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Houston Voice, No. 845, January 3, 1997
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Houston Voice, No. 845, January 3, 1997 - File 001. 1997-01-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4547/show/4514.

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(1997-01-03). Houston Voice, No. 845, January 3, 1997 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4547/show/4514

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 845, January 3, 1997 - File 001, 1997-01-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4547/show/4514.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 845, January 3, 1997
Publisher Window Media
Date January 3, 1997
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript HAPPY NEW YEAR! JANUARY 3RD, 1997 •ISSUE 845 !State's Top Law Firm Offers Domestic Partner Benefits Macchio to Helm Houston Premiere of 'Business' Film Star lleadlines Tony Award WmnmJ? Production film star Ralph Ma<ehio (The Karate A"1d. \fi• Cousm I mn>) head1mes nn 1mprcss"e cast m the Houston premiere ot the touring produe11on of Broad\\ay s Tony A\\ard and Puhtzer Pnze '"nnmg musical /lo" fa Succeed In Business II 1/hout RcJ//y Trymg Macchio stars ns J Pierrepont Finch, a clear·e)cd. '"ly Ralrh Macchio '"in de'"' \\asher al giant corpora· t1on on has ''s~) 'o; the Ii m 1 t ti c I 1 m b from the mailroom to the board­room Along the \\3) he gets the gir' gets I the monc) .md nearly gets the boot all while following the m struct ons of n hand) dand) guidebook entitled ()OU guessed t'1). "/1011 to 'luc<eed In Business II 1thout Rea/11 Tf)ing ' Ralph Macchio has an extensive hst of f1lw. credits, although he 1s, perhaps, best knoY.n for his celebrated performance as Johnn) in Franci\ Ford Coppola"s The Oumdcr< nnd for the tnle roles in the popL'ar film sene• Th< Karai. Kid, The Aaratc A1J II and !ht Aarate Aid Ill lie has appeared most recently rn the ensemble film \ 'akcd In \o?w )ork, '"th Eric Stoltz, k:athlccn Turner and \1ar) Lou1;e Parker. He reccl\ed \\1de acclaims tor his role m lfi Cousm I 11111) Y.ilh Joe l'c,ci and '\1ari;a Tomei For \\alter Hill's Cross­ro< 1d• •. M.1cch10 kamed to pla) the guitar\\ 1th intricate style !or !us role '" a mu.\lcal prodig) Macchio also starred alongside .John l.ithgo" 111 Distant Thundl!r, the story of an attempted rcconc1hat1on betY.een a father nnd son after the Vietnam War Other film credits include The last POW, Teacherr wuh '.'lick Nolte and Up the Acadcmv If is 1clc\lst0n mo\les include The Three Wishes of 811/y Grier," "Journey to S un·nal," and "Dangerous Compam In additior\ the \ersatile Macchio recently performed in an OfT-Broad\\a)' production of On/) (Conurru•d on pagt 9) Clinton Policy on Marijuana Raises Ire 8\ ( urt Morri\1111 r~e Clinton aJm1nistrauon's response lO the voter a~­pro, ed medicinal marijuana iniliati,es that passed m Anzona ,md California has dr.1,..n fire from man) ind1\lduals in the guy and lesbian commun1ly Ban) ~1cCallre), Whne House Drug C ll!r, Attorney General Janet Reno and HHS ·ecrcUI) Donna Shalala held a press conference this \leek to addres' the issue I hey announced that an) ph) sic1ans prescnbmg man­Juana would be punished "ith loss of pm 1leges - and olten prosecuted - irrespecli\e of the ballot mtllatl\es ( ommuntt) •leaders as dl\er,c a< U.S Represen1a11ve Barney I rank (D-"1A) and ACT l P \\ ashington, DC's (Commwd on~ J [ I Vinson and Flkins, the state's top la" firm. that employs more than l,500people, issued a company memorandum this "eek announcing that 11 is extend mg health benefits to the same-sex domc,t1c partners of 1ls cmplo)ee's The pohc\ became effcc t1ve Janual) I, 1997 The Houston Ve-tee obtained a copy of the memorandum d1stnbuted lo all firm perso;-nel from the Benefit 1md Com pcnsat1on Commtncc - and m an excl~- \e mcst1ga1ion dtscovcred that the company's nen pohcy ts preccd.n• sett ng The addendum descr bes "lio ts c!q;1ble for benefits other than the employee Description 2 of the pohq reads Ari individual )OU have dcc;1gnated as )our d<'mestlc partner in accordance "1t.'1 the F 1rm s domestl( parmer benefits pohc) ( a cop) of Y.h1ch can be obtained from the fur's Benefits Office)." W 'hole th ts ts remarkable m itself, the compar.) has pushed the envelope bevond comprehen'1on The Firm the fifteer.'" largest r. the nation ha• extendc<I the e. ~1b1hl) 1 includ .any unmanied child (mduding .a child of your domeslk partner) "ho 1s less t:1an 25 }ears old and "ho depends upon you or your domestic partner for support.• Remarkabl), V1~son and E.lk1-s, has prov ded t°'m gay and lesbian employee's the same pm leges bestO\\Cd upor> hetero­sexual staff The benefits package also co' ers unmarned children w'io are bet\\ een the ages ol 25 and 30 and "ts a full time student at an accredited tnstitul!on of htgher education " In "hat appears to t>c a \\e!I thought out pohc> the ftrT!' also addressed the issue of COBRA in the addendum since the program administered b) the federal go,emment does not cover domestic panners. The federal go\ emment does not recognize any mamage that is not bc1" een a male and female The policy reads 'CORRA continuation is not a'a1lable for domestic partners N thr children of domesuc rartners. Ho\\C\er, the Plan '"" prm 1de co,erage 'ubstantially comparable to COBRA con­tinua11on coverage for n domesuc partner or the child or children of a domestic partner upon your death, )Our termina­tion of employment "1th the Firm (other than by reason <>f gross m1sconduc1), your becoming e'. ' tble for berefits under fit le XVIII of the '>octal Secunt) Act or a dependert child .:if o domesuc partner ceasing to be ehgtble for plal' CO\Crage ., each case tf the mdtv dual "as co' ered to' the P ~ ~ as of the t'me of the event \\h1ch tr1gge:s such co~erage cont1nuat10" benefits• :N'" C>""7'" SI-I C>"VVI:N'" G-ExcLL ·s1VELY AT CINEPLEX OOEON SPEC rRUM 2660 Au~uu1 Onve ADVANCE TICKETS ON SALE NOW! CAl.l. ("'13) 444-FILM 1i. lu11 .,,. u.1' •• '"" "-•.lfi<r 'tHOW., OAILYAT lo20pm. 4 1"5pm. 7 OOpm & 9.'\"5pm ,.,..._~_,,,_., ....... ....,~~ - FVITA TlMMOYM 11:- N- n.,.,. <J. ,,__.,,., T ....... ....-,,,,,J ,._. ,._ ,__,,,_,., Pref erred GraRhics The Preferred Source for Computer Graphic Design High Quality, Custom Designed Graphics. Do you nttd reliable wn•ice for your graphic tieeds? Providing superior graphic de>ogn to our community is our specialty! And ii comes with a CustomA!r Satisfaction Guarantee! \Ve offer design & layout. desktop publishing. typing. and printing to meet all of your graphic requirements. From calling cards & >tationary to ad copy & design, go with thepn!ferred<;0urce ... Preferred Graphics. internet web Page IDesign1 Computer Staffing Charter Member H HOuSTON a., & Led>oan Q{AMBER of~ 713.528. 7654 pgraphic@neosoft.com New Location: 811 Westhe1mer, Suite 202 In This Issue Letters to the Editor Page 3 Regional News Pages 5. 6 National News Pages~ 8 Global News Pagn Ii Arts & Entertainment Paye.1 9, 10. 12. 15, 2./ Opinion Pages 11 27 Bulletin Board Page 13 Columns Pagts I./, 21, 22. 2./ Galaxy Horoscope Page I./ Puzzle Page I./ Community Directory Page 16 Such Is Life Page 16 Business/Financial Page /7 Sports Page 17 Health & Body Pages 13, 24 Out In Houston Page 25 Scene & Heard Page 26 Community Calendar Page 17 Classified Page 18 Personals HOUSTON VOICE ISSUE 845 January 3. 1997 ~1974•fle--Str. -19110oslle--V­clla> gedna...t>fle-Voain 1991 --... ,... Orlen Qescenl Ooy Slw. - -llecvetme-r I 19'.IJIS fle 811 Westheomer, Suite 105 Houston. Texas 77006 (713) 529·8490 (800) 729·8490 FAX. (713) 529-9531 E-mail' HouVooce@AOL.com Contents copyright 1996 Office Hours: 9am - 5:30pm weekdays PUBLISHER Crad Ouren EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT Jon Anthony/entertainment editor Lee Oavis/spot1S ed<tor Carolyn Roberts/soaeoy editor WRITERS Rich Arenschoeldt. David Bianco. Andrew Edmonson, Larry Longie. Curt MorilSon, Jazz Paz, David Richardson, Carolyn Roberts. Patr1C1a Nell Warren, Glen Webber CARTOONIST Earl Storm PHOTOGRAPHERS Steven David, David Goetz PRODUCTION Matthew Penmngton/manager ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Jon Anthony, Lee Davos Carolyn Roberts INDEPENDENT ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES: BenJamon Andre-Diaz. J C Michalek, Stephen Schmidt. Boll Sheppard CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS John Toups NATIONAL ADVERTISIN<J l"u: . ..-"t:.'tn:." f"' IVt;; Rovendell Marketing, Po Box 518. Westf1led, NJ (908) 232·2021 NotlGe 10 BdVert1sers -raiesc!ledoletcunocnw•-Sept 1996 • P..wiloreompietereprockJCtl:)nOllf'V~ ~~a.::=,:~=:-.... • Opnona ~by~ Of allMOfWll ••not ~W'IOMOllNHQull(D"VOCl9«bltdenclW9 aSfl..l'Nnolllblitytar .,,.ccnen1 ••PfMMd or llnPlild al NICI ll1deS"'....,..... cl pel'ION iving or~ r ... or fldJQr1llfrt"9c*100f'I . ~a1,.rwn•or""*"llphotef'IYp91'9Gft« ~nst.:INor~intheHoutUJl'IVoa •notk>b9conatnMlllf'Vr'ldlc8lOlalhM•\J91 on«DbOn at Mid"""'°" Of~ • The ~d ~orops'IGW ••PfesMd lher91n do not c::cnldul9.,, endOJMm«'t Of Ql.*Wll .. by The Housm VQll/'A OI •• ...-fl POSTMASTER 5et'd ~-- corr9ci'°"9k>811 'NII'*'*""'· Suit• 105. Houlton. TX 77006 $ubSCflPbOl'talekiVSfbyamtf«US1"11l) $1 75p« ...- 1s.cs 50 per s snonlhl or $91 00 per yes) CMIMY M1vfiltJlll'IQ dednt 12 00 noon CST, Mondly '° ,..........,. SOOpmCST"'°"'"Ylof\.mahod~lo< Fndayp.bllelhon ClassifNld ~ng dtdne 12 noon CST Tu.tdey !of Fnc»)'~tion ResponSlbilily W. do r-.:it a~ f1narQe! r•~Y for d9ITIS by tne ~. buc rNdws #e llP.ed IO .,... tne newspaper of lll'l'j SUllPICIC>" d fl'auckllenl or ~ ed\«\lsng #'Id IWpCICl'll ...... b9 ~ ~ GtMt« Housten Gii~ & Leston Ctwnb9t of corimerca. Nation.I c;.y ,..._~Ck* c;.y & l...,_, Press AMoc:iMo\ Aaoon "*"1# ~Pr ... L.ETTER TO THE EDITOR An Open Letter To The Pres­ident of Walgreens By BRUCE W. SMITH, D.D.S. l would like 10 1hank and congra1ula1e your corpora110n for an action in Hous ~ ton that ts an excellent example of clear corporate v1s1on and conservative principles l unders1and 1ha1 a few mon1hs ago, you quickly responded 10 1he complain! of one of your cusiomers by remov mg a gay publ1ca11on from your lobby ( Out­Smart ). l undersund 1ha1 lhis was because the cover made reference to sex, This is an example of how sensitive you are to your customers and I am encour· aged 10 wrue wuh confidence that you will be equally re;pon<ive 10 my sugges­tions l lhink you 'hould follow lhis policy 10 ll"s log1cal conclusion by removing any publ1ca11on from your siores 1ha1 make reference 10 sex. There are numer4 ous women s and men's magazines that run article\ on how to have better sex! Of course. you should slop selling condoms and sexual lubricanlS because 1hey only encourage people 10 have sex If your corpora1e policy is wha1 11 appear\ tn he I am sure that you are very con;erva11ve and probably believe that punishment 1s a decerrcnt to crime. rherefore , you \hould consider remov­ing products from your pharmacy departments that treat sexually trans­muted diseases because people will only get heller and go rigb1 ou1 to have more sex. Of course. this may cut into profits from sale' of pen1c1llin, clo1r1mazolc, AZT and pr<Heasc inh1b1tors (to men­t10n only a kw) hut I am ~urc: 1ha1 you will not min<l. 1hc 1mpor1ance of correct pol icy 1s surely more important I have been told tba1 1n order to be fatr. you have ~lopped th~ pla(;emenl of all local cummunu)· putil1c.:11wns 1n your l oh­bie' l'hts sound' like a good idea because u saves valuable floor space and avoids any 1mpl11.:at1on of favoring one publi· cation over anolher Involving your srore~ in support of local communu1es must be a real pain. not to menuon probably cutting inco profits (keeprng lobh1es nea1, employee 11me. elc ) You might even be approached 10 underwrne fund·rai<ers to fight AIDS and breas1 cancer! Boy, what a sltppery slope 1ha1 would be . Again. please accepl my !hanks for your demonstration of where Walgreens Corporation stands on lhese issues . ( Dr Smith, a /ongf/mt community sup­porttr, prm I tees Gtntral Dentistry in the Montrose area. J'he aforementiontd letter wax forwardrd to th,- offlfe of tht PrtJidenl al Wa/grr,ns corporate ofjtce. T/Jtlf addrt.rs is 200 Wilmot Road, Durfit/1/, //,, 60015-ed ) An Amazed Reader of The Voice B) GEORGE PtJT ... A\1 Going into my favorue establishment. Loho's, l couldn I believe my eye;. After rubbin(!: them . t realized 11 wasn't a dream. There ~he ~as' Could It be? Dr. 1 Joctl\"n Elders on the cover of the llous tun VO/a (hsue 843) Amarmg! hnall>. someone the whole communit) can hold to high esteem wa~ being teatured wuh prominence on the lronl page Ila" mg heen an :n 1d reader of the Voice tor year·s~ It w.ls rctre'-hmg to 'ee some­one ot suhstance on the front page· I must aJmu although. I was not a fan of Dcho· rah Bell's, "-he hc&an to turn the paper into a leg1t1mate newspaper. Recau~e 01 ' 1ha1, l "a' concerned when her depanure became public. After she left, 1he paper seemed unfocused-~torie' and pie cures thal did not match. hunk} men on the cover for no reason , etc. But 11 appears to be back on irack and l want to commend the suff for 1urn1ng 11 around The llous1on lesbian , gay, bisexual and transgendered community needs a real newspaper and the voice is our only answer. Mind you, l have nothing agains1 sexy men but 1f I want to see sexy men. I will go 10 Lobo and buy a magazine 1ha1 spe­cializes in that type of entenamment or pick up a TWT l look 10 1he Voice for my news and so does a lot of 01her people m 1he commun11y. II JS 1he only paper we have that informs us on what is happening for lesbians and gay~ on a local and national level which 1s important to many of us Kudos 10 you all Keep up 1he good work and thank you for being the Voice of 1he Hous­ton communuy Elders Deserves Accolades By TAMLA JENKl"S l wan1 10 thank the Rev. Carolyn Mobley and Curt Morrison for an insigh1ful interview with Dr. Jocelyn Elders . We should be proud of 1he effom this remark­able women has pu1 forth in forcing the public to get real and deal w11h the cp1- dem1cs thar assault u ... Jailv .t Elder' as an in~p1ra11on and r~le model for all 1hc people Black , lesbian, gay, and others Her s1ra1ght talk 1s JUSt what lhe young people ol today need to hear And the more ;he irrnates 1he religious people the belier "e all are for 11. Maybe someda) \he ~111 get the credit she desene' for heing so truthful about thing' A Thank You From Steven 's House By JA\1ES GRJHITll, C.P. EJ.e utnr Dutctor Stl'lt'n .1 lfouu rl1e Ra111how RanGlcr Danct: Club Jeservc a hag Thanh. anJ a hats off Te us salute for their great Christmas Show bef1t1ing Steven's House recen1ly. They raJSed $2.164.77. The mood was festive a11he or B.R.B. and ever> one had a great 11me. The <how was high >p1rned and kept moving with lots of music and dance Steve Carbone and President Scott Price hosted 1he evenrng The) had brought together a great mix of talent including. Dyan Mu:hacls, Nevada, M1~~ Camp America 1977. Jvanna Siarr, Tuna Mell , Miss TGRA 1997, James Robens, Byron Norton-Mr. Moniro;e 1996 Sha­wna St. John , Penelope Penn, Red Draper. Cmd1 Lynn, and of course all the mcmhers of 1he Ramhow Rangier Dance Club As us.ual. 1he1r routine~ were fla\\ less, and brought encore~. Chrisiy & Associates, Coll 45's, Suzanne Anderson Proptrt1es, and pr1 vale donof' spiced the p<ll by having chal· lenge numbers where monies ~ere dou ­hled and tripled. and as "'ual the crowd responded from rhetr hearts The Rainbow Rangier and S1even·s House are hoth }oung organizauons on the move. The Ransler have captured national tulcs. and are recognized by the community as a g1\'1ng caring ul ented group of men Steven s Hou'e is ~rateful for 1heir generos.iy and sup port The JlouJton Voue encourages our rtad· er.t to s~nd tH \our rommenzs and sugger· rion.i . . ~II /rttrrs to the eduor should be addressed w 811 Wtsrhe1mu, Sime 10.