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Montrose Voice, No. 253, August 30, 1985
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Montrose Voice, No. 253, August 30, 1985 - File 001. 1985-08-30. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4479/show/4454.

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(1985-08-30). Montrose Voice, No. 253, August 30, 1985 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4479/show/4454

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 253, August 30, 1985 - File 001, 1985-08-30, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4479/show/4454.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 253, August 30, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 30, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript 21.06 Decision: Political? By Linda Wyche Montrose Voice Editor Politics, not judicial interpretation, is being attributed as the reasoning behind Monday's U.S. Circuit Court decision to uphold Texas Penal Code 21.06, the sod­omy law. The decision affects the lives of approximately 700,000 Texas homosexu­als. By a 9-7 vote, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled to overturn the 1982 deci­sion of Dallas Federal Court Judge Jerry Burhmeyer. Buchmeyer nued that the law was unconstitutional anCl denied homo­sexuals the right to privacy under the 14th Amendment. Gay activists and thoRe who closely fol­lowed the case of Donald Baker vs. Henry Wade, District Attorney of Dallas County, almost unanimously blame politics a nd Reagan Administration conservatism as the reason for the ruling. Citing that all the Reagan appointees ruled to uphold the law, Tom Coleman, president of the Texas Human Rights Foundation and vice president of the Houston Gay Political Caucus, said, "The Moral Majority wing of the Republican Party wants this law reinstated. Gays who voted for Reagan got themselves criminalized." 2 1.06: What Does It Mean to You? The MONTROSE VOICE asked some peo­ple in Montrose: "What effect will the rein· statement of the Texas sodomy law have on your lifestyle?" Skip Engelhardt: "'!'here will probably be more harassment for a short time. I'll be more careful especially in this neighbor­hood." Ron Hellot: "It doesn't affect me one"' ay or another. Tiwy are not going to intimi­date me. I'll do what I want when I want. I think it's stupid and inhumane." Buck Langland: It's gonna go on any­way. We've done it before. We're gonna do 1t again ... John Haley: It's a crock. I really don't know what I can do about it except put both deadbolts on the door at night." Earl Gregory: "I think it will be reversed by the Supreme Court. It won't affect my lifestyle significantly because it never was enforrcd." Jo'reda Jerrell: "It makes me mad as hell to know that my friends are criminals." Charges Filed over Happy Buddah Fire Arson investigators have filed charges against a man believed to have set a fire that destroyed the Happy Buddah Restau­rant at 516 Westheimer last month. According to Roy Paul, Houston Fire Department Arson Division investigator, ~iguel Jorge Delgado, also known as Car· ml'n or Carmen de Cuba, is being sought in connection with the July 21 fire which caust-d $230,000 damage to the building. WitnE'.Rses claim Delgado was seen leav· mg the rE>ar of the building at the time of the fire. He was employed there as a part· time entertainer Also a rompanion of Delgado's sup· posedly told someone that the two had been paid to burn the building. Paul says he has "pretty spt'Cific information'.' that the arsoni11ts were paid to commit the crime. He would not reveal that informs· ti on Investigators have not been able to locate !Mgado and believe he has left the city. Of the 16 judges ruling on the case, seven were appointed during the Jimmy Carter Administration, two under Richard Nixon, one under Lyndon John· son, and six under Ronald Reagan. The Jone Johnson and six of the Carter appoin­tees voted to uphold the Buchmeyer ruling a nd both Nixon appointees joined the Rea· gan appointees. Lee Harrington , former GPC president, echoed Coleman's feelings by saying," • . . while I have a number of Republican friends, and with all due respect to each of them, I hope they understand now why the issues of the economy and inflation and even the deficit ..• all pale in comparison to an American citizen's basic human rights . . . . This decision was a direct result of Ronald Reagan being president of the United States." A politically motivated action must be met with a politically oriented response, according to Ray Hill, Houston gay acti­vist. "We will be looking at this for the next decade," said Hill, "We are seeing a rise of religious fanatic control of the American jurisprudence system." He added, "The only thing we can do is get every available person involved. An;vone not involved in the gay political system should no longer be considered Donald Baker; 'We're appealing to the Supreme Court' gay." CHANGES IN PROCEDURES. Politics may not only have played a part in the decision reached by the court, but also in the fact that the appeal was even heard. Attorney Jim Mattox had dropped the appeal process in early 1983 and Potter County (Amarillo) Di•trict Attorney Danny Hill decided to pursue the matter himself. In September 1984, a three judge panel of the court said that Danny Hill could not override the decision of the attor­ney general. In January of this year, the full court reversed itbelf saying that Atty. Hill wa" a member of the defendant class and could pursue the appeaL Judge Alvin B. Rubin, in a dissenting opinion, stated, ''Determined to uphold the constitutionality of a Texas statute whatever obstacles bar the way, the majority opinion tramples every procedu­ral rule it considers." Rubin added, "If this en bane decision is precedent. it assuredly rewriteli the adjective law. If it is not intended to be precedential, but only a special-life support contrivance, under­taken for the one purpose of salvaging the statute, it denies equal justice both to the litigants before us and to those who, in the future, will be denied equally extreme judi­cial measures." The justices voting to uphold 21.06 cited a Virginia sodomy law similar to Texas' which was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court. In the Virginia case, Doe vs. Common­wealth's Attorney, the high court sum­marily ruled, meaning no opinion was rendered with the decision. Judge Irving continued page 6 Montrose Voice "The Newspaper of Montrose" August 30, 1985 Issue 253 Published Ever:y__F.rida-"y---'(-7_1_3;....)5 29-8490 _ _ _ Montrose Residents Demand End to Suburban Teens' Westheimer 'Cruising' -- America's Labor Day: Honoring Working People Bv Don Maines Monlrosr Vorce Correspondent Neartown residents Tuesday called for an end-by Chnstmas-to "reckless and cnmmal" behavior associated with tee­nagers cruising lower Westheimer on wee­kends. "Tins 1& an achievable goal Our Christ· mas present to Montrose might be that this problem Wlll be gone," 881d Rev. Ron Pogue, pastor of Bering Memorial Me~ho­dist Church, where more than 200 neigh bore met to air complaints and seek "creative solutions" to the cruising pheno­menon they say is disrupting their lives Residents and property owners, m the form of an old-fashioned town hall meet­ing, voiced their concerns to a ta.k force addressing the issue, ''The Future of the We~theimer Strip-Weekend Cruising." Cit) CounCJlman George Greanias, _the director of city traffic and transportation, and two Houston police officers also addressed the panel, which includes Pogue, Warren Duncanson. Matt Ware­ing Tom \\'hitworth, Jill Hafner (preSJ· den't of the Neartov.-n Association) and Chairman Mark Schmidt lpresident-elect of the Neartown Business Alliance). Working with Greanias, the task force plans to formulate a pro-active program to crack down on joy riding, prostitution and illegal drug activity that surface, in the Montrose area on weekends, particularly on and around the Westheimer ,,tnp between Bagby and Montro6e Blvd .. Frustrated r idents painted a frighten· ing picture of an "idyllic, ioyfol" neighbor· hood that becomes ransacked with \iolence, traffic jams and "disruptive, sometimes criminal, activity" from Fri­day nights to early Sunday mornings. "Unless you live withm two blocks either side of the strip, you don't truly know what the problems are," -aid Eric Orzeck. a resident of lower We,;theimer He said noise on weekend nights makes it continued p.3 2 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 30, 1985 ~ l,ABORDAY ISAT ... naturally (ff ~' d :fURA\;~ . TONIGHT, MONDAY FRIDAY, AUG. 30 NESS LABOR DAV FULL MOON MAD Customer Labor.er party Appreciation Day Fa: :d begins at 9pm . . . al Be Bust from continues all weekend Speci er SUNDAY BEER BUST 2:30pm ti/? f::Y:'ue:'sf:!!::~'!.rs Sunday ,....,...~ r1easure! gHAPPYHO~S DAILY (Mon-Fn) 2pm TOO' BUNS AND WEENIES . Drinks Specials All Day Long AFTER-HOURS NIGHTLY 1022 WESTHEIMER - 528-8851 Pl~y safe! MEMBER • Montrose Voice Pcipul•tlon l•t 198S) 32.000 Census tracta 401 01 . .ao1 02 . .C02 01. 402 02 405 02, 403 end 4CW 01 Zip codn (rovgnly) 70006. 77019 iPOrt•on). 77098 Bounded (roughty) Shepherd Dr (weat), Allon P•rkw1v (north), Main St least). U S 59 (soutl'I} UMUde (Montroae Blvd 11 Westhe1mer Rd) 29•441·13"N Longilvde 95• 22'$0''W. Altitude 40' ELECTED OFFICIALS fOA MONTROSE George GrHnilll, Houston City Council (d111 C) El Fr•nco l:~:~~~·o!?