RRANEO, by Tony Patrioh, S 13 00 Through some 46 photos, Itahan photographer Tony Patrioh explores the homo-erouc tamory in which, smce the begmnmg of ume, adolescent boys have discovered sex. {Oversize paperback! THE HUSTLER, by John Henry Mackay; trans. by Hubert Kennedy, $8.00. Gun· ther is fifteen when he amves alone in the Berlin of the 1920s. There he dis­covers the boys of Friednch Street, and the men who stroll by and speak with them. Soon he is spotted by Hermann Graff, a sensuive and naive yc>ung man who becomes hopele;sly enamored with Gunther But love does not fit neatly in­to Gunther's new hfc as a hustler . . Gunther's story was first published m 1926 For today's reader, 1t combines a poignant love story wllh a colorful por· trayal of the gay ubculture that thnvcd m Berlin a half-century ago DANCER DAWKINS AND THE CALIFORNIA KID, by Willyce Kim, S6.00. A new and very different lesbian novel, which Judy Grahn calls: "A wonderful, rip-roaring Western lesbian adventure that left me warm, tickled, and hoping she wntcs a dozen more." "The hook of the year," writes Feminist Bookstore News. ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, $5.00. The story of a teenage love affair that should have been simple but wasn't EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan, $7 00 Johnme Ray Rousseau ts a 22-ycar-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm. Ke1th Keller 1s a white banker with a 10 o'clock bedume - and muscles to die for. This story of theu love affair is one of the most engross­ing - and funniest - you'll ever read. ............ TO ORDER .............. : Enclosed is$_ -· Please send the book~ I've listed below. {Add $1 00 postage when ordenng 1ust one book; if you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Plea.c send me these books: 1. ____ _ 2. _ 3. ___ _ 4. _ _____ _ s. _ _ ~ Visa and mastercard accepted, please send acct. number, exp. date, and signature name --- address city state _ __ z1p ______ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. l'·S 40 Plympton St Boston, MA 0211 fl • ········································· JANUARY 3, 1986 'MONTROSE VOICE 3 TCLU Blasts Cisneros' Record on Freedom Issues From a Published Associated Press Report San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros has a "real blind spot" when it comes to per­sonal freedom issues and his city compiled the state's worst civil liberties record in 1985, the Texas Civil Liberties Union said. "The nation's 10th-largest city bears close watching for its insensitivity to free­dom," the TCLU said Friday, Dec. 28, in a year-end report. TCLU Director Gara LaMarche said 1985 might have dulled some of the shine on Cisneros' rising political star. "For somebody who has a national repu­tation as articulate and progressive, he's got a real blind spot as far as the First Amendment is concerned. The average liberal in Dallas, Houston or New York City thinks this guy Cisneros is really a star, but they haven't paid attention to the other si..Je of Cisneros," LaMarche said. That "other side" includes a "very unfortunate tendency to pander to right­wingers," he said. Cisneros did not return three calls from The Associated Press last Friday. montrose VOICE ANO TEXA >•STAR MONTROSE. TEXAS Population <•t 1985) 32 000 Census tracts '01 01, 401 02. 402 01. <02 02. '05 02. 403 Ind - 01 Zip COd• (roughly) 77000. 77019 {portion). 77098 Bounded (roughly) Shepherd Or twnt). Allen P1rkw1y (north), Main St !HSO, U $ S9 (IOllth) L1t1lude (MontrOM Blvd II WMlheu'l'MH' Rd) 29"4.c'13 .. N Longitude 8S' 22'5CTW, Allilude 4(1 ELECTED OFFICIALS FOR MONTROSE George GrNnla1. Houston City C~ncll (d1tt CJ 801 B•gby. t11JJ 222·5933 El Franco l" H.lrr11 County Comm11Sloner (pcl 11 ""''Preston. (713J nr-4"' Waiter Ranlu'n. Co,.tabte (pcl 1J J(H S•n Jatinlo, (7f3J 221-5200 Oebf• Oanburg. Tl•H HouM of RepreMntat111M (<list 137) IGI f SW Fwy. /713/ S10-8068 Craig WHh•ngton Te11111 Senal• !d••I 13) 2323 CarOlme. 1713} 116~4343 Mickey Lellnd. US House of Repr1Nnt1t111n fd111 18) Jgrg Smith •820. (7131 7:»-7339 The Newspaper of Monlrose Es1abl1shed 1980 OUR 271sl ISSUE JAN 3. 1986 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 DISTRIBUTION 11 500 copies w'ekfy In Houston through 1~0 major d1ttnbut1on pointa m the MontroH. the Village. the Hetght1 •stimat«J pa1-on 11t• l1ctor 2 8 Hl1m1ltd rHd•rahip 32.200 WHkfy 500 copies weekly elsewhere 1nrough 10 ottter d111nbution points Ht1m1t«I pau·on r1tt /1ctor 2 5 eat1m1t1d r•MJ•rah•p 1.200 weeldy TOTAL OISTRIBUTION !GUARANTEED) 12.000 copies weekly tot1J Ht1m1t.cl rt1d•rth1p 33.400 weekly Con1en1s copynghl 1986 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurgipublt.Shlf-lid1tor Linda Wych&m1n1oino .cJitor Roger Lackey 01t1u manager David Roumfortproduct10n director Mark Blazek. Austin corrHpandent Scott Cutsinger I Bill o·Rourk& rot:•f contnbutOtS Steve Warrel'\ n•tiOnal corr•JPOtlcHnt ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Houston (713) 529-8490 Elsewhere Texas (800) 222·1537 EXT 995220 Elsewhere US (800) 22S-0227 EXT 995220 Jerry MulhollandiM1v•rt11mo d1r«:tor Rick H1l~1ccounr eit«:utiv• Found1no M•mblr1 Grealer Montroae Business Guild. Gey •nd LMb•tn PrHI Auoc1111on N•w• S.,wc.1 New1-0ne. P1c1f1c News Service Synd1clt.cl Feetur• S1n11c•1 & Wr1ttr1 Brian McNaught. Unt­versal Pr ... Syndtelle. News Amer1c1 Synd1ca1e POSTMASTER Send Midresa correchons to 408 Avondale, Houlton. TX 77006-3028 Subtcript10n flt• in US m SH/ed tnvttope $49 per year (52 ••un) $29 per tot months {28IHue1).orS1 25perweek (less than 26 •SUHI Back 11sue1 $2 00 Neh N•t•on'11 ldverl/$1t1Q rtPTH•ntatrvt Joe 01Sllbeto. R1vendell MArklhnQ 866 Slh A11enue, N~w York 10011. (212) 242-6863 Advt1t11ino dHd11M Wednesday 5 30pm for lnue r1leued Friday evenlng Notre. to •d.,.,tia.,.. Loe.I •dver11S1ng rate achedull Seven-A wueflectlveOct 12 18&4 and Eight A .. lbef'tf.c:uveJan 3 11NM1 ReJpons bll1ty The Mon1rose VoiCe does not assume respon. 11bi ry '°' 1dver1111no claims ~eori 1h0ul0 a0v1 .. the newspaper 10 any decet;1tive 1cher11S1ng Statewide, it was a "mixed year" for civil liberties, the TCLU report said. It reported "gains" in the form of defeats of proposed anti-abortion legislation and bills that could have eroded rights of crim­inal defendants. TCLU also claimed a vic­tory in the legislature's decision to allow farm workers to collect unemployment insurance. The "setbacks" included a tentatively approved State Board of Health rule adding AIDS to the list of diseases for which a Texan can be quarantined. State health officials say isolation would be used as a last-resort measure against incorrigible AIDS victims. San Antonio provided several of the "setbacks" in the TCLU report including: -A city ordinance barring people 13 and under from attending-without their parents-concerts or shows "which are vulgar, profane and repulsive to society generally." The ordinance is aimed at rock concerts. -Bexar County District Attorney Sam Millsap's threat of criminal prosecution of AIDS patients who do not cease sexual w'*' STEVE 0 . MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMfITED DISEASES AIDS1KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON.-FRI. 8:30AM-5 PM SAME DAY APPOINTMENT MON;1. WED., FRI. EVENINGS AND ~ATURDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY 2801 EU.A BLVD., SUITE G HOUSTON. TX 77008 (713) 868-4535 IN 1l-IE HEIG!iTS ~1 •=== activity that can spread the disease. -Complaints about abuse and harass­ment by police. -An attempt by the City Council to keep the Playboy Channel off the local cable TV system. Cisneros assistant Shirl Thomas noted that the council rejected the move to ban the Playboy Channel, and city health offi­cials were instructed to stop sending the "inappropriate" letters to AIDS victims. LaMarche said Cisneros "allied with the Moral Majority types" in the push against the Playboy Channel, and he helped win approval for the rock concert ordinance. Thomas said the mayor supported the rock concert ordinance because, "He lives very close to downtown and he has seen on many occasions young people leaving the arena and it was a concern to him." "He would say there's an issue of ste­wardship," said Thomas. "We took as a model what the movie industry has done. There are some movies that children under a certain age should have an adult accompany them to." LaMarche said the TCLU chose not to get heavily involved in three majorissues viewed by some as personal freedom fights-seat belt;;, •molting and the no­pass, no-play school rule. LaMarche said the new mandatory seat belt law is not an "infringement" on indi­vidual rights. "The right to drive is not at the same level as free speech or praticing your reli­gion," he said, calling the seat-belt law "a reasonable exercise ofregulatory powers." TCLU won't get heavily involved in the no-pass, no-play debate unless it perceives a "grossly disproportionate impact" on minority students, he said. "There is no civil liberties right to engage in extracurricular activities," LaMarche said. TCLU has fielded calls from Texans con­cerned about city efforts to limit smoking in public places-an issue in which TCLU has chosen not to get involved "as long as these ordinances leave some way for peo­ple to smoke." 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1986 For One Gay Native American It's a No-Win Choice '86 AIDS Budget Comes at Expense of Indian Health By John Rosi Pacific New• Service Special to the Montrose Voice Buried deep in the 1986 Department of Health and Human Services budget is a 10-word request that raises the hackles of both Native American and gay communi­ties. The DHHS will take millions of dollars already allocated for a pilot Indian Health Service program and spend it on AIDS reflearch. Randy Burns is one citizen doubly affected by the shift. He grew up in a large traditional family on the impoverished Pyramid Lake Reservation in Nixon, Nev­ada, sharing the joys and deprivations of Northern Piute tribal life. As a child, he hunted jackrabbits and learned the old ways from his grandfather, the son of a renowned healer As he grew into adolescence, Randy Burns began to understand that he was gay. "By the ninth grade, I was going off into the sagebrush. You could never bring your friend home. Being gay is still very much in the closet on our reservation," recalls Burns. A decade ago, during the first flowering of gay liberation, Burns put re..ervation uptightness behind him and fled to San Francisco, where he met other young Indi­ans with similar experi«>nces. "We were never really accepted in either the Indian movement or the gay movement so we started our own club," says Burns, who today runs Gay American Indians (GA!), a l,()()().membl'r inter·tribal group which ha1 rediscovered the roots of Indian homo­sexuality. Those roots are documented as early as 1790 when French fur traders noted "berdaches"-braves who dressed as women-among Candian Indians. Film buffs will remember " Little Horse, the Contrary" in Dustin Hoffman's Little Big Man, a gay character drawn from life. The DHHS will take millions of dollars already allocated for a pilot Indian Health Service program and spend it on AIDS research. "We were the go-betweens among the tribes and between the Army and the tribes," Burns explains. "We were always regarded as having a special place. The people saw us as makers of medicine." Despite such antecedents, gay Indians often meet with hostility in Native Ameri­can circles. Even in urbane San Francisco, the local American Indian Center is embarraRsed when GAI posts its literature on office bulletin boards, according to Burns. And back on the Pyramid Lake re11ervation, Burns says, the AIDS jokes a re brutal. The imbroglio over AIDS funding has further muddied waters. Last July, when then-head of DHHS Margaret Heckler propORed the reprogramming of a $.5 mil­lion Indian Health Incentive Program GUEENWAY PIACE APARTMENTS :\333 CUMMINS LANE HOUSTON (713) 623-2034 New Year's Move-In Special 2 Bedroom I 2 Baths with all bills paid lease by January 5th and Receive 1 Month Free Office Mon.