\. lloust(ln . rx. 77006. /med ro (713; 129 95.11 '" e 11101/ed ar llou Vo;, t'@ao/.nim Although 111s1101 cus roman" lttltn ma..,· [Jt edited due to frng1h or conttnl Support the ..a&. BERING • CARE ~ .. CENTER Image ... until they get to knowyou, it's what's on the surface that counts. With that, do you want your image quickly splashed on paper? Or do you want House of Coleman 10 ink a bell er job? T H E I M A 0 f I N K f ~ ~ House of Coleman Fine Printmg alld Graplucs 901 WEST ALABAMA • HOUSTON, TX 77006-4693 713.523.2521 •FAX 713.524 . 2643 GARY RAMAZETTI PORSCHE AUDI EXPERT BILL CLAIRE FAMILY MORTUARY 6 Private Cremation l<ll Collll'ktc Qrr •lid C'Nccnt fa1 1# F••ilJ • Complete F<Ml8t'al • Pre-Arranged Services In-Home Services • Pre-Need tnsta-ance • Al lnstlance Policies Honored 522-9030 ~~~~:";f~4 A 20-year Austin tradition comes to Houston . Put on your slinkiest costume and get ready to samba at the wildest party of the year! http: I /home.earthllnk.net/-carnava.l/ HOUSTON VOICE I JANUARY 3. 1997 3 Catch The Bering Spirit A Place for Everyone ~~ ~r BERING M EMORIAL U NITED M ETHODIST CHURCH A Reconciling Congregation Where persons reqardless of sexual orientation, qender, ethnicity, aqe - fully participate in the church's life and ministries as loved disciples of Christ. Sunday School ..... 9:30 am Sunday Worship ... 10:50 am 1440 Harold at Mulberry (713) 526-1017 Sunday • ll:OOam PRAISE & WORSHI EVENING SERVICE HIV Affected Group HIV Infected Group MIDWEEK SERVlCE 7· Op • 7 Op 7 Op • 7. Opm 4305 L1lhan Handicap Houston. Te)(a'i 77007 \cccssiblc · · 'PtUtM ~ e~'ti,4 e~ (one !Jlock south of Wnsfiington on Thompson ut Lil an) (713) ti0-9235 r= KQJ~BE•P·ROJE@1Jj . A L - .,q,;;.·~·r_. __ ~ __ ! ....... _1: ..... _ _ .J - :-! ....... _ .. .... Ill•--~~ Fn. Jan. JO, i:OO pm MOVIE NIGHT "Six Degrees of Separation" Fri. Jan 17, 7:00 pm MUSICAL NIGHT "Anyrhing Goes" Fn. Jan. 24, 7:00 pm MOVIE NIGHT "Torch Song Trilogy" Fri. Jan. 31, 7:00 pm MOVIE or MUSICAL T hurs, Jan 23, 7:30 pm Organizational meeting co form a support group for Physically Challenged Gay Men (facility is handicapped accessible) Sat, Jan 24, 7:00 pm First of four two-hour sessions of Basic Computer Skills Course ($15 per session with discounts for persons who are rem ed, unemployed or on disability) aoventise (YOUU cbancb bene f ou as LoUJ as $68 .. 4 HOUSTON VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1997 Church Calendar of Events Friday-I 103 • '" Your Sacred Self' uudy group usmg the best seller by Wayne D)er. COME learn more about your sacred self, sacred siSlers & hrolhers. & the ~acred , loving Creator God who made it so. At Kingdom Community Church 862·7533 • Calhohc Mhs al I 0:00 am at the Kolbe Pro jeCI 522·8182 . Saturday-1104 • Mus u D1gn11y Houslon 11 7 30 pm 880· 2872 Sunday-12105 Maranatha Fellowship Mcuopolitan Church Services A Study in the Gospel of Mark ... and .. The I Factor,"' cHow to be I pos· lll\'C influence 011 others u a witness for Chnst) at 10.00 am Praise and Worship, Mm 1srry of the Word, Drama and Personal Mml.S· ary 11 ,00 am at Maranatha Fellowship 528· 6756 • '1CCR wor!ih1p services 9:00 am & 11:00 am 861 °9149 Church of che XII Apostles worship service at 10:30 am Chapel of the San1ana Funeral home . 5352 Katy Freeway 665 7903 Monday-1106 •Catholic Mus al 7:30 pm Kolbe Project 522· 8182 • MCCR Handbell Choir Reheaf'ial 11 7:00 pm 861 · 9149 Tuesday-1107 • MCCR Empower' ~nl for l.1v1ng support group & pol luck dinner at 6 :00 pm. Gloryland Smgen at 8:00 pm. The Gospel Ensemble 11 6,00 pm 861 -9149 ' PROTECT meet• at Benni Church. 520-7870 •HtV Affected group meets at 7:00 pm. Judy or Pam at 880·9235, HIV lnlcctcd group mceu at 7:00 pm Cathcnne or Robert at 880-923~ Al Community Gospel • Maranatha Fellowship MrC has home t groups that meet 1n each others home for a time of fellowship , sharing God ·, word, and prayer. Call for lhc loca11on m your area 528· 6756 . •Worship Service 11 :00 am at Fauh and Hope I •Advent Scripture Study 11 Kolbe Project Fellowship 773-4429 7 30 pm 522-8182 •Grace U.1heran Church Sunday <chool for all Wedn esday 0 1108 ages II 9:30 am Worship Service at 10:30 am 528 3269 'MCCR Bible S1udy 7 30 pm 861 9149 •First Un11ar1an UniversallJI Church Sun · •Worship Service 7 30 pm II Faith and Hope day Services at 9 30 am and II 30 am 526·5200 I Fellowship 773-4429 •Services at 5 30 pm Dignity Church 880· , •. MCCR. Jubllauon Mixed Ensemble meets at 2872 6.30 pm Midweek uphf1 service 11 7 00 pm, Bible Study, Lecture Senes &: C'hou Rehearsal • • Community Gospel worship service u 7 30 pm 861 9149 II 00 am & 7:CJO pm SERVICE IN NEW LOCA TIO!> . 4105 L1lilan 880·923~ • ••A Course in M1raclcs" - S1udy Group using the book. puhhshed by the l;oundu1on •.ffouuon M.ss1on C'hurch worship 5erv1ce for Inner Peace, whu:h I) aimed at removing the at 10:30 am 529·8225 blocks 10 our awarene~s of one's presenl.'.e • Kingdom Communuy Church worship 1 Kingdom Community Church 7 JO pm 862 service 11 11 .00 am Sunday School at 10:00 am 1 7533 862·7533 "The Ccle>l1nc Prophecy, An Th d OJI0 9 E1tper1en11al Gutde'' at 10 00 am urs ay· • Co vcnan1 Bapust Church Worship service I :30 pm and cduc111on hour 11 3:00 pm 668 8830 • Bering Memonal Un11ed Me1hod1s1 Church Worship \crv1ce to SO 1m Sec ken cla'<:i 9 IS am 526 1017 Medical miracles start with research r KINGDOM=;; COMMUNITY CHURCH Ollch a glimp« of the KmgJom or God Sunday School 10 AM Sunday Won.. h1p ~rv1ce - II AM WednCM.lays:: A Cou~ in M1 rnd~ - 7.JO PM 4404 Blog.um Ill Sno.,.cr ... 7ll·S62-7"il.\ -- Cid Luu YOU, u C1m1 th1t1 tk1 LOVING EXPERIENCE. SerYift! the Gay, Lubi1n, Bi-utual I Community of C1tholiet & Friuds. Beeome a part tf Di5nity U.S.A. SERVICES Saturdays 7:30 pm Traditional Mass Inclusive bturgy celebrated. Call i nd prell 4 for our Socill Event• l Schedulu . Todo• bienvenidos! fFull dclillls m '95 - '96 Ga.v and Les/mm Yellow Pagr:s) In the He1chts at 1307 Yale Suite H e (713) 880·2872 ' Bible S1udy 7 00 pm Al Fauh And Hope Fel 1 1owsh1p 773 4429 • Cum m u1111y Onap•t '"14 __ .,, -••.._ :-. ...-o pm 880 9325 1 If you wanl an tlltnl llSltd m 1hu uuw11, pl~arr call 529 8490 ~ American Heart • Association ... Flfll"'"'IJHNtlDlisouo --· 5LINDAY 11 ~ R~J~PMlw.. An evangelical ministry with celebration services of Praise, Prayer and Study of God's word. Bible Class: 10 am (Nur..,t:ry proviclt:cl) 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 (Handicap accessible) (Montrose at Hawthorne) ff"r 1~fo on "cckly home groups. call 528-6756 REGIONAL NEWS Shown accessing FugiNtt. an on-lint databau and mfonnauon stn.·ict which pro"·idt.s 1<uk/y updattd /ms of stattwtd• paro/u r<l•asu "" (from l•/t) D•an McC,,a. Com­paq voluntur, Houston Poli« Officu Richard Cruz; and Grant Crabtru, Com paq voluntur (Photo by P•t• Baatz Photography.) Chris Bell Only Candidate To Meet Deadline The Houston Chronicle reports that Cuy Council candidate Chris Bell is the only candidate who filed a campaign financial report on time_ There are 15 candidate' on all vying for the at-large pornoon being vacated by John Peavy. According to the story. tardy cando· dates could face a fine of $100 according 10 Texa\ Ethics Comm1ss1on rules. Bell, a former KTRH radio reporter filed h1\ report prior IO the Dec 20. 1996 dead­line Bell 'campaign reported $24, 855 in contribu11ons and $18,447 in expen dotures Tho Chronicle artH;le sla1e1 1ha1 aay rights at:llVl!'.l Ray Hill, one of the can didates 1 indicated circumstances exempted him from complying with the report deadline. "I haven't sohcued or receavcd any money for the Ray Hill cam­paign," Holl oold the paper There are monies being spent on my elecuon, but not by my campaign" Accon.ling 10 a representative of the Bell campaign, complaints may be filed against the other candidates with the Austin-based Ethics Commission. In related news. a press release from the Hill campaign informs that the cam­paign has designated Jan . 6, 1997 as Early Vo11ng Day. Add111onally, the campaign is urging voters to attend the Coty Hall mee11ng that evening and speak out m oppos111on to the proposed change' 10 the Sexua lly Oriented Busi· ness Ordinance prior to us considera tion for a vote by the Council Hill is bemg supported by the pol111cal ac11on com mlttee Adult< for Legal Freedom albeit the organization is not a formal part ~f his "clecuon apparuus." The nearest location for Montrose res· odents to log their early vote is down­town at 1319 Texas Avenue (at Auston street). The City Council Chamber '" City Hall Anne• IS located at 900 Brazos, Public comments begin al 7pm and speakers can register al 6pm. Compaq Joins Forces With HPD Criminals 1n Hou!iitOn and Harris I County are closer than ever 10 apprehen· soon thanks 10 a high tech collabora· 11on between Compaq Computer Cor· pora11on and Crime Stoppers of Hous· ton. Called "Opera11on FastTrack," the prOJeCl provides Crime Stoppers with instant acccs!'o to data cr1t1cal in track­ing down dangerous fugitives in all major crime categories It is cxpecrcd to revolut1on1ze methods of cr1m1- nal apprehension in this community. The project wa~ enabled by a Compaq contribu11on for $30,000 in compu1er equipment from Compaq Works. In addt· 11on , Compaq " providing ongoing 1echn1cal support termed by Crome Stoppers as "invaluable . even exceedong the cost of the equipment." HSP VA Presents Compelling AIDS Drama The Axe of Dtscrtllon an AIDS aware· ness play, ends 11s four·year tour of Hous· ton-area schools w11h a place m the Silver Anniversary Theatre Season at the High School for the Performing and Vis ual Art< (HSPVA) Wr111en and directed b) Sharon Ferr­anti. with music hy Jay Ferranti, the play emph»izes the 1mp1c1 of AIDS and HIV on high school students. Every day m America another young per· son is infected with HIV. and while advance!!. m treatment have been made, we are s111t wuhout a cure. We musl con­tinue our vigilance 1n educating young people and adults about AIDS and its prevention. According to theatre coordinator Bob Singleton the project would not have seen fruition wuhout the fonan· c1al backing of the Houston Challenge Foundation an organization which primarily focuses on AIDS education issues. "The play JS 40 minutes Jong and focuses on high school seniors the morning afcer their graduation discus.sin& future endeavors Ten years later 11 a reunion. some of the graduates have succumbed 10 AIDS It's a great play.· said Single· ton Diffrtt/On will be performed m the HSPVA Denny Theatre at 4001 Stan ford on Jan IO and II, 1997 at 7 :30pm Tocke" arc $5 00 and can be purchased at the door or by phoning (713) 942· 1966. le~rn to dimb! (' Jll for'"" free catalog of ~thvc \ac,,1ions and ad'·~nture travel k'r g;iy men and [,'Sbi.ans Al.YSON ADVENTURES"' 1-800-S·AL YSON bA SIC BRO T H R S H C:> l...f • T' C> N POST-HOLIDAY SAVE UP TO 60o/o ON SELECT CHANDISE ~ Active Wear • Casual Wear Club Wear • Holiday Fashions AND MORE!! BASIC BROTHERS ~°'" fJfd 4414 ~ e~ s~ 1232 Westheimer • 713/522-1626 MON-SAT 10 - 9 SUNDAY 12 - 6 IEMSER: HOUSTON GAY I LESBIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Houston, we're not here to educate you about the gay mark.et-we're here to deHver it lAllCE1 MMIB: QUARTER MILLION+ CllCIUTllN: 100,000+ llltamN UICATllNI: OVER 570 For lnfomiation Call (713) 942·0084 HOUSTON VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1997 5 ~~~ ii~~:~ ~~~e1te!! ~· · ~ Call for details ~ ~ Y'"' (713) 529-8490 ~ L! ~'7--S~~S~14 ----·- ~ Att S.S. eOMUt e'Hlf# SuNdAy, JANUARY ~' 9:00 pM CANdidATE foR RSICSS EMpERoR XIII JrnEl McNEil pRESENTs ONLY IN NEW ORLEANS: ThE REd BEANS & RicE REVUE GENTRY - 2}0} RichMoNd SATURdAy, JANUARY 11, MidNiGhT RSICSS EMpRESS XI CRYSTAi RAE LEE LovE pRESENTS MOON OVER MIAMI - A BARE BUNS CONTEST PRi ZEs AwARdEd foR Fuzzy BuNs, BAby CAkEs, BubblE Bun, PApA's ChoiCE & MR. HoT BuNs 197 ~ir•• GENTRY - 2}0} Rid1M0Nd -->Oubergine All pROCEEds hENdiT THE BERiNq CARE CENTER & ~ 8ERiNq DENTAi CliNic rlmouqh SoiREE AuhERqiNE 1919 Decatur Houston. TX n007 (Waslwlgton 0 Whde • between Studemont & Houstoo AYO.) hnp11www.ncosoft.comrmccr/mccr.html Brea~fast Specials Served Sat - Sun tOam-tpm and Fri - Sat ttpm-4am 6 HOUSTON VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1997 REGIONAL NEWS Macy's Disburses Grants to Three Houston Groups As part of its ongoing commitment to the fight against HIV/AIDS, Macy's West awarded grants totaling $231,000 to 33 HIV/AIDS organizations serving communllics in ftvc states (Arizona, Callfornra. Minnesota, Nevada, and Texas) where the company docs busi­ness . Three Houston area agcnc1cs-Com­mun1ty Partners. Omega House, and the AIDS Founda11on Houston arc among the first to receive funding from the new Passport Fund, a grants program for HIV/AIDS educallon, treatment. care and prevenuon established this year in cooperation with Federated Depart­ment Stores , Inc. A granl of $10,500 will be awarded to Com­mun Hy Partners. which has operated a school-based AIDS Prcvcn11on Project for 1he past two years. The grant will par­tially fund an HIV and AIDS counselor on sue at three school-based clinics 1n the Houston area, scrvrng 600-800 stu denu annually. Community Partners has been working since 1972 to address the needs of Houston's poorest children and fam1l1cs with an array of educa· uonal and cl1n1cal programs . Omega Hou"e will use their grant of $5,()(X) to serve indigent patients in their eight bed home-like residence. Omega House 1s a licensed residential care faclllly for 1crminally 111 AIDS patients and provide!