~t~ ~~~~:loner (pct 1) roor PrHJon. (711J 121-er rr W•ltor Rsnk1n, Conalable (pct 1) 301 San J•cmto. 1111} 221 6200 Oebf• Oanburg. te .. s House ot RepreHnt111~es (dist 137) rsn 1 s w Fwy 1113} 520-80CS8 Craio wastungton r ... , Senate fdttl 13) ,323 C.fO/IM, (113} &W 4343 M 1diev Leland us House of Aepr...,.,1111 ..... /d11t 18) 1Sl1Q Smtih •820 (713} 1»133P The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 253rd ISSUE, AUG 30, 19S5 Published every Friday Montrose Voice Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 CIRCULATION 9.000 cop1• weekly through 150 m1ior d•atnbut•on points in Montrose. the Village end the Heights est1m•t9d pn1-on rete factor 2.8 Ht1m•led rHdersh1p 25.200 wukly plus 1.000 cop1et weekly through .cs other Tel!H d1stnbut1on points Ht1m1ted pu1-on '''' t1cror 2 S eat1m1ttd reader1h1p 2,500 weekly TOTAL CIRCULATION (GUARANTEED) 10.000 COP•• WMkly total t1t1m1ttd rHdttthtp 21.1()() wHkJy Contents copynght 1985 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg p1Jblslter Lind• Wyche edit°' Roger Lackey office maneoer Mark Blazek Au1tin corresponc»nt Scott Cutsinger. 8111O'Rourke1oc11contr1bcJtot1 Michael Helquist, Steve Warren n1tion1tcontr1l'Jlut0t1 Jerry Mulholland 1ccount HK1.1t1v1 Jool Cunningham .coount H.c11t1v1 ,..oundlng Mtmberr GrHtl' Montrose Business Guild. Gey 111d LHb••n Pree AHOC•ltlon News Services· N4tWt·Ont, P1c1t1c N.,ws Service $ynd1c1tN FHtur• Serv1CH & Wot•r1 Bri•n McN•ught. Uni• ver111 Preti Synd1ca1e. Ben Sargent, Spec:111 FHturesl Synd1c111t1on S•in POSTMASTER Bend 1ddrM1 corrections to 408 A\IOndalQ, Hou1ton. T x 77000-3028 Subsc11pt1on ttl• '" US In Hlled envelope $49 per year (!12 ill$UH). $29per 11x moriU'll 1261:1sun) orS1 25perwMk Oest than 26 ltsues) Back 111un $2 00 uc.h N1tJOnal MJvert131ntJ ttfJ'H.,,tll1\I• Joe 01S1bato R1v~I Marketing eee, eth Avenue New York 10011. (212) ~42-6863 Advflft,.mg dHCll1M Tuetday. 5 30pm. for luuereteased Fri'" day eyentng Notice to e<hwtiaers Local 1dvert1s•no ratetchedul• Severt--A w11 ettect1ve Oc1 12 198-f /fapOnaibiltty n~ Montrose Voke does not: assume '"Pon· altMhty tor 1<1¥ert11Jng claims RNdert shOuld alert ttie neowt~ _.,Jo.any <IK•Plr<• odvtdialnG AUGUST 30, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Group Wants Cruising Halted by Suburban Teens from page I virtually impossible to sleep before 2:00 a.m. and "the trash is something to behold." Another resident, McArthur Johnson, added, "People sit on my porch shooting up and l find syringes in the lawn the next day. Across the street, they stand on the corner and expose themselves for sale to passersby. "The whole situation stinks. I'm just sick of it. There's no need for it," said Johnson. Many of the speakers said the attractiori of hustlers, drug activity and "the thrill of sex" lures middle-class teenagers to join the growing popularity oflate-night cruis­ing. A high school teacher explained, "They associate Montrose with sex, even if viewed vicariously from a car." Often, he said, it is "daddy's car," but "their par­ents aren't aware of what they're doing or where they're going." Hyde Park resident Mitch Young, and others, called for stricter enforcement of existing laws. "Any Jaw must be enforced to gain the desired effect the law is intended to have," said Jack Sanders. "We should encourage the police by cal· Jing and reporting what we see," added Dan Kuchars, who extended "kudos" to patrol officers whose active presence seems to deter some criminal activity. "I think police should be as active, if not more (active)," said Kuchars. Officer T.J. McNamara said, "It's good to hear someone else is as frustrated as we are." However, his description of some of the joy riders as "kids just out later than they should be" drew comments of "Wrong, wrong, wrong" from several audience members. And many of the resi­dents said they didn't understand why there aren't more arrests. "No more warnings," said one. "They've been warned. Now it is time to take action." Panel member Whitworth tried to relieve the fears of one man, who said he hoped that calls for beefed.up law enforce­ment wouldn't be used as an excuse to harass gays, blacks and Hispanics. "The bottles I have dodged and rocks thrown at me have not come from gays, Hispanics or blacks, but from white, middle·class punks," he said. Whitworth said, "We are attempting here to restrict conduct, not lifestyles." Some residents suggested bringing in mounted police and making "strip" traffic one·way on weekend nights, and many said they believe in the concept of making lower Westheimer a "pedestrian mall." Leslie Larson said a survey of business owners supported that idea. But Butch Day, representing Spud-U-Like, balked at the notion saying that would virtually put him out of business. Orzeck said, "I would like to make our neighborhood available to us as re~ident.; to be able to walk outside of our house" (without fear) at any time for whatever reason." o Correction Last week's MONTROSE VOICE, in the story entitled "A Lasting Entity: Houston Gay Bars," it was mentioned that The Exile, a Houston bar, was no longer open. The Exile, located at 1011 Bell, is indeed open. According to Doug Bone, owner, it has been in the same location for 31 years making it the oldest gay bar in Texas. The MONTROSE VOICE regrets this error. We are bound to have something you can't do without. First Annual Labor Day Sale Up to 25% off on some items Straw Hats Short Sleeve Shirts Sunglasses Selected T-shirts not all sizes available It's not too early to start Christmas Shopping Novelty gifts in stock now. In the Brazos River Bottom Club where the cowboy is home. Speclala Good Friday (8/ 30) thru Monday (9/2/85) STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AfDS KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON. FRI. 9-5 PM MON .• WED. FRI. EVENINGS AND SATIJRDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT 2801 ELIA BLVD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX 77008 (713) 868-4535 !S!: ~ = 4 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 30, 1985 Montrose Mouth Heaven in Montrose By L'Aneelo Misterioso, Esq., M.B.E. As we approach Labor Day weekend, the Mouth salutes everyone who works­regardless of where or how you work. The big news this weekend. of course. is the Preview Grand Opening of Heaven. It's truly an amazing place I'm sure there will be many a match made in Heaven Here's a rundown of who will be serving inside the pearly gates. Bartenders include three Davids. Russ. Cliff. Jim. Donny and Chuck. Deejays are Eric. Mike and Joe Doorkeepers are Ron and Tommy. Phil and Keith will handle lights And, Bill will serve as barback. Heading up the crew will be Charles Armstrong This weekend Heaven wt/I present a dou­ble T-dance Sunday and Monday. There will be searchlights scanning the sky and both dances will include free draft beer. -o- The Tower Theater at 8pm will be the scene tomorrow night for The Miss Gay Texas Pageant. -o- Full Moon Madness will be going on at Muy'a tonight on the patio. In coniunction with a Laborer Party. Happy Hour prices last all night Monday will be customer appreciation day with beer bust starting at 2pm on the patio. Stick around because there will be periodic specials and buns and -o- The Venture-N's Ram-Beaux Party last Sun­day was an exploding success. Whacko City at its finest -o- Llef and Ken are now broke from keeping Mane 1n Park Plaza. Oh well, what can the sisters do -o- AI JR.'• next Tuesday there will be the finals of the 1ockey shorts contest. The winner will be receive a three-day, two­night trip to Vegas -o- The Mining Company will have a beer bust and $1 .50 Cape Cods this Labor Day from 4pm til midnight. Stop in and see Randolf and Skip. Don't forget deeiays Jimmy, Mike and Brian. Definitely don't leave until you see that hot David Preston on the patio. Too bad he's married -o- The Houston Council of Clubs is publishing a cookbook. Artwork is needed for the cover. $100 cash prize or a special leather bound edition goes to the artist with the best concept. Entries are due at The Rip­cord by September 15 For further info. call 526-8054 -o- The Ripcord 1s not closing (who knows how these rumors get started). Further more, there will be surprise specials all weekend long for Labor Day. Don't forget to wish Tony Perry a happy birthday. It's coming up soon. -o- The Krewe of Hydra is planning a Hallo­ween Party. More info as we hear it -o- The 611 is fine-tuning its recent remodel­ing. The new parking lot is still under con­struction. Sundays there have become quite a happening with music by Mardi Coleman and 50¢ draft. As a matter of fact. their 50¢ draft special is here to stay-seven days a week -o- Swamp Puddy wants to know what Ball Lightening 1s? Chief Buttrock is behind it. -o- Lovely Alberta at Dirty Sally's celebrated Photos by Albf>rt Puente Parting Shots of Summer .. · . • and a happy and safe Labor Day her birthday Wednesday. She's the great cook on the patio. -o- You've-come-a-long-way-baby Dept. Alan Davidson has been elevated to the top spot at Rich's. Congrats are in order -o- John Mott, Alan and Rocky of Rich's fame were all spotted in a free-for-all at Beaches last Monday nights. Any clues as to who won? - o- At Beaches. the ever-talented Cha Cha is now serving on the day shift. Drop in and see him. -o- Beaches South Pacific Party will be held on Labor Day starting at noon and running tii midnight. That's 12 hours of fun, food. and entertainment by the South Pacific Dancers and the Texas Gentlemen. Advance tickets are $10. $15 at the door. (You