-ffi. 8:30-5:30 Houri Saturday 10:00-5:00 Sunday 1 :00-5:00 grant to AIDS research, Native Americans were furious. The monies had been slated to bring Indians into reservation health care programs now contracted out to whites. The move came in the wake of other, bigger proposed cutl>acks­President Reagan's proposed 1986 Indian Health Service budget came in $35 million under Congress' final 1985 appropriation. The federal government has been obli­gated to provde health care for America's one million Native Americans since the early 1800s. Indian Health Service, a branch of Public Health Service, now runs a network of 47 hospitals, 80 health cen­ters, and hundreds of clinics and health stations on re8ervations. But despite the infrastructure, Native Americans are the most poorly cared for ethnic group in the country. Indians die younger than all other Americans. Their alcoholism , suicide, tuberculosis and heart attack rates are multiples of those for white Americans. South Dakota's Pine Ridge Ogala Sioux ReRervation, once a hotbed of radical Indian activity, is an example of how bad statsitics have worsened: the infant mor­tality rate there increased from 14.6 per 1,000 births to 31.6 during the first two years of the Reagan presidency. A week before the 1984 election, Reagan fueled the anger of Native American lead­ers by vetoing a supplemental Indian Health Appropriation. Heckler's suspen­sion of Dr. Everett Rhodes as director of the Indian Health Service for alleged improprieties some months later caused more outcry-Indian leaders say Rhodes was suspended for having criticized the Reagan veto. When DHHS ordered the transfer of funds from Indian Health to AIDS research last July, Native American health providers threw up their hands in despair. "It's unconscionable," says Martin Waukazoo, a Rosebud Sioux who runs San Francisco's Native American Health Cen­ter, "Five million dollars could fund 37 clinics such as ours on reservations all over the country. We can't provide full ser­vice as it is. "Our social worker comes in only four hours a week-and she isn't even sup­poRed to counsel men. This money was taken from Indian Health only because the Reagan administration thinks it's pol­itically safe to do so," says Waukazoo. "We're the least opposition. We have no voting power. Gays are real vocal." Randy Bums, too, opposes the transfer but is caught between two worlds. "I think it's a disgrace that they've taken from one desperate minority and given to another. But our members are dying of AIDS, too. They come to San Francisco and come out of the closet and take risks and get sick." Bums says, "You can't go to Indian Health with AIDS. Back on the reserva­tion, there are no facilities and even here in the city, the Indian staff at the clinic tells everyone your business." Meanwhile, in the past year, Bums has gone to the funerals of five GAI members who have died of the dreaded disease. More than once, Burns says, he's been asked "this ridiculous question: what if a war broke out between the gays and the Indians-whose side would I be on?" His answer: ~'All I know is that I don't want to fight a wa r. I just want to stop the dying." '/Jou have jomelhing lo ja'I . . . S a'I ii wilh cf a,jj • • • in 14l We design and make our own jewelry. Custom work on request. CALL ( 713) 680-8286 or Send Order Form. Kenesco lid. 1101 Post Oak Blvd. Suite 9-558 Houston, Texas 77056 NAME ADDRESS CllY, STATE. ZIP Chec k. Cord No qty Pondenl 75 00 00 qty Tie lock 48.00 00 qty Colla pin 48 00 00 qty 10· Herringbone chain 7500 ea qty Ear post • 3900 ea Money Order. [ M/C or Visa Exp Dote NEW rn10COLL 8T ~C ·A· f · E- /\ND Ci\Bt\QET Now Open Seven Days a Week!! Piano Bar Opens atSpm Happy Hour 5-7pm Well Drinks, Bloody Marys, Screwdrivers s12s Nightly Entertainment Featuring "Sylvia Reyes" Come join Ed and Wiiiiam and the Crew at the New Driscoll Street Cafe for a Memorable Time! LUNCH SPECIAL! $495 Monday-Friday llam-3pm Lunch Hours: 11-3 Monday-Friday (Closed Saturday Lunch) Dinner Hours: 6-11 Monday-Friday 6-12 Friday- Saturday 6-10 Sunday Sunday Brunch: 11am-3pm with Entertainment UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP New Driscoll St. Cafe 1834 Westhelmer Houston, Texas 77098 522-7020 JANUARY 3, 1986 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Women's Program to Kick Off KPFT Fund Drive From a Press Release On Jan. 10, KPFf, Houston's public­sponsored radio station, kicks off its Winter fund raising marathon with a day of special prgoramming celebrating women and the progress they have made. The special programs lined up for this event will take a close look at women in work roles that have traditionally been men's domains, women looking toward the future, women's new attitudes and an overview of some Jaws μertinent to women and how they have changed. "We'll have national and local programs that will analyze from abortion to literature and poetry," says Marie Wade-Baxter, direc· tori producer for the KPFf special. "Pacif­ica has a powerful group of women producers that will give listeners the sense that they are supporting a wortbwhilesta­tion." The music to be highlighted in "I've Come a Long Way, But Don't Call Me Baby" covers a wide genre in the tradition of KPFf and the Pacifica Foundation. The premiere forum of alternative music in · Reproductive Rights Topic of Seminar The National Organization for Women, University of Houston Chapter, will spon­sor a seminar entitled "Reproductive Free­dom: Your Right!" on Jan. 18 at the University of Houston-University Center from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The program's four sessions will cover the historical, physical, legal and ethical aspects of reproductive rights. The first session, a plenary, will introduce the his· torical aspects of reproductive rights and responsibilities with attention to the impact of race and class. Physical matters will be addressed in the second session. These include availa­bility of contraceptives and abortion, wel­fare policies, a nd lack of child care. Following a brown bag lunch, the third sesion will focus on legal aspects at the local, state and natlpnal levels-both legislative and judicial: The last, and gener al, fU!Ssion will deal with ethical issues of reproductive rights. The issues to be covered include: what does it mean when a government funds childbirth for the poor, yet withholds the right to funds for abortion and discour­ages sex education in schools? There is a suggested $5 donation for the seminar and non-English speaking assist­ance is available by arrangement. The seminar is endorsed by the March 9 Plan­ning Committe for the March for Women's Lives, March on Washington for Repro­ductive Rights, March 9, 1986. For more information, call 522-6673. Houston-folk, new age, rhythm and blues, jazz. experimental, blues, and rock and roll-will take their turn presenting women's voices and attitudes on what promises to be an informative and intrigu­ing day presented for and by women. The day's programming will include a special interview with Mayor Kathy Whit­mire, poetry by producer of"Speak Easy," Hitaji Aziz, and special issues of "Break­through" with Cherry and Pokey, and Clara Kern's "A Women's Place." KPFf is 90 FM on the radio dial. Experts to Actors: No Evidence Kissing Spreads AIDS From a Published UPI Report Medical experts recently told a group of actors, producers and other members of the Hollywood community that there is no evidence supporting fears that AIDS can be spread by kissing. A producers' group invited the experts, including a doctor from the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, to Hollywood for a seminar to calm fears intensified by the death of Rock Hudson because of the disease. Carol Akiyama, senior vice president of the Alliance of Motion Picture and Televi­sion Producers, said Dec. 26 that the group was told there Willi no evidence indicating they would have to stop kissing to avoid AIDS. After Hudson's death, the Screen Actors Guild adopted a policy requiring produc­ers to notify actors in advance if their role would require intimate contact because of fears of AIDS. The AIDS seminar at the headquarters of the producers group was attended by members of SAG, the American Federa­tion of Television and Radio Artists and other organizations representing "all aspects of the industry," Akiyama said. Akiyama said the producers' alliance sponsored the session to alleviate the fears that prompted the SAG policy of advance warning of kissing scenes. On the panel was Dr. Donald Frances, AIDS adviser from the Centers for Disease Control; Dr. Robert E. Anderson, chief of the AIDS section of the Calif. Department of Health Services: and Dr. Betty Agee, in charge of communicable disease control for the Los Angeles County Health Department. AIDS has killed more than 8,000 people in the United States. t NEytec!~~!!ln~!~r?ilAL · ~ $50 per year and get all facilities free r ~ l for you and a friend for one month lL • Weight Room • Racquetball , "- ~ • Indoor • Sauna Heated Pool • lndoot • Aerobics Volleyball •Indoor Basketball •Kung Fu •Fencing ~ =?Z Masterson Branch YWCA 3615 Willa 77007 (Waugh Drive North just past Memorial Drive) 868-6075 6 MONTROSE VOICE , JANUARY 3, 1986 The Far Side by Gary Larson ., "This is getting pretty eerie, Simmons .... Another skull, another fortune." 1 KTHflQI DE Pl .;-'­" Never mind my name. You just tell your boss some thing is here to see him!" Butterflies from the wrong side of the meadow ··~ ~ ,:,.'......,_ --"h< ''Yup. This year they're comin' along reeeeeeal good .... Course, you can always lo~. a few to an early frost or young pups. Lo.te.r. .. /==+======= ~· "Ed ... the 'later' ts bock." Montrose Nightclub Hit by Robbers Robbers pried open a side wall of a Mon· trose nightclub early Saturday morning, Dec. 28, and stole an undisclosed amount of cash from the club's safe and also robbed the club's cleanup crew. . The Houston Police Department is seek­ing three Hispanic males who en.tered the Bayou Landing, 534 Westhe~mer, at approximately 5:45 a.m., by prying loose sheet metal at the right rear corner of the building. Upon entering, they bound and gagged the three-member clean up crew. $5°0 OFF ONE YEAR MEMBERSHIP reg. $2500 NOW $2000 MON.-THURS. 10am- 8pm FRl.-SAT .. 10am- 10pm SUN: 1pm-6pm WE CARRY ADULT FILMS 2016 MONTROSE Houston, Texas 77006 529-5544 Dby lKe '~Kz Texas A G~~OL\E - * Brownsville Write or Call for Brochure 120 E. Atol St., P.O Box 2326 South Padre Island, Texas 78597 512/943-3632 Winter Specials (including sir fare. transfers. sccomodations. and breakfasts) 3 day (Fri.-Mon.), or 4 day (Mon.-Fri.) · · · • · · · · · $189·00 Fly/drive option ... . .... . . $199.00 7 day (weeken~ arrival) .... $219.00 Fly/drive option · · · · · • · · · $259.00 BETTER LAWns & qARDEns Total lawn maintenance including mounng. edging. trimming. pruning fertilizing sprnqing. • Firewood i ·. • Bed mulching N~ • A2dled Feeding -~J:ll~ • Debris Removdl . ·>.;,.~;..,;:. • Complete Tree Service • Stumps Removed • Totdl Fencing Services (Ceddr notched Packet Tredted. etc .) • Complete Sprinkler S11stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent lhat house or apartment through a Mon1rose Voice C1assll1ed Call 5~8490 And cheroe •t on your American Express. Ooner"a Cfub. Carte Blanche. MasterCard nrV1• 11t cln ~moriam DONALD RAY SMITH Donald Ray Smith. 24. died Dec 4. 1985, in a Houston hospital of pneumonia and bron­ch1t1s He was a member of the Woodland Acres Baptist Church, a 1981 graudate of North Shore High School, a three-year member of the Honor Society, and a member of the REA and Art Club. Smith is survived by his mother. Anna Manley; brother Gary Manley; sister Patrice Drewery; and a number of other relatives. Funeral services were held Dec. 6 with the Rev Van Morse officiating with San Jacinto Memorial Funeral Home in charge. PETE ST. GEORGE Pete St. George of Bellaire. former Mont­rose business owner. died Dec. 26. 1985. Pete operated the popular Brasserie Cafe on w Alabama and later on Westhe1mer for several years in the early 1980s. He was most recently working as a manager in a ianitorial service 1n Bellaire He was buried Dec. 31 in Lake Charles. La GEORGE WATSON May 24, 1951-January 2, 1986 I hadn't known George very long. I met him at the office, where he first caught my atten­tion by the strange brown spots on his face and hands He was quite thin and had the most luminous eyes. They arrested me at first glance, and I knew right away that there was something special about this man. Through 'frequent lunches and office conversation, George revealed bits and pie­ces of his hie to me. talking about his boy­hood in Indiana, his first great release 1n San Francisco, where everyone was simply crazy. He found himself in the city by the bay, like so many others. and when he was transferred to Houston, he felt a little sad at leaving San Francisco Unfortunately, after only a short time here, George was diagnosed with AIDS He was not given long to live, but instead of giving up, he educated himself about the disease and took on a holistic philosophy that kept him alive for over four years. Four years. I thought' Such a long time to survive! He said that he had learned more about himself during those painful four years than he had learned in all the years before. He never regretted his actions or the fact that he was gay. At the office. he always con­ducted himself with the utmost profession­alism. rarely showing pain or depression. Then, he left a message on my answering machine just before Christmas "Hi, Jeff! This is George Watson wishing you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! Bye bye1" It was so cheery Two days later he had pneumonia and was in the hospital. Less than a week later, he was dead. Such a full, noble life. Although I didn't have the plea­sure of knowing George for years. he left such a deep impression in my mind-of a man who faces death with courage and dig­nity. He was soneone who offered hope and inspiration to all who knew him, fighting on until the air just couldn't come anymore He will be missed by his office colleagues. his family who surrounded him at the time of his death, and by all those who were privileged to know him. The funny thing about George was that he made death seem so real every moment we knew him, but at the same time. he had this magical ability to make 1t seem simultaneously distant. He may be physically gone, but his presence always remains to offer hope, and eventu­ally even a little understanding to this vast mystery around us-the mystery he studied so diligently while with us and has now so completely solved -Jeff Bray --------- MIKE K. REED Mike K. Reed died Dec. 18, 1985, at M.D. Anderson Hospital. Born May 6. 