\ an alternu1ve to hosp1tal1 ~ zat1on for AIDS patients rn the last months of their lrvcs . The thrrd grant of $5,000 1s presented to AIDS Foundation H ouston, Inc (Al ' ll). an education and social service agency. The agency operates a food assistance program called Stone Soup. which pro· v1des food and pcr<onal hygiene prod­ucts to tow-income people with HIV and AIDS . The grant will be used for bulk food purchases The new funding comes from monies rarsed by Macy's "Passport"' fall fash­ion show, held annually rn the Bay Arca and this year rn Los Angeles One of the nation's most successful HIV/AIDS fund-ra isers, "Passport" has con­tributed more than $4 . I m1lhon to edu­cation, research, prevenuon and care srncc bccomrng a benefit 1n 1988 Hos1cd by E lizabeth Taylor and Ear ­vin " Magic" J ohnson • this year ' s events rarsed $1 5 million . In add111on to supporllng seven Bay Arca and Los Angeles beneficiaries, Macy's set aside a portion of the 1996 proceeds to initiate grants to HIV/AIDS organ 1La · uons throughout the Macy·~ West chain .. AIDS is an issue that 1s of vital concern to customers and employees in all our markets," stated Michael Sternberg, Macy's West chairperson "The Pass· port Fund allows us to reach further rnto the HIV/AIDS community and provide assistance to HIV/AIDS organ1za t ions wherever we do business ." Federated supported the new program by matching Macy's contr1but1ons to the benefiting organrzat1ons "The fight against AIDS 1s a strategic focus of the Federated Foundation," ,aid James M. Z immerman. federated pres· I 1dcnt. "Through our support of AIDS I organizations nationally, we hope to make a meaningful difference rn the lrvcs of people affected with this dis · ease ." "AIDS has affected the retail profcs- 1 sion and th. e fash.1on community to such an extent. we felt it was a compcll ing iss ue," satd Della Ehrlich. Manaa,er of Community Relations bhrlllCh "and Larry Hasheburger. the director of communily relat ions. started the cut ting edge program approx1ma1e ly e ight yea rs ago. •·onginally. corporate had I to be persuaded to get involved ," said Ehrllich, who added that they are ptea-.d they were the first retailer "' 'upport AIDS programs IKrewe Fundraiser to Benefit Omega House and Steven's House The Krcwe ot Olympus-Texas. Inc. will host thcrr annual Twelfth Night Fundr­arser on Saturday evening, Jan . II, 1997, at 7pm at the Lovell Inn-50 I Lov· Cll The fundra1ser this year will benefit Steven's House and Omega House. Tick· cts arc SIO (ten dollars), and may be pur­chased from any Krcwc member or at the door and provide\ 1he holder with com· 1 pllmentary Hor~ d ' ocuvres and one free drrnk ticket fwclfth Night is the first maJOr celebration of the year­k1cking off the Carnival Season . Car­nival runs through Mardi Gru (thrs year Feb . 11 ). Olympus XXVIl ·thc annual Krcwe ol Olympus hall masque will be held Sat urday Jan 25 Ball Captain Bruce Ree ves said, · n1e theme this year 1s Pride and PreJud1ce We hope to reflect on drs · crrminatron throughout the world and the pride which can be fostered from 11 ." Entry to this event rs by rnv11at1on only A limited number of 1nvlla11ons arc available from Krewe members For informauon about JOining the Krcwc of Olympus, please call the Krcwe hotline at 867·3431 , c·ma1I us at krcwc­olympus@ geocic1es com or visit our web page at http //www geoc1 . 11cs com/Bourbon Strcct/4048 Texas Gay Rodeo Poster Competition The 141h Tcxa' Gay Rodeo will .. ke place 1hc second week or November 1997 m Hous ton The Texas Gay Rodeo Association (fGRA) hu already begun planning for the rodeo In accordance with the organiza tions guideline) , the rodeo poster wall be selected by the Staie Board ot Trustee> at the January Slate Meeting. which will take place Jan 12, I 997 at the Brazo> River Bot tom in Houston The designer of the Rodeo Poster will re,eive a SIOO pnze on add111on to having the poster on display around the coun1ry fhe Rodeo Pos1cr. in addition 10 being colleciible, is TGRA's maJ<H adver11smg media for the rodeo Professional, art1s1ic eJtpression nf the sport of rodeo and a respectable. markec able fundramng item for years to come arc important for the winning de'>ign . All sub· missmn" must be 1n a camera ready fonnat Entnes for the posrer comest muu be sub· m11tcd by Jan 9, 1997 to TGRA Vice PreS1· dcn1 Michael A Ganz 11 (713) 777 1444 or your local TGRA Chap1cr NATIONAL NEWS I AIDS PAC To f!ost Sanchez j at Inauguration 1 The American AIDS Poll11cal Action Committee (AIDS PAC) wall host the Red Ribbon Inaugural Gala to welcome Washington Congresswoman-elect Loretta Sanchez, the woman who ousted "AIDS Public Enemy Number One," Rep. Bob Dornan (R-CA) Proceeds from the gala, held at the Ozone Club In Washington on Jan 19, 1997, wall be used to benefit the Sanchez cam­paign which has incurred $50.000 an addi­tional expenses as a result of Dornan's continuing dispute of the Nov. S elec­llon results Military To Track Gay and Lesbian "Criminals" The Department of Defense (DOD) will comply with a federal legislative mandate to 1rack: crime suusucs. albe1t eight years late. The departments new database, the Defense Incident-Based Reporting System, will keep track of forty SIX cate­gories for crime information entries into the Federal Bureau of lnves11ga- 1aon's (FBI) Uniform Crime Report. Of concern 10 many in the community 1s the classaf1ca11ons of what consti­tutes a crime. Along with Homosexual misconduct, fra1crnizat1on, sex­ual harassment and sexual assaults arc all classified as .. high interest'" anc1- dents to be tracked Information on where crimes occurred, however, wall be hard to come by which could help to cover up so-called ·•" uch­hunts." At any rate, u will be po~s1ble to collect stat1st1cal information regarding hate crimes in the military, including those based on sexual oraen­tat100. Community organizations "'ill be monitoring the Situation close!> to ascertain whether 1he informat1on is being used to harass individuals based on 1he1r sexual orientation HRC Employs New Field Director Donna Red Wing, a longtime advoca1c for lesbian and gay rights who was instrumental in the defeat of Oregon's anti gay ballot measure in 1992, has been named the national field director for the Human Rights Campaign. "We are very fortunate to add Donna Red Wing's talent and vast experience 10 the staff of the HRC," said executive director Elizabeth Birch. "Donna s ab1J1ties as an organizer. public speaker. and commuted act1v1M will continue the process of bu tiding our movement, and the Human Rights Cam­paign. from the grassroots up" Red Wmg was named Woman of the Year by Tht Advocatt an 1992 for her outstand­ing ach1cvemen1s cowards le~b1an and gay equal1ty. PIM\~ )upporl AluS ~ ousinq f- ouslon (713) 5'20-9248 MALE STRIP CONTESTS SUNDAY with Blacl~ Velvett WEDNESDAY with Dyan Michaels I Marijuana continued ... (( ontmued from front page) Steve Michael and Wa>ne Turner spoke out against the policy, and Michael and Turner spoke out against Cabinet mem­bers the} believe to be lesbians who sup­pon the polic} Frank, who 1s sponsoring a federal bill to legalize marijuana for medical use, issued a statement saying that, "medical practi­tioners who are following the dictates of their profession and the laws adopted b) the voters of their states b} prescribing the method the> think best suned to re­duce suffering in seriously ill people do not deserve to be persecuted by the fed­eral government." Frank urged the presi­dent to kill the plan to pursue prescribing physicians. Mccaffery claims that marijuana is not generally accepted as medical!} effective, that there is a high risk for its abuse, and that other, approved drugs are available to treat nausea and other S}mptoms more effectively. He characterizes the success­ful ballot initiatives as "hoaxes" and "stealth" measures designed to ti) to le­galize an illegal recreational drug. Mari­juana is classed m the same categol) as heroin under federal la" and neither can be legall> prescnbed by a ph} sic1an. Abandoning their typical!) more re­strained tone, Michael and rurner made a statement deploring the "betra)al" b) Reno and Shala la. both long the targets of numerous rumors, as "well kno"n, clos­eted lesbian cabinet officers • Somewhat ludicrous!) . the pair sought that a1I !es-and Shalala in an e!Ton to force them to "repudiate" the polic) "We refuse to allow Ball Clinton to make people "ith AIDS collateral :lamage in his failed drug war," said Michael "They're choosing this fight because the) think it's an. easy win.• "The California Medical Association has advised physicians not to prescribe mari­juana at this time," sa) s local proponent Dick Evans. ~1.D. \\ho is a member of Texans for Medical Rights Dr E\ans told the Houston Voice that there is evidence that shows that mari­juana has some medicinal purposes. specificall) for terminall} ill patients "We are working "ith state representa­tives to introduce legislation that would be more restrictive than California's proposition \\hich is basically too loose which I think is pan of the problem," says Evans. The California proposition states that mar11uana could be used for a host of conditions and an} other condittons that are affected Dr Evans believes it is to "broad ... He also believes the proposition erred in granting the nght of prescription to health care pro\ iders rather than ph) si­cians The issue is of primal) concern to man} in the communit) because a number of people "uh AIDS ha>e found that man- 1uana helps wJ!h the disease's charactens­tic "asting S) ndrome by easing nausea and sllmulating appeltle BOY TOY DANCERS SEVEN NIGHTS A WEEK NATIONAL NEWS Through the Lens of History I Rape Case Astonishes Hollywood B) ELIZABETH BIRCH In a few yeaN when we all have some true pcrspecuve, gay and lesbian Ameri­cans will look back on 1996 as a 1urn1ng pomt for our movement for two very criu~ cal reasons. First. 1996 was the year 1ha1 gay marriage hit the natrnnal consc1ous­nc< s-for belier or for worse (although I would argue ultimately for belier). The other watershed was the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in the Colorado Amend­ment 2 case, an opinion that tantaliz­ingly hmts at how lh1s court will deal w11h other gay and lesbian civil rights qucs­uons Religious pollucal extremist organ1· zations shoved gay marriage into Amer- 1ca '.s collective face in their quest for a new fund-raising tool that they hoped would have the added bonus of 1orpcdomg Bill Clinton 's re·clcciion. Their scheme was clever and dexterous, as their shills methodically introduced an11-gay marriage bills in s1atehouses across the country in a build-up to the mother of them all. the Orwel1an and unconstitutional Defense of Marriage Act In lhc short rur. . their strategy was both a success and a failure_ A total of 16 slates and the U.S. Congress passed anu-gay marriage laws (The governors of Ala· bama and Miss1s.1pp1 pc111shly 1Ssucd executive orders after their slate legis­latures refused 10 pass such sp11cful bills.) I can only presume that 1h1s 1s.uc proved to be a casl1 cow for such hale groups as the Chrisuan Coah11on. the Family Research Council and the Trad111onal Values Coallt1on. But 19 states 1h11 considered such bills did not enac1 1hem. President Clinton disarmed the &•Y marriage m1u1le tar· gc11ng him by announcing that he would >ign the federal lcg1sla1ion By pluck10g the qucsuon of gay marriage out of che Hawa111n universe and depos Hing ir in the. living rooms of Americans everywhere. rel1g1ous. pol1t1cal ex1rem1s1s have, I behevc, helped advance our cause m the long run. Rather than pouring into the streets to stop the terrifying gay marriage juggernaut, people arc pausing 10 think about the question. most for the fir3t lime. And, as more and more grasp, for valid and logical reasons, There are emotional and his­torical and, perhaps, religious ratlon­alcs for barring same-sex marriage; but this is not a theocracy-Pat Robertson , are you h~tening? Our legal system and our Constttutlon were created to pro­tect the interests of the minority from the ' tyranny of the majority The other rc~ult of 1his anti-gay marriage campaign has been to evoke the new empa­thy from reasonable people who have suddenly thought about, and now under­stand. how unfair it is to deny committed gay couples the same privileges and rcspons1bih11cs enjoyed and endured by married couples. Opinion leaders hkc William Safire and Ann Landers agree 1ha1 gay spouses should by cn111lcd virtually everything heterosexual r spouses can claim, b.ut they stumble o~ the word "marriage " In the meantime , DOMA defenders (hkc sponsor Rep. Bob Barr -Ga.) sound increasingly absurd as Ibey rail that gays. scckmg this most con- ' serv. ative of institutions. arc ~omehow threatening c1vtl1za11on'(, very foun­dation ( Elizabeth Birch 1s the Exccuuvc Director of the Human R1gh1s Campaign ( HRC) headquartered 1n Washing­ton . D.C. HRC is the largest gay and les­bian poliucal organization in the count I")' with an e~tlmated l S0.000 mem· bers nationwide. The views in 1his article are those of the author and do not neces­sarily reflect the views of the Houston Voice, its advertisers or ~taff) Hoover Film Derailed HBO has hailed work on a movie about J Edgar Hoover, because 1t could not resolve such issues as wherher 10 portray the late FBI director as a crossdrcsscr who had an affair wuh his right-hand man. Clyde Tolson . Bnan Gibson (What's Lo•< Got to Do With It) was ready 10 direct, offices were sci up in Canada, locauons were scouted and Tom Sizemore had a prchmmary deal m place to star. Bui Gibson and HBO cxcc­uuvcs and locked horns over the issue of drag and other allcgauons made in the Anthony Summers book "Official and Conf1dtntial: Tht Stcrtt Lift of J. Edgar Hoovu." which served as HBO's source material for the film Rumor had the prOJCCt permanently scrapped-al an cst1ma1cd cost of $2 m1l­hon- b u1 1h1s wa> vigorously denied by HBO sources. who maintain the p1c· 1ure's gone from the front 10 the middle burner, and that costs were about $1 mil· hon A source also de01cd that HBO was shying away from volatile :;ubject matter or thll It was somehow directed to by Ted Turner. who now calls the shots at Time Warner-owned HBO and was v1hficd for dumpmg the Anjelica Huston-directed "Bastard Out of Carolina" from TNT because ii included the brutal rape of a child by her stepfather. HBO sources s11d the script will contmuc CPR can keep ) Our lo\'c alive 8 HOUSTON VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1997 be mg developed. h was rushed into pro­duction to suit a window 1n Gibson's feature schedule. and also 1n hopes of debuting 11 on HBO by May 10 qualify for Emmy cons1dcrat1on. That plan is scrapped, and 11 's unclear whether Gib­son will return at a later date. The problems over script surfaced last week . The du1pute over content sur­prised Hoover author Summers, who said he ha. a library full of documents and 800 taped in1crv1cws . Aside from one general conversation with Gibson, and a late 01gh1 phone call from an HBO sta­ff er. Summers said he1s not been con­tacted " Three weeks ago, I had a call from a woman who was very rude at 9:30 at night. ask.mg, 'What's this about Hoover being homosexual , what are your fac1s to back 1t up?' I never heard of her, so I asked her to fax me. She never called again. I had a long conversation wuh Gib.>on, who impressed me but 1t 's fanusy and fic­tion 10 say chere was any facl checking done . lt 1s bunkum." HBO sources said they rou11ncly sub­stantiate through independent par­ties, and wouldn"1 au1oma11cally call Summers While some fell that the Hoo­ver project would remain cloliieted per ~ mancnily, HBO source' maintained 11's sull a hvc proJCCI The network offi­cially declined comment Amen.c anHeart .