can phone in your order with a major credit card.) - o- New to Beaches 1s the Thursday movie · nights. There will be lots of rarely shown films The Magic Chflsttan, starring Petter Sellers and Ringo Starr, will be screened this coming Thursday Joining them will be Raquel Welch, Christopher Lee and many others. including a famous macho star in drag You've got to see ti to believe 111 Start­ing time Is 8pm. ~o- A special welcome to Larry Bradley, new barback at Beaches. - o- Lee Borba 1s now al Merldlen Leasing to further serve your car leasing needs. Need new wheels, go see Lee. ~~ ()-<¢~~~~ I" NOW FEATURING RECORDING STAR KIMYVEn'E with her hit 'Hot Man' 9PM-1AM OPIN POR LUNCH from I lam Happy Hour 4-7 Mon-Fn 608 W§THE1MER Plans Being Made for Town Meeting II A group of Houston gay people are seeking input for Town Meeting II. The objective of Town Meeting II is to address problems of the gay community and discuss possible solutions. The meet­ing is tentatively scheduled for Sept. 29 from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. A location has yet to be selected. Those wishing to contribute to the agenda of Town Meeting II are asked to write: Proposed Topics for Town Meeting II, P.O. Box 66083, Houston, Texas 77266- 6083. Organizers request that suggestions for topics be limited to 250 words and received by midnight, Sept. 14, 1985. Shake the habit. '.mS.. Salt. It's responsible for a lot more than seasoning your food. It can also contribute to high blood pressure. a risk factor for stroke and heart attack. It's a habit you can't afford not to shake. ~ American Heart Association WfRI: FIGHTil\G Frn 'iO.JRLIFE The Spartan A hrisk·movmg novel of gay male love, valor, and Olympic hopes - set in dassical Greece, in an era when love between men was an allepted and valued part of life. Pk•;1sc scnJ mt• __ rnpics of The .'\/><1rt<1n at $7.00 c;Kh postpaiJ. EndoscJ is $ __ name--------- aJJrc tllV --------- ~ttlll' - Zip Don Ht1rri.'llm ALYSON Publica tion~. Dept. P-5, ------------'PO Box 2/lll, Bmton, ll.1A 02208 AUGUST 30, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 The MAIN EVENT for LABOR DAY SEPT. 2 12 Noon - Midnight -----~-..... ~· Featunng O.J.s L•rry Thompson & Doug Summers SOU'l'II PACil(IC PAll'l'Y i12 N-oo- n--=- 3 pm: ooa, Swimming & Dancing 3 pm - 6 pm: THE PACIFIC fS[AND DANCERS (Hula, Tahitian and Fire Dancers) pm - 8 pm: Rock, Disco & Slow Dancing (Inside) New Videos and the best of G.W.'s summer slides on screen .-:--------- 8 pm - Till: ERNESTINE'S SOUTH SEA REVUE Maude and Ernestine Duet FREE Draft Beer, $1.00 Bloody Marys and Mimosas - ALL DAY SURPRISES! To charge tickets by phone on VISA, MC & AM. EX_ call: I \ BEACHES at 524-6969 Advance tickets $10.00, at the door $15.00 ~ Ykv""=" --- teets ava BEACHES .--~~~~-~--~--~ FITNESS EXCHANGE HOUSTON GUEST HOUSE Available for PRIVATE PARTIES "\ j 1 ...... 6 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 30, 1985 Politics Seen as Key to the 21.06 Decision Goldberg wrote in his opinion that the Doe decision "does not control our considera­tion of a state provision addressing 'pri­vate consensual sexual behavior among adults."' The court held, also, that 21.Cl6 should stand as constitutional "in view of the strong objection to homosexual conduct which has prevailed in western culture for the past seven centuries." NO LONGER LAW ABIDING CITI­ZENS. "Gay men and lesbians have virtu­ally no rights in the privacy of their homes," is the interpretation Sue Lovell, president of the GPC, gives of the rein­Rtatement of 2Ul6. "The state has said it can legislate morality. We are criminals again. We are no longer law-abiding citi­zens." If proRecuted under the sodomy law, it is considered a ClaHs C misdemeanor and carries a fine of $200. Harris County Dis­trict Attorney John Holmes says he does not think there will be an increase in prosecutions under the law. He says even if the law is constitutional, his office will not prosecute many cai;es. As a practical matter, most of the cases that are prose­cuted are tho11e in which the participants engaged in the act in a public place, he ~ays. He adds, acts which occur between consenting adults. behind cloRed doors, are practically impo•sible to prove in court. Coleman, an attorney, disagrees with Holmes on the question of prosecution of 21.()6 offenders. "Ifit', reinRtated of course they will (prosecute). U.S. Attorney Gen­eral Edwin Meese is on record to abolish the exclusionary rule. This will allow the police to enter one's home at any time. Dr. Steven Hotze, the head of the opposi· tion to Houston's January anti­di11erirnination referendum, hailed the decision and expressed hope that the deci­sion would return homosexual activity "to a cnminal category where it rightfully belongs." However. City Councilman John Goodner, who also vocally oppo1:1ed the anti-discrimination ordinance, wai; sur­prisingly less excited about the ruling. Goodner ;;ays he doe.• not expect any police hara1111ment of gays or gay esblish· menta. He added that he hopes that those who wi~h to persecute gays do not use the law as a weapon. A Dallas group, Doctors Against AIDS, joined Danny Hill in his push for appeal partly to combat the AIDS crisis. Michael Wil11on, president of the KS/ AIDS Founda­tion of Houston, debates their claim on the ba. is that "sodomy does not spread AIDS." Wilson said. "The two issues are not related. RegardleRs of sexual orienta­tion, AIDS is a health iRsue, not a political one." CHANGES IN GOVERNMENT POL­ICY. Mayor Kathy Whitmire would not comment on the effect of the ruling on the city until it has been further studied. Officer Al Baker of the Houston Police Department said a task force is currently studying police recruitment and promo­tion policy and is expected to make a report in two weeks. Whether the ruling will affect the policy is not known. HPD currently maintains an anti­discriminatory hiring and promotion pol­icy. However, this may change with homosexuality being criminal. Sidney Braquet, administrative assist­ant to State Senator Craig Wasliington says that the appellate court action would probably not affect Washington's attempt to push a gay rights bill through the State Senate. "There's all that more reason for it to be considered. He (Washington) has not given up hope and ususallydoesn'tgive up easily," said Braquet. Washington's bill was left in committee at the end of the last legislative session. Baker, who filed the original suit in 1979, and his attorneys, headed by James Barber of Dallas, announced on Tuesday they would appeal the latest ruling to the Supreme Court. The earliest the law will be reinstated is September 17, 1985, the date of the official order. THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE! You're Reading It The Montrose Voice HOSPITAL INSURANCE MAJOR MEDICAL Ages 19-34-$45.30 35-49- 50.84 50-64- 70.01 Monthly Bank Draft Insurance Office 523-9822 Group Rates lnd lvldual Issue r.o:; OFFP ARlSlN!5' CA'e'?SR10o;Q"1>Xft' ------------ ~ e A/C.REPAIR ~I ,.,. e VW SPECIALISTS ~, I~ ALSO & FOREIGN CARSa: ~ OPEN • OVER 10 YEARS ~f ' In SAT EXPERIENCE c > . e ENGINE ...1f lz CARS OVERHAULS 0 C>J'RUCKS e ELECTRICAL ZI Ir WORK C :icvctES ~I llil ~, c; TEXAS STATE ~ ,~INSPECTION ST ATIO .,.: 1: 238 WEST GRAY ~ I~ 528-2886 Iz~ · BOAPMEN ·5 :30PM I~ . TWO LANES I~ . FAST SERVICE O e AUTO REPAIRS I~ · Ml FFlERS . TIRES <I 0 ~ -e)f!lOOte O!f. ~R!,! ~D.,1.A~'!.J.00~0;.tl VIDEOTREND 1407 Callfornla-527-0656 Mon. Sat 10am-9pm Sun 12-7pm VIDEO TAPES/VCR RENTALS & SALES All type movies (Children thru Adult) Including war documentaries and foreign films NO MEMBERSHIP FEE NO DEPOSIT FOR MEMBERS Fight Against 21.06: A Chronology 1979: Donald F. Baker, a Dallas County schoolteacher, files a class action suit drops appeal. Hill decides to file appeal against Dallas County District Attorney himself. Henry Wade to have Texas' sodomy law September 1984: Three judge panel of (Texas Penal Code 21.06) ruled unconstitu- the Court decides Hill's intervention was tional. Baker believed the law threatened improper. his job. January 28, 1985: Court reverses itself June 15, 1981: Trial opens in Dallas. and allows Danny Hill to file appeal. Arguments are heard in two days. June 1985: Arguments heard in New August 17, 1982: Judge Jerry Buch- Orleans. meyer, Northern District, Dallas Federal August 26, 1985: By a 9-7 ruling, the 5th Court of Texas rules 21.06 unconstitu- U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals reverses tional. Buchmeyer's ruling, thus upholding the November 1, 1982: Attorney General law which makes homosexual activity ille­Mark White files an appeal of Buchmey- gal in Texas. er's ruling to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of . August 27, 1985: Donald Baker and Appeals in New Orleans on behalf of Attorney James Barber announce Danny Hill, Potter County District Attar- plans to appeal decision to the United ney. Later, Attorney General Jim Mattox States Supreme Court. '9:noberts . ~~!) Chiropractic · Clinic 1305 Waugh Dr. Houston. TX 77019 INCLUDES EXAM. CONSULTATION & X-RAYS Between Allen Parkway & West Gray on Waugh Dr By Appointment (713) 521-2003 • Back Pain • Neck Pain • Shoulder/ Arm Pain • Headaches • Hip/Leg Pain e All Types of Insurance Accepted Free Lance Journalists Houston's largest alternative publication, the ~ont­rose Voice, has positions available for free lance Jour­nalists to cover news items of interest to our readers. Important: We are seeking joumal~sts-not C?m:r!lenta­tors. We need writers of factual stones-not ed1tonals or reviews. We need in-depth investigative articles and major news features and interviews. We serve, in combination, Houston's large and influen­tial gay community and the general Montrose population. Submit samples of your work-and ideas you have for stories-to Linda Wyche, Montrose Voice editor, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006. AUGUST 30, 1985 ' MONTROSE VOICE 7 International Printing Specialists #/ ~ need r#n/c. <fn [!