1950, Reed attended school in Opelousas, La.. and graduated from Louisiana Tech School in Opelousas. He was attending the University £}:{f;.1'1/£)~' EDU~~ "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS: Albert G. Nemer, John J Adams and r.ordon A Thayer JANUARY 3, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 of Houston, majoring in computer science, at the time of his death. He 1s survived by his father, brother, two aunts and many friends in the Houston area. A memorial service will be held at M.C.C R. on January 11 at 3 00 p.m. The services will be performed by Rev. Dee Lamb. Memorial donations may be made to the KS/AIDS Foundation in his name. OuA POLICY The Montrose V0tce will comnwmor11e the pasamo of MontroM re11ctonts and Houston gay community members with 1n announcement Friends or relat•vn ol the deceased may provide us with facts abOut the penon I Ille, names of the closest survrvof'1. and burial arrangements Prose or versa can be included Ptelutft are appreciated and wlll be returned Name of the deceased $h0Uld be attached to the photo lntorme11on should be provided to the MQlltrose Vote:e at the eartiest Possible date and will be pub1tshed 1n the next 1va1lab1e ec:ht1on There 11 no ctlarge for this lef'\/1ce Group Pushing for 'Gay Town' in Neveda From a Press Release A group called the National Association of Lesbians and Gays (NALAG), a non-profit Nevada corporation, recently announced its plans to develop the first resort and residential community for gay people. The community, to be called Stonewall Park, will be both a destination resort with recreational and legal gambling facilities and a planned residential community, NALAG hopes the concept of a destina­tion resort geared towards lesbians and gays will provide the self-subtaining base of the community's economy. Stonewall Park is planned for the Sierras in north· west Nevada. Additional information on Stonewall Park and NALAG is available by contact­ing the National Association of Lesbians and Gays, Liberty C~nter Suite 350, 350 S. Center Street, Reno, NV 89501, (702) 322· 8093. Counseling Services Loneliness/ Depression Personal/Family Problems Drug/Alcohol Abuse CALL DANIEL J . KUCHARS 529-9004 for an appointment SLIDING FEE SCALE -Founder & board of directors member of largest private drug rehabilitation program m M1ch1gan -Former senior narcotics rehabilitation advisor, U S. Dept. of State, Washington, D.C. -15 years experience 'in personaV family/ substance abuse counseling -Certified social worker (formerly M1ch1gan) -Certified drug abuse counselor (formerly Michigan) IN HEART OF MONTROSE VISA. MASTER CARD AMERICAN EXPRESS. CHECK or CASH Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily r----------., Incredil:>le BREAKFAST SPECIAL Monday thru Frtday­MIDNIGHT TO l lAM $1.90 Includes 2 eggs a nd choice of I) biscuits. mu!finS or toast: 2) bacon. ham or sausage: 3) hash b rowns fries or grits (Not good with any other oller) Expires Jan 31 1986 ltousE of piEs ~ JllDTM.IVw'CT AND PJSDl"I ~ OPEN 24 HOURS 6142 Westhelmer Only 782-1290 _J L---------- ~-----------, : s10°0 i ! off ! I CUP THIS AD and attach it to I I your next order for S 10.00 off I ar'o/ of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multioart Forms • 2-Color Printing e Fo/ers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Envelopes • Amouncements • Invitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet Copying • Invoices • SPEEDY =-- PRINTING SERVICE OF TEXAS Fast Reliable Service. Excellenl Ouahly. Low Cost 5400 BEUAIRE BLVD. Con11eruent Southwest locatJC>n lbb.kras!DIC~'°''"'~ CALL 667-7417 PICK UP AND DELIVERY MEMBER GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS GllllD. GREATER BEUAJl~E CHN.olBER OF COMMERCE Pi.."'•· onr «>upon ~ <llSlOmPf and/OI °'~· cannot _~ _com_b.-t_ With om_.. discou_nts °' 1p_«ia1_ o~ _ J 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1986 'Painting Churches'-A Play on Words Montrose Live By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Critic "The pistol of my talent I fired strmght at my own heart."-Veromca Geng The title of Painting Churches, cur· rently playing downstairs at the Alley, is a play on words Mags Church paints portraits-an art form so out that it's in. She has just ended her first one-woman show But she's even more excited by the fact that her parents have finally decided to allow her to paint a portrait of them. She's gomg to paint the Churches. Get it? (Like many sophisticifted jokes, it becomes sophmor1c when you stop to explam 1t.) This is good adult humor without ever getting sexy It doesn't insult vour intelh· gence or speak down to you. It isn't aimed at an age group slightly below yours It probably wouldn't play on network televi sion. Nor do you have to be an elitist aesthete to make .•ure it won't go over your head. Maybe some people think I'm an ivory· tower kook, but I'm sure anyone would feel at home with James. My roommate was at work. So his truck-driving lover went to the theater with me. It turned out to be the first live theater piece he had ever seen. The glow in his eyes and the trace of a chuckle still lingering m his voice"Bfterthe show reminded me that I had made a very wtSe ch01ce of careers. Mags has been successful even though she's been hiding behind her canvasses rather than speaking through them. If she can paint her parents well, if she can get back in touch with their Bo:;ton realities as well as her own JS'ew York in•ulated self-concern, she w1ll become a much bet· tcr artist and a better pt'rson too JS'ancy Boykin is very earnest m this role Mags 1s not the only one not totally in touch with reality All three Churches have built castles in the air and spend .,ome time maintaining them Painting their own mdividual churchei;? The parents have become one. They are like the right and left hemispheres of the same mind. The father, a Pulitzer Prize-wmnmg poet, has dY.fodled into an ineffectual dreamer He keeps trying to work, but he can't produce anythmg practicaL He's even lm;t control over his continency. But his dreams arc so wonderful. And he 1s so wtse in matters of the heart John Wyhe, who was so good as the prosecuting attorney in Execution of.Jus· t1ce, 1s equally stunning as Gardner Church Matching him in warmth and intensity, Victoria Boothby is Fanny Church. Fanny has made a fetish of the practi· cal. Her greate>St daily joy is finding a bar· gain at the flea market She has had to fight so hard so often to get through to Gardner that she's become a little shrew· ish, a little insensitive to the feelings of others. But she doe~ take good care of Gardner and she can still teach her daughter what Mags needs to know. When Gar and Fanny are clicking together, they interlock beautifully. They are so real, so witty and entertaining that they must have been the life of the coC'ktail party circuit in their day. There are a lot of bitter revelations in Tina Howe's 'cript, but they are dealt with very humanely Following her playw· Jim Hackett as Jerry Ryan and Deborah Bo1ly as Gittel Mosca m a scene from "Tu'O for the Seesau," Houston's West End Theatre's mau;wra/ productwn playing January 4, 5, 11 and 12 at the Jewish Community Center's Joe Frank Theatre "Painting Churches," running on the Alley's Arena stage through January 19 stars (left lo right) Victoria Boothby as Fanny, John Wylie as Gardner and Nancy Boykin as Margaret (Mags) Church right's lead, dire<-tor Jo•ephine R Abady keeps the scales tipped towards gentle humor. A definite yes. o Notes JS' ext we<'k will be my preview of what you can expect theatrically for the next three months .. Concert Chorale of Houston, Hou•ton's professional choral ensemble, will hold auditions in all voice parts on Saturday, Jan. 4 Basses and tenors are espe<-ially needed. All positions are paid. The audi· tions will consist of two songs (one in Ger· man); the melism(ls in "And He Shall Purify" from Handel's Messiah. chro· matte and whole-tone scales and sight· reading. For more information, call 960-1323 .... Beginning Jan. 2. the Museum of Fine Arts began charging admis><ion: $2.00 for adults and $1 00 for senior citizens and college students. Many visitors to the museum, however, will still be admitted free of charge, including: children under J H; Glnssell School of Art students, and MFA members. In addition, Thursdays will be free to everyone, all day, from I 0:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. o Celebrate "They told me, Heraclitus, they told me you were dead."-William Corey Po1•l W <'orey was born the 9th. David Bowit• (8) announc1'CI in an interview m Rolling Stone a few years back that he's not h1sexual anymore. Composer Francis Poulenc (7) had the good taste to fall in love with a baritone instead of a tenor. Sherlock Holmes (5) only had one woman in his life, whom he only knew very briefly Well, two if you count his land· lady. Seymour Kleinberg (5) founded the Gay Academic Union. And two anniver· saries: Oscar Wilde arrived in the U.S. for the first time on the 4th. Collette made a cause celebre in Paris on the 3rd by kissing her female lover-onstage and a little too pas11ioriately. And one unC'ertainty: Was poet Robert Duncan born on the 7th or 8th'! "I have been seeing his face everywhere, the face of a former lover. But it is not he."-R. Duncan. Enjoy, o Openings Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 (Jones, 4)­and Mahler's Ninth Symphony. HSO and Co mission a. The Art of Dani-e (Jewish Community Center, 8)-The opening of this exhibition of paintmgs nnd sculpture about dance signals the beginning of Dance Month at the Kaplan. .Jennie .Jones (Showstoppers, 8). Class Act (Art League of Houston, 1953 Montrose, 9l-Art League inbtructors and their students. In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voile TAFT Automotive 1411 Taft 522-2190 Letters A Wonderful Christmas From Residents of the McAdory House The McAdory House family would like to thank our community for all the wonder· ful Christmas gifts that we received dur· ing this holiday season. The ceiling fans will make our summers cooler The garbage disposal and the mic· rowave will make our kitchen better equipped. New sheets cover our beds, and new towels hang in the bathroom. With the washer and dryer, the new bathroom downstairs, and carpet for the stairs, we expect a brighter new year. The tree. the cake, the cookies, the carol· ers, the food, and the wonderful envelopes that filled our stockings-they contained pocket money for each of us-made this a truly sreciul Christmas. The most special gift was the time that you Bpl'nt with us. Your visit to our home warmed thl• holiday season. .Finally, a special thanks to the com munity's bars, businesses, and churches, and w the house's Atl'llm (we love you). You've proven again that ours 1s a sup· porting and loving community that we can be proud of. Need for Traffic Light From Loran E. Doss There certainly is a need for a traffic light at the intersection of Stanford and Wes· tht'imer. It is very difficult to turn right or left from Stanford onto Westheimer. When trying to cross Westheimer at this inter· section, it sometimes takes a long time because of oncoming traffic. It would also help ifthere were not a bus stop across the street from each other. Items in the "Letters" section represents opinions of some of our readers and not necessarily the views of the MONTROSE VOICE. Readers arc encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest to the community. Please keep the letters brief and mail to "Letters to the Editor," MONTROSE VOICE, 408 At·ondale, Houston, TX 77006. Police Seek Killer of Former Montrose Business Owner Bellaire police are seeking the killer of a former Montrose business owner found dead in his home Dl'<'. 'l.7. According to As.•istant Police Chief Matt McGuire, there are no suspt-cts in the killing of Pete St. George. St. George for· merly owned the Brasserie Cafe, which was located on W Alabama and later Wes· theimer St. Gewge was found stabbed to death in his Bellaire home, in the900block of ,Jolen, about 8:00 p.m. last Friday night, l>t'<'. 27, by his employer. Police are looking into several possible motives in tht• killing, but McGuire added, they uri. not 11urt' enough of uny of thl'm. Tht• vil'tim was robbt•d It is not surP wlll'thl•r rohhl•ry was u motive or an "ufterthought." St. (;l'orl(e was huried Dec at in Lake Charh•s, I..11 ..~ Pl3;y ~Safe! JANUARY 3, 1986 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 --~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-. First North Houston had "One" Then there was a "Choice" Now We give you the answer K.J.'s @ 1183~~~~1NE 2 blocks South of Aldlne-Bender 445-5849 HOURS: 6PM-2AM SUNDAY POOL Tournament $300 entry Winner Takes Pot WEDNESDAY MONDAY Hotel & Restaurant Employees show proof of employment $1.00 bar drinks all night TUESDAY Airllne Employees show proof of employment $1.00 bar drinks all night THURSDAY Late Night Happy lfour llpm-lam Amateur Strip Night Anyone Can Enter Cash Prizes 9pm FRIDAY SATURDAY _..~t NO COVER! ~ PARTY!! PARTY!! PARTY!! Tired of looking for an apartment in all the wrong places? It's time you visited 1920 West Alabama. Enter our gates and you'll reallze you've finally discovered the finest In gracious apartment living. We've combined privacy and elegance at this professional adult community located In the Montrose area near River Oaks with easy access to Downtown and the Medical Center. Why hunt? We have It all! One bedroom from $305, two bedrooms from $415. 1920 WEST ALABAMA 529-6798 Happy New Yearl "Taxi Zum Kio,• "You Are Not Alone," "Male Couple," "Ernesto," "El Deputado" Order Your Copy Todayl • RENTAL GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE • SAME DAY DELIVERY FOR MOST SPECIAL ORDERS • AU TAPES GUARANTEED - - - - - - - --- --, MEXICAN RESTAURANT 4701 N. Main Houston 869-1706 2for1 DINNERS Not good with any other offer Expires 1/31/86 A TASTE OF MEXICO 24 HOURS DAILY CLOSED TUESDAY 10PM REPOEN WEDNESDAY 10AM I I I I I I I I I I ------------ 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1986 TwoSHows STAI~TING JANlJARV 10PM 12TH A.~n ~IID~IGHT TEXAS' TOP FEMALE IMPERSONATORS KANDI DELIGHT, DIONE MARTELL, TIGERLIL $1.50 ALL WELL ''"ODKA JUICE DRINKS 8-2 NO COVER QJ\..1TRQS~ ~#'-._'~''°',...•I ~I~ ~ 'Olt A MAN S MAN MrN1NC COMPANY 805 PACIFIC HOUSTON • 529-7488 21.06 Freed om Beer Bust; Sundays in January Happy Hour till 8pm All Tips from the Beer Bust will be Donated to the T .H.R.F. 21.06 Supreme Court Appeal Fund during January. Construction Party on the Patio (Sundays Only) Fortunes A Surprise for Pisces By Merk Orion For Fnday, Jsn 3, 1986, through Thursday. Jan 9. 