~ Association .. l''flhblV-~ ondSbob A former ABC-TV carnng director and four other men were ordered to stand trial on charges that they sodo mized an a.piring male actor "This 1s one of the mo>t troubling cases I've had 10 deal with rn many years," Mun1c1pal Court Judge Charles Rubin told the group Thursday al the end of a monthlo ng preliminary hearing . The actor claims that casting director Jerry Marshall invucd him 10 his home in August 1993 to meet some ABC cxccu­t 1ves. Once there. he said he was drugged , bound and gang-raped by Mar· shall and the others. who were not ABC employees The actor. who said he was a homosex­ual . later was driven 1n his own car to Bev· crly Hills and abandoned . Rubin threw out one count of kidnap­ping against Marshall and the other four defendants, but ordered them held on charges of sodomy and oral copula- 11on The other defendants are Fred Goss, Ken Dixon. Michael Sullivan and Osbourne Parker. All are scheduled 10 be arraigned next month . The actor earlier had sued Marshall's former employer, Cap11al C111es l ABC Inc , for sexual harassment. seeking unspecified damages . A JUdge d1sm15'ed the lawsu11 after ABC argued 1ha1 II wasn't responsible for Marshall's acts because the assault happened at his home and on a Sunday. But a state appeals court rems1ated the lawsuit in November, ruling that the corporallon could be held liable . in part because of the wide scope of a cast­ing director 's duties . Mark Johnson . a vice prcs1dcn1 of Capital Cities/ABC nctwork com­mun1cat1ons, repeatedly has s aid the company wouldn ' t comment on the case Israeli President Apologized for Remarks Israeli President Ezer We1zman apol­oaizcd Monday 10 members of gay and le~b1an groups fur companng homo scxual11y 10 alcoholism and con­dcmn10g it as "completely deviant-" "He asked to apologize for any public sta1ement that might have offended any­one: · presidential spokesperson Arich Shumcr said. The outspoken president told high school students last week that homoscx­ua llty "disgusted" him and said that "like alcoholism, I don't think we need to encourage it or say It is something wonderful.'' The remarks drew harsh cruic1sm. Lib­eral parliament members called for Weizman's resignation, and several hundred people dcmonsirucd out side the prcs1dcn1's home Saturday night On Monday, Wcizman met with about 10 rcprcscn1at1vcs from gay and lesbian groups 10 a I 1/2 hour session mcd11tcd by Liberal Mcretz Party leader Yoss1 Sand. The gay activi)tS Ciieemed satisfied wnh che reconcilia11on Tai Yaros Hakak, a gay rights acuvist, said while We1zman's recract1on was a good sign. "his biased comments were rcprcscn1a11vc of a homophobic soc1- c1y.'' -one of our fca'• 1.s that people w1t1 uao his example to disc riminate ag11nst us," she said. In Israel, consenting adults have the right to engage rn homosexual relations and, under a 1994 Supreme Court ruhng. may marry. Bui many gays complain soci­ety still lags behind the West in acccp11ng them. About a dozen anll-gay pro1cs1crs dem­onstrated oucside Weizman's resi­dence during the meeting , waving Israeli Oags and chanllng, "Go home homosexuals ," "He only apologized because they pres­sured him ." said Michael Goldberg, a 16 year-old seminary student . "The Torah said gays arc hkc animals. II 1s wrong for a man to lie with a man " The 73-ycar-old Wcizman, who plays a largely ceremonial but high -profile role , frequently courts controversy w11h his off-the-cuff pronouncement, A former air force commander, he o u1 · raged fcm1n1s1s by suggcsung women were unfil for combat . Last year he con· ceded that "perhaps" he wa. a chauvin· ISL _Jxplore Frilnce blf Bille! I ART & ENTERTAINMENT Houston Symphony Hosts The Canadian Brass Brass Fireworks Con­ducted By Stephen Stein The Canadian Brass , 1he world's leading brass ensemble, known for ils lrademark humor and eclecuc programming mix of Jazz. classical reperioire, and pop 1unes will make i1s Housion debu1 with lhe Hous1on Symphony 1h1s mon1h . As one of 1he firs1 classical ensembles 10 cross over in10 lhe world of popular music, these five virtuoso performers have expanded the repertoire and audi­ence appeal of brass instruments. Their concerts are known for their unique blend of virtuosity as well as irresistible spon1ane11y and humor Moreover 1hey were the firsl chamber ensemble 10 lour lhe People's Republic of China, and has performed 1hroughou1 Nonh America, Europe, Japan , Aus- 1raloa, lhe Middle Eas1 and lhe former Sov1e1 Union. Each season, the ensemble presen1s more 1han 130 concens in Norih America alone . The 1ns1rumen1al group has been fea- 1ured on The Tonight Show with Johnny Canon, the Today Show, CBS This Morn­ing, Entertainment Toni1ht and Stsamt Street The Canadian Brass -Jens Linde­mann, crumpet~ David Ohanian , French horn, Ronald Romm , lrumpet, Eugene \Yatts , trombone: and Charles Daellen­bach , tuba· ·is currently celebrating 11s 261h season The Quin1e1 brings a program 10 Hous1on which includes Wagnu's Prtludt to Act Ill o/ lo/1tngnn , J S Bach 's llt1/t Fti- 111u ,,, G M mor , Shof..t>r Suue. Georg• M Cohan un Broadway Dealt Strttl Blues . a medley of Stephen Sondheim tunes, Westward Y . Ho , and a Tnbutt to Duke Ellington Mos1 of the arrangements and original works for brass and symphony orchestra on this program have been written especially for The Canadian Brass Currently, 1he ensemble records exclu­sively for RCA 'BMG Classics. Record­ings are also available on Phillps Clas­sics and CBS Masterworks Their dos- • cography includes more than forty recordings, renecting 1he dovers11y of the music they perform. Recent releases include Swmg11mt! , featuring bog band music; Fireworks!, a collec11on of Eng­lish Renaissance and Baroque music ; Brass Busters! , Ragt1mt , and Tht Duit­land Album The Brass has published more than one hundred works drawn from their own reper1011e, and 1hcy perform on hand--crafted instruments of their own design This innovative and exciting show debuts wi1h 1he Hous1on Symphony­Exxon Pops Jan. 10-12 al Jones Hall in the 1hea1re d1s1rict of down1own Hou•- 1on Conduc1or· on-Residence Ste­phen Stein leads performances on Fri­day, Jan 10 and Saturday. Jan. II at 8:00 p.m .. and on Sunday. Jan. 12 al 7:30 p.m. For 11ckets and informa11on, call 7 t 3- 227·ARTS or 800·828-ARTS The Houston Symphony·Enon Pops Series 1s spon~ored by Exxon. The con· cer1 sponsor for Sunday, Jan . 12 is Bank Uno1cd. KQUE·FM 102.9 1s lhe radio spon­sor, and KHOU· TV Channel II IS lhe tele­v1s 1on sponsor of lhe Hous1on Sym­phony- Exxon Pops. Melro Ne1works 1s 1he 1996-97 underwruer of 1he Houston I Sy mpho n y Con d u c l or Ill R c!liH.fc-ncc post "Succeed" continued ... (C""''"wd from front p.igt) Aiddm[l1 and won raves for hos role oppo­site Robert De Niro in Joseph Papp's Public Theater production of Cuba und 111.1· reddy 8L'ur, which ran for nine months on Broadwa) Originally produced at the La Jolla Play­house in La Jolla, CA, Business opened March 23, 1995 at the Richard Rodgers rhcatre on Droad" ay to rave reviews. Nominated for 1995 Tony Awards for Best Revival of a Musical, Besl Director and Best Choreography, /lo"· To Succeed has music and lyrics by Frank Loesser and a book by Abe Burro .. s, Jack Wein· stocl.. and Willie Gilbert. based on lhe book b} Shepherd Mead Director Des McAnuff who received a I On} nomination for his direction of How to Succeed and a 1993 ron) Award for hos direction of The Who's Tommy, reunttes with his Tomna colleagues. on How to Succeed - ron» Award-winning choreog­rapher Wayne Cilento. Tony Award­winnmg set designer John Arnone and sound designer Steve Canyon Kenn.edy. Costume designer Susan Hilferty, light­ing designer llo,.ell Binkley and orches- Inani t a stroke can change your life forever trator Dann) Troob round ou1 the 'how's creative team In addition to winning the Puht1.er Pnze for Drama in 1961, llo" fo Succeed also won the Ton) Award and the Ne" York Drama Critics Circle for Best Musical. Crea1ors Frank Laesser and Abe Burro" s previously collaborated on Gun and Dolls. I/ow to SucC<'ed was their. longest running Broadway show playing t .417 perfonnances. me national lour is bemg produced by Dodger Productions, Kardana Productions. Inc., and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Perfonning Arts. //ow to Succeed In 811smess Jl'tthout Re­al~~ · Trymg, a presentation of the 1996- 1997 Mas1erCard Broad\\<!} Series, makes its l lous1on debu1 at Jones Hall from Jan­uary 14-19, 1997 Perfonnance times are Tuesday through Frida> a1 8pm, Saturda) at 2pm .and 8pm and Sunday al 2pm and 7pm. Tickets arc available a1 all Ticket­Master locations To charge b) phone, call 713-629-3700. Please note tha1 the mati­nee on Saturday, January 18 will be signed for the hearing impaired. The TID# for tickets 1s I- 800-755-6244 . Am . ~ encan Heart aA Association .. y Flflllbng'*'-""Ol-souo Reduce your risk factors The holidays are f inished ... and so are you! So, relax and t reat yourself to music by your favorite Lesbian and Gay artists. Of course, you can find them at LOBO LOBO BOOK SHOP 3939-S Montrose 713-522-5156 1997 Hours: Monday • Friday 4pm • 2am Saturday & Sunday 2pm · 2am Happy Hour Saturday - Thursday till 8pm Sunday 99C. Vodka, $1 Domestic, Sl .75 Well Monday - S 1.25 Domestic Pool Tournament 8:30 pm, FREE Piua Tuesday S 1 .25 Well Classic Ga Wednesday $ 1.25 Domestic/Well, STRIP CONTEST 11 pm Thursday S 1 . 7 5 Well, S 1.50 Domestic Friday - Happy Hour till 1 Opm · Hourly Shot S ecials till close · VIDEO POST OFFICE 9 m 1318 Westhetmer 942-2582 Saturday 9-1 lpm $1 Well $1 25 Happy Hour • Schnapps Daily HOUSTON VOICE I Jh.NUARY 3. 1997 9 - . --- . ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Nicholas McGegan to Helm Symphony Concert Concert Showcases Baroque and Ea rly Classical The Houston Symphony opens the new year with Shell Favorite Masters con­certs " Mozart, Haydn & Bach " show­casing four members of the Houston Sym­phony performing works from the Baroque and early Classical period, under the direction of famed early music specialist Nicholas '\1cGegan . Principal fluttst Aralee Dorough will perform the Quantz Flutt Conctrto in G maior; Robert Atherholt , principal oboe, will play J.S. Bach's Obot d'Amort Concuto in A maJor. principal bas­soonist Benjamin Kamins will perform the Bassoon Conctrto rn E minor by Vivaldi • and principal hornist William Ver '\1eulen will play the Haydn Horn Con· ctrto No I in D minor The world renowned McGegan conducts from the harpsichord in the Quantz, Bach, and Vivaldi concertos. Opening and closing the program are two works by O\foiart tht O.-uturt to la Cltmtnza di Ttto , and Symphony No 31 . Paris Ms. Dorough, Mr. Atherholt, Mr. Kamms and Mr. Ver Meulen are members of the Houston Symphony Chamber Players, and with that ensemble, have toured the United Stales, Japan and Europe with Mu>1c Director Christoph Eschenbach , appearing and teaching at the Pacific MuSlc Festival, and at Chicago's Rav­inia Festival Together these four artists have per formed and recorded the Schoenberg Quintet for Wind Instruments, OpuJ 26, for Koch International Classics. The reviews have been exceptional "The f irst recordrng by the Ho ust0n Sym~ phony Chamber Players 1s not only a In· umph for the •. players involved. but as fine a cross secuon of the intimate side of the Second Viennese School as we've had on recording>." (lo• Angtlts T1mtJ ) In Tunt Magazine stated "What leap< at you from the recording ts the sensitive phrasing and highly polished ensemble work by virtuoso musicians " Engiuh conductor Nicholas Mc­Gegan IS equally at home with period and modern instrument orchestras. He stud­ied at Cambridge and Oxford Univers1 11es, and IS Music Director of San Fran· cisco's Philharmonic Baroque Orches­tra, a position he has held since 1985 In 1990 he b«ame the ar11s11c director of the Gottingen Handel Festiva l 1n Ger­many In add111on, he 1s also Principal Guest Conductor of the Scottish Opera. and is the founder, director and harps1 ... chord player for The Arcadian Academy. Nicholas McGegan appears as guest conductor regularly with the orches- 1ras of St. Louts, Minnesota and San Francuco Symphony 1n the United States, and v.1th the Coty of Birmingham and Hall C-orchestra; in Great Britain He frequent!} leads The Hanover Band and works with the Academy of St. Martin 1n the Field, the Freiburg Baroque Orchestra and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, as well as leading hlS re1ular season of more than forty con certs and touring wnh the Philharmonic Baroque OrcheStra. In I 996 ·91, Mr. McGegan will tour the United States with The Hanover Band and with 1he Arcadian Academy. In addi· lion, he will appear in Germany and Lon· don with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment 1n programs including the complete Handel Conctrti Grossi 10 HOUSTON VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1997 which will be recorded for Virgin He also has conducted more than forty operas in Europe and the United States, ranging in musical style from Monteverdi to Stra­vinsky . and including the major Mozart operas and works by Handel. These per­formances mark his third appearance with the Houston Symphony, Aralee Dorough became principal flut­ist of the Houston Symphony in 1991 She h» performed and recorded the Mozart Flute Concerto in G major with Christoph Eschenbach and the Houston Sym­phony, and performed Mozart's Con­certo for Fluie and Harp with harpist 0\1arisa Ro bles , Christoph Eschenbach conducting Add111onally, Ms Dorough has per­formed chamber music throughout Japan and Germany. and has served on the fac­ulty of the Pacific Mu>1c Festival in Sap­poro, Japan for lhree summers as a mem­ber of the Houston Symphony Chamber Player>. She has made numerous appear­ances with the Da Camera Society of Hou;ton. and her rec1tals have been heard na11onally on National Public Radio'> Performance Today M\ Dorough grew up in Pennsylvania and " 1he daughter of 1azz p1an1st and composer Bob Dorough. For the Quantz Conctrto, she will perform on a Baroque flulC, hers being a copy of a flute by G.A. Rotten burgh of Brussels, circa I 745, made of box wood Robert Atherholt, principal oboist and holder of the Lucy Binyon Stude chair, 101ned the Houoton Symphony in 1984. Prior pos111ons for Mr. Atherholt have included principal oboist with the Opera Orchestra of New York, as well as posi­tions woth the New Jersey Symphony, the Orche\tra of St Lukc•s and the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. Robert A1herho lt has appeared fre­quently as soloist with 1he Houston Sym­phony, be&inning in I 985 w1th 1he Hous­ton premiere of the Lutoslawsk1 Con­certo for Oboe and Harp, and including <he 1 world premiere of the Schumann!Picktr Ro1tiancts arid lnttrludts • which was recorded for Virgin Cla~s1cs. He also recorded 1hc Mozart Oboe Conceno on 1he P1ckw1ck label, with Christoph Eschenbach conducting. H1> chamber music performances out­side of the Houston Symphony include concerts with Da Camera and the music festivals of Marlboro, Grand Teton, and Caramoor. Mr. Atherholt is an asso­ciate professor of oboe at the Shepherd School of Music ai Rice Un1Vers1ty, and has been on the facult ies of the Grand Teion Mu>1c Fes11val Orchestral Semi­nar, and 1he Na11onal Orchestral Insti­tute in College Park, Maryland For these performances, Mr. Atherholt will perform on the oboe d'amore, an alto­voiced instrument often featured by Bach in his compos1t1ons and frequently described as sounding like a comb1na- 11on of the modern oboe and the English horn. Bauoon1Sl Benjamin Kamin.