/Jaf'U!/i ' w-e can [!/Ju/n{ it/ Our Services Include: * Design & Layout * Business Stationery * Business Cards * Flyers, Brochures * Price Lists * Menus * Office Forms including: * Blank Paper Stock: Continuous Forms, Invoices, Copy paper, letter & legal size Purchase Orders, Mailing * Large Mailing Envelopes Labels, Tabs, Interoffice Forms. * Delivery * Wedding Invitations, Social Announcements & Brides Boutique Please consider us for your printing needs - Call 861-0026 so our Sales Staff can asist you with your next printing order. 2103 Yale • Houston, Texas 77008 • Telephone: (713) 861-0026 BAYOU IANDING 534 WESTHEIMER 8 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 30, 1985 Sports Voice Challengers Beat the 'Old Guard' in Tennis By Rich Corder Special to the Montroae Voice Great tennis weather is finding lots of movement going on in the Houston Tennis Club Challenge ladders. Last Sunday, "the eRtablishment" really took a licking a" only David "Boom-Boom" Heiland was able to survive a challenge in defense of his fifth place B Ladder ranking. Heiland defeated Thomas Cortez~. 6-2. Eight other matches, including one dou· hies cha1lenge, all found the challengers ccming out on top over "the old guys." Newcomer Steve Bearden got on the ladders by a .;core of 1-6, 6-3, 7-0 over C Ladder seccnd place holder Steve Bryant. Bearden was later defeated by another newcomer, Gabe Herpin ~. 3-6, 7-0. The win moved Herpin into the number two position. The other newcomer making the ladders for the first time was Sebastian Veles whose 6-4, 6-1 victory over Lou "007'' Garza placed him in third place on the B Ladder. Other winners were Ron Bell taking over number four on the Top Ten by the score of 6-1, 6-3 over Rich Corder. HTC President Donny Kelley surpriHed Top Ten number two Rick Hadnot, 6-0, 6-3. J.C. Barrera welcomed number six Rick Dupont back from the Greek Isles by thumping him 6-4, ~- Tim Syer~ moved closer to his old rank· ing by besting newcomer Oi;car Martinez out of the number one B Ladder rank he won only last week. Syers won by a score of~. 6-2. In doubles action, the old number one team of Kelley and Corder moved up a notch by beating Anni Alabanza and Tho­mas Cortez in straight sets, 6-3, 6-3. Complete listings are in SportsVoice Standings. o Tennis Singles Deadline The "draw party" and deadline for the 1985 Houston Tennis Club Singles Cham­pionships is September 6. Tournament play begins September 15. HTC member· ship for the remainder of 1985 is $9 and includes a free T-shirt. For more information call Donny Kelley at 789-2110. Bacchus Beats Barn, Again For the second time in as many weeks, Bacchus I defeated the Barn in MSA Bil­liard League action on Wednesday night at the Barn. The 9-6 win means Bacchus I remains atop the pool league standings and the Barn retains its hold on seccnd place. Prior to this past week's action, The Ranch Hands took the third place by edg­ing JR. 's by one game in their position round. Lipstick won fifth place in a lop­sided victory over 611 III. Sports Voice Calendar & Standings Regular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nts Center Houston Tennrs Club 9am-Noon, Homer Ford Tennrs Center Women's Bowhng League 5pm, Stadium Bowl W W.B Bowling League 7 30pm. Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: Frontrunners, Goll Center, Her­mann Park MSA Men's Bowling 9pm, Stadium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Tennrs Center MSA .. Fun Volleyball League." 7pm WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7·30pm Homer Ford Tennis Center MSA Pool League, 8pm, in sponsors' clubS THURSDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennrs Center MSA Mixed Bowling League 9pm, Sta­dium Bowl Special Events Aug. 27·Sept 1 Series 9, Men's Softball Gay World Series. Milwaukee, Aug 27-Sept 1 with Briar Patch team representing Houston Aug. 29-Sept. 1 1st Annual Gay Women's Softball World Series Aug 29-Sept 1, Mil­waukee, with Just Manon & Lynn's team representing Houston Aug. 31·Sept. 2 Houston Tennis Club partocopates Los Angles tournament Aug 31-Sept. 4 Houston Outdoor Group scuba diving on Cozumel, Mexico Sept. 14 Garage sale to benefit Houston Tennrs Club Sept. 15,22,29 Houston Tennis Club Singles Championship Tournament Oct 12·13. Annual Texas-OU Tennis Clas­sic, Dallas Oct. · Texas-OU Football Weekend. Dallas Nov 9-11 Houston Tennis Assn "Hou-Tex V" June 1986 Oak Lawn Tennis Assoc hosts Texas Cup Challenpe. Dallas. competing woth Houston Tennis Club Summer 1986 United States Olympic Fcsto· vat Houston MSA Pool League Standings. Summer League FOLLOWING WEEK 15 TEAM ThlS Week. Matches so far, Total games 1 Bacchus I 8-7 13-2 14~76 2 The Barn 7-6 12-3 158-67 3 Ranch Hands 8-7 11-4 124-101 4JAs 7-8 10-5 141-64 5 LopsUCk 11-4 10-5 137·88 6611111 4-11 10-5 120-105 7 Street Cats !HI 10-5 11~106 8 BICChus II 8-7 ~6 129-96 9 Kindred Spirits I &-9 !Hi 120-105 10 EIJ'a 7-ll 8-7 109-116 11 BAB CowbOys 7-8 8-7 ~126 12 Kindred Spirits II 8-7 7-8 106-117 13 Sally's Shooters !HI &-9 94-131 14 The611 12-3 5-10 111·114 15Too611 &-9 4-11 115-110 16 Aancheroos 3-12 3-12 87·138 17 Yard Dogs 8-7 3-12 86-139 18 Ars Pals 7-8 3-12 83-142 19 Hooters .,.. 2· 12 67-143 Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Aug 25 DOUBLES LADDER 1 Aon Ball & J C Barrera 2 Donny Kelley & Roch Corder 3 Armo Alabanza & Thomas Cortez 4 Boll Santaoto & Sieve Bearden 5 Paul Brown & Billy Green 6 Sieve Chaney & Rock Martinez 7 Tim Syers & Ronnie Mauss 8 Oavod Heoland & Marty TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jorn Kotch 2 Donny Kelley 3 Rock Hadnot 6 Rich Corder 7 JC Barrera 4 Randall Dickerson 5 Aon Ball 8 Rock Dupont 9 Shy W1lhe 10 Armo Albanza 1 Tom Syers 2 Oscar Martinez 3 Richard Pregeanl 4 Sebastian Velez 5 Lou Garza 1 Joe L 2 Rock Knapp 3 Gabe Herpon 4 Steve Bearden 5 Steve Brya~I 1 Oscar Ysasso 2 Steve Chaney 3J V Klinger 4 A.ck Ma'1 tnez 5 M ke Holloway BLADDER 6 David Helland 7 Larry Jarvis 8 Ronnie Mauss 9 Rick Massey tO Thomas Cortez CLAOOEA 6 Roy Mendiola 7 John Murphy 8 Paul Brown 9 Billy Green 10 Daiw1d Hendrickson OLADDEA 6 Joe D 7 David Moskowi!Z 8 Howard Brown THINKING ABOUT BUYING A NEW CAR? 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Nemer, John J. Adams and Gordon A. Thayer 10 MONTROSE VOICE I A UGUST 30, 1985 FREE LUBE JOB By Appointment Only (Sept. 2-6) Hours: 8-5:30 Mon . ..frl. TUNE UPS 528-1901 Air Conditioning on a Lube Front End Work Brakes Transmissions 1901 TAFT ~WCITEJ THE PAINT THAT LASTS AND LASTS. Regular Price S 13.99 SALE PRICE s7 .99 Mtg Rebate _s2.00 Savings Per se 00 Gallon • James Bute Paint Company 4920 San Felipe at S. Post Oak Blvd. Houston, Texas Since 1867 Monday-Friday 7am-5pm - Saturday 9am-3pm 627-1120 Light Hardware & Home Improvements Commentary Journey to the Interior By Sharon McDonald Special to the Montrose Voice It was the remark about the Tiffany box that got me to thinking again about my life as an interior design critic. You didn't know? My dears, there's more to this Iii ole dykelette than meets the eye, believe me. Not that writing for gay newspapers isn't fabulously lucrative, but you know what they say; a freelance writer is a free­lance eater. But about the Tiffany box. Clark had just casually described some­thing as being "the color of a Tiffany box, when I jumped in with, "But what color is a Tiffany box?" Well! His arm jolted to a halt in mid-sweeping gesture, and his face flashfroze in stunned disbelief. "What do you mean, 'What color is a Tiffany box."' He couldn't believe I didn't know. I couldn't believe he couldn't believe. Shock matched shock. Now I know I may lose a segment of the gay male readership by saying this, but the time has.come for put­ting cards on the table: I don't know what color a Tiffany box is. I don't own a single piece of Lalique. I-I-alright, I'll say it: I've never been to the opera. Love me for myself or not at all. Even with these gross deficiencies, I've managed to eke out an existence. It's hum­ble, but with a certain nobility if! do say so myself. There are, of course, moments when the gaps in my upbringing come glaringly to light, like this Tiffany box question. But in this great country of ours, anyone can rise above modest beginnings. Look at me. I became an interior design critic. I found out that anyone could do it. You, too, can become a highly-paid, highly respected writer for interior design maga­zines. Some might say it's the perfect gay job, even more perfect than interior designing. The first time I got this kind of work I was petrified, sure that someone would find me out and expose me as a fraud. But I've since learned the tricks, so tp speak. of the trade. Now, although I enjoy a good mystique as well as the next guy, I'm the kind of generous person that also likes to share the wealth of my hard-won knowledge. So if you've ever dreamed of seeing your name in print in one of those magazines featuring $3 million summer homes, read on while l tell all. The first thing you've got to remember is never to be