1986 ARIES-Quick decisions and the abil­ity to organize with a sense of authority is one of your unique talents This brand new year is a good time to begin or expand on an ambitious venture. Nothing seems to be too much for you TAURUS-Your year ahead opens with financial interest. You have a great head for business: make sure it's alert to avoid mistakes. Look for an ending and a beginning and a possible smokescreen. Spend latter days next week with social friends. GEMINI-You've laid your ground­work, maybe even built your prototype. Now, you have to see if it will fly and try to enlist the aid of others. Your presentation plays a key role. Not this weekend, but next, you'll obtain real confidence. CANCER-You're trying to make someone into something they're not. Your intentions may be quite good, but lay off the gilding for now Appreciate everybody just for who they are, free of your fantasies (no matter how wonderful they may be) The Golden Rule applies here. LEO-Bringing clarity and order to your previous confusion and chaos is a good thing to be doing at this time of the year. Getting organized now brings its own kind of freedom. Get it together­then get together. VIRGO-Spend time and money wisely this weekend. Concentrate on your own enterprises, don't invest in others. Later, emotions run high and it may be hard to keep perspective. Remember the year is very young. LIBRA-Imaginative flair and creative approaches should keynote your first weekend of 1986. Experiment You'll have willing hands ready to pitch in. Romance takes a happy leap forward, too, while days next week bring a spot of work. SCORPIO-Understanding dawns as a certain mental log jam dissolves. Cooper­ation with others is both necessary and beneficial. Someone else may supply the vision, but you're the one to make it happen in 1986. Go to it! SAGITTARIUS- True to your essential nature, all that energy you've been feel­ing is finding its purpose and direction. You can be a real help to others You're learning to share without giving it all away Ever thought of becoming a sex therapist? CAPRICORN-Words for your ego this weekend: You are generous, optimistic and usually even-tempered. You may be a push-over for flattery, but can ulti­mately tell if 11 has the ring of truth. In jewelry, you prefer gold over silver. Clothes are important to you, and even in your oldest duds, you always look greatl AQUARIUS Roll out the welcome mat; company's coming early in 1986. You're always a fine host, but plan easy fixin's so you can enjoy yourself. Roman­tic harmony helps you hum a happy tune at day's end PISCES Your emotions run deep, with a riptide to the surface. Last week's New Year's party turns onto this wee­kend's open affair Someone who thinks they know you well will be in for a sur­prise JANUARY 3. 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 11 Pacific at Grant (713) 521-0107 Premiering Monday Jan. 6th SHOOT FOR THE STARS AT HEAVEN! Can you sing? Can you dance? Can you act tell jokes, or impersonate? Are you a Magician, Musician or Mime? This is your chance to be a star! Every Monday night at 11pm, a $100 cash prize will go to the best act-as well as a trip to the finals. Your host will be the multi-talented Randy Jobe, star of Risky Business and co-author of "Surrender Houston." Call 521-0107 for more information. After all, Heaven can always use a fevv nevv stars! JANUARY 1986 SUN 5 T-DANCE FREE DRAFT BEER 5:30 pm to 2 am with After Hours MON 6 TALENT SEARCH w /host RANDY JOBE TUE 7 OLDIES NIGHT w/ 25¢ WELL DRINKS WED 8 DYNASTY NIGHT 7-9. 10¢ DRINK NIGHT w/10¢ WELL & DRAFT 9-2 THU 9 MALE DANCERS "THE HEADLINERS" FRI 10 and SAT 11 WEEKEND WARM-UP 10¢ WELL (8-10) AND HOUSTON'S HOTIEST AFTER HOURS SUN 12 VIDEO PREMIERE OF DIANA'S 32nd ANNUAL AWARDS 4-6pm. FREE DRAFT BEER ALL NIGHT AND AFTER HOURS HOUSTON'S VIDEO/DANCE CLUB FOR THE MEN OF TEXAS! 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 3. 1986 Controversy Causes Tennis Club to Split Sports Voice Bemg unable to dissolve difference>< among the membership concerning the organization' by.Jaws and constitution, the Houston Tennis Club has split into two groups. Some members of the former Houston Tennis Club, have formed the Hou-Tex Tennis Club. However, it has come to the attention of SportsVoice that the name Hou·Tex Tennis is registered by the man· agement of the Houston Tennis Club. DifferenceR among members of the Houston Tennis Club surfaced at the club's Christmas party on Dec. 14. At that time, Revera! members voted to approve a new set of by.Jaws. Rich Corder, club member and challenge ladder director, argued that the proper parliamentary procedures were not being applied. According to a statement relea!<ed by the Hou-Tex club, "The Club voted to res· cmd the old by-laws and approve each article in the by-laws, constitution and rules one at a time. The by-laws, constitu· lion and rules were accepted by majority vote. The majority made that decision; the majority will rule." In the Dec. 24 edition of The Netsletter, a club organ, Corder states," 'the group' led by Chavez, Kitch and Kelley (who had told me there would be no by-laws, etc., changes at the party/ meeting, since he did understand that the two-week notice to the entire membership had not been done properly or timely), proceeded to vote out the old set of by-laws (which Kitch said were not being used anyway and were not good, etc. and vote in a new constitution, by-law~ and never-before-seen rules (They said the membership had been given these at the November . . . but all of you who were at the Nov. meeting, or received your printed information from Chavez only 10 days before the Christmas party were Frontrunners to Participate in Houston Marathon Five members of the Frontrunners are pre· panng to run m the annual Houston· Tenneco Marathon. The event will be held on Sunday, Jan. 19. The race begin" at /l:OO a.m. at the down town library, and for the firbt time in it;; 14-year hi,tory, the course will encompas' a large portion of the city. The course will "'ind through a north section of the down­town area, Hermann Park, West Univer­sity, the Galleria. and the final 314 miles along Allen Parkway close to Montrose. Training for the marathon begins about Ill weeks prior to the race and many runners average 40-60 miles per week the last two months. Lead runners will be crossing the finish line around 10:00 a.m. and the last runners will complete the race after running four long hours. Spectators are encouraged to invite their friends and pick a festive spot along the 26.2 mile course or at the finish line a nd watch a11 more than 5000 runners including the Frontrunners participate in this event. being ignored ). Because both clubs will operate inde· pendently, players are eligible to partici· pate in both challenge ladders. Rich Corder is the acting ladder director of the Houston Tennis Club and Jim Kitch and David Garza serve in that capacity for the HOGs Announce Latest Winter Plans The Houston Outdoor Group will leave Saturday morning, Jan. 11, and return Sunday,Jan. 12,on a camping trip to Lake SomerVJIJe. The groups hail" this trip as a good one for inexperienced campers. It is also quite mexprn. ive. The campers hope to vic>w Halley's Comet. During the weekend of Jan 24·26, the HOGs will truvl'I to Aransas Pnss to ohscn·p the Whooping Cranes and other wildlife of the Gulf Coast. The firnt night will be spent in Victoria with n morning visit to the zoo. If weather permits, they will take a boat ride into the bay to see the cranes. The group will be staying in mot· els both nights and a deposit will be required to guarantee rooms. The previou,.Jy announced trip to Aspen has been changed to Ski Purgatory. A fee of ,389 mclude11 airfare and seven nighl.8 lodging. Twelve have already paid their deposit;; and those interested should con· tact the Houston Outdoor Group as soon as possible. Anyone interested in these or any of the activities of the Houston Outdoor group, may contact them at680-3144 or 521-3641. newly.formed group. Both tennis clubs meet on Sundays. 10:30 a.m.·1 :30 p.m., at the Homer Ford Tennis Center. Corder may be reached at 524·2151, Kitch at 861-0694, and Garza at 926-7171. SportsVoice will resume publication of tennis challenge ladders next week. F 1 GENERAL S , REPAIR l ~· SERVICE 561-7755 When 1t Leaks .. . Doesn't Open .. . Needs to be Wired ... Or Just Needs Some Paint ... ANO HAO TO BE DONE YESTERDAY Call Us First Electrical, Plumbing, Appliances, A/C Repair In Mont-rost?, Neady Eve-ryone Reads the Voi<e JANUARY 3, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 Fog Cuts Into HTC Play Sports Voice Calendar & Standings By Rich Corder Special to the Montrose Voice This past Sunday, Dec 29, Houston awoke to 11 r<'lllly foggy morning, convmcmg many Houston Tennis Club members to remain in bC'd. However, th(• challenge ladders have a new No. :i player as Rick Hadnot took over that rank from Donny Kelley, who defaull(•d. Bill Santaiti got his winning streak off to a good start after last week's default from Steve Ch!'sm•y moved him into the No. IO spot on the D ladder. Santai ti got n match with No. 6 Henry Eckhardt and pulled a leapfrog, jumping the maximum four notches to take :-:o. 6 by the ~core of 6-3, 6·0. The only other challenge match resulted in "ekoming n newcomer to the ladd!'rs. Eugene Brown, recent finalist for a Level IV club singles championship. took over No. JO on the Bladder from Ronnie Mauss to the tune of 6-2. 6~!. City Calls for Ballfield Reservations The City of Ho uston Parks and Recrea tion Depa rtment's Athletic Division will h old a citywide meeting for all Presidents and Commissioners of Little League and P ri· vate [;('ague Organ izations on Wednes· day, Janua ry 8, a t 6:30 p.m., at the Fonde Recreation Center, 110 Sabi~ at Memor· ia l Drive. The meeting is being h eld so that inter· est!'d leagues may a pply for use of city­owned ballfields. The City of HouAton has approxima tely 150 lighted and 346 unlighted b allfields. Regular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Ten­nis Center Houston Tennis Club 10:30am-1 30pm. Homer Ford Tennis Center Women's BowhPg League 5pm, Stadium Bowl WW B. Bowling League 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: MSA Men's Bowling 9pm. Stadium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Center MSA 'Fun Volleyball League." 7pm WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League plays 8pm, various locations THURSDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center 'Whatever Happened to Baby Jane' MSA Mixed Bowling League 8 45pm, Stadium Bowl Special Events Feb 14·16 IGBO·alf1hated Bluegrass Clas­soc, Louisville Feb 2B·Msr 2 IGBO-afflhated Spring Break Invitational, Ft Lauderdale Mar 27-30. IGBO-alf1ltated Dixie lnv1tat1onal, Atlanta Mar. 29-31 IGBQ-affiltated MA K.1.T , Kansas City MSA Pool League Team Standings. Wonter League. Week 5 TEAM Recent Week, Total Matches, Total games DIVISIO N A 1 Four 611 2 Mary's Naturally 3 Bacchus II 4 Bacchus t 5 Ranch Hands 6 BAB Shooters 7 Manon & Lynn's 8 Oultaws 9 Too611 10 Street Cats 11 The Hole 13·2 5-0 ..,. 4-0 10-5 4-1 7-8 3-1 0-15 3-2 8-7 3-2 8-7 3-2 15--0 2-2 2-13 2-3 7-8 1-4 5·10 1·4 DIVISIO N B 1 The Barn 2 611 Ill 3 The611 4 Kondred Spmts II 5 The Galleon 6 L1pstock 13·2 5-0 11-7 3-2 8-7 3-2 9-6 2-2 ..,. 2-2 7-8 2-3 52-23 39-21 43-32 37-23 39-36 38-37 37-38 41·19 37-38 34-41 27-42 51·24 41-34 34-41 31-29 30-30 39-36 THE BEST LI11'LE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVAfE BATHS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 URSlJLINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 " , . . In the heart of The City" $44 00 • COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE 6 WINE • FRH AIRPORT SHUTTLI • • COMPLIMENTARY COHTINEHTAl IRE.AJ<FAST (large single/double occupancy) • VAl.fl SERVICE • Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Res'3rvotions required pie. .ise c.oll Toll Free 800-253-5263 (Notoono1) 800-521·4523 1ca:11 l (415)·.l.41 514~ (Son ftO'ICISCO) 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 7 JRs 8 Kondred Spirits I 9 Lone Stars 10 Hooters II 11 Hooters I 6-9 13-2 1·8 2-13 2·13 2-3 1-3 1-4 0-5 0-S Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches lhrough Dec 23 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 2 Randall Dockerson 3 Donny Kelley 4 Rick Hadr>ot 5 JC Barrero 1 Tiny Tom 2 Sabe Velez 3 Oscar Martinez 4 Edward de Leon 5 Ron McCauley 6 Arm1 Albanza 7 Ron Bell 8 Roch Corder 9 David Helland 10 Steve Bearden BLADDER 6 Lou Garza 7 David Garza 8Joel. 9 Ronn Rodd 10 Ronnie Mauss 3!;-4() 30-30 26-19 17-52 16-59 1 Eddie Chavez 2 ThOmas Cortez 3 Larry Jarvis 4 Mark Deardorff SMr 8111 1 Steve Bryar! 2 Roy Mend 1ola 3 John Murphy GLADDER 6 Rock Knapp 7 Gabe Herpo~ 8 Rock Massey 9 Solly Green 10 Randy Miller DLADDER 6 Henry Eckhardt 7 Rudy Garcia 8Joe D 4 Da1wod Hendncksor> 5 Oscar Ysassl 9 JV Kltnger 1 O 8111 Santa1to 1 David Moskowitz 2 Howard Brown ELADDER 3 Randy Joen;creck 4 Steve Chesney DOt..BLES LADDER 1 Jim K1tc~ & Dick Cotten 2 Arm1 Alabanza & David Garza 3 David He land & Rich Corder 4 Steve Bearden & B I Santart 5 Ronn Rodd & Rochard P•egeant 6 Solly Green & Paul Browr> 7 Eddie Chavez & Henry Ee hard! 'Ii~XAS STATE OPTICAL z• / / , Dr. E. Burt Denton & Associates OPTOMETRISTS TSO-Village 2515 l 'niver-it'l- 528-1589 TSO-South ~fain 4414 ~fain 523- 5109 COME H.ELP CELE:BRATE" . THE RETlJRN ·oF ·A . . . TRADITION!!'°.: ... · . .. , . .., .· ...\ ·. ~ : . . . . \,\ . Spend Sunday at the Brazos-14 Hours of FUN Happy Hour Noon to 5:00 STEAK NITE 5:00 D.J. DAVID ROYALTY 4:00, BRAZOS RIVER BAND 7:00 Dancing-Drink Specials-Fun All Day (713) 528-9192 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 3. 