> began his profe~s1onal career at aac ntneteen, Joinrng the Minnesota Orchestra as assoc1are principal ba~soon1s1 after .,tud1es with No rman He rz b e rc He became principal bassoonist of the Houston Symphony in I 98 I As a solo 1st with the Houston Symphony, Mr Kam­ins has performed concertos of Weber • Vivaldi and Mozart , and recorded the Mozart Bassoun Concerto with Chris­toph E<ehenbach and the Houston Sym· phony Mr Kam ins' musical act1v1t1es out .. side Houston included fe"1val appear­ances at Marlboro, Tanglewood and Claremont, and he has served on the fac­ulty of the Grand Teton Orchestral Semi­nar, and at the Blossom Music Fesuval A devoted chamber musician, Mr Kamins was a founding member of the Aurora and Epicurean Wind Quintets. Equally commiued to teaching as per­forming. Mr. Kamins 1s associate pro­fessor of bassoon at the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University, and is in demand nationally for master classes and recital appearances. In add1t1on. he pro­duces several chamber music concerts each year at Rice University Prior teaching pos1t1ons have included the University of Houston and St. Olaf Col lege in Northfield Minnesota. Mr Kamins plays a German bassoon manu­factured by J .A. Hec ke l Hailed by the Bulin Ntttt Ztit as "an impeccable solo horn," W1JJ1am Ver Meulen ts recognized as one of Amer­ica's leading hornisi.. Principal hor nist of the Houston Symphony since I 990, he has played with the orchestras of Chi· cago, Columbus, Honolulu Tangle­wood, Sun Valley Summer Symphony, Colorado Music Fes11val, Kansas C11y and St Paul. Mr. Ver Meulenhas appeared as soloist many time> with the Houston Symphony, performing works of Mozart and Ric h­ard Strauss under the baton of Maestro Christoph Eschenbach. HIS recording of the four Mozart horn concertos with the Houston Symphony and Christoph Eschenbach, released by Pickwick. has rece ived h1ah cr1t 1ca l acc la1m Among numerous awards and honors, Mr. Ver Meulen received first prize at the 1980 Jnterna11onal Horn Socie ty Soloist Compet111on and in 1986 was honored wuh the OulStanding Brass Player Award at Tanglewood Equally regarded for his pedagogical mastery, W1Jl11m Ver Meu1en1S Associate Professor of Horn at the Shepherd School of Music at Rice Un iversity a nd has served on the facul­ties of 1he Interlochen Center for the Arts and the Un1vers11y of Houston, as well as appearing as solo1S1-clin101an at Interna11onal Horn Workshops In 1985, he rece ived a "Dis11ngu1shed Teacher of America Certificate of Excellence" from President Reagan and the White House Commission of Pres- 1den11al Scholars. Mr. Ver Meulen will perform the Haydn Horn Concerto No. I on an instrument custom-made by Engle­bert Schmhmid of Germany, a modern horn which combines the charactcns .. tics of three d1fferen1 period horns. Underwritten by Shtll 011 Company's Foundation and spon•ored by KUHF-FM and KHOU-TV, the concerts will be held at 8 p.m Saturday, Jan 4 and Monday, Jan. 6, and at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 5 For 11ckets and informa11on, call 713 227-ARTS or 800·828·ARTS The Houston Symphony's Classical Season 1s endowed by The Wortham Foundation, Inc. in memory of Gus S and Lyndall F. Worth am ( Conctr· Talks •ponsortd by Houston Ctllular art gi»tn in JontJ flail auditorium, orrhtJtra It'll. 50 minutn prior to tach of tht C/auical Stawn conctrtJ ThtJt luturts art /rtt to all t1cktt-holdtr:J On Jan. 4 6 Ira J Black will /tad Conctr­Talks ) ~ American Heart Aa Association .. ¥ Rghl.wy/Hl-1~ --· Hthis is the . only : prem-e I you clieck, v)toiruesr may outlaSt you. • Checking your tire pres."'1r'C is a good idea Chcl'king your blood pressure is an ewn lx·ttt·r one. High blood pr(·ssun• gn·atly increa:;es your risk of slroke and heart attack. And th!he art• harder to deal with than a flat tire. To learn more, contact your m·arcst American Heart Association at l-8QO.AHA-USA1 or online at http://www.amhrlorg n..-. prow:ted ••P'I* MMOI. 0!992, 1195.~l-tewtAllooUM You can't get HIV from a telephone, c:==Q r0~~~ but you can get prevention. Edu1:1t1nn is the fine 1tcp 10 prevcn11n1 I~ ~rn: .J of HIV, tht virus 1ha1 taU\CS AIDS With JUI! one phone call you can ha\c the Amcn~an Rt-d Crou IC'kh you and your fdlow "'Nlcn how 10 l\Old •nfecuoa No one has more e1tpe11cn..:c 1ca ..· h1n1 heahh ud ufe1y than 1hc Red Crou For decade•, •e·\'c cduca1cd ....,e>rkcn chroush CPR cra1ning 111d we>rkplace he•llh and ufrcy co11ne1 So 11\/e us a call B«au1e ""'"~' • n&re, chang1111 beb.n1or n lhe oaly way we can Pop the 'VIM To achedule an HIV/AIDS education Hlllon for your workplace, or to obtain Polteft, br°'6 churH and other materlal1, call your GrHtef Hou1ton Area Red CroH (713) 526-8300 Education that work•, from a name you can truat. +..._ ..... -.. WORKPLACE HIV/AIDS PROGRAM OPINION Plain Speaking By LARRY LINGLE If homophobic shrinks and born-again christ1ans have failed in a never ending quest 10 turn homosexuals straight, film makers have proven more success· ful. The film "Man W11hout a Face" about a scarred teacher who re-emerges from the shadows for a protege under­went one cosmetic change from book 10 movie: The hero was no longer gay. This perhaps saved the sensib1lo11es of Mel Gibson (later lo star as " Braveheart " based on the Sco111sh leader, William Wallace , who at least one hosloroan contends "'as homosexual) and spared the producers any charges of pedoph­tl1a . One of the most acclaimed films of !his year os " The English Patient " based on Michael Ondaatje 's book The hero os a dashing explorer who falls in love wllh another man's wife while working with the Royal Geographical Society on North Africa. He becomes an unwilling agent of the Nazis as a means to reunite w11h h os love OndaatJe based hos book on the true life of Count Laszlo Alnunasy , who was not Eng­I 1 sh nor a patient and certainly not a reluctant spy for the Germans. Almmasy was Hungarian and monarchist a Nazi spy a. early as 1936, and ull1ma1ely worked for Soviet ontellogence And even OndaatJe agrees that Almm.-y" life offered nothing so romantic as the doomed affair of cine· mauc acclaim_ Actually what 1s known of Almmas) I!'. that he wa~ homosexual and during the Nonh Africa campaign wrOle a numher of pahionate letters, which still ex 1st, to a young German officer on whn>e behalf he labored to prevent his posting 10 the Russian front. Even on Nazo Germany being sent 10 the Eastern 1•10111 wus comparahle lo 11 l mos1 cer ta1n tlealh. Almma<y's lite os the stuft of foc11on and, on 11~ own, would offer fascinating reading and viewing, but ala'. a dash· mg explorer and a young, blond German otfi<.:er m love would only sell tickets at a Landmark theatre and other ~uch ar1 houses Of course, lolms have long taken liber ties wuh homo~cxuals_ .. Laurence of Arahrn "at least did not invent a hetero· sexual interest but likewise 11 did not dwell on TE. Lawrence 's affection for Arab boys. Can you omagone the outcry of such romantic logures as Rudolf Valentino or Ramon 1"avarro , matinee ideals of an earlier era, were portrayed as homo· sexual'! But , wau. they were . Well, then what about Gary Grant and Randolph Scott nf another generation? Damn, they were gay al,o. and lover~ for a time Heterosexual historian~ and writ· ers have . and continue to fight a rear guard baule to deny the homose•ual 11y of Walt Whitman They continue to demand nothing less rhan a wriuen con fessoon from the Old Grey Poet himself before conccd ing 1hc obvious In the Library of Congress rests Wb1- tm1n's diarie' which contain 1he war ye an in the nallon '1.; capital when the poet tended 10 the wounded The repeated entries of meeting young men and brong ­mg them home for the night were, I assume, the ac11ons only of a Good Samaritan And , hos ever evolving faith on the strength of "comrades" was but hos love for hos fellow man . None of h" charlla blc nature extended to women In truth, Whicman 1~ a shining example that homosexuality, at lea'I in the art­ist, 1s more than s1mpl)' a different sex~ ual persuasion. His lo\IC ot men gave b1nh to his concept ot comrades Just a~ Tenne"tt William• ' finely etched leading ladies voiced his own tragic out­look. One of the most telling moments of mod­ern history was the result of unrequited love for another man Roy Cohn on the l 950's was an upstart young lawyer who auached himself 10 Senator Joe Mc­Carthy , an alcoholic closeted homo­sexual who auached himself 10 the fore­front of the Red Scare of the tome Along the way Cohn became infatuated with a young man wuh both the good looks and body that Cohn never had , G. David Shine So Cohn arranged for Shone 10 JOin McCarthy's staff and, conveniently, Cohn and Shone traveled Europe together m search of evidence of Commies and, 1n Cohn's case, true Jove . That Shone was straight only proves the adage that closeted cases such as Cohn always strove for the unattainable. Cohn trocd to prevent Shone from being drafted onto the Army and when that failed he sought to gain a favored spot for his beloved. It was from this love-starved quest that the McCarthy-Army hear· ongs came about and during that con­frontation McCarthy was finally dis­credited before the na11on . All for the love of a straight man. Now no ho;tory book, at least 10 date, will point to this simple truth. Again II IS left 10 a playwright and a gay one, to drama­t oze realuy on realistic terms In The Ntw York Times Magazine ·, year end review which encompasses some of the finest asses!'iimcnts of some who died 1his past year Ton) Kushner offers a brief play on the life of G David Shone. Kus­hner. who has already done more lhan enough for Roy Cohn in hos "Angtls in America,• again capl ure s the essence of that despicable llltle man . Shine. who parred t:ompany wnh Cohn after rhe hearing'• wenl on lo manage lhe fanuly hotel chain and produt.:cd lhe movie The Frtnch Connutwn " and died on a plane crash th" year. Kushner'> playlet takes place on Hell. Shme arrives 10 he met h} Cohn and upon recognizing his old friend, proclaims "thos mull be Hell!" And the cast only grows. Alger Hiss , J, Edgar Hoover and Tricky Dock ( Richard l'iixon ) himself As w ilh much of Ku hoer's humor 1here are a lor of 1n,ide JOles. such as wuh Hoo vcr m drag, 11 might he Arthur Fmkels tem." The reader 1s e~pcc1ed 10 know tha1 leading lights of the Radical Right. a lead mg foe of gay rights who, at the same time, lead ... a quiet domestic life With his gay lover and their two adopted children. But Kushner's tale as s111l Cohn's s1ory the man who would always deny he wa> gay. even 3' he and Cardinal Spelling sailed the East Rover aboard his yacht filled w11h young men, the man who would deny he had AIDS even as he lay wrenched w11h pain and disease Kushner's offers the truest assessmen1 of that dark day on 1952. '·Even you (Shine, who was not consu.Jcred tern hly bright. hos name 10 the contrary) must have known, you must have suspected, for you_ I ruined the cred1bi111y and career of the man I admired most m all the world' For your sake I pushed Joe McCar­thy to pcrd111on, Dave, for you, because Joe had moxie hke nobody's business but he didn't have your eyes! Dave, our story is epic. it's tragic , 11·1"i •South Pacific • Dave, my doomed love lor you turned you into history. Dave you goua know that I" Shone's final lone 'ummar11ed hlS life "Roy. I'm real confused" to which the Wall Kelly bulldog figure on the black Chanel dre,,, ho'° and '11le110 pumps replied . "Of cou"e you arc, beauutul. It's the 90•!"-a. J I:dgar Hoover wob· bles off. Climb the GrilHbl Join other gay men and lesbians for an active and memorable vacntlon. We offer climbing in the Tetons, bildng ht Proven ce, hJkinit ht the Alps, and more_ Call for free catalog_ ALYSON ADVfll1URES ""- 1-800-825-9766 v E N T u R E • N 2923 Main Houston 522-0000 Noon Open to 7:00 pm 7 Days a Week ALL WELL/BEER/WINE $2 Now that we're the ONLY bar in the 2900 block of Main, we have plenty of FREE lighted parking FRIDAY, JANUARY 3, IOpm Jennifer Ellsworth, Candidate for LOVE. SWEATS A Steamy Bathhouse Review A Benefit for Colt 49's Stone Soup A FRIDAY, JANUARY 3, 9pm till?? A v Guest Bartenders on the "TOP" v The Court * Black Jack with Jackie SUNDAY, JANUARY 5, 5pm till ?? Cookout on the "FARSIDE" The LVL PWA Holiday Fund Guest Bartending HOUSTON VOICE I JANUARY 3. 