intimidated by anyone at any time. Your job is to intimidate. This will be There's Only One Community Newspaper for Montrose And You're Reading It Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily easier than you think. When you arrive at the house in ques­tion, you'll be shown through by eitherthe owner or the designer. Try to make it the designer. No, no, no, not for the cruising, silly! For all the gritty little details that he/ she knows and you don't. I mean, you can't very well go back and write, "There was room with a lot of blue and lots of cushions, some of them pink," even though that's the way it looks to you. You need to hear the guy who picked, plumped, and placed those pillows rave about them with specific repeatable adjec­tives. I was once standing in a doorway scrib­bling on my notepad, "big rocks in floor near front door," when the designer mur­merd in an offhand tone, "and of course, we.have the flagstone-paved entryway." "But of course," I murmured back, sound· ing a trifle bored, while my hands fur· iously scratched out my version and recorded his. Do all this and then you can cruise him, if you still want to. That reminds me of another invaluable tip: act bored. Never, never, never let on that you're impressed by anything. You see solid gold table legs every day. What, another Renior? How tedious. A popular misconception is that the per­son who writes interior design stories actually knows something about art, architecture, furniture, and interior design he or she is commenting on so offi­ciously. This misconception is a wonderful thing; it clears the field of many would-be contenders, leaving it to those of us who need the money. That brings me to a very important point. If you should by chance happen to drive a dented 1971 Toyota with no hub­caps, do whatever you have to do to make sure they don't see your car. The owner will think you're the gardener, or that you're there to case his house, either of which can be very embarrassing. Park around the block and hike up to the front door. They will never think to ask you where your car is, because they will never think of you as a human being. Hiding your car may be more difficult if you have to drive through private security gates to get up to the house. If you get trapped, lie. It will be obvious that you're lying. but they'll respect you for it. Do compliment the owner or designer. No matter how hideous the house is, this need not be difficult. If there's absolutely nt)thing you can see that you could compli­ment without choking, then try crediting them with an act of nature. One line that always works for me is, "I like the light in this room." You'll be amazed how many designers and homeowners feel person· ally responsible for this, and think you are just too clever for picking it up. Whenever you really get stuck, mention how the plants in the room "add vitality." And don't use the, "Ilikethelightin this room" line when you're touring the wine cellar. They're not fools. What to do about furniture you don •t know the name of? Act as if you know it, but it's just slipped your mind, silly you. Now ask a specific question about the piece, gesturing at it so there's no mistak­ing that piece you mean, and letyourvoice trail off as you make a show of having temporarily misplaced the word. "Was this another find from the Paris trip, this striking . . • uh ... " They'll be quick to jump in with, "Oh, the armoire!" When you're being chatty with the owner, chat only about their possessions'. Never mention that you've seen a similar piece (of art, furniture, architecture, wha­tever) anywhere before. You'd be surprised how many designers tell their clients they're getting a one-of-a-kind something or other. And don't think you can break this rule because you add that the other sideboard was "not nearly as distinctive" as theirs. Pride is a funny thing. Speaking of pride, I think that about wraps up this subject. Tie a bow around it, stick it in a Tiffany box, and call me and tell mf' what color it is, will you? KS/AIDS Foundation Joins Info Network The KS/ AIDS Foundation of Houston has become the only organization located out· side of California that is a member of CAIN, the Computerized AIDS Informs· tion Network. This computer data base will provide the foundation with a broad spectrum of AIDS information that enhan­ces the organization's ability to provide AIDS education. The data base's menu offers a number of categories that will be utilized by the foun· dation. The data base's "educational/ media information" category will provide the foundation with information about new· sletters and brochures, references of audio-visual resources, and a collection of current and archival news articles. Of real importance to the foundation is the data base's "research/ clinical data" category. The in-depth technical section includes epidemiological statistics, infor· mation related to medical and behavioral research studies, clinical and laboratory information about AIDS and AIDS related complex, and AIDS infection guidelines for health care workers. The "scientific/ medical resource" cate­gory will also enhance the foundation's educational programs by providing an on· line source of articles and abstracts from medical and social science journals. The data base will also tie Houston to other AIDS organizations by providing a facility for on-line conferencing between CAIN subscribers and others. This feature provides a form for interaction between researchers, as well as a means for net­working among groups and a mechanism for sharing ideas on issues of common con· cern and current interest. The cost of subscribing to CAIN and the computer services are being provided by a donor. Health Advocates to Host Party The Houston Gay Health Advocates will have their Annual September Pool Party a nd Meeting at Beaches, 2700 Albany, on September 7 from 4:00 to 8:00 p.m. Members and guests will receive a free drink and happy hour prices. Snacks will be served. Water volleyball and dressing rooms are available. The group encourages members of any health oriented profession to use this opportunity to become acquainted with Gay Health Advocates. For further infor· mation, call Steve Burton, 790-9448. President of Mothers Without Custody to Speak to NOW Cathy Knupp, the national president of Mothers Without Custody, will present a program about the prejudice,; ~nd miscon· ceptions faced by non-custodial mothers at the monthly meeting of the Houston Chapter of the National Organization or Women. The meeting will be held Tuesday, Sep· tember 12 beginning at 6 p.m., at the Houston A0rea Women's Center, 4 Chelsea. For more information, contact Houston Arf'a NOW at 522-6673. AUGUST 30. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 HAPPY LABOR DAY!!! STIFF DRINKS ICE COLD BEER HOT MEN NeW' Sound Live D.J. Great Music D.J. MARDI COLEMAN -ALWAYS- 50¢ DRAIT BEER NOW OPEN!! 13. Adams~ Ltd. LABOR DAY SPECIAL DRINK PRICES 611 Hyde Park 528-9079 . ~ - - - ------- .... I I I I I I I I s10°0 off I I I CUP THIS AD and attach it to I your next order for S 10.00 off ar"o/ of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing • Flyers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Envelopes • Amouncements • Invitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet Copy;ng • Invoices 1· ~-ri7~J SPEED'r PRINTING SEi:::rv ice 1 I ,... ;.,..i Fast. Rehable SeMCe. I I EXcellent Qua 1ty, Low Cost 5400 BEUAIRE I I BLVD. I I Convenient Sout~t l.oaltJOn _.~ ... or Owmry Rcc• .... ~ I I CALL 667-7417 I I PICK UP AND DELIVERY I 1 M~~~~~:r~~~r~M't:f 1 1 :~~~~:== 1 L-------------------.-..-1, NOW OPENI NEW LOCATIONI 4701 N. Main Houston 869-1706 I I I I I I I I gpanlsh C(JQowe1t : MEXICAN RESTAURANT Complimentary Nachos with purchase of dinner Good thru Sept. 30 A TASTE OF MEXICO, 24 HOURS DAILY CLOSED TUESDAY 10PM REOPEN WEDNESDAY 10AM ----------- 12 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 30. 1985 Part II Montrose Live Fall Entertainment Schedule By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Critic If you clipped out last week's column, you know that this is the continuation of a calendar of theater and concert offerings for the next four month~ . Next time (about the beginning of January), I will only try for three months. This town is too robust to capture a full four in ju"t one column. November: LEGIT 1-Dial M for Murder-Company Onstage 1-Stage Door-Actor~ Workshop 3--Gone To Texas-Chocolate Bayou at the Autrey Hou&e-lle,quicentenial salute based on letters, memoir' and songs from Texae in the 1880s. 8--0utu·ard Bound-Theater Southw· est 12-The Odd Couple-Pace at the Music Hall-Touring company of recent revival with all the sexes reversed. November: MUSICALS 21-Kiss Me, Kate!-The first time since 1959 the Alley has presented a musical with a plot to it. 28-The Fantastics-Stages 29-Faust-HGO-Gounod's opera in French with surtitles. !l<ovember: KIDS 9-The Golden Grotto-Main Street­The kids will enjoy the story of a prince who's a frog, whose in love with a princess who's not, the two being aided and abetted by a bumbling wizard, a Valkyrie and a pipe-smoking dragon. The adult, will enjoy the spoofing stabs it makes at opera. (I did this show once, as the wizard, m Denver) 9-The Wind in the Willou s-Coptpany On stage :-;ovember: DASCE 8-Paul Taylor Dance Company-SPA 14-Gisellc-Houston Ballet is the only company m the US. that has thi' Peter Wright production. 