1986 Junk Movies: The Very Worst of 1985 By Scott Cutsinger Montrose \ioice Film Critic Well, it', that time again. Once more we scrape the bottom of the barrel for the trash among treasure. Movies that were avoided at the theaters are now out on videocassette, and we really need to know what is worth our time and money Moviegoers spent a lot less at the movies in 1985 than 1984, and most people attrib­ute It to "poor product." The movies seemed to fall into three main categories: popular, medicorc and small. Popular films like Back to the Future and Rambo made big bucks, while small films like Coca Cola Kui and After Hours slipped in and out too fast. Other mediocre films like Return to Oz and Falcon and the Snou" man either hit or missed according to the mood of the country. This year only a few of the "popular" films made the box office dollars, and ever­ything else sort of staggered along and barely broke even. Cable TV and video­cassettes accounted for a bigger chunk of the entertainment dollar, and the movie industry '<uffered. Unfortunately, they have not risen to the occasion with better ammunition. There were still too many sequels, teen movies and trash films, all being shown in boxy theaters with poor sound. Since 1985 movie« weren "t doing so hot. the studios decided to re-relea'e some of the 19H4 biggies. Unfortunately, people were tired of Gremlins, Ghostbusters and Return of the Jedi, resulting in a big no­show Audiences know now that a re­re I ease usually signals that a videocassette "';11 be popping up soon, so they'll wait. Several sequels were attempted once again, but most were poor copies that made little money. Rocky IV was fun and is really raking it in. but it certainly is a rehash of the previous three. Mad Max 3-Beyond Thunderdome, National lam­poon's European Vacation, and Friday the 13th Part 4-A Neu· &ginning(spare us please) were all unnecessary and audien· ce' soon caught on to the fact that they weren "t too good. Zombies were all the rage thi>' year in a lot of horror films. There were nuclear zombies in Warnin,ir Sign, space zombies in l.i{f'{orcc, and regular ol' zombies in Day of the Dead and Return of the Living Dead Only Return managed to be enter· taimng by adapting a wonderful "tongue in cheek approach that really had me laughing. Several popular actors scored only one for three in comedy films that didn't turn out so great. John Candy missed with Breu·sters Millions and Voluntens, and hit mediocre with the snappy Summu Rental. Chevy Chase proved that he could act without falling down in the very funny Fletch, but fell on his face again with stupid antics like Spies like Us and the terrrible European Vacation. Maybe next year they could strive for quality over quantity. Finally, the worst overuse of a theme this year was "The Ru. sians-" We had a eteroid Russian fighter in Rocky /\/, Ru•- 11ian defector& in White Night.,, and Rus­sian missle threats in Spies like Us. With patriotism 'oaring, it's easy to make buf· foons out of the Russians and end up look ing like American propaganda instead. The movies did their share of flag waving (just like during the war), but it sure doesn't help for1>ign relations-now does it? The following worst li~t contain' the films that I felt have little or no cinematic value. The runners-up are films that had a few bright spots, but for the most part were al«o di•cardable. It was definitely a bleak year for moviegoerF, but hopefully in 1986 I won't have trouble narrowing down my list to 20 big duds. Anyway.you have bet>n warned about the;e-so be on the lookout! Sluggers Wife-Oscar wmner Michael O"Keefe tGreat Santini! and wri· ter Neil Simon should hide their heads and put this baseball turkey in a closet some­where. The story about a sluggish power hitter married to a rising rock singer was silly and oh so dull. We won't even men­tion Rebecca DeMornay's hilarious rock numbers. 2. Bride-A shamelessly boring adap· lion of Mary Shelly's Frankenstein crossed with Pygmalion and starring Sting nnd Jennifer Beals (Flashdance). Sting •at and brooded over his creation, while Jennifer walked around thecountry­• 1de in flawless attire doing and saying nothing. The only thing worth watching was four.foot actor David Rappaport and his bizarre friend•hip with 6"4" actor Clancy Brown las Frankenstein). 3. Torchlight-Excruciatingly bad drama about cocaine addiction that nobody should have to sit through. Pam· ela Sue Martin was the wife of our worst actor of the year (Steve Railsback), a sick man who ruined himself and sold every· thing to get drug money. Unintentionally funny are scenes where Raislback sneaks into his own closet to toke on a huge water pipe. 4. Tl'en Wolf-With the success of Michael J. Fox in Back to the Future, an independent company made a hoopla (and a lot of bucks) off this low-budget werewolf movie. When Fox starts getting hairy one night and finds his Dad doing the same, I started laughing at the bad makeup. When he transformed into a werewolf mid· court during a basketball gam, I decided it was time to go home. 5. Last Dragon-Berry Gordy's attempt to cross martial arts with dance video was a bona fide disaster. Vanity (a Prince pro­tege) made a nondescript debut as a dance palace deejay who is befriended by a cute Bruce Lee fin a tic (Taimak). A low point for black cinema, although teens flocked to see this trash over and over 6. National lampoon's European Vacation-This sequel to Vacation a few years back had the same actors but notthe 88me humor. The Grizwald family travels from country to country, wrecking havoc and basically acting very ignorant and stupid. The only funny sequence was when mother spots a giant billboard of herself in an X-rated movie (a thief snatched some dirty home movies). Other· wise, the film was totally devoid of any· thing reeembling a laugh 7. Better Off Dead-Director Savage Steve Holland came to Houston to defend his comedy as a parody of all the stupid teen moVJes. Well, we had sick jokes, fat boys, dumb jocks, stupid girls, and all the rest, so I guess it wasn'tjust a parody after all. Things were only spruced up by some crazy animation sequences that really belong in some animation festival and not in this movie. 8. Commando-After the terrific T1'rm1· nator, we sure expected more from Arnold Schanenegger than thi• silly "Rambo­lik~" rip-off. Larking basic dialogue, sto­ryline, or sensibility, this "blow-up" adventure just wobbled along to the big explosive finale. Rae Dawn Chong (who should know better) somehow manages to stand by Arnold through the whole film , only flinching slightly when she nearly blows him to bits with a giant bazooka. 9. L1fl'forc-l'-Our worst actor of the year Steve Railsback, popR up again in this hor'. rible sci·fi epic. Everything from the dia· logue to the wide-eyed expressions were straight out of camp fifties films like lnvadns from Mar.,, and the special effects were definitely not done by Spiel· burg's industrial light and magw com· pany 10. Secret Admirer-The worst film of the year, and well deserving of that title. A love letter wrecks havoc when people just happen to keep losing and finding it, and also wondering who wants their body. Besides the usual stupid teenagers. there is a gaggle of very silly and immature adults who also try to get in on the action. A very bad film that will hopefully never grace a silver screen again. o Runners-up II Cats Eye-Not one, but three very badly done Steven King stories. 12. Pale Rider-Clint Eastwood's come­back Western was a rip-off of Shane and boring to top it all off. 13. ll'gend of Billy Jean-Helen Slater (Supergir/) adds a second turkey to her acting credits in this "teen on the lam" flick . 14. Mad Max 3 Beyond Thunderdome­Only Tina Turner brightened this blatant waste of film that featured endless shots of Mel Gibson trudging (and trudging) through the desert. 15. Godzilla 1985-The return of Japan's super monster was greeted, as you might expect. with less than spectacular reviews. 16. King David-Australain director Bruce Beresford attempted a Richard Gere biblical epic, and got something on the order of the campy Samson and Delilah played straight and dusty. 17 Perfect-John Travolta sunk further into oblivion as an obnoxious Rolling Stone reporter investigating Jamie Lee Curtis, health clubs, and whatever el~e he could stick his nose into. 18. Spies like Us-Chevy Chase and Dan Ackroyd bubble around on a stupid mis11ion that's full of empty jokes and leads totally nowhere. 19. Volunteers-This John Candy/ Tom Hanks vehicle about Peace Corp volun­teers should have been hilarious, but somewhere along the way the writers gave up and left everything in shambles. 20. Mean Season-A senseless and vio­lent drama about a killer who calls a repor­ter right before he kills. Kurt Russell and Mariel Hemingway wandered aimlessly looking for the sick killer, and somehow find themselves in the Everglades (of all places) at the end. o Special Mention WorNt Foreign Film-ReturnoftheSold1er Most Disappointing Film-The Eme­rald Forest Worst Christmas Movie Ever-Santa Claus; The MoL·ie "Bad Rap" Award-Krush Groove "Little Drummer Girl" Award for "Sleeper" of the Year-Plenty (of zzzz's) Worst Actor-Steve Railsback for Torchlight and l1feforce. Worst Actress-Jennifer Beal for The Bride Worst Supporting Actor-Fred Ward in Secret Admirer Worst Supporting Actress-Tanya Roberts in Vieu• to a Kill Worht Film-Secret Admirer "Secret Admirer:" Worst Film of the Year An example of the brilliant acting in "lifeforce" You'd bl' disturbed too if you were the stars of "The Bride" An attractive bunch from "The Last Dragon" Rae Dawn Chong misfires in '"Commando" 808 Lovett ~\--~~ 521-1015 ~•- ----'& CAf·~ ~-----....z.. i Boulevard Big Bang $1. 99 Breakfast Monday-Friday 2 Eggs, Bacon or Sausage Two Pancakes Hours: 7am-11pm Mon -Thurs Born-Midnight Saturday 8om-11pm Sunday Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTICES° The Montrose Voice. a general circulation newspaper having published conlinu­ously for 1 year or longer. is qualified to accepl legal no11ces affecllng lhe news­paper's circulation area of Montrose. CARS & BIKES MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba, 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ASCOT LEASING, L TO. 1303 Upland, 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN JACINTO MOTOR LEASING 10700 Richmond #100. 781-8566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE JOIN IVY LEAGUE One bedroom, hardwood floor, deck. fenced in yard. beautifully landscaped, hot lub Ideal for home proiecls Near downtown and BAB $250 mo No dep­osit, ro lease. Roger 630-0530 HOUSE FOR RENT HALF BLOCK OFF MONTROSE BLVD. EXCELLENT CONDITION, $695 524-7327 - 923-1423 If no answer. try after 6pm Smart upper, 1· 1, IOIS of hghl. c/ath. dis­hwasher. ice maker. elc • security gales J.402 Garrolt, $395/mo 1 year lease 529- 1111 MONTROSE AREA APARTMENTS Etf 11 bdr12 bdr From $225 thru $350 Cell 527-8305 Burlington Apartments GREAT LOCATION Close to Downtown in Montrose Area. Small community, Adults only, Nice pool, Large closets, Biff windows, Free mou1e channel, Well maintained 1 and 2 Bedrm. Effective rent from $249 3502 BURLINGTON 523-0249 MONTROSE OASIS Quiet adult·only building deep in the heart of Monlrose. Free gas heat for win­ter. swimming pool for summer Central AIC. GE appliances. mini blinds and more !BR at $315. 2BR at $375 plus security deposil & eleclrlc. 308 Slrotford •I T•ft By Appointment, Pl .. H 523-Slot Luxury Condominiums Now Leasing with option to purchase. Great location. Large beautiful swimming pool & Jacuzzi . Controlled entry security. Remote controlled garage entry. High efficiency AC & heating. Free cable TV One bedrooms from $375 ($150 deposit). Two bedrooms from $650 ($250 deposit) . 2507 Montrose Boulevard Call for appointment 524-0830 Small quiet 'Monti'oseco;plex--,;;ew paint, new double door ice boxes. $100 depos11 1 bdrm $285 plus elec Also avail· able 2 bdrm. 529-8178 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED PERFORMING ARTS Ticket office personnel sought full/part time. Excellent verbal skills required Base plus comm1ss1on Call Ms. Knipp afler 1 lam. 526-5323 Newspaper Positions Local Reporter An aggressive, but con· scientious, experienced or journalism school graduate news reporter. Fulltime position to report on the news of Montrose. National Gay News Editor Experienced reP<?rter or edi­tor familiar with national gay rights m.ovement and related issues Book Reviewers Free lance opportunity to review numerous gay­themed books. Male to re­view male-oriented books and female to review fe­male- oriented books. submit samples of your work and resumes to Henry McClurg 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Walters and bartenders needed. hones!. clean and dependable. Contact Ed Mun­cey, 522·7020 Looking for 10Cai enterta1nmen1 Musi be gOOd! Call Ed Muncey 522-7020. MOr part hme cook for Boulevarclcare Contact Bobby or Tony 7am-3pm 808 Lovett 521· 1015. Monday-Friday JANUARY 3 , 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 Work from homel No Hperlence necft· aaryl Port/full time. Male/fem•I•. M•rl<•­tel9 needed for Dania~ pl•n/Vlu pl•n. $15.00 Commlaalon Heh pl•n oold. (713) 5~9029. (24 hou19.) Wanted qualified mechanic. Must be experienced Taft Automo11ve. 522-2190 Ask for Linda or Chuck. (MISC.) FOR SALE For Sale. DP300gym set. $75 or best Otter Like new RCA 17" Color TV, remote con­trol. 520-1122 FOR YARD SALES See ads under "Yard Sales" at the end of the Montrose Classified MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS Z-MAGIC TOUCH BY David of E.T (713)622-4530 BODY MASSAGE Full body massage Hot 01l-1n or out Bruce 622--0370 PERSONALS GIW1M seeking close encount~ safe sexual to perm. kind Am 34. slender. 5·9• beard, non-smoker/doper Contact for mutually agreed exchanges Jay, Box 56412, Houston 77256 OVER-SEXED, OVER-SIZED? Handsome. well-hung, Greek versatile GWM desires outrageously well ­endowed. 1nsat•able. nicely- built, lop­man (or Greek versatile). Only serious calls from over-niners. please• (713) 526- 3979 NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTION? GWM, 34. 6' 170. Brni brn. is resolYed to f1nd1ng GWM with compatible stats Well­adjusted. profess•onal, non-smoker. humored. outdoorsman, cinemaph1le, xenoph1le. Act on your resoult1on and write me so we can rendezvous Reply Blind Box 271-L c/o V01ce WICKEDLY WITTY T-SHIRTS Over 200 designs $1.50 gets full cata­logue Public Image. 