1997 11 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT I Swansong Perfo rmance The West CoaSl"s leading representa­uve of modern dance, BELLA LEWl­TZKY has been changing the landscape of dance for more than five decades. first as a riveting dancer with the famous Lester Hor ton and then as a sensitive and inven­tive choreographer and artistic direc­tor of her own company Proclaimed as "one of the authentic voices of American modern dance" (lnttrna/tonal Herald Tribune , Paris, France), the Lcwitzky Dance Company returns to Houston for the first time since 1984 as part or !IS Farewell Tour In add1t1on to her outstanding talents as a dancer and choreographer, Bella Lcwttzky has long been acknowledged as an a rust of great integrity and com mu ~ ment Indeed, in a review following the pre­miere 10 September, 1996. of Four Womtn in Timt, which IS to be danced here, Los Ange/ts Timts Dance Critic Lewis Segal could not resut commenting on Ms Lcw1tzky's principled tenacity: ''Bella Lewnzky has never made easy choices. So her final creation for her 30- year-old modern dance ensemble (scheduled to be disbanded in mid-1997) predictably avoids any taint of elegiac nosrafgia and concentrates on the unfinished bu)iness of feminism. one of the defining themes of her career long before the company ex1>tcd ." A modern dance revolu11onary, Ms Lewllzky kept her company in Los Ange­les when It wa.s unheard of for any mtcrna­t 1ona lly~accla 1med American modern dance company not 10 be based in New York. A vehemen1 arts educalor and defender of freedom of expr<.s1on Ms Lcw1tzky crossed out a clause promising not 10 ere· ue obscene work before signing chc acccp1ancc form for a $72,000 Na11onal Endowment for the Arts (NEA) grant 1n 1990. When her grant was consequently w11hdrawn, <he sued the NEA and won . Like her dancers, Bella Lew1tzky's cho­reography 1s lean and taut-movement pared to the bone . The sparcne<s and sim­phc1ty or her work reveals an artist with a lucid vision, a conjurer who dist1lls movement, amplifytng the emotional impact upon her audience. Lew11zky trademarks include athlcti­c1~ m. quick footwork. bent torsos, free fall<. dramatic nair and endless waves or mo-.cment Ms Lcw11zky has chosen a bravura program for the Company's visn to Houston with three dances rcprc­scntat1ve or her choreographic gen­ius spanning over cwo decades: lmprts­sums #2 (Vincent Van Gogh ), Four Wom~n m Tlmt and Spacts Bttwttn • All ten com­pany members will dance rn each of the three works Ms Lcw1tzky's early training was with Lester Horton and later, as his colleague. she co·foundcd Dance Theater 1n Los Angeles In 1966 <he formed her present company which has toured extensively to 20 foreign countries on five con1inen1s and 43 states . Her work as choreographer, dancer, lcc1urcr and educator ha~ been recog­nized through numerous awards. includ ­ing five honorary Ph D.'s, the first Cal- 1forn1a Governor's Award for lnd1- v1dual Artist, and the first Los Angeles Arts Council Award in Dance. Moreover. her artistic v1s1on places her in demand w11h important national and European arts palrons for the creauon of new dances. She has been comm1ss1oned to create new works by 1he 1987 Los Ange­les Fcst1val, Chatcauvallon Fesll­val 1n France, UCLA, Philadelphia Dance Alliance and the Krannert Center for lhc Pertormmg Arts at the Un1vcr J/4 sf °* * ll:OOpm * OP s J Sofur>d tlJdde * Hosfess * c:alJ Sha~ Roxanne lee Lc~e z. 13 MALE STRIP CONTEST al ll:OOpm with Daivi < J/4 \,/') SATuRDAY St-IOW al ll:OOpm wi!h Roxanne ~ V5 $1 Budw ser & Bud l.qhl V) All Daq A41 N1qht 0 sity of I1111101s, amung others The first work on the program IS lmprts­sions 12 (Vincent Van Gogh), created in response to the passionate paintings of 1he 19th century arust. This remarka· hie eight-piece work choreographed in 1988 constitutes the second dance in the IJllprcssions trilogy. a dance homage to the visual arts . "This piece unfolds in unexpected ways," wrote the Los Angtlts Timts , and Dana Magaz1nt raved that 'happily, the pure dance force generates the energy in this ode to the Dutch painter ... W1th his symphonic-size electronic ~core , Larry Attaway certainly captured the vibrant feeling of those canvasses. His and Lcw1- tzky's responses, aided by Darlene Neel 's apt lighting, are remarkable equ1v1 lents of the pain1ings and <kctche>." Inspired by Judy Chicago 's Tht Dinner Party • Ms Lewuzky choreographed Four Womtn in Timt to an ongrnal )Core by Music Director and Composcr-in­Residence Larry A Attaway 1h1> year. In Scc11on I we find the Primordial God­dess a mythological character con­cerned with life and birth . Los Angtlts Timts Dance Critic Lewis Segal exclaimed that Lori McWilliams , who will reprise the role of Primordial Goddess here in Houston. "'remains first among equals in "Four Women,' an art1s1 with enough authority to dominate and energize the corps, plus enough imagination to find the goddess within her and make us believe m her d ivinity." The second secuon feacures Sophia, an abstrac1 symbol transformed into a purely spiritual dimension. The con cept of Sophia developed in the ccntu· ries after Christ when early Gnostic relig­ions believed in her as an incorporeal cnrny. Roman scholar and philosopher Hypatia , 370-4 IS A.D appears as 1hc third "woman an lime .. with Engli!'h wrncr Virg inia \'\'oolr , 1881 1941, u the final charac1cr. Choreographed by Ms Lew1tzky in 1975, Spacts Bttwun explores the spe­cial world of the proscenium area . Thi~ work looks at the mult1facetcd 1mpll­cauons of space as dancers occupy u and the human interferences that arc inher­ent in this special kine11c language . Dana Magazint wrote that Spaces Between "raises the level of debate between the physical and the meta­physical to thrilling heights , becomes an orgy or contrapuntal movement as dancers swing on PlcxiglaS\ scaffolds , doubled and tripled by other dancers and their shadows ," The Society for the Performing Art> (SPA) will present Bella Lew1tzky and her company of ten dancers for one per· formance only on Saturday, Jan II, 1997, at 8 p.m. in the Wortham'< Cullen Theater. Immediately following the performance Ms Lcwit1ky will an)wcr queS11on• from the Slage as part of the Exxon CurtainTalks Series . Radio >ta · tion KUHT 88. 7 I'M is media sponsor for this unforgettable evening of modern dance . Tickets for this farewell performance arc available at the Houston Ticket Cen· tcr in Jones Hall and the Wortham Thea tcr Center as well as all Ticketmastcr locations. To charge by phone. call 227· ARTS . (The SPA, in partnership with the Jewish Community Center (JCC), IS sponsor­ing an intermediate to advanced level Master Cla)s in modern dance technique taught by a member of the Company at II a.m. on Friday, Jan. IO, a1 the JCC, 15601 South Bracswood . This special offering is part of the 1996-97 1.W. Marks Jewel­ers Inc . Master Class Series. Registra­tion and observation fees arc $3.SO in advance and SS.00 at the door. Call 7131 729·3200, ext 3223 for more informa · cion.) ~ 1\\t \oUU\ \\,c.ut fo. q Uot\\)tl 11 :00Pm 61-'115___..M_AL_E-STR_IP~c""""c~r-·.,=TF~ST~ ~ at ll:OOpm wi lh Pa1v1 .L. ~~~~~...;._.~~~~--,j .2517 r:'alph Slreel al Weslheimer Gu~m= ~~n~v ~T. Jo~H, Nicol~ ~u1~t J~~~IC~ ~l~I~ ~ .ft158 .Ao~~T .AoP~IGUtz '--It ,_, (713) 5.27-9071 • t loppy !-'our 7 om-9pm wee~ Joys • $1.50 Well 4-7 '>alurdoy • $1.50 \ odko 7am-6pm • Muq Club 7 am-JOpm • 3.75 Pitchers & 1.75 Mugs 1 /7 Amcdeur/Talent L..:....; .::) u Niq ht CJt H:OOpm I- w1fb Oqan Michaels Gr>anny 1 s B u r>ger>s' 12 HOUSTON VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1997 BULLETIN BOARC By LEE DAVIS HIV/AIDS Ministry A new year wnh a full ~hcdule of programs for the 1ay, lesbian, bisexual and rransgcndcr community, announced Executive D1rec ~ 1or Ralph Lasher of The Kolbe Proj ect "We arc conunuing our monthly potluck/com mumty concerns wuh a video p resentat ion ID January and February by John Bradshaw about heahn& the rnncr child of gays and Jes bians," said Lasher. "and as soon as we have a volunteer faciluator we will offer a monthly potluck/communuy concerns pro1ram concerned wuh the parucular social, medical. spiruual and coming out issues of lesbians ." On Saturday, Jan. 25, a basic computer skills course for 1wo hours on four Saturdays for SIS per session wuh special discounts for per· sons who arc retired, unemployed or on d1sa· b1l11y will be offered . On Thursday, Jan. 23 11 7·30pm a planning ~s.s1on wlll be held to con· sider the fcu1bll11y of a monthly support group for physically challenged gay men . Every Fnday night. there will be a movie or musical shown on 1hc1r new 53" screen The Kolbe PrOJCCt as a min1s1ry of Francis cans which has served men and women ID the community of all rchg1ous fauhs or none <11ncc 1990. fl offer uncondllional love , acccp1ance, ho!ip1tal11y and caring For more info call Ralph Lashcror Loren Connell a1 713 522 8182 JAGS A benefit for AIDS Foundation Houston will be held on Jan II al 7pm Food, cock1aols and dancing w11h live entertainment will oo;ur 11 JAGS. 5120 Woodway al Sage. Also on tap 1s a fine ar1 1uc11on, fashion show. rafOe, photo1raph1c e.1h1b111on and construe llon of the Houston Communuy Mural .. The l.1vmg Wall • .. In Your E111r and Off 1hc Wall" tickets arc $150 each w11h tahlcs starling at $1,SOO For onto call 713 623.6796 Holly Nuber On Friday, Jan 17 al 7pm, Holly Nuber will be the guest ~peak.er at the monthly meeting of Li- 8 (Lesbians in Business) at the lnnnova Bu1ld1ng. Greenway Plaza Recently appointed as Director ot lhc Upcomrng Soft ball Proa:ram with the Cuy of Hous10n Parks & Rccrea11on Dept .. Holly"s lifelong 1heme 1s "If you set your mmd to u. you can accomplish almost anything ," Holly will be 1alkong aboul her family back ground, her youthful involvement with sports, her experiences with Pearland, and her plans for the future. For mfo call the L1B lone al 529.0077 Hairdresser Artist? Butera's presents an Olivier exclusive ar1 show runn1n& throu&h Jan 31. W. Christo phcr Ohv1cr. alias Chris Oltv1er. ahas Thar Guy, ahas The One Next 10 the Window, ahas Michael Kempers' old assistant shows his artwork at 4621 Montrose . For info call 5200157 Ms. Gulf Coast leather The third a.nnual Ms. Gulf Coast Leather Con 1es1 Weekend is comm& March 7~9 Held m the Montrose area, the contest 1s open 10 111 Lea· therwomcn re&ardlcss of sexual or1cn1a lion m the Gulf Coas1 Region including Ala· bama. Arkansas, Florida, Louisiana. Mis· s1ss1pp1, Oklahoma and Texas Mr Chucl Higgens, Na11onal Lea1her Assoc1a11on­ln1erna11onal Male Co·Cha1r 1992~93 will MC the contest along "'llh Ms. Jill Carter, Intcrna11onal Ms Lea1her 1996 97 The wcelend bcgms wnh Fnday N1gh1·s Mee1 and Greel Sarurday afternoon "'Iii hold seminars and demonstrations covering 1op1cs for 1hosc of all uperrcnce levels and exposure to 1hc leather community. The con test will be held on Saturday evening, and a brunch wuh Ms. Gulf ("ou1 Lca1her 1997 on Sunday will bring 1he weekend 10 a close Anyone des1rin& info can wrue to Tc.xas Leather Produc11ons 11 P 0 Box 667072, Houston, 77266-7072. or e·mall Tc.xas leather Produc11ons at 1cxaslca ~ thcr@Juno com Saxophones Wanted!! ANNUAL GUMBO COOKOFF AUCTION & SHOW Presented by The Texas Renegades Club & the Royalty Candidates of the R.S.l.C.S.S. Cook-off 5:00 pm in conjunction with Steak Night. Showtime 7:00 pm Dr. Ken Dye of Rice Un1versuy ~eeks su.o­phonc player~ for Blazina Saxes Soprano, alto, tenor & b.i.ntone sax.es arc needed 10 per form for Mardi Gras·Galvcston on Feb 8 and other poss1hlc act1\11tic\ The f1r~t rehearsal. which ,.,II include a master class m saxophone. wlll take place on Feb 2. Call 1heor Ho1hne al 713.527 6018 for •n apploca­uon and fur1her info Dr. Dye also announces The Houston Concert Band 1s accepttng new members for all instru­ments, wuh a special emphasis on percuss· 1on1sts, french horns and tuba players for the 1996-97 season Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 7:30-9 30pm at Rice University For furiher info call 713.527 6018 Junk Food Alert This time. this year 1s the llmc for cleansing and detox, announces CenterPoint Project, Inc . • a non profu educ111onal organ1za. uon cstabhshed m 1986 Learn to lei go of the JUnk you have been eaung all of your life Learn to hvc healthier anJ longer. lhe natural way Herbs have "'orked naturally tor thousands of years Auend 1h1s session ,. 1th "1anan Bell at Ccn1crP01Dt. 7621 Westv1c ..... 7 ~Opm for SIO on Wedne<day, Jan 8 For info call 688- 7225 . Also, on Jan 9 , Ccn1erPom1 offers a $5 ses· sion on lhc 1op1c of .. Conver~aoons with God " Suppose you were to asl God (Orne of life's most pullhng ques11ons and you gor clear. d1rcc1 an~wer(. Explore the ~cal Don· aid Walsch hool "'Conversa11ont; Wuh God" wuh Bob "1iller and change )vur life Again call 688 7224 for mfo Globetrotters Here Again A sold ou1 cro>A d a1 the Summa las1 January should entice everyone to bu) 1he1r 11ckcu now for the return of The Harlem Globetrot· lers Ser for Fnday, Jan 24 at 7 lOpm, od C1S are pnccd a1 S9 ~. Sll, Sl5. and Sl7 and are no~ on ule 11 all T1cle1mu1cr tocauons To charge your t1d.cu by phone call 713 629 3700 Innovators in the sport of ba~kc1ball. the Globetrotter~ ha ... ·e a 1radn1on that 1s an)' thing but trad1t1onal. F.rom outlanduh .. above the nm .. s1am dunks and '"'how did they do that"' compct111ve pla) 1bcrc·s sornc· thing for everyone' The roster includes 1wo players ~ho set a new Guinness World Book of Records slam dunk 11 an amazing II feet, 8 inches . Next Time For Real The AclOrs Workshop announced their open· mg of Nat T~ For R<aJ • D1roc1ed by Micbael Sullivan , thu romantic comedy set in New York Cuy, <1ars Tifl'any Gnuit . Todd Green­field and Bill Symington . The play concerns a youn& woman who nnag· mes herself to be the next Edith Piaf. her 1rans vcsutc ne11hbor, and an out of town middle age businessperson ~hose lives intertwine on 1be Bog Apple Performances for the Hous1on premiere arc a1 8pm on Thursday, Friday, and Sa1urday n1gb1s from Jan 2-18. 1997 Sunday per fonnances for Jan. 5 and Jan 12. arc ar 3pm Those amaz.ing Globttrotttrs 1! Brazos River Bottom 2400 Brazos Roustdn (713) 528-9192 All proceeds benefit the Til Tha Sheltered under lhe Colt 45's ( er Memorial Fund 501(c)(3) charily) HOUSTON VOICE I JANUARY 3. 1997 13 817 Fair~iew (@ Cenverse) (713) 528-9204 Friaay, January 3rd' Saturaay, Janaury 4tf'i Sunaay, January 5tFi Miss Z.ack Miss Z.ack M!ss Z.ack Victoria NicoCt Pai vi Ltt Lovt Naomi Warwick Ro,.:annt Ltt Lovt Sivi Ross Micf'iatCay LtaFi Halston Franiit Lant Tara Dion Friaay, January lOtFi Saturaay, January lltf'i Sunaay, ]41tuary lZtf'i Miss Zack Miss Z.ack Miss Z.ack Vittoria NicoCt Pai vi Ltt Lovt Naomi Warwick Sivi Ross Dyan Micf'iatls Ro;i:a nnt Ltt Lovt N itH ColCins Ltaf'i Halston MicFiatCay 1~tl I z y J 312 Tuam • Houston (713) 528-9343 Sf.to*w SATURdAy, JANUARY 4, 1997 MC: MicHAElAy GUESTS: KARA DioN - Miss HousTON F.F.I. JAydE MykEls LANA BlAkE - Miss BAyou Ciry USof A AsHlEE HousroN FRIDAY NIGHT 8-BALL LEAC:.UE ME..,brRS o~ly Suck AR01.~d & D~"n WllH OUR DJ Bill Co~z11lrz The Great American Puule 34 B1bhcal abbr for Isaiah 35Amencan revolutiorwy ~or Con· ,_. •• gen­eral Forrest TEXAS EDITION e,. Horry Mc:CUg 1 2 3 4 s state, abbt ACROSS 73 First 1 buneh of 0·1 6 Stllle abbr S roused to 75 rUler intenM anget 7 of Russ11 c 76 Amer- 7 nwrw ot wlllkU>g a • 1can-born I extinct New Zea· land fhghlleu bird 10 11 12 13 14 10 Ltrco1n·s first nwne 15 16 12 experunental testing place 21 )' 22 lk 23 15wl'le<e Sam to.. ton tr_...eled to talle 27 • 28 29 ..... p1 1u ll )4 IJS. ,. I" ,. •• 19 I •o •• ~6 47 •• •• mu • .. • '1 >2 ;) 54 COIM>lnd of Te•., army lhat later 57 I 58 S9 oO defeated Santa Anna •2 63 64 65 0 8th 1711ev•a:tPon• -- month 167 21 lbb' for baronet 22 Illy State abbr 23 Ngh offioal 1n Otto.,..,, Empire 25 peroon of l.Jllllrd 27 abbr for bOI h Cdepenthng on the case of the 1st iet-ter) a million watts & a tf\ouUndth of a wau 21 1n1eriect1on to ••pt"eu surprise. a11n·1nnr 29 Te•as lt'Cl!•ans rl.l)bed bOdlet with oil from this anl· m111 to repet lnsetll 31 obondon 36 Scottish f0t one 37 aviator 31 16-Hth centu­ry Swed1Sh dynas­ty. orgarwc vessels 39 etn and 0th conson.il• of tne aipnat>et 'O San Antonio nosted this 1n ·aa to eel• ..... 250th 1"'1tday 43 wrr m • mirror Okneecap hr;ong 31days.- 50 31 .. ths of a dozen 51 tw•ce served as preSideni of the Reput1t1c of Texas 53 rrutitary branch that mostly ta.es. abbr 55 ~ conference of Houston. Sin Antocvo & O.llas 51..-.1y '*"" st every ind•· vldual one, abbr 60 not tight 61 drunkard 12 er.Mn prav1nce that was part of French Acadia. al>br 63 1n tl'le Near East • large 1M. stat IOI ta'.,a'tlef'al II aounds like 'double you tee· 67 where tne 1973 tow t>Wget taor­ror "Texas Chain.­...., Massacre" was f II med 2 words 71 remained 72 land OI Lincoln 71 72 Engh sh 7J critic& 75 a.<rcrB-IOt. lf'llialS f76 DOWN 1 one of a senes ot stwp t11ns 2 period of t 1me 3 c;loth.ng 4 Prince &smarck. aeato< of the Ger­man Empire. 