22-Delia Stewart Jazz Dance Company-at the Tower Jliovember: MUSIC 2-Alicia de Larrocha, pianist-HSO 4-James Galway flute-HSO 5-Liza Minelh-Pace at Jones 23-Pinchas Zuckerman, violin-HSO December: LEGIT 6-The A.D. Players' Christmas show. 6-A Christmas Carol-The Galuei;ton Grand Opera-What better setting herea bouts for Dickens? 12-12th Night-Main Street-The real 12 days of Christmas are the 12 after the Holy Day, culminating in the arrival of the Magi on January 7 Thankfully, this play will still be on. 13-Silent Night, Lonely Nigh/­Company Onstage 19-The Birds-Ensemble-Walter Kerr's translation of Aristophane,; · hilar· ious comedy. 19-Pamtmg Churches-Alley-Ms Church paints a portrait of her parents. December: MUSICALS 14-Amahl and thP Night Visitors­Pasadena 14-Anme-TUTS-with Jo Anne Wor· Icy as Miss Hannigan, Coco ab Sandy and Bill O'Rourke somewhere in the chorus. 21-The &st of Ri.;;ky Busine~s '85-a revue of the year's revueb. December: MUSIC 9-The Concert Chorale with guest con· doctor Thomas Dunn, the director of the Handel Haydn Society of Boston. Includes traditional Christmas carols and Haydn's "Kleine Orgel Messe," which must trans· late as the Little Organ Mass. 13-Christmas PopR-Sing along with the HSO Pops. Around this time my crystal balls begin to get hazy. Somebody ought to be opening a children's show around Chanukah and somebody else must be doing the Nut· Jo Anne Worley as Miss Hannigan in "Annie" Rita Moreno and Sally Struthers in a scene from Neil Simon's new t1ers1on of the "Odd Couple" Liza Minnell1 will open Houston's 1985·86 Broadway Star Series Kent John11on will perform the role of an AIDS uict1m in Jeff Hagedorn's "One" to be presented by The Group (Thea{er Work1hop) on September 19, 20_ and 21 at Channing Hall, Fir1t Unitarian Chi:rch, 5210 Fannin, 8:00 p.m .. This production will benefit the KS AIDS Foundation of Houston. For reseruat10ns call, 522-2204. cracker, but nobody mentioned eithl'r of them. o Notes Gideon Toeplitz, executive director of the HSO, has announced that Tom Fay has been promoted to orchestra manager. Fay is married to Paula Page, the HSO prin<"i· pal hnrpist. And Sergiu Comissiona announced that Toshiyuki Shimada has been promoted to conducting associate. We should be se<'ing a lot more of him . ... Robinne Comissiona will offer a four week workshop on dealing with perfor· macne stress. For more info and to pre­n•.,.; ster, call 527·4933. I>o we have time for this we<-k's birth· days? Celebrate w;th sculptor Emma Stevvins (Charlotte Cushman's lover) (the 1st), cooking connoisseur Craig Claiborne (the 4th), musical happenist John Cage (the 5th) and the novelist Rryher (Annie Winifred Ellerman), lover ofpoeteHs H.D. (Hilda Doolittle) (the 2ndl. o Late Theater Notes I think I mentioned this last week, but Goerge Anderson, the Alley's casting director, is going quietly nuts about it! Would any Latin American actors and actresses please send their photos and resumes to Casting, The Alley Thl'atl'r, 615 Texas Ave., Houston 77002. You don't have to be an Equity member. . . Dont't forget the Sixth Annual Houston Jazz Festival tonight and tomorrow at Miller Theater. Early warning; On September 19, 20 and 21, The Group will be presenting One. This play about a person with AIDS will be done as a benefit for the KSIAIDS Foundation. For, resr.rvntions, call 522· 2204. dramatika *Framing * Fine Art Posters * Broadway Posters * Cards of All Sorts * and of course ... FUN! 3224 Yoakum Call 528-5457 20% off all custom framing with this ad!! Hurry! Good through 8131185 3 Is A Charm!!! Drop In to See Us! l<l\JCOl<O 526-1719 LEATtn:n Q \' i ,)DY ~/ I COT~ ustom Room ~11 Fairview 1 526-2668 /§)ITT~ \@)XCJHrR'ffl'Se B. ADAMS L TO. 526-1902 NAUTILUS FOR MEN 6i WOMEN *COUNSELING *60 NAUTILUS MACHINES *SUPERVISION *SAFE UVA TANNING BEDS *WHIRLPOOLS *COMPUTERIZED BIKES *UNIVERSAL *DYNAMIC AEROBIC CLASSES *FREE WEIGHTS *WET & DRY SAUNAS *VERY CLEAN *AIR CONDITIONED * Last 3 Days 1/ 2 PRICE SALE* 2900 RICHMOND (.,.,. G1'Mnw1y Pim ) PHONE 524-9932 " . In the hea rt of The C ity" $44 00 · FRH AIRPORT SHllTTLE ·COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE & WINE • ·COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL BREA.KFAST (large single/double occupancy) •VALET SERVICE • Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Re•eNohon• '0Qu"ed p'eo•e coH A Toll Free 800·253-:.263 (Na•1onal) 800 521-4':>23 (Ca i ' ! GT4 14 1 5)- ~1' ·514' (San ~rU'11.1s~o1 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 I AUGUST 30. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 PARTY ALL WEEKEND ON PACIFIC , STREET \\ousro~ 808 PACIFIC SUNDAY: 521-2519 SPECTACUI.. .. AR s;l.TNDA Y 50¢ Scnhapps all day/all night 12 Noon-4pm-50¢ Bloody Marys, Screws and Cape Cods. 4pm-8pm-T -Dance ... NO COVER with all juice and well vodka drinks only $1.00 8pm-2am-The Party continues with the most handsome men in Houston. Video, Dancing, Cruising and all juice and well vodka drinks only $1.50. All night long ... NO COVER MONDAY: LABOR DAY MONDAY Special $1.50 Cape Cods All Day/All Night 11am-8pm-Happy Hour with Texas' best hamburgers 8pm-midnight-10¢ Draft and 50¢ Hot Dogs till midnight . .. Cruising, Video and Dancing Tt.JESDA Y: JOCKEY SI-IORT CONTEST "Summer Finals" Tonight Only, 10pm with Maude Grand Prize Winner Receives a · Weekend (3 Day/2 Night) Package to Las Vegas for 2 (hotel and air fare). Don't miss the summer climax. Park Once ... Party All Night 14 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 30, 1985 The Far Side by Gary Larson ••M~l.IN VERSAL PRE.SS SYNDICATE ~Betty, you fool! Don't tease that thing!" The kegger lasted well into the night, and on the following morning Dale thrust his foot into a nest of cranky, hung-over, stimulus-response scorpions. When neas go unchecked "Is it still there?" Tarzan contemplates another entry Fortunes Here's Your Labor Day Weekend Horoscope By Mark Orion For Friday. Aug 30. 1985. through Thursday. Sept. 5. 1985 ARIES - Advice from an outsider could be just what you need this Labor Day wee­kend. You're at en important juncture that may require that objective view which close friends or lovers may not be able to provide. A wise stranger may have something impor­tant to say. TAURUS-During this holiday weekend. you make others feel good. and that's some­thing that makes you feel even better in turn On end on it goes. Playing safe. What's good gets great. GEMINI-After the holiday, it will be time to do a bit of explaining and clearing up. Your home life is important to you. but the problem 1s that there's someone or some­thing else in your life that's also very impor­tant. Straddling the fence can be painful Which way now? CANCER- You're getting closer and closer to what you want. You can almost feel it. If you don't let your iuncredible ego get out of hand. it will soon be yours. Keep in touch with your soft and gentle side "Firm, but yielding" are the key words this Labor Day weekend LEOTh1s holiday weekend finds you indulging in some fantasy time. A Sagittar­ian or an Anes would be a perfect partner for your fun. You' ll need to take the init1at1ve on this one, be in charge and get a charge out of your make-believe. VIRGO-A bit more lightness and frivoltty before the summer officially ends, and wouldn't you have thought you'd be played out by now? There 1s that nagging sense of things that need to be done, but not until you've had all the fun you can find. Ain't nobody gonna stop you! LIBRA-Talk about it, and don't forget to do a lot of listening. You and your lover or other close person definitely have some things to work out, and with your commu­nicative powers at their peak, this is a good time to get it all out. Don't allow yourself to be shoved around! SCORPIO-Steady as you go for this last big Summer Holiday. There's a firm and strong quality about you that has quite an appeal to those who lack your sense of surety about things. Problems arise only when you feel like you've got to flaunt it. It's there for all to see and love. No need for heavy advert1s1ng SAGITTARIUS- Sagittanans like your· self love your privacy, but you may have to forego some of that this weekend You'll be with otehrs, like 1t or not. Ta~ing care of their needs. Joining in on their ac11v1ties. you could make some new contacts that will prove very Important Seek, don't hide CAPRICORN - Forget all your minor bat­tles of the past and partake of the last Summer Holiday Then, alter the weekend, you'll be in the pos11ton of making big deci· sions Once you do, you'll be able to get on beautifully with your life. AQUARIUS- Learning your ltmitations and working with them rather than ignoring them makes you both more sensible and more understanding of others. You'll be doing this during this Labor Day weeekend And your will be truly aware of the needs of your friends You're growing up, no matter how old you are. PISCES - Some good news and some more good news· You'll pass tracks with some new potential lovers this Labor Day weekend And you won't cross the tracks of one certain person you would rather forget about. So enioy tho last Summer Holiday­prior to a work-filled week that will follow ·- AUGUST 30, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 Feature A Lasting Entity: Houston Gay Bars An Interview with Larry Bagneris By Jerel Shaw Editor's Note: In this the final installment of a four-part series, we talked with Larry Bagnerjs, who has serued as uice presi­dent and president of the Gay Political Caucus and ia actiue with the National Gay Task Force, Texas Gay Rights Asso­ciation, and