495 Elhs St Su•te 204. San Franetsco. CA 94102 PLAY SAFE Safe sex 1s fun. erohc. Play safe. for your sake, for your partners sake G1W1M mod 40s. 5·4· en1oys home Me. entertaining with friends. very affection­ate Looking for sbm, well built. discreet. masculine appearing men. 21 -30 only Race not important Want someone to share my life and home w•th Reply Blind Box 26&-F CIO Vo•ce. ~~~~~~~~~ AN ORDINARY GUY Well educated. GIW•M, 38. sincere. hon· est, d•screet Seel<s seme Reply Blina Box 271-S Clo Vo•ce Get Yiu. M•lercardl No Credit N.c;.": ury. Collatenl depoot required. Aloo 32 olgn•ture I011n Md 60 free gr•nt loca­tlon1I (713) 5~9029. (Sff Employment.) GBM wants to meet others Call Michael 772-7049 Mlituregay couple-seeking olhergay per­sons m the Splendora/ Porter area for friendship and socializing Call Larry or Tom It 1-689-1507 GWM. 32, 6', blonde/blue. nice build masculine. stable, honest Wants lo start '86 w•th mascuhne. stable. honest. GWM. 28-40. Not into heavy bar scene w•th health secual appetite but not prom•scu- ~~:h~~~h~~•I ~~,~~7i: ·~e~trrss~?:~ phone number apprec•aled Reply Bhnd Box 27~ T, Clo VO•C8. 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat • IN I WEEK· Integrity meet.a 7:30pm JAN JAN 3 4 JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN 5 6 7 8 9 Cntena for inch.J11on 1n 7·01y Ca tender end Montrose Reeources 1 Event or group must 1pedhcally pert111n to neagnborhood or Montrose or Hou1ton·1 o•Y community unJest m1,orc1ty. 1ta1eor n1t1on11 holtday or major n1ho n1I g1y 9\'ent 2 Strlctty eommerc111 events not included 3 Bu11neu. c:iV1C and toe1aJ groups and their evenll are generatty quahf.-d 4 Pohtrtal events where only one v.ew of a subfect. cand1d1te or party '' dOminant not quahf•ed For adchtional inlormation or phone numbers. look for the lf)On10nng orpeniz.ation unoet 'RMOurcee • Typestyles indicate events' location ~ Events in Houston, Events of Local Interest Elsewhere. Events of Area lnter81f SELECTED EVENTS THROUGH 7 DAYS •FRIDAY: "Breakthrough" lesbian-feminist program, KPFI', FM-90, 8:15-llam •FRIDAY: Montroee Country Cloggers meet 7pm, MCCR, 1919 Decatur 'FRIDAY. Baytown Lambda meets 7:30pm Jan. 3 • SATURDAY: KS! AIDS Foundation meets 3400 Montrose, no. 501, llam • SATURDAY: Houston Gay Health Advocates meet 7:30pm Jan.4 • SUNDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 10:30am·l:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center llSUNDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center llSUNDA Y: Women's bowling league plays, 3pm, Stadium Bowl • SUNDAY: W.W.B. Bowling League, 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanes •SUNDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett •MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain llTUESDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center llTUESDAY: MSA "Fun Volleyball League" plays, 7pm llTUESDAY: Montrose Symphonic Band meets Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm •WEDNESDAY: Houston Bar Owners Assn. meets 2pm Jan.8 • WEDNESDAY: Neartown Business Alliance meets 7pm Jan.8, Liberty Bank, IOOl Westheimer •WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League competition • WEDNESDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold llTHURSDA y, Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center llTHURSDAY: "Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFI' Radio, FM-90 llTHURSDAY: Mixed Bowling League, 8:45pm, Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain llTHURSDAY: Cleis, Lesbian Mothers Group, closed meeting Jan.9 llTHURSDAY: Avondale Association meets 7:30pm Jan. 9, Christian Women's Center, 310 Pacific SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS • IN I WEEK: Houaton North Prof-1onalo meet.a 7;30pm, Jan. 11 • IN I WEEK: Gay Aaiana & Fnendo meet 3pm Jan. 12 Jan. 13, Autry Houae, 6265 Main • IN I WEEK: Montroee Art Alliance meeta Jan.13 • IN 1 WEEK: Gay &: Letibian Hiapanico Unidoa meet Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, Jan.13 • IN I WEEK: KS ' AIDS Foundation &: Mon.,.._ Counoeling Center AIDS Riak Reduction <Safe Sex) Worluihope, 8pm Jan.13 • IN 1 WEEK: Lutheran• Concerned meeto Jan. 14, Graoo Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh • IN l WEEK: Citizen• for Human Equality meeto 7;30pm Jan. H , HoU11ton HoUM, 1617 Fannin, 9th floor • IN I WEEK: HoW1ton Data ProfM&ional• meeta 7;30pm Jan. H •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Political CauCWI meeta 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm Jan. 15 • IN 2 WEEKS: Choicee meeta !pm Jan.19, Maater90n YWCA, 3615 Willia • IN 2 WEEKS: Parenta FLAG meet.a 2pm, Jan. 19. Preebyterian Center, 41 Oakdale • IN 2 WEEKS. Greater Montroee 8W11neu Guild meeta 7pm Jan. 22, Brennan'• Reetaurant. 3300 Smith • IN 2 WEEKS Clea. Leebian Mothen Group, opm meeting Jan.23. Dignity Ctr. • IN 3 WEEKS: Houaton Area Gay &: Leebian Engineen & Scienti1'ta meet 7pm Jan.28 • IN 3 WEEKS. Mon.,.._ Civic Club l~eanown) mttota 7pm Jan. 28, HIS Weetheimer lltN 6 WEEJCS IGIO-<lfllllalad lllueegrcm Claalc. Loulsvllla. Feb. 1~16 • IN 6 WEEKS Houaton Liveotock Show & Rodeo OP'!na. Aatrodome complex, Feb. 16-Mar. 2 •IN 8 WHICS IGllC).al!Ulalad Spring ltadc lnvllaltonol, R. Lauderdale, Feb. 2&Mar. 2 •IN 9 WEEKS Nallonal Leoblan and Goy Health Foundation pteoanls 7lh Nal!onol/leoblan Goy Haollh Conlarane. and 4111 Nallonal AIDS Forum, ''MoYlng Leoblan and Goy Health Cara Into Ila Molnllraom," Mar. 1.H6. ~ga Wcahtnglon Un'-'slty, Wcahtnglon. D.C. HI 11-12 WEEKS: IGll().aftllalad Dixie lnvltaltonol. Allanla. Mar. 27-30 •IN 12 WHICS IGIC><lllllalad MAJCJJ. KONOI City, Mar. 29-31 lllN AIOUT 14 WEEJCS 11111 annual Soufhaallam Conlarane. lor Le&bianl and Goy Man. oprWlg 1986. N­Orlaml 111N AIOUT 2l WEEICS Oalc Lawn Tennis Auoc:. hoots T•ao Cup Challenge. Dollao, compaltng with Houston Terv1ia Club, June •IN 25 WEEJCS 17th annlY9rlary ol st~ll Rlols, Nw York, June 2S • IN 30 WEEKS: U.S. Olympic Feotival OP'!nl, HoWllon, July 25-Aug. 3 •IN 31 WEEJCS. Goy Gorn. II, '1rlump In '86," Aug 9-17, 1986. Son Frandlco •ti 32 WEEKS 4lh annlY9rlary ol ladaral ruflng og<*lll T•ao' "homoMln.K>f concM:I law," Aug 17. 1982 •IN 35 WEEKS: 150th birthday of City of Hou.ton, Aue. 30 - '19 WEBS· Unl¥wlal Fallowshlp ol M91ropollon Community Churc:NI • Dignity lntamdlonol lirnlJtmaous lnlernotlonal c:onleranc:ao ..-,1y 19-26. 1987, Miami! R. Lauderdale 16 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1986 Prof w M 34 S'8", 175 stocky na,ry Love to CIW dance, grve massages. snare quiet limes Seek'ng hairy W M. 35-50. non-smoker with same hkes Lee 713- 468-1563 Super-dt~cX.ntei deni;1- P&i"n! S.ve 1/3 lo 3141 No w•lllng period' Only $11 month. Frff 1-r•y1; Frff clHning. (713) 520-9029. (S• EmployrMnt.) - - PHONE -SEX - - Our service connects Horny Guys 24 hrs a day Do It now tor less than $3 50 an hOur (4151346-8747 OUR POLICY0n-Sexually-Exphc1t~r- 11s'ng The Montrose Voice does not beheve 1hat humans engaging 1n consent­ing sexual acts with one another 1s 1mmor11 Our readers are encouraged to advertise here to seek relat1onsh1ps encounters adventures. etc All advertis­ing should. howe"Y"er, not contain Jan­gua9e that would offend an unsuspec1'ng reader A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can show you how to have active tun or play passive games with the personal ads In their new book ·c1ass1t1ed Atfa1rs. they II tell you hOw 10 wnte an ad Iha! really stands out what to expect w"1en you place or resPond to an ad. and even what afl those fvnny little 1bbrev1ataons mean SendS8to Class1hedAttalfs."Aly­son Pub • Dept P-5. 40 Plympton. St Boston, MA02118 (Alsolncludedw1Ubea coupon lor $5 oft on your nexl Personals m your choice of 25 gay publications, '.'.''.:'~ding !he Montrose Voice !_ YARD & GARAGE SALES HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce 1t here . then stand back for the crowd Call 5~8490 or v1S1l the Voice al 408 Avondale lo place your yard sale announcement DINING OUT IN MONTROSE. ALL RESTAURANTS LISTED HERE SERVE AS DISTRIBUTION POINTS FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE Bma 'r•ga •=-'2601 Grant-522.()042 Boulevard Care~ loven-521-1015 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Gyro Ciyros Sattdw1cl'\ Shop-15j6 West· !Je,""" -~ll-"655 - o;p;;-3112 K rov-~11-3816 HouM 01 ~-e1c2 Wathei;,-7~ SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ~tra1 Incl an Rfttaurant-2047 Marshalt-626- •113 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Second Verse-3619 WasNngton-ee2-3773 5;n1Sh F'°1iirtr-392l M.u~i06 __ SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Star Piua-2111 N01folk ~23-0800 St•k n~Jl ~ontroae-62M135 Taurnai MWW1Cite=52i'W Mab~ 2394 Will1e1 880--Westtieimer at Montrose-528· :,Ott To place an AD in the Montro:=.e Voice .. ju:=; t phone us ! 529-8~90 ll\am-5: "Op I e~ days Ads can be charged over the phone to a maior credit card OR we can bill you later. Living for the New York Stock Exchange? Stuart, you must be deranged, Your only interest be Dow Jones? Stuart, you must be blind, What will you leave behind When you are only bones? At times, one of the market's bulls, At times, one of the market's famous bears. Stuart, your money may buy you jewels, But it cannot wipe away Loneliness' tears. Which will it be this week? What stocks will you now seek? Will it be steels, banks or computers, Or, will you buy commodity futures? Yes Stuart continue to speculate, While you remain without a mate. Let your stock charts determine your fate, While you any chance for Love negate. Stuart spend all your time with charts, Use all your energies and smarts, To make the right buy-use your guile, And then leave Texas with nary a smile. 'Cause you keep Looking to money to be your nurturing River Nile, While you've left behind in Texas, fine, beautiful Kyle. HOUSEBOY/ STUDENT Attention all young men (18-20 years of age) who may have tried to reach me during the last week. I have not been home. I have been traveling and I'm presently visiting Houston. I will be here through Saturday, January 4, and can be reached at (713) 654-1234, ext. 2003. If I am not in, please leave your number and name with the operator and I will return your call and arrange to interview you on Saturday, January 4. I will be back at (914) 428- 3991 as of 2:00 p.m., Sunday, January 5. Montrose Voice Classified Advertising :,n:: 0 ''~" "{;{ ;'.~ ~'dv:;,: trl•~n3~1~;h~~":/,':'.:,~ 1;~7;;J' >f'1 For regu• rr d' •P'•Y alfv rt1s1ng TiiE HEADLINES: Headline words in bold type, centered, are $1 each word (minimum $3 per lone). (Centered bold headlines can also appear within the text or at the end of the ad, and are also $1 per word. with a minimum of $3 per lone.) TiiE TEXT: Each word m regular type is 40¢ (Additional regular words in "ALL CAPS" or Bold Words not in all caps are 55¢ each. Additional BOLD WORDS in all caps are 70¢ each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each additional word like this 40¢ THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each add111onal word hke lh1s 40¢ THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLD, $9.00 Then each addoltonal word like I hos os 40C ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WOROS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE 55¢ EACH Addttlonal bold worcla llke thlo In teal •r• 55C Heh. ADDITIONAL BOLO, ALL CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer, make no copy changes during the run, pay for the full run in advance, and deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same cond1l1ons and deduct 25'!11 BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number We'll confidenllally forward all responses to your ad lo you by mail or you can pick them up atourolflce. Rale 1s$3 for each week the ad runs. (Responses will be forwarded mdefmilely, however. for as long as lhey come in.) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail your ad in or phone 1t m. You can pay by check. money order. Mastercard, Visa. American Express. Diner's Club or Carte Blanche. Or we'll bill you DEADLINE: Classihed ads received by 3pm Wednesday will be placed in that week's newspaper. Ads received later will be placed in the following week's newspaper. ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blond Ad number, clo Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006-3028 It wlll be for­warded, unopened, to lhe advertiser. Enclose no money ADDITIONAL NOTES: A ··word" 1s considered anylhing separated by "spa­ces." except hyphenated words are considered 2 words when each segment 1s a recognized word if 1t stood on its own. A complete phone number, including area code, 1s 1 word City, state and zip 1s 3 words bold line---- bold lln• - - - texl words· --~- bold line Use add1t1onal paper 11 necessary CATEGORIES DAnnouncements 0 Accomodat1ons (lodging for Houslon visitors) O Cars & Bikes O Commercial Space D Dwellings & Roommates O Employment & Jobs Wanted 0 Items For Sale 0 Models, Escorts. Masseurs 0 Personals 0 Pets O Rides O Travel D Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AD UNDER --~ IN THE "GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY " OPPOSITE PAGE ' --- - bold headline words at $1 each (minimum $3 per line)· regular words in text at 40¢ each· ALL CAPS regular words in texl at 55¢ each: Bold word a In text at 55¢ each· - - - BOLD ALL CAPS m text al 704 each Blond ad number assigned for $3? Complele issue of newspaper with my ad in 11 mailed to me. $1.25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Tim ea week a: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S). O Also. I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week. 1 have enclosed (or will be billed or charged, as indicated below) an add1t1onal O $29 for 6 monlhs or 0 $49 for 1 year. TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged: - --- METHOD OF PAYMENT D Check enclosed D Money order enclosed O Cash 0 VISA charge 0 MasterCard charge 0 Diners Club charge O Carte Blanche charge 0 Amerc1an Express charge 0 Bill me If charging, card expiration date - --- Credit card number ----------­S1gnalure Name Address Phono(s) for venficat1on ol ad. II necessary MAIL OR BRING TO Monlrose Voice, 408 Avondale, Houston. TX 77~3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 1Qam·5 30pm JANUARY 3. 