1871, aA'enrger.AUllnar> bofnAmer1- c;an producer 5 d1rect1on Abilene to Houston, abbr ~head~:::~~ Republic of Texas 11 K>ng of Te .. s Swing 2 words. had hOme· IOi¥nOI Ttrtey Tee• 13 Cotton State. abbr 14 exist 14 HOUSTON VOICE I JANUARY 3. 1997 1& Faced with 1 def 1c1t because of dechning 011 reve· nues In t961, Tex· u enacted ttu tax 17 Israeli MlpOft 18 raw egg White used tn glazmg 19 detestation l?i 17 18 19 ~4 •••. 25 30 • !7 3' cable TV old movies c hannel •1 indefinite!y 1ong time UGeorge BlXnt' r• Ot with name tials die compet1t ume last as Gracie_ 10& ••sm.A 1 ~­waist ~o 26 j)) .o.n J k• sh of apanese mono '5 I ...... od ndef­ely ,n,e y' ., ln1t Xi •1 4 4S ·.·. 1 .• / ,. >5 ;o ···· fj6 I< •• •9 ·10 •.,. 14 20 most ll•sl!y 24 gloss. an e•plan-alory note aU.Ched 10 a text, abbr 21 .cronym for p~ic relations 27 Eskimo boot ~~~~!t~~~: r~e~ Senate 11 a place filled with goodwill ll'ld Q<Xld intentions. and 1f the road to hell II paved with them. then 1t·1 a pretty good cfelou- ") 29 Supreme Court ThOmls' ad· veraary Hiii 30 desol!nll """'"tly 32~ for etectron volt 33 one com-plete circoo 01 long ti mes "'consu rned 50 Canad ... Norttiwest Territories a ... 52 Organizal 1 Amer~Sta on of les etd•ng ed m.a.-..U.O 5" most urry• 55 be troubl 5Sdwect'°"A toTexaCity 59 m favor 14 befOfe '5 airport des· 1gnator f0t AU$~ t1n·1 maun field H Pogo cartoon cr•or Kelly. intoals ('We have met the enemy and he ls us") H 11te of Te•· as State Fair S9origonll-~ man\.lf act urer abbr 70 Roman numeral 400 73 dayhg~I time abbr .7.4.. e..1.0.1 _t wt.etl'a_,. cttMOlA.FftA TLftU PUZZLf TXlQ COLUMNIST And There You B) DAVID RICllARDSO~ Is It JUSt me or 1s It almost inconcciva blc that another year has gone by? It's very frustrating for me not only to real ozc that time has flown so rapidly. but also that I had 10 make decisions on what 10 do for New Year's Eve. Staying home woth the television didn't seem like a hot idea, especially since I had pawned 11 10 buy Christmas gofts. Then, I read somewhere that many people go out w11h a special >omcone 10 ring m the New Year. Smee my accoun1 ant was already busy, I ukcd my lesbian friend Toyah to go out woth me And. since her accountant wa~ busy too , she said yes. Clothing proved 10 be a big challenge Tru't me when I tell you 1hat a very short guy wtth a rather large nose does not look good 10 a tuxedo. Indeed, as we walked down the street , a small chold pointed at me and shrieked to her parents; "Look at the funny looking penguin wtth the bog beak!" That is one good 1h ong about being a kod-ot's the last tome on your lofe you can be blatantly rude wtthout fear of retro buuon, unless you get a JOb on food serv· ice . . or as a writer. At any rate, the news· Have It! paper headlin<> the following day about a demented penguin attacking a small child were purely coincidental. So. Toyah and I amvc at the Ballroom and the doorman gives us the once over and rolls his eyes. He snidely informed us that Toyah'• pan1sui1 was unaccepta­ble and that their policy called for women 10 be in dresses. My date pulled herself up 10 her full height of •even feel tall and saod that if she wanted 10 put on some­thing slinky and seductive, she would have worn Sharon Stone. Somewhar mollified, not to mcnrion terrified, the doorman let us 10 When the modnoght hour arrived I troed 10 make champagne toast, but the bread kept ge111ng all soggy I aho have )Cl 10 figure out who thos Old I.ang guy is and what 1s so important about his Sign that we have to sing about It every New Years. Aho what's all thos about baby new year is some dtapers7If1ha1's the case. maybe June Allyson could be the baby new year. Now I am off 10 get some black eyed peas and then ot's off 10 the Antarctic where I woll ioon the rest of the penguins. Happy New Year .. And there you have it' If This Week Is Your Birthday- You may be having the nagging feeling that there's something you should be doing. but you can't remember iust what it os Thos may JUSt be a sign that you are moving forward toward a new future that hasn't become apparent to you yet Aries (March 21 - April 20) You may have a tough tome with changes on a personal level Smee these changes are going to take place without your say-so learn to accept them Pay attention to your home hie, your family needs your input expressing pos1t1ve feel-ings woll do wondt:rs Taurus (Apnl 21 - May 21) New ideas need to be shared. and the feedback of others may improve the concepts It's tome to make way for a new approach Time out may be a welcome change 1n your love hie - although there 1s love. the day to day routine may have become bonng and tedious Gemini (May 22 - June 21) Your need for solitude and quiet may be hard to achieve Make the necessaty compromises, meeting all respons1b1hltes, but keep your input at a monomum. Tty not to be so generous with money, or you may come up short yourself Expect defiance from those not wanting change. Cancer (June 22 • July 23) Use resources on the most economic and efficient way possible on order to reach your goal. You might have to do some iugghng. but the extra effort will be worth 11. Others will end up amazed at how much you were able to do. with so few resources . Leo (July 24. August 23) Perfection 1s not required, and will no doubt be 1mpos· s1ble to achieve. Assuming any type of superior stance will aggravate those around you, tty to leave well enough alone You have a great deal to think about. especially concerning personal matters. take tome to do so. Virgo (August 24 - September 23) Resist any suggestion or man1pulallon that Ines to get you to give more than you've got 1n terms of time, money and energy. Standing up for yourself will give you a great feeling of success, boosting your confidence tenfold Don't budge on what you believe Libra (September 24 • October 23) Show your appreciation to your fnends and famtly. You have lots to give those you love. and revealing those feelings more often woll bnng you JOY and peace. Financial success will be tied to a raise or pro­motion and 1f not now, advancement os on the vety near Mure Scorpio (October 24 • November 22) Leaming something new will give you a feeling of JOY and confidence which you can share with fnends and loved ones You are currently ndong on a crest of contonued success e1lher at work or on the homefront. so be prepared for any unexpected d1fficulhes Sagittarius (November 23 • December 21) VVhat has previously seemed hke a potentoal disaster, probably concerning a relationship, may instead turn out pos1- t1ve and provide you woth new opportunities to create a more stable and loving closeness If you find yourself on a rut. do something about ot now. Capricorn (December 22 • Januaty 20) Any investments, especially on the area of real estate or stocks, can provide you with excellent returns Communicate clearly woth experts 1n these fields before you make your move Tty to let a trou· blesome problem take care of itself En1oy time with your mate. Aquarius (Januaty 21 • Februaty 19) If you feel pressured about making a choice, onsost on more tome to gather the onformatoon and think about what you really want from all this It's best to delay any decision. instead of ttyong to undo what you never should have done on the first place. Practice moderation Pisces (Februaty 20 • March 20) If you are finding yourself constantly letdown. 1t may be time to re-examine your expectations • unreahstoc expectations of others will only cause you gnef Compromise 1s a key word for the week Certain matters are not worth worrying about, since you cannot change them. ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Lauren BacaU • Jack Lemmon and James Garner in Warner Bros' comedy, My Felio¥.· Am~ricans Somewhere Ove r The Rainbow ... By CHRIS RUNDQUIST What do you do when you u~ed to be lhe most powerful man in the world? In the cases of former Presidents Kramer and Douglas, you can write a few books, do some endorse mcnts. set up your prcsidcnrial library. or be chased around the coun1ry by psycho· parhic NSA (National Securny· Adm1nrs­tration) agcn1s. In 01hcr words, there is no place 10 go bur down. bur this can be a good lhing . Warner Bros Holiday release of .. My F•l­low Amtnrans •• (PG- 13) opened in thea tcrs on Dec . 20 This • ••• film sta rs the incredibly talented Oscar winner J ack L<mmon ( Grumpier Old Mtn ). who plays for­mc r Prcs1dcn1 Russell Kramer. and J ames Garner ( Ma..,·enck ) plays former Prcs1 .. denr Matthew Douglas Former First Lady Margaret Kramer is played by the incomparable Laurtn Bacall My only problem wnh lhe film is lhar she does nOl get enough screen time, Curren1 P rcsi· dent William H•rney 14' portrayed by Dan Aykr oyd ( Ghostbusttrs ). The seem· ins.ly 1d1ollc Vice President (based on VP Oan Quaylr perhap•?) IS played by J o hn llrard ( Tht Pfltran Bnt/ ) The alls.tar c.:ast also includes Wilford Bri· mly, Jor ll olli\, Brad Whitford, Everett Mc Gill , S e la \Vl'rd a nd Marg llelgenbe r · rger The ftlm was directed by Pe ter Segal (Tommy Boy J , and produced by Oscar winner J on Pttrrs (Batman Tht Princt of TidtS) Pre,ident Kramer(l.cmmon) 1s a popu lar guy who did the con.,..ent1onal Republi· can 1hings m office. more m 1he foreign rcla· tion11 area 1han m 11;oc1al rcfonn at home. Like most pol1t1t;1ans, hc"11; got a big ego. and he"s also tight "11h a huck ff he saw a penny on lhe s1reet, he \\Ould dive in fronl of a mo.,..ing 1ruck to ge1 u He upualizes on hi\ nnage in every conceivable way In order 10 make a little extra money This includes dancing wuh a giant panda bear during a corporarc cndorsemen1 President Douglas (Garner) is a staunch Democra1 who 1s also a lady ' s man in the throes of a d1von:e. He ~a smart guy, but a real cynic about politic~. which he has confused wuh governmen1 (no, they arc no1 1he tiame 1hing) Douglas cannot stand his long 1ime opponen1 Kramer. whom he secs as stodgy, 1i&htf1s1ed and not too sharp, and takes advantage of any occasion to knock him down a fev. peg~ 1l11s film ha\ everything you coutd a ... k for in a script II has political intrigue , scandal, explosions. car chases, psychopa1h1c kill ers, and even a l111lc politically in'.'lie ghtftftful drama But the comedy moles this movie The pamng, of Lemmon and Garner as e..xccllen1 The 'Wa) their charal:lers pla) orr of each other Is htlanou' v.Uhoul IOSIOI! a Hnsc ot realll) Garner can say .. F10• you" to Lemmon, and 11 is totally believa Jack Nicholson and Sh irle)' \bc:Laine reprise 1hrir Onar wmnmg roles m Par· amount Pictures The E~· en1ng Star blc I thmk lht§ pairing as even better than Lemmon and Ma11hau ( Grumpy Old Mtn ). which is saying a lot By now you should he asking what Dorothy and 1he rainbow have 10 do wtth this movie Well. I am not gomjt 10 tell you You will just have to sec the movie for your~elf. but I will give you a hint bOlh former Presiden1s will be eternally grateful to a QUEEN! 'Evening Star' Shines Brightly By JON ANTHONY II has been 13 years since Ttrms of Endtar· mtnt made us impact on audiences 1hrough ~ our 1he country. The film is one of 1hc most beloved and acclaimed movies of our time Besides audiences, Endearment swept that years Academy Awards as well Nominated for eleven Osccccars, the movie garnered five awards m all, including Best Pic1ure, Best Director. Best Actress ( Shirley Mac­Lain< o ). Besr Supporting Actor ( Jack Nlcb-o lso n ) and Best Adapted Screenplay. Ba.ed on lhe novel by Larry McMirtry • 11rt Evtnmg Star continues 1he saga of Aurora Grccnway's plight after her daugh1er's death m Ttnns of Endtanntnl I mus1 admit, n was w11h a certain amount of trcpida1ion 1ha1 I embarked on reviewing 1his film. Hav mg enjoyed lhe first one, coupled with the knowledge of Hollywood's reputation for lousy sequels, I did not wan1 this film 10 dimmish the impact of the ongmal. Much to my surprise. 11 did not Although the film has earned m1x.cd rcvacws 10 date. I am of the same opinion of the cn11cs who lhmk this film 1s a gem It rs now 1988. IS years aflcr rhe dearh of Emma (Aurora ·s daugh1cr), and Aurora Greenway (MacLaine) hasn' t changed a1 all. Aurora 1s sull s1rugglmg to keep every one tha1 surrounds her life, family or friends. together preferably under her con1rol. Much 10 her chagnn, she is havmg a tumultuous time dealing with the melo drama that surrounds her First rhere"s her 18 year old granddaughrer Melanie ( Julie tte Le""ls ) who 1s deter maned to do thmgs her way m spite of Aurora Havmg me1 a man she 1hmks ~he JS m love wnh, Brut:e ( S<"oU Wolf ). no1hin1t will i.top her from Ol"iCCrlainrng tha t happ inc"" mc lud ing moving 10 Los Angeles with the guy Of course , Aurora despases Bruce a $elf-effac ing nitw11. and with good cause He's 1he embodiment of a typical moron-strong on looks , short on everything else Then, there 1s Aurora·!> frequcnr trips to 1he Slate pcni1en11ary to visit her grandson Tommy ( George Newbern ) who has been arrested on a charge of possc~sion with intent to sell. Tommy resents 1hc visits and informs 1ha1 he is only gomg through w11h rhe charade to placate the parole board by show· ing them he is cooperative. Rounding out the dysfunctional family arc Teddy (Mackenzie Astin) . his girlfriend Jane and their son Bump-Aurora's first great· grandchild whom she dellicribes as ••a mon· s1rrrous kid ·· A.s if that were not enough to contend wuh, along comes Patsy Carpen1cr ( Miranda Rich ardson ). Emma's best friend who makes Aurora's life miserable by vying for Melanie's attention. Through u all, Aurora receives suppon and fricndsh1p from her maid Rosie ( ~1a ri o n Ross ), her neu door neighbor Arthur Cotton (the late Br n J ohn­son ) and Hector Scot! ( Oonold Moffa t ). a retired general and one of Aurora'ti former lovers The ensuing conflicts and family drama's appear to 1ake their toll on Aurora who feels guilty about not having raised the grand· children 10 be upstanding c111zens. Rosie, concerned about her friend, con· cocts a way 10 get Aurora to sec a therapist. Initially res1stan1 10 the concept , she ends up seeking a counselors advice Ponra· yed by Bill Paxton ( Twultr ), Jerry "a hand­some non·ltcensed counselor who helps Aurora pick up the pieces and lhtn some Filmed in Houston , Tht E•tnm1Star1s a wonderful film tha1 will delight audiences w11h its whimsy, authen11c portrayal of a family lorn and palched h lS abou1 life's 1ro n1cs ecstasies and neuroses In essence, 11 1s about a con1cmporary family Shirley Maclainc 1s ohcnomcnal m this role. If ever there was an actrcs' la)'lor made for a par1. 1h1\ I!'. 