the Gay Hispanic Caucus. He is also inuolued in areas which call for coordination between the gay and non­gay communities. On the subject of "bars," his life, as with many gays, seems to be intrinsically affected by this institution. JS: The objeetive of this series is to enlighten people (gay a nd non-gay) about the effect of gay bars on the gay lifestyle. Larry Bagneris: They're unique. Reflecting on my own experience when I was trying to come out in New Orleans, it was emotional to say the least. I remember going to the door of a bar and feeling extremely nervous. I would have to go home and relieve myself because I was too embarrassed to use the men's facilities inside. I'm talking about 12 or 15 years ago. J S: Will you share with our readers more about your early "bar experience?" LB: I wasn't so much as embarrassed as frightened. You're told a lot of things about the gay lifestyle and you're wonder­ing about many things. I would term it a "closed society" (back then) because a lot of people were arrested in the bars in raids by the local police. There were vice squads­men there who apprehended someone if you as so much hugged another person. The:v termed this indecent behavior. So the bar represented a challenge to anyone coming out. Yet, the bar was, and is, a very special place to a gay person. It represented the only place where a person could meet. I mean eight to 15 years­ago it was the bar. It seems hard for people coming out now to realize that. I have a greater appreciation for the movement and community because I have expe­rienced and seen the transition and I per­sonally know the importance of bars. It also is a place where one can go and feel a little protected. It is a place where one can make the transition into the gay lifestyle. It is a place where much of our political energy is coordinated; and a place where one can be educated directly or indirectly on what gay life really is and about other related things that are hap­pening in the community. JS: Larry, it seems that some in th·e gen­eral society have and still do.perpetuate myths about the "bar scene?" LB: We've heard many lies and myths about the bar. You know, the massive orgies going on behind closed doors. There was a "hooray" from some when the raids were happening in Mary's at the tum of the decade. There was an unfounded rea· son to respond negatively when Mayor Whitmire went to the bars to thank the community. You remember, in the news­papers there were phrases (quoting anti­gay movement people like Geneva Kirk Brooks), "semen swept floors." I mean all of this based on ignorance. So there are many myths that still circulate, but we as gays know they're not true. The gay bar is no different from a flT~~~ You, Mon~~~~ , For Making Our First Year Such 1~ A Big Success! r 804 PACIFIC 523-0511 Served Saturday, Sunday and Monday tlll 3pm OUR FABULOUS SUNDAY BRUNCH Mimosa or Mother Lode Cooler Chilled Fruit Salad Grenadine Choice of One: Eggs Benedict, Eggs Sardu, Seafood Omelette ala Newburg, Eggs Ranchero, Steak and Eggs with Hash Brown Potatoes, Danish Pastry & Blueberry Muffins Coffee or Tea $5.95 LABOR DAY WEEKEND TEAS from 3pm to 7pm Marys, Screws, Cape Cods 50¢ · <£.. -~.-----~~ Mother Lode Welcomes HEAVE~wd~ ·,..;..·--.:...~-- ~- to the Neighborhood ,.J ~ r ~,_ :> Larry Bagneris with state Repre­sentative Debra Dan burg at Christmas party straig•.t bar in terms of prohibiting any­thing illegal to flourish. JS: So LarrY we have a young gay per­son, just reaching drinking age, and what you're saying is that the bar is an excellent avenue for self-realization? LB: I'm saying that any freedom requires responsibility. Freedom equals responsibility. I would never apologize for anyone at the legal drinking age for going into a bar. Also, we cannot compare a 19- year-old gay person coming out with that of a straight society which has numerous outlets. A gay person is not only seeking under­standing about his or her sexual identity but also of the gay community. In time, a person who comes to a bar will not only learn how to properly consume alcohnl, but also how to interact with his or her peers. Subsequently, there is a source of security and a network of friends estab­lished. Fortunately today there are other outlets, and once again the bar structure has supported us in establishing these outlets. JS: Would you explain? LB: Yes. There are many activities today (in Houston) that we as gay people can participate. The bar has been that source of information. You see, the bar today is not the only mainstay. We have other organizations like churches, clinics, and many other diverse organizations that a re a part of the gay lifestyle. "Gay Pride Week" demonstrates this. Also, 15 years ago the bars were owned and operated by the Mafia. And I say that because I know what I'm talking about. But today our people are running (owning) the bars, and because of this, they are in tune with the many changes taking pla_ce BALDING? New Medical Treatment* Prox1dil • , an advanced combination of Minoxidil with other Prescription Drugs 1s far superior to Minoxidil alone. Call today for a free consultation MPB CLINIC Suite 10. 5401 Dashwood 661-2321 in the community as well as its demands. JS: You mentioned Gay Pride Week? LB: It is fortunate that the bars have allowed us a 10-day celebration. I can't begin to tell you the type of generosity. They haven't just donated money, but liquor and personnel time. They've made sure that their representatives have comp­lied with decoration codes. They've entered floats. They have been very metic­ulous in their preparations. And as a standard, be.sides the GPW, the bars have helped to coordinate programs such as "Playsafe" and the AIDS effort. About eight years ago, when I first became active in the Houston gay com­munity, there was this problem of discrim­ination in some bars. Blacks, Hispanics, women and other minorities were being asked for several IDs. One bar, The Load­ing Dock, did not allow women to enter. After talking to the management, things changed. Marian Coleman has been very isntrumental in the concept of "Men and Women Together." Also. Black and White Men Together <BWMT) was responsible for bringing the ID matter in focus. Today that's unheard of. The gay com­munity believes in unification and we've shown this against the Klan march and by simply the image that we try to project. JS: Larry, there are people who say that the bars are a detriment to the neighbor­hood. LB: Now there are problems that are happening on Westheimet where we have runaway youths from the straight society. This problem did not come from U!. And we also have the traffic congestion of youths from the non-gay community. Onct> again, this is not our problem. JS: So Larry can we conclude by saying the bar b an entity that is and \\;II be an avenue for gays to enjoy, support and learn. And maybe where non·gays can learn something about the gay lifestyle? LB: Definitely They v.i ll be around forever. We've worked very hard to secure that space. As long as we continue to put ourselves behind the "eight ball" or on the defensive. we'll be pawns to what the gen· era! population says. While bars do not have a total grip of the approximately 250,000 gays in this city,it has and always will be a central point of focus. THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE! You're Reading It The Montrose Voice • 16 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 30, 1985 Films Struggle to Convey Message Films By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic The bulk of American moviegoers require a lot of action and very little rationale, rei;ulting in box office hits like Rambo and Back to the Future. One of this week's new films follows this pattern faithfully, while the other tries to use a little scientific rea­soning and ultimately becomes boring. Michael Cirnino's Year of the Dragon is a slam-bang action flick, but if you linger too long to try to think things out, you might get very confused. Its story (a pohce captain corning down on the ChineRe Mafia) i~n 'tan ethnic character study like The Godfather or some of the graphic Scarface. The underlying thoughts about race and prejudice are there, but they are greatly whitewa1<hed with fabulous action sequences and jolting murders. On the opposite side there 18 Warmng Sign, a film so enamored in explaining the dangers of gene-splicing that it becomes tedious and slow. To make matters wor,e, some of the important information con­cerning the effects of an incident are inex­cusably left ouL Somewhere there's an important point to be made about experimenting with genes and viruses, but when accident vic­tim, become crazed zombies. you know somebody is headed down the wrong track. o Year of the Drugon In the late 70's, director Michael Cimino wa;; hot property on the basis of a film that won an Oscar for him and scooped up four others including Best Picture. The tri­umph of The Deer Hunter wa11 oversha­dowed later by the diHastrous Heauen 's Sam Waterston and Kathleen Quinlan m "Warning Sign" Gate, a megabuck Western that bit the box office dust to the tune of millions and sunk the studio that produced it. The director with big visions of films that cost big bucks was soon Hollywood's spitoon. Fortunately, MGM gave him another chance and he wrapped up Year of the Dragon under budget and on time. Whether audiences will clamor to see it is something only time will tell. But one thing is for sure, Cimino has made a bril· liant spectacle