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 17 MONTROSE RESOURCES SELECTED STATE_ NAT ORGANIZATIONS Bar Owners ANn ot Ta (BOAT)--720 BnlZOI t«>2 ~tin-t512) 472'-3333 A•g,sg~:'io~~:~·~:npe~.:~.s :1~~ W..ntngton, DC 20003. f212) ~7·3101 Gay & Lesb&tn Pr .. Aan-POB A. Otd en. .... Sl.11 New YM NY 10011-(212) ~ G1y Reghll Nal LObby-POB 1882. WHtungton. DC 20013-1'-02) 546-1801 Hum1n Rights C.mp&tQn Fund- POB 1396. Wuh­ll'lgton. DC 20013-12021 s.t&-2025 Lambdli Legal OehtnM-132 W 43rd. New York. NY 1003&-(212) 944-9488 leab .. n1Gay fhght1 Advocat•-POB 822 Austin 78787 Media Fund for Human Righ11 --~POB A. 06d Chel ... St1. New York NY 10011-(212) -.6622 Nat Aun of Bu11neM Cound~-Bo• 1514'5. Sin FrlOC•SCO. CA 9"115- 14'15) ~53$3 Nat Aun of G1y & LeabianOernoCtubl- 174'2M1a Av SE. wa.sn.nqion. DC 20003-(202) 5"7-31CM Nat G1y HNrth EdUc Foundation-POB 784 ,...... Yorti:. NY 10038-(212) 515i3-e313 °'Or Gr•nbef'g '7131 523--5204 Nat Gay R1gtrta Ad'l'ocat•-540 Castro. Se" Frtn-­c. co. CA 9'11' - 1415J MJ..382• Nat Gay r..- Foree (NGTF}-«> 5th Av New Yorll, NY 10011-(212) 7'1-5U> NGTF't Cr1t11hne-(800) 221·7044 Coutlede NPW Yon: Slate) Ruf•• Cmhtton. Clo wa1ter·Zanghi. Box 811. Brum. TX7tw527 Tx Gay'l.~n Tu.k Force- POB AK. Denton 78201-- ts1n 391-121e US Trar.vest.•tf' T,.,_.,.1al COntlCt Svc-1017-8 E Pt«.e. SNttlt. ~,.. 12'.' f2'Di") 9a4-8266 --ATTENTION ORGA-N-IZ_AT_l_O_N_S_ _ Check your listing We llst here each week name or organization. address, phone. regular meeting dates and times. and ?n~6~,~~t~~~1~o':'::tt~nf~r~~r~~s:~n~~! Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006. THE MONTROSE VOICE­INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY AodlorAIOS-P086&114. 77~~77 An A C.petla Chorus. Church of Chrl1t-P08 116734 7·7·266""----~--~~~~- A Place"' the Sun-622-7695 ACLU-1236 W Gray-524-5925 AIDS Hothne--529-3211 (Gay & Lesbian Switch~ boa.a) Am;;;C.n -Gay - Athe11t1-POB 66711, 77266- 527·9255 ~Rainbow Society tor tn• Deaf-520-0732 Avondate Aun-POB 86054. 7726& meets 7 30pm 2nd Thurs. Women·• Chn1t1an Ctr. 310 Pac1hc ~~t· Maoaz•n•- e130 sw Fwy ~~~:~~~-Robe";, Moon. d1r. 209 8«1ng Memorial United Method11t Church- 1440 Harokf-52trl017 1vc 10 SOam Sun Cho--:C~1ted--P08 70996. 77270-529- 3211 (Gay & Lesbian Sw1tchb0erd) "'"'' 1pm 3rd Sun, Masterson YWCA. 3815 Willia. 'Social ~~·~~~ternat• Fndays. Sund•)' brunch Christian Church of the Good Shepherd- 1707 ~r~ose Svc 1pm Sun. Bible ltudy 7 30pm Church of Chn1t1an Fa11t1-18'0 W•theim..-- ~~ 'C~~OA4~~"~~~:'e study 7 30pm Ct1zen1 tor Human Equa,11ty (CHE)-POB 3CM5 77253--680-3346. 937-3516: mMt 2nd Tl.In, Hou House. 1617 F~nn1n. 9th ftoor Kl1v1ty room Cleis Lnb1an Mothers Grc.x.ip-Sarra '73-3708 meets 2nd & 4th Thut1. Oegntty Ctr. CiiP.,.rs-342-6502 Con •5·s-meets a1 Braz:oa Arver Bottom. 2.ao Brazo1--S28-9t92 COmnuttee for Publ~ Health Awareness-PCB 3045. 77253--5~. 522·50M Sharing Group tor the Worned Well" meet Fri. 7-lpm. Montrose CounMhng Ctr_ ______ Community Poht-;c.J" ActtOn Committee CC· PAC)-POe 2005. 77252-236-11666 co;ru;;;:m;fYG~r-3207 Mon"'-1-ro-.0---5-2-1· 0511 Svcs 11am Sun. 7 30pm Thurs COnQr~11on Aytz Chay1m- 1840- --­Westhetmer- 68tr8997 728-5181 IVC & IOCial &pm 2nd & (th Fn ~11ne--..,.22'"'s.-1"'505=""~- Demo Committee ot GPC-5~ Dhlrma StudyGroup-40SAvonda•e-52•·95S4 Diana Foundat•on-2700 Mason-524-5791 Otgntty/Hou (gay Cathohcs)-3217 Fannio- 52&-0111. 5ZH&« mau 7:30pm Sal ESOPS Prl\late Prof .... t0nal SOC1al Cfub-9e1· 9876 Federlbon of Chlnttee United for Soc••I s.m. ~~~~~~ht:!',~~u~~:,181 aF~J!:~ Montrose Cl~c. Montrose Counael1ng Ctr lit Unit.nan Church--5210 Fannin-5~1571 1YC 11 15am Sun Ftontrunners- Joe 520-3019 Of Salvador S~ 1288 runs Sun. Tues & Thurs Memorial Park Tenn11 Ctt Gay & Ahvt Shenng Exper.enee (GASE)- 528- 1311, 528-0891 Gay & L•bl'~.-n ~A-rc~h-ov_M_O_f Tx ath11i'te'OiliH1"C Gay & Lesbian Mormons- 1713 W•the1mer ..-0. 77098- 568-1'13 Ga)' & L•bian $1-ud-on_l_As-•n_a_l_UO_tH-~ 4800 Calhoun-529-3211 (Gay & lesbian Swotchboa.al Gay & L•b•an Switchboard - POB 8&591, ~~J2:,"~6~ ~~~11cm. counMling_ ref· G8YA.sian1 & fnendl- 2915 Waugh Or •288- 523-t789. 7SS-3633 meets 3Pm 2nd & ~ast Sun Gay Fatheni- 3217 Fant'Mn ~ 528-0111 Gay & L•ba.tn H1spatWC1UniOoa-POB800821, 77290-882-1'78 meett 2nd Mon Dignity Ctr Gay NutMe AUIAnCe~IMee -- Gay fi9oc»e WI ChriSbanid.nce-Box 013. Be.,. .. .,. 77401 - elS-26'1 ?r~~;!~~Ce= :tk~~.~~B1it~ Wed (Hou) G1y Pride Week ComrmitM-POB 86821 n2&6-St1n fOf'd 523-7644 or C.thy Len1~n eea-e256·~~~~~~~~~~~~ Gr•ter Montrose Bus.nes1 Gu1kf-M1ke N~ton 630--0309 or Bruce Wooliey 5~ meets 7pm. •th Wed. Brenn1ns Reel. 3300 Srruth ~p theater worklhop-Joe Watts 522· 2204 meets 7pm Thurs. Otgntty C1r, 3217Fannm Hazelw1tch Productions-2615 Waugh Or #26e. 77006 lesb11n concerts. free mailing list Homophile lnterfeith Aftiance-729 Manor- 523-6969 Hou Area Ga)' & Lesb11n Engineers & Sc1entL1ts-POB 66631 , n006-43~1879 meets 7pm 4th Tues Hou Bar Owners Assn (H080}-c10 Brazos Rive< Bottom. 2400 Braz:ot-528-9192 meets 2pm 2nd Wed Hou Community Ck>wns-862-831• Hou Council of Clubs-526-80S4 Hou Data ProfHSiona11-SZHS822. 664-6459 meets 7 JOpm 2nd Tues HOY Gay Heaitn Advocates 790-9448 Meeta 7 30pm 1st S.t Hou Gay Studeots Asso-747·3098 Hou lntet-Fa1th AlhallC8 con1ac1 ttuough Int ... gnty/Hou Hou Motorcycle Ctub-clo·-~a,Ys. ;onw;,4 Ntrner-528-885:.::..;=1'--------­Hou North Professt0nals-POS 3&40. Humble 77347-B•H at 821·7126 meet 7 30pm 2nd sat Hou OutdOOr Group CHOG ~-521·36'1 or Jim 68().31"4 11H 1ne-P0e 16()(1. 77222--59(.1732. 529-701' 1fflha1ed groups are Interact, e ·uamo·1 A Place 1n thti Sun, Montrose Art Alhance. Gay & L•bsan Arch1vea of Tx. Gay & Lnb1an Switchboard Montron Symphonic Bend. board meet 7 30pm 111 Thurt {vaned ~hons), educational forum 7 30pm 3<d Thu<S lngersotl Speakers· Bureau-POB 301. Bella re 77'01-~ 1n1eorit;7HOu·-:..(-Ep-,-.c-o-p-.1•-•-n -)--P-O_B_6_800_8 . 77266-524-1'89 meets 1 30pm 2nd & •th Mon. Autry HouH. 6265 Ma n lnteract-POB 16041. n222-529--701• KPFT Radio. FM-90--C 19 Lovett B~-s* 4000 · Breakthrough'' ielblan--tem.nrSt pgm fn 8 15-11am •·w11de ·n St•n"' gay pgm Thura 7.30- 900pm In Montrose, Neady Everyone Reads theVot'e KSIAIDS Foundetion-3317 MontrOH 80J11155", 77006-52 .... 2437: AIDS Risk Reduction (5afe Se•) Workshops Bpm 2nd & 4th Mon in con1uno­hon with Monttose Counseling Center Jerry Kauffman Cancer Fund-778-4106 K;ewe Ot Hydra-811 Grace4and-811t M91Cl9f 726-1032 LM,bda Ctr Gay A6c:ohc>Ucs & Alanon ~"121• Jo Annie--521-9772 L•btani Gay Resource Sve-Un1verstty ot Hou. '800 ca1houn. box 309 nOCM-74i-1253 mMt1 2 30pm ane<nate Ton. Spend~top Room. 2nd ftoor. Unl'tlersny Ctr Let Us Entertain You W_.•nd-pro1ect of Hou Council of Clubo-526-8054 The Llnle ChUtCh-212 fargo-522-7695 ncs 2:30pal Sun living Wat., Church-271-6472 (S..-1~ 6pm Sun. Holiday tnn Main & B!Odqett. Rew JM!Vle Leggett Lone Star ",..'-'ud~oa:...1..,G=-,-ou-p--""PO=e~1< 05==-n""., _77_,2,_7-, LO¥rter Westhetmer Pohce Sul>Stat.on-802 W•thetmer--529-3100 Lutherans Concerned-meets at Grace Luth• ran Church, 2515 Waugh-521-0963, 453-11'3 meet 2nd & 4th Tues ever11ng1 McAdory House--c/o KSiAIDS Found1bon, ~17 MontroM Box 1155-524-2437 Men Against Deception Courtesy Club-P08 S.1871, 77254-529-3211 {Gay & LHb•an Switchboard) meets b~v.oeekly M"etropohtan Comtnul'\lty Church of the Aetur· rect1on (MCCA)-1919 O.C.tur-811-91'9 pot· luck chnn.,. 730pm 111 Sa.t rnonthty. 1vC1 10 <Som & 7 15om Sun & 7 15pm Wed mombo<· th1p Inquirers class 7 30pm Mon .OUC.hon dUMI Tuea: & Wed ..... fHou) Mot•opololan~Wc_<n'°d~E-,_,,-.,-.,,__--5~~-96-1-~ ~ SI Slop'*" E1>sc:opal Church. 7 JO Wed Montrose Art Alhsince-fi94..1732. 868-931' ..._ S332 atM1at1 L-H Inc. mee11 2nd t-.4on MontroH 8u11neaa Gudd ... Gr .. ter M~ Bus G!Jlld MontroH Church of Chnst- 1700 ... ontmee­n7- 929fli l\l'C 11am Sun MontroH Civic Club see Neenow,, Aalft Montroae Climc-803 Hawthome- 528-5$31 open Mon. T11e. Thurs &-9pm ~~~~~ ~~t~,r,r:;;: mee7t : Montrose Counset1ng Ctr-900 LOYett •203- 529--0037 AIDS victim support group O 30pm Mon. Women·1 Support Group 7pm Tuet. AIDS R11k Reduction (Safe Se•) Workt"°t)e 8pm 2nd & •th Mon 1n con1unct1on v.i1th KSIAIOS Founda­t• on ~ngers. gay men·s chorus- M ke ~ 3810 ~~f~ SoftbeN LMgu9--POB 222.72 77'127- MontroM Sports ARn 1MSAJ -spec~ group MontroH Symphonic Bano- POB '80613. g~~:= .i;;o:,.1~ r- Oign ry MORE- 52e-MORE f>29-co37 projeCt ~ Cour.settng Ceni.r M SA,... Mon Night eo... ling-play Stadium Lanes 8200 Breesma n...-.Steve 692-4591 MSA Pool 1B111atos) League-Oebb e seon 973-- 1358 or Oennil LOfCS 66CH;752 MSAIV0Ueybl.1J-Mart1. 522-1469 games 7pm n ..... Gregory .... enc:ofn schoOI, 1101 Taft Montrose Watch subgroup Neertown Assn Mi.atv,g-,_-tnfftl it-the Barn. 710 Pac1t1c-528- 9427 club neght Thurs Nii".Onal Ga)' Heetth Education Founcsation- 523-520< ~:~t()R~hC:~:~~'C:~.~~~~~0~~;..·- NMl1own Assn 1Montrose Civic Ctub)-1413 W•tt"1•mer meet 7pm •m Tu• NeertOwl'\ Bui1neu Alliance-529-7010 meets 7pm 2nd w.ct. Liberty Ba.nt, 1001 Westheunet ~ FrMdOm Chmtran Churt:h-829 Yale- 863-8377 IJVCI 10tm Sun 0....reatera A~n;--mo-.,.-_.,--o~Montr--ooe~-CO-u_n_· ~i:~~lw49:=~~r~~:nn::· Bo11ng Churcll. '""° ..,._ Parents & Friendl ot Lest»an1 & Gays (Parents FLAG)--- ,,_,. 2pm 3.a Sun Prnby• lena!'\ Ctr 41 0.kda~ Park People-c o Neartown Community FlrehOuM-7 41-2524 Paz y Uberact0n- POB &00063 77260-862- 1478 Presbytenan1 lor Lesbian/Gay Concefl•­PrelbytwLan Ctr, •1 Oakdale- 5~25&4 meets 7.30pm 2nd TCJe& Pr•tdenta Oub {pest pres1de!'ll$_G_PC"'""j:POB 668 ... 77266-5~• Recr .. t;()na1 Land Fund ComrJ,Tftte- Mustang Club protect R1Uun;;-Qay1..nbtan Support Group-529-- 3211 {Gay & Lesbian Sw•tchboerdl ~ Chac>el-1409 Sul Aoss-524-9839 ShAnh of T• counse1tng 'for 11&-threatening 111---522-50&< Sodtty - tor~t --rr;;:eiS} - Golt Coast Tninsvntrte Chapter-PCB 90335 noeo Society 1ot the PromottOn OI Amazon s.do­Maooc ... m (SPASMJ-POB 70996, 77270-Gay & LMbaan Sw1tehboard 529-:\211 Sunoance C.ttte CO IOCil r club-Clo Tt'8 Bairn. 710 Pad!IC-528-9427 ~~,,':~ith~~!~~ouncsat1 on-191S Ta RtOers-c.to R«OrG. 714 Fau·view-521·2192 WW8 Bo'4'11ng- Myrt 723-1455 bowls 7 30pm Sun. Post OP &ow11ng Lann ::t::-~= Arts Aun- 1001 WMU\9'­Wt\ at Ever ttlPP.-n"'edtO~~ ::~"t .. ~~t;:!"t1a~L=.-o243 evet women·1 Bow~ng Le.gue-Oebbte 97~1358 $pm Sun Stadrum Lanes 8200 Braesma n women'1 Lotiby Alllance--4 ChelSM-521:.0.39 W~ottball L .. gue~~ 77008-Cathy or 2-'0lyn 1188-8256 emo-- Baytown Lambda Group- 427-1378 mnts 1 :IOpm Odd Fri CONROE-Conroe A,_ lambda Gay M-\olO!ll 344-6'70 Conroe ArNLestHans-Kathy at 1409} 7~ rrwel !pm 2nd &_· ":_" .:F_n====::..:::...:..:..:.c GALVESToN-Laml> da Alc0h0iic1 Anonymous-763-1401 MetropoUi.n Commun ty Church ot Gatvnton lsland-182• Broed•ay-765--7626 QUICK REFERENCE (Tear Out & Post by Phone) Doctor ... ada or 55-3211 FIRE-227· 2323 Gay Pololoeol Clua- n- 52-1-.1-000------ KSAIOS founOabOn-52(·2'37 lawyer-SM 8ds or $29-3211 MONTROSE VOICE-529-&190 POLICE-222· 3131 ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular classified rates of paying "by the word." you can purchase space here "by the inch." When buying by the inch, you can Include special art, logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1 • $29 2" $39 3" $49 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3" $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3" $39 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 3. 1986 Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory To c:xjyertise 1n this page. coil 529-8490 during business hours ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep it fisted here In !he Montrose Voice where literally thousands turn each week - VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional service through 1 VooceClassof•ed Cell 5~8490 Pay by check or charge 11 on your American Express Diner's Club, MasterCard VISI or Carte Blanche AUTO SALES. LEASING MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba. 975-1985 SEE OUR OISPLA Y AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ASCOT LEASING, LTD. 1303 Upland, 973-0070 SEE OUR OISPLA Y AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN JACINTO MOTOR LEASING 10700 Richmond #100, 78Hl566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Also - · cars & Bikes" on "Montrose Class• foed page AUTO REPAIR ALL PAINT & BODY SHOP 1510 Leeland. 659-3131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE WEST GRAY AUTO (TEX STATE INSPECTION) 238 W Grey 528-2886 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Major/Minor Repairs Gas or Diesel Electncal Repair 526-3723 2716 Taft Road Service TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1411 Taft. 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE NEARTOWN KA.,,-,,R-=z--- 1901 Taft. 524-8601 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE AUTO REPAIR & BODY SHO_P_ 2001 Harold. 522·5255. 526-1940 BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS Tummy's Berber Shop. Hair culs $9 00 House calls S 15 00 & up For rnfo 528- 8216 BOOK KEE PING General Ledger, Billings, Financial Statements, Payroll Word Processing Income Tax Services Available T.H.6. BOOl<l<EEP/#6, Ere. TOM GRAHAM (713) 861-2533 See Ilse 'Tax Preparation" category COUNSELING DANIEL J. KUCHARS 5~9004 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DENTISTS Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhe1mer Houston. TX 77006 Monday thru Saturday Hours by Appointment (713) 524-0538 EYEGLASSES TEXAS STATE OPTICAL 2525 Unoversoly (Village). 528-1589. & 4414 South Me•n, 523-5109 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Eyeglass frames repaired New frames for your old lenses changed whole you w11t Eyeglass prescriptions f illed Many, many frames to choose from Come see us at Smith Opticians. 4313 Austin. Auston & Wheeler Mon.-Sat 7 30em-6 30pm 524- 8884 FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch. 528-3651 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GIFTS. PARTY GOODS TIS THE SEASON 1966 W Grey (R1over OekSJ 5~5700 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GOURMET SHOPS SAY CHEESE 3626 Westhe1mer (Highland Village). 621- 1825 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GYMS OLYMPIA FITNESS & RACKETBALL CLUB 8313 SW Fwy. 988-8787 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPB CLINIC 5401 Oashwood #10. 661·2321 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HOME AIR CONDITIONING """'TIME FOR A/C REPAIR? $25 pluo p1rta. CALL 543-0391. JANITORIAL SERVICE PLUS 528-62•5 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Cleaning et its best for less' 522-6967. JEWELRY KENESCO LTD. 1101 Post Oak Blvd. #9-558. 680-8286 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MEDICAL CARE STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. 2801 Ella Btvd suite G, 868-•535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MOVING MOVEMASTERS Boxes. loo' Visa MC. AMEX welcome 1925 Westhe•mer 630-6555 PICTURE FRAMING Custom Framing with metal moldings at wholesale prices 527-0111 PRINTING SPEEDY PRINTING 5400 Bellaire Blvd. 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAX PREPARATION PERSONALIZED SERVICE Complete bookkeeping. tax service Cell Oen. 522-8455 TIRES ••• ·~" 529-1414 !I THE 11 tl f rucE ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview 3 Blks West of Montrose TRAVEL TRAVEL CONSULTANTS Complete travel arrangments All services FREE. Open Monday through Friday 9am·5 30pm. 2029 Southwest Fwy., Houston, TX 77098 (713) 5~~ VACATION IDEAS? See "Vacations· lollowong ·on the Town" on the previous page VARIETY --wi'iOLE EARTH PROVISION CO. Alabama et Shepherd. 526-5226 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE VENDING VIDEO --VIDEOSCOPE 2016 Montrose. 529-5544 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE VIDEOTREND 1401 California, 527-0656 SEE OUR OISPLA Y AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ~see "Adult Video" category A CLASSIFIEDAFFAiR_? __ John Preston end Frederick B1andt can ahow you how to have active fun or play peu1ve g1mes with the personal 1ds In the•r new book. " Classohed Affe•rs." they'll tell you how to wrole en Id lhll really st1nds oul, what 10 expect when you place or respond to an ad. and even whet 111 those funny little abbrev11t1on1 mean SendS8 to"Cl1ssof1edAff1"s " Aly­oon Pub • D1pt P-5. •O Plympton. St , Boston. MA 02118.(Also included woll be• coupon for $5 off on your next Personals l~crid~~gcr~~c~0~ftr~!.g~~1g.u~11cat1on1 PLAY IA'! Sate aex 11 fun. erotic_ Play safe. tor your s1k•. for your putner'a sake. To place an AD in the Montrose Voice ... just phone us! 529-8490 10am- 5: 30pm Wee~ da ·~s Ads can be charged over the phone to a major credit card OR we can bill you later Keep your working parts in order . • :a American Heart V Association 'NE'RE FIGHTING Fm 'rOJRLIFE In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voi'e Photo• by Rofler Lackey Montrose Soap And So Be It Resolved By the staff of the Montrose Voice While taking down the decorations and sweeping up the confetll, Soap decided to prepare a few resolutions to be used as a guide to a highly successful social year in Montrose. Because there are so many wonderful things to do, these resolutions should be a lot easier to keep than such dreadful ones like promising to work out regularly 1 Never miss an Encore party The New Year's Eve bash was a Number to remember. 2. Always begin Sundays on Pacific Street By parking once and partying all day, there's no need to rush from the depths of The Mine, all the way up to Heaven, after having a little taste with JR. 3. To the newly rediscovered 611 and the Metro. both soaring to new heights in 1986. 4. To ''Thank God for little girls" because they grow up to be beautiful women. Always take a tip from Bacchus to share in the Kindred Spirits, at Just Marlon and Lynn's. 5 To head down Main Street on the way downtown. You can always get Rich's with a Venture-N to the Exile. 6. May It be resolved that It Is a sad good­bye to the Chicken Coop, but the bigger animals are still 1n The Barn. 7 I also resolve never to look under Mary's dress as she pulls the Ripcord and Chui" down to The Bayou Landing. 8 As I stp grog tn The Galleon, may I never forget my Cousins in the Briar Patch with E/J and Dirty Sally. 9 I will try my best to look for Bears any­time I dredge The Brazos River Bottom because all so often they come In Twins. 10. For safety's sake, I will slow down On the Curve and stop at the Corner before heading out to KJ's. 11 Finally, I will strive to cut out all of my Risky Business at Studio 13 and save it for when I am behind The Ranch. Now on to other things. -e- There are three times a year when virtually every gay person comes out: Halloween. Gay Pnde Sunday and of course last Tues­day Every club in town was wall to wall with men and women At Heaven, the crowd danced 1111 the sun came up And at Mary's, Drl1coll Street Cafe, JR'a, The 611, Mining Co., KJ'1, Ripcord, Venture-N, Cousins, Galleon, Kindred Spirits, etc., etc., the bal· loons dropped. Auld Lang Syne played, the champagne flowed freely, some shed a sen­timental tear, the rowdy got rowdier, and the party continued all night. -e- With all our resolutions made, let's get on with plans for the first quarter of 1986. The BRB's 8th anniversary 1s coming Jan. 26. But you don't have to wait until then to •git country." Every Sunday tn January, they're having a Sunday afternoon Denim Dance and Wrangler Roundup (Levis too, of course). DJ David Royalty starts at 4pm and the BR Band starts at 7 -e- KJ'a is the new gay bar in North Houston, 11830 Airline. They always have something going on, including a Wednesday late night happy hour, 11pm to 1am. and a Sunday pool tourney e The Ort1coll Street Cata now has Sylvia Reyes entertaining on the piano. Stop in at 1834 Westhe1mer. -e- The House on Pies at 61 42Westheimercon­tinues with their incredible $1 .90 breakfast special. (And breakfast begins at midnight.) Don't get your House of Pies mixed up. They're both good eating places. but the breakfast special 1s good ONLY at the 6142 westheimer House of Pies. -o- The Boulevard Cale's Big Bang Breakfasts continue too Only $1.99. And you get both eggs and pancakes AND choice of bacon or sausage. Chutes will tum you upside down! Video Trend, 1401 California, has received copies of several major gay art movies, such as "Taxi Zurn Kio" and "El Deputado." But you better reserve them fast (or lastly?) -e- First there were stnp night Tuesdays at JR'1. Everybody thought It was a most unlikely place for a stnp contest. But sur­prise! It became THE place to be on Tues­days. Well NOW, they are going to be have show nights (we're talking DRAG. honey) on Sundays at JR's. Unbelievable! Two shows, 10pm and midnight It starts NEXT Sunday, the 12th, with Kandi Delight. Diane Martell and Tiger Lil. And NO cover. -e- Will they EVER open that patio at the Mining Co.? Well you can get a peek every Sunday in January for the Mme's Construction Beer Busts All tips for the beer bust will be donated to the T.H R.F. 21.06 Supreme Court Appeal Fund -e-lf you ever thought you were a star, now you can really be one. In Heaven, no less (Get it? A star in Heaven?) If you want to sing, dance. act, tell jokes or impersonate tn pub­lic, now you can. Right out there in front of everybody. Monday nights, 11 pm at Heaven. It starts. this Monday. (Even if you don't want to star, you can always watch others either star or bomb. whatever the case may be.) To help you get over your stage fright. there will be a $100 cash prize for the best act each Monday. Host will be the multi-talented Randy Jobe, star of Risky Bu1lne11 and co-author of "Surrender Houston." -e- Another Mardi Gras season is upon us. This, the year of the Tiger, The Krewe of Hydra will be taking a bus (or two if need be) to Galveston, for their Mardi Gras celebra­tion. This is not as elaborate as the Crescent City-on-the Mississippi gala. but it is closer to home. If you'd like to go this Feb. 8, you can get advance tickets from the Ripcord, Tlmele11 Taffetta, Rascals, Barn, and The 61 1. The Krewe of Olympus, who's captain this year hails from our very own Roa-ood Estates, informs us that a group of Housto- JANUARY 3. 1986 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Gene an.d Hank will serve you well Cassandra's sure-fire cure for the hiccups. Or, could it be the unknou:n comir? n ans will be flying to New Orleans on Janu­ary 10 for their annual ball. -e Rumor has 1t that all of AP. 's birthday roses died after spending one Saturday night with h1m1 - o We understand that one of BRB's owners has become a Daflas1te due to a "k1d"­napping by "The Bearded One" of Dallas. -e- Just a few questions: Which recently-changed-into-a brunette 'f!RB bartender is really known as Snow White? Which Cousins bartender and Chutes deejay have been making babies? Some birthday presentl! -e-lf all the post-holiday chores work up an appetite, you're welcome 24 hours a day at the new Weathelmer Cafe. The old Tim's Coffee Shop is now open under new man- The sounds are always the best at Chutes agment. En1oy the oldies on the juke box while savoring some scrumptious food. MERIDIEN LEASING INC. 325 528e 7J5i '86 BMW 309/mo 395/mo 569/mo '86 CADILLAC 329/mo '86 MAZDA RX"l 209/mo 626 178/mo '86 MERCEDES BENZ 190E JOOE 560Sl 34C)!mo 498tmo 725/mo '86 PORSCHE 398/mo 498/mo '86 TOYOTA Umry C~lio 172/mo 185/mo '86 HONDA Accord l'~I~ XJ6 '86 JAGUAR 569/mo '86 BUICK 1:1'9/mo 2:1"J'mo Gill LEE BORBA ~ (713) 975-1986 NO OOWN Pf\YME.NT • LOY.1R MONTHn PAYMl.NT • C..SH FOR )OUR TRADE ·. 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 3. 1986 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz Do You Live in the Perfect Tense? By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. f',"ews Amen.ca Syndtcatl' Special to the Montrose Voice Any reasoning soul knows for a fact that no one is perfect, right? Wrong. There are die-hard among us who strive for perfec· tion with 11 belief that this happy state of being is entirely attainable. But, to paraphrase poet Alexander Pope, "Whoever thinks a faultless piece to sec, thinks what n'er shall be." Our p<>rfectionistic comrades are really playing a game which cannot be won. Right off, it behooves us to state that striving for the best isn't a bizarre mind set. It only becomes a problem when it strains our relationship with others and when it runs us, exhausted, into the ground Studie!! show that perfectionists are compulsive persons who become entangled in detaih;. They suffer from what pt1ychoanalyst Karen Horney called the "tyranny of the should," a feeling that they should have done better at anything they attempted to do. Their mood swings exefed those of an average person and, what is probably most important. they get in to conflicts with thoi;e who can't tolerate their rij?id qtandard,;. If you've ever wondered whether you have perfectionistic tendencies, then the quiz ahead might tell. Jui;t rate youn;elf on each item as follows: I-Disagree; 2- Agree somewhat; 3-Agree qtrongly. Answers follow 1 I would feel a strong urge to level a hangin1t picture which was slightly tilted. 2. lt would bothermcifl had to poqtpone 11 1ob which I had already started. . 3. If I don't ke<>p setting high standards for myself, I believe I will fall behind. 4 . Even if no one would notiC'e it, couldn't knowingly let mistakes in my work remain uncorrected. Right off, it behooves us to state that striv­ing for the best isn't a bizarre mind set. It only becomes a prob­lem when it strains our relationship with others and when it runs us, exhausted, into the ground. ---- 5. I don't like to admit my weaknesses to others. 6. I am not satisfied to do only an aver­age job 7 My parents always demanded the best from me. 8. I don't function too well if my work area is not neat and organized. Explanation Few reAearch facts are available on the subject of perfectionism. A leading author­ity on the subject is Dr. David D. Bums, profeA80r of psychiatry at the University Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He finds that such type,; have obAessive­compulsive personality makeups. They are guilty of "all or nothing" thinkin1t. They can't re-adjust their standards even when there'~ plenty of leeway for them to do so. They often experience a kind of anti· climatic, downcast feeling after they have expended much energy and drive on a job. Perfectionists experience unusual inner stress when faced with challenges. They often develop "performance anxiety"-a fear which prevails before a test or prior to a situation in which they mustconfrontan obstacle on their way to a worthwhile goal Burns investigated the "perfectionistic cognitive st~le," as he calls it, in the work setting to find if such persons actually wind up earning more money than those who are more easy-paced. Out of a group of 34 insurance agents tested, 18 who attained the highest score on a test of per­fectionism were selected for the survey. Surprisingly, the average earnings of the high scorers were actually less than those who were not perfectionists. Apparently, the salesmen who strove for perfect perfor· mance were paying the price in dollars for their mental attitude. o Score Add up your points. Our quiz isn't an offi· cial teAt, of course, but consider that a score between 14 and 19 is average. Scores of 20 or more indicate that you tend to have perfectionistic personality features. Note: In his work at the University of Pennsylvania Mood Clinic, also known as the Center for Cognitive Therapy, Burns finds that perfectionists can learn to be more flexible and less driven by their com· pulsion to achieve all things without flaw. Similar bre1.1kthroughs have been made by other therapists. .. 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