11 MacLame 1s pivotal to this film, tihe 1s practically m e\Cry scene m 1h1s 010\ 1c lier performance 1~ euraord1 na ry and wo rr hy ot 1he Academy ·.s 1111cn Sbirle} MacLaint • Juliette Le""is ~orge !'twbtrn and rt-iac kenzit Astin in Tht Evtning Siar tion . She controls the flow of the mov 1e as we sec her age. both ph)sically and emotion ally throughout the ftlm The rest of the cast is good as well. Paxton u surprisingly good at charm, Lewis• portra yal of Melanie is cyp1cal of her neurone acting style and Richardson was delicious as Patsy, the divorced Hous1on socialite The real surprise here was Marion Ross Ross' excellent performance as Rosie was breathtakingly b rilliant The deplh that Ross brought to 1he role is amazing. Ross is sure to gcr a best actress nod at this years Acad· emy Awards and I woukt no1 be the least btt sure prised if she does not bring home the coveted statue Jack Nicholson appears during the last 1wenty minutes of the film He repnse11 his role of Garret Breedlove, ano1her of Aurora s former lover~ Nicholson and Maclaine ha\o·e a na1ural chemislry when on screen and their scenes "'ere poetic and 1hought pro.,..oking Nicholson has d1ff1 culty playing s1raight characters and h11 awkwardness sho't\s 10 some degree He IS at his best when he ponrays "'·acky charac ters Ncvenheless. he added a d1mens1on to the film lhat was laconically lad.1ng 1lbe11 an a dimini!htd capacu>·· This 1s a wonderful fiJm that will make you laugh and cr) s1multaneou .. 1y There arc i.ome notous momcnh thal lake you by sur pnse and there are some po1gnan1 scenes 1ha1 emo1e aurhen1u.: realism Tht' £1 tning Star t 'I" a •••• <far fr lm rha r .. tllnC'.s brightly ind cC'd 1022 WESTHEIMER 713/527-9669 SUNDAY JAN. 5 3PM-TILL GUEST BARTENDERS PATIO BAR $.50 DRAFT BEER $1.50 WELL VODKA DRINKS MON.-FRI. 7AM -2PM SWEAT SHIRTS NOW ON SALE HOUSTON VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1997 15 - ' .. ~ • . . i ·.J ! "T • •• - Fa11view ~1 § m ~ t (.!) 1u ~ Fairview D:HEEEll'l IE rm mmm m _,m Poc1flc Street im II AVQ!ld(ll~ m Westheimer Westheimer m m _ovett Hawthorne fJ W.Alabama W. Alabama ~ HI G> a E G> =i ~ ~ ~ V> 0 co ~ w m Richmond "0' Richmond 0: m EZJ .z... . 0 - ~' Shepnord ~ 59 m+ m Comorol~&- Accommodations 21 Lazy J 312 Tuam 528-9343 22 Marys 1022 Westhe>rner 527-9669 Montrose Inn 408 Avondale 520-0206 23 M M1n1ng Co 805 Pacific 529·7488 The Lovett Inn 501 Lovett Blvd 522-5224 24 Outpost 14 19 Rochmond 520-8446 25 Pacific Street 710 Pacific 523-0213 Bars/Clubs 26 ors 534 Westhe1mer 529-8813 27 Rascars 1318 Westh"'""'r 942-2582 10 611 Hyde Part< 611 Hyde Part< 526-7070 28 Richs 2401 San Jac.nto 759-9606 11 BnarPatch 2294 Holcombe 665-9678 29 Ripcord 715 Fairview 521-2792 12 Bnc:ks 617 Fairview 526-8102 30 Steam 402 Lovett 521·1450 13 Brazos River Bottom 2400 Brazos St 526-9192 31 Venture-N 2923 Mam 522-0000 14 Chances 1100 Westhe1mer 523-7217 15 Cousr.ns 817 Fairview 526-9204 Restaurants, Book.stores, Other Businesses 16 EJJ's 2517 Ralph 527-9071 17 Gentry 2303 Richmond 520-1861 40 Baba Vega Rest 2607 Grant 522-0042 18 Heaven 812 Pacific 521-9123 41 Boudreaux Rest 2313 Crocker 526-0790 19 Incognito 2524 McKinney 237-9431 42 Char11es Coffee Shop 1100Westhe1mer 522-3332 20 JRs 808 PaClfic 521-2519 43 Chills Smoothies 3939 Montrose 526-5300 such is LI FE! IN OUR STRUGGLE FOR THE EQUAL:TY OF SAME-SEX MARRIAGE!!! \ \ 16 HOUSTON VOICE I JANUARY 3, 1997 Ci P.eferredGraphles. Hous!or TX (713) 528 7654 .. Chnsty Donuts 1103 W Gray 524-4005 45 C1neplex.Qdeon 1450W Gray 524-8781 46 Crossroads Bookstore 1111 'Nestheuner 942-0147 47 Eckerds Drug Store 1007 Westhe1mer 524-9229 48 Houston Voice 811 Westhe1mer 529-8490 49 lnkhngs Bookstore 1846 Rochmond 521·3369 50 )(roger Grocery 3300 Montrose 526-7865 51 Lobo Books & Vtdeo 3939-S Montrose 522-5156 52 Main St Theatre 4617 Montrose 524-6706 53 Montrose Cfinic 215 Westhe1mer 520-2000 Clothing Stores 60 Basic Brothers 1232 Westhe1mer 522-1626 61 Jewers Boubque 2404 Taft 523-3557 62 Leather by Boots 807 Fairview 526-2668 63 Leather Forever 711 Fairview 526-6940 Tax Changes Could Have Impact At the stroke of m1dn1ght last Tuesday, the New Year rung in federal lax changes that will affect adoptions, seniors and people with terminal illnesses. House Ways and Means Committee Chairperson Boll Archer, a Republi­can from Texas, released Monday his "Top Ten" list of tax changes that will go into effect Jan I These changes will result on marked improvements m the lives of the Ameri­can people," Archer said m a statement. The lost is : -For small businesses. the amount of costs deductible from taxes will be increased to $18,000 from $15,000 ·Accelerated tax-free payments from life msurance policies to patients diagnosed as having less than 24 months to live, oncludong those with AIDS. -A deduction of 40 percent of health care premiums for more than three million small businessmen and women. up from 30 percent on 1996 Unemployed taxpayers will be able to make penalty-free withdrawals from their Ind1v1dual Retirement Accounts to cover the entire cost of 1hcir health insurance premiums . By LEE DAVIS Women's Football lhe Houston Women's Flag Football League (IIWt.f'L) continues season play on Saturday, Jan , 4, Games are played at Wilson Elementary School, located on Fairview, between Mandell Jnd YuporL foour games are played began n111g at 9am antl continuing until lpm Players, referees, cheerleaders and coaches are sull needed as the season conttnues with semi-finals on Jan. 25 and the Champ1onsh1p Game played on Feb. I Join the llWF'l'L at Ms. B's on Sun­day, Jan 5 at 4pm to see videos of recent games . Ms. B's " located on Buffalo Speedway. !'or onto contact Tonya Mcd­ra no at 713 .315 .9368 Ab Crunches The Baylor College of Medicine advises that abdominal exercising devices are all the rage, but you can get the same results working out on your Jav. ong-room floor "You're probably better off learning to do crunches-and varia11ons of them-than you are using a device that may work one or two mus­cles," said Dr John C1anca, an Assistant Professor ot Phy<ocal Medicine and Rehah1lotat1on. Crunches, "t·ups and most of the abdom­inal exercisers work primarily the rec;:tus abdom1nous, the uppermos1 layer ol muscles on the center of the body. Allhough no device or movement can exercise all four layers of muscle in the abdominal 1roup. C1anca satd crunches olfer the greatest versatility ''Some of the aerobic videos provide excdlent 1n!iilruc11on an crunches, crunch variations and other exercises that are tremendous for strengthenang the abdomen," he said. Strong abdomi­nal mu<elcs not only look good . they pro­mote better stahol1ty of the m1d·sec­t1on. support and protecl the spine and aod on breathing Volley Volunteers The Lone Star Volleyball Classic IX os stoll looking for volunteers for their tournament to be held Friday, March 28 and Saturday, March 29 Volunteers are needed to dostnbute welcome pack­ets. rc&oster players, house players, -Taxpayers who have long-term care insurance policies will be able to deduct the cost of their premiums and expenses from their taxes -For people who work for small busi­nesses or are self employed, and for Amer­icans who lack heallh insurance cover­age, they or their employers will be able to make tax-free contributions to a pri­vate savings account that covers the cost of their routine health needs. -Changes on pension laws will make it easier for small businesses co set up pen­sion plans for their workers. -A tax crcdn of up to $5,000 to defray expenses for people with incomes below $115,000 who adopt children . Adopting a hard-to-place child would mean a tax credit of as much as $6,000. -Senior Citizens aged 65-69 will be able to earn up to $13,500 a year without los­ing any of their Social Security bene­fits, up from the $12,500 limit on 1996. ·Spouses will he elogoble for a $2,000 deduction for contribut1ons make to their Individual Retirement Account, regardless of whether they are at home or work outside . Previously, homemak­ers were hmoted to a $250 tax .deduction. assist at the gyms, show the city, etc. tf you are 1n1ere!<ited, please leave a mes­sage on the Lone Star Volleyball Asso­c1a11on •s 24 hour voice mail at 713 878 .4629. HOG Wild The Houston Outdoor Group (HOG) is planning 1he1r first camping 1rip of the New Year to nearby Huntsville State Park, Jan. 10- 12 . You can enJOY the 8-mole hike around Raven Lake, biking traols­or JUSt cuddle by the campfire. The pre­campong meeting will be Monday, Jan. 6th at Cafe Express on Korby at 7pm. Call Mark at 266.5510 for details . Recently, 46 members JOUrneyed to gay­owned Rainbow Ranch Nov 8-10 for a wonderful weekend , Instead of fish­ing on Lake Limestone, they hoked where the lake had been, The drought had JUSt dried it up. £\.'en w11h the lake missing. they played volleyball, basketball, horseshoes and a rousing flag football game using dirty socks on their back pock­ets as flags. If you would hke info on HOG, call the or hotline at "KAMPOUT" or wrote to them at P 0 Box 980893 on Houston, 77098. 8 Ball The Houston Metropolitan Bil­liards League, Inc. (HMBL) announced recently Weck 9 standings as Jackson 5. Ouo Cousins, Ripcord Maniacs, LR.'s Cue Crew and Master< of the Mone on the top five places, respecuvcl} The top five player. were Willie Suniga, Bob Cypert, Larry Lentz, Charle< McMahon and Charlie Clay On Jan, 12, the 3rd Monthly Meeting will be held at the Minong Company at 2pm, One-half season dues are payable at that tome@ $24.50 per person or $122.50 per team All Skate The Lamba Rollerskating Club will be holding their first skate night of 1997 this Wednesday, January 8, from 8-10 pm at Starhte Skating Academy, 8075 Cook Rd Admission os $5 + $1.50 of you need skates. Door prizes, fast skate, train, and more . Questions or comments? E-mail lrsc@neosoft.com or call (713) 787- 0625 , FREE COMPUTER TRAINING 658-8883 ... 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Except no imitations Only The BesUor Y-® .ErQrrLtS 3701 Montrose Blvd. call 529.5100 COLUMNIST Family Values promised immune system. Up In Smoke! Joan Beck , who wrote Cigartttts: What By ESPERANZA LAVENDER JAZZ PAZ rM Warning Label Dotsn 't TtU You, notes llappy New Year• Happy New Year's reso- that smokers usually look older than non-lutions and optimism and good cheer 10 smokers because 1he damage to their skin you all. I hope your Christmas was every- causes wrinkles. Smoking increases the thing you hoped for and that your new year risk of psoriasis, decreases the ability will he splendid with sparkling health and of wounds lo heal and smokers have higher vual energy. If you are one of the 46 million rates of broken bones and osteoporosis Americans-<ine in four people, three in than people who do not smoke. four 1f you count in the bars-who still In addition, their fractures take longer to <iooke but intend lo try lo quit in 1997, I wish heal and they are more likely lo suffer back you courage and endurance with your pam. 11us 1s ~au.~ It 1s not only the lungs resolve. and heart that are damaged by smoke. Cig- Seven !;mokc~ out of ten express the desire arectes arc also associated with cancers to quu >mokmg, according to Dr Michael of the mouth, pharynx, larynx. esopha- Fiorc:. a ~molcmg cessation expen from gus. pancreas, cervix. kidneys, colon, the t'n1\'ef!llly of Wisconsin Medical bladder. and bone marrow. When a smoker School 1n Madison , Wisconsin . Only is stricken with any disease or Injury 2% of all quitters actually kick the habll, requ1r1ng surgery. they require more but every year on Jan. 1. millions practice anesthesia and are more likely to develop quitting And, every successful hour of respiratory complications and abs1enuon is healing Within 20 minutes require oxygen of quutmg, a smoker·s breath is cured, There is support available to those who ca1bon monoxide levels in the blood long to be tobacco free. In an unprece-drop' and oxygen levels return IO normal dented effort, 250,000 health care pro-e1ght hours after the final cigareue. v1ders have recently received informa- The chance of succumbing to a hear1 attack uon to share with smokers on how to quit. decreases afler 12 hours and after 48 hours The Commit To Qu11 Program IS availa-the ability IO taste and smell improves. In ble at pharmacies, or by calling the 1hree days, breathing 1s easier and in a few American Cancu Socitty at 800-ACS­months circulation is better. walking 2345 . For a consumer guide on the new 1s easier and the lung capacity increases smokrng cessation guidelines. call up to 30%. One year later, the nsk of heart 800-358-9295 attack 1s half wha1 u used to be, within two Or. Flore's research indicates tha1 as hard years It drops to normal. Indeed, at the as it 1s to reJCCl c1gareucs once one 1s five-year anniversary of that last puff. addicted-and many studies propose that the nsk of cancer for a former pack-a-day it is harder to quit than heroin-the suc-smoker 1s only half what it u!i:cd 10 be . ccss rates "s1gn1ficantly increase" 1f a Stroke, 100 . health care professional provides mot1- Wi1hin 1en year~ rhc pre-cancerous cells vation or advice. I am a nurse. I care deeply arc replaced and 1hc risks arc s1m1lar to aboul my fr iends and readers I hope this people who have never smoked. And, at 15 helps. years. the nsk of coronary heart disease (Jazz believes that her brother Mau would 1s at 1hc same level as a never-smoker. have had a better chance of living with 51111, 500.000 die every year from c1ga- AIDS instead of dying from It if he were no1 reue smoking, It causes emphysema and addicted to cigarettes before he got sick c.:hronu.: h ro nt.:h1t 1s . II make\ pncumo· She 1\ c omnutled to c 11 c ourag 1ng eve nia, tuhcrculos 1s, in fl ue nza and the ryone to quit. If you would like lO talk to a common cold worse for the smoker and friend about quitting, or 1f you're strug·- everyone who lives with him or her. More· gling, call her al 713-868-5153 And con-over, I would be preaching to the choir to gratulate her partner, Jan. who IS rcm1nc.J our community of the conse approachang her one-year anniversary qu~nces ot ~ mokmg wuh an already com of qulltrng cigarettes torever!) ~!!!:::~:=!!!!!!!!!!!~~~lll'l!!!l!m="--......~- ART & ENTERTAINMENT A Riveting Tale of Two Men Held Captive Drama Unfolds At Main Street Theater l'wo men-an American and an Irish· man-held cap11ve in Lebanon are JOined by an Englishman in the nveung drama Someone Who '// Watch Ovu Me , making us debut Jan 9 at Main Street Theater. Hailed by the .Vrw Yorktr as 'a beau11ful play," the Houston premiere of Frank \1cGuinnc"' 1992 play Somtont Who'll Watch Ortr Mt , an astonishing success m its New York premiere. will be directed by Ron Jones The riveting drama revolves around Adam ( Hosea Sunmon-. Sr. ), an Ameri· can doctor. and I:dward ( Kent Johnson ), an Imh 1ournal1St, who are being held hostage in Lebanon They keep one another company, combating their fear and boredom by exercmng. singing, Jllk111g and fantasi11ng about things and people they ml" . Soon Michael ( <;.,orge Brock ), an Fnghsh academic, JOlfl) them. McGuincss shows the d1>cove11es the three cap­t1VC.! t male about themselves and each other. and how they use humor and 1mag1- nat1on in their dcterm1na1ion not to be subdued by their captors. As Tht Ntw York Times reviewer noted, this play .. Brin&.!t ll.!t own l11ht touch to grim mat-ters •• Ron Jones directed Marn Street Thea ter's productions ol A P1ur Of My !lean , Manso/ and Jointd At rhe Head Ken1 Johnson's recent work. at Mam Street The­ater includes the lllle role in Otd1pus rhe KmR and roles i
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