that is sure to split audien· ces and critics alike. The story features a well-used cliche: unruly cop fighting against the unfair "system." Like in Serpico and Prince of the City, Stanley White is a cop who cares enough to fight against unbeatable crime and corruption. His new assignment is to break up the wild youth gangs that are terrorizing Chinatown and killing busi­neARrnen . Stanley (Mickey Rourke) decideR that he should also break up the Chine;;e Mafia while he's at it, and that's when all hell breaks looAe. He comes up against .Joey Tai, a young Mafia businessman who has an eye on taking over leadership of the association and may be a force behind the youth violence. Through a series of elabo­rate deals and killings, he does assume power and the responsibility of getting Stanley off their backs. Of course, Stanley's superiors don't believe that the Mafia is connected to the gangs, and insist that he leave well enough alone. Ignoring them, he begins busting up gambling, prostitution, and other vices which forces Joey Tai to resort to violence. The ChineRe Traid (Mafia) is Stanley White (Mickey Rourke) and Tracy Tzu (Ariane) in "Year of the Dragon" John Lone portrays Joey Tai m "Year of the Dragon" one of the world's oldest criminal orgam· zations, and it will not fall easily. Year of the Dragon is filled with explo· sive violence, but it is not as gruesome in the style of Scarface. The large-scale mas· sacre in the Chinese restaurant is so vibrantly overwhelming that we barely realize that people are being killed. Murders are effortlessly choreographed, and only one scene involving a beheac;!,ing seems unnecessary. With all of the excitement abounding on the screen, it's hard to realize that this crime thriller is still reaching for a mes· sage. Like in The Godfather, we see a group of people who resent being mixed into the American melting pot. They want to overcome their own prejudices and leave behind outdated ethnic ideas and customs. There are also the Americans like Stan· ley who resent foreigners and want to blast everyone from blacks to Chicanos to Vietnamese. Stanley's ex-Viet Nam vet mind sees the Chinese in the same cate· remaining normal people. The normals include Kathleen Quinlan as the head of security (unaffected because she is pregnant) and her sheriff husband played by Sam Waterston. Assisted by J ef· frey De Munn as the man who could possi· bly whip up a new antidote, the three end up innoculating the 80 or so zombies that are wandering around the lab. Whoops ... Sam almost forgot to give himself a shot there and almost became a zombie him· self. Sam should hit himself in the head for appearing in such silliness after his great performance (nominated for an Oscar) in The Killing Fields last year. As for the film, it's not really bad but just B-movie material with good actors trying to overcome. There are some tense moments, but everything drags out for an eternity. Easy to avoid and probably easy to miss (I hope it's still playing somewhere in town), the best advice for this film is to heed the title. gory as the Viet Cong-enemies to be dealt {.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ with and overcome. But then we find him falling for a Chi· nese newscaster who he uses and often abuses. The unlikelly romance doesn't make much sense, and to make things worse we have an inexperienced model (Ariane) playing an important role that requires much more experience than she has. As often is the case, the romance drags down the action and contributes lit· tie. Mickey Rourke is good as Stanley, but he's an unlikable guy to watch. Rough and rude, we have a hard time sympathizing with someone doing everything the hard way. The most watchable actor is the out· standing John Lone as Joey Tai. Last seen as the prehistoric man in Iceman, Lone is a China-doll faced villain who you just can't hate. His acting is Academy Award material and he will no doubt shine in future efforts. The magnificent sets for Chinatown were constructed in Dino De Laurenti&' new North Carolina studios, and they are colorfully authentic. Editing and special effects are superb, although the makeup and costumes a re often lacking. Cimino directs the whole thing like he did his pre­vious efforts, using a sparse screenplay that develops into a powerful and emo· tional visual experience. Year of the Dragon isn't for everyone, but if you like your films rough and hard then this will thrill you. It's got more to offer than Rambo as far as excitement, but if you're looking for a movie with "mean· ing" you'll have to wait until the fall dra· mas hit town soon. o Warning Sign COFFEE SHOP 1525 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON 529-2289 Customer Comment: "I absolutely adore the 'Oriental' veg. breakfast that you offered. The Mex. type omelet this morning was wonderful. too. You have the best breakfast quite possibly in Houston. My only complaint is the parking, because it's obvious everyone else thinks so, too. Oh- and I've never been served by a discourteous waiter, waitress here. They are great." GET BUTCH WITH A NEW HOT ITEM LUMBERJACK SPECIAL CONTINUED 2 eggs. 2 hotcakes, with bacon or sausage 11pm to 6am $295 REG. $4.24 With all of the scare about the AIDS virus, you would think that screenwriters could come up with a better "lab" movie than Warning Sign. Of course, we've already been warned of potential biohazards with films like Silkwood, Andromeda Strain and China Syndrome. But gene splicing and viral experimentation present dread· ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ful consequences that would tend to make ' a wonderful movie. Instead, in Warning Sign we get plenty of scientific mumbo-jumbo that is ulti· mately useless and boring. This gene· splicing facility (BioTec ASTonomics) is obviously doing more than genetic core experiementa in their labs. Not surpris· ingly, it's a biological weapon thatcaus~s soldiers to become crazed, turn on their own, and then die. How nice. Of course, someone "accidently" drops a vial of the stuff and infects the whole com· plex. The building is sealed off and eve· ryone is quarantined. The government sends in a clean.up crew, but when prob· lems occur they decide to just let the dis· ease run its course. The government always geta stuck being the bearer of bad news. Meanwhile, people are dropping over like flies and then coming back zombie­likl' af~r taking an anti-toxin In a humor· ous twist, it se!'m& that everyone becomes rnized zombies with or without the antibo· di~. Soon we have "Return of the Living Jk-.d" heaving axes (a lot of axes) al the few 1411 Taft 522-2190 * Cooling System check Iii flu sh $2795 * A/( :harge & Check $2695 * 011, Filler Iii Lube S24•s limo •o chec> vour c0011ng svs•em• ASK FOR CHIFF BUTIROCK 1411 T.A.F T-522-2190 • AUGUST 30, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 110USt OF MEAlS 833 ALGREGG 8 HOUSTON, TX 77008 8 869-3319 (1 Block N. of 14th Iii Studewood) Houston's Most Complete Meat Market 9am-6:30pm Mon.-Fri. 8am-6pm Saturday Ground Beef 10 LB. S99o Chopped Sirloin 5 LB. BOX S79s Tender S&D Liver 89¢ LB. Ribeye Steaks s3s9 LB. Fillets Whole Fryers 49¢ LB. Pork Ribs SMALL 10 LB. s139o 8 oz. s299 T-Bone Steaks $299 Ekrich Sausage $189 LB. Large Selection of All Types of Meats We provide fine meats for The BRB, The Barn, Tim's Coffee Shop, Chapultepec, E/Js, Spanish Flower Restaurant and the Boulevard Cafe. ~r·~•r-J ~ 1 WE ACCEPT MASTERCARD, VISA. AMERICAN EXPRESS • 18 MONTROSE VOICE AUGUST 30. 1985 The Montrose Voice If Montrose is part of your world too, you should be part of the Montrose Voice. TO SUBSCRIBE, OR TO ADVERTISE, CALL 529-8490 ··--'·-''-·-------"' ":_\_...,_ \ AUGUST 30. 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 Montrose Classified MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS s;;:;d8nvHouseboy, Kyle wou1d hope that you 1n particular read my drsplay ad and then call me- co-llec-t. --- Make new friends by volunteenng The GWM. :iii. 6 2· 185. brown hair. blue eyes moustache. versati•e Wants friendship, stable re1at1onsh1p 30-40 No smoking or drugs Reply Blind Box 251B. c 10 Voice ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose Voice, a general circulation newspaper having published continu­ously for 1 year or longer, 1s qualified to accept legal notices affecting the news­paper's c1rculat1on area· Montrose CARS & BIKES ASCOT LEASING 1303 Upland. 973-0070 (See our display ad this issue) DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APT$. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE W1llowwood in NW HOOsiOn. For leasi" 4-2-2 with wooden deck Roomma­tes/ pets welcome 681-3544 evenings 306 STRATFORD 1 BR APT. Adull only 1n smliil we11 n.n bu1ld- 1ng with pool. laundry & covered r.,~:'"~!·~=,·~~~· 9,~~~ ~~: from here only because they buy $315 plus HLP $200 Dep Call for Appl 523·6109 BURLINGTON APTS. ** August Special** with 6 mos. LEASE 112 3rd & 112 6th month RENT FREE! with 1 yr LEASE, 11th & 12th month RENT FREE! Sec Deposit $100"' 1 Bedroom $310"' 2 Bedroom $360'1f! Security Gates Montrose Downtown Area 3502 Burlington 523-0249 - - GARDEN OAKS HOU~ Stunning. remodeled two bedroom house $130.000. $3.000 down payment 10'Mi fl>ced interest Lease purchase availa-ble $750/month 524-57_3_0 _ _ --~Helght1. N-TowhouH 2/2'hl1 Vaulted cehng•, fireplace. fenced Great for roommate• Must see. $675 688-4757 - - - -Height• Blvd. HouH 2/1/1. dining room WtD hook ups $395 688-4757 ~ght1 Blvd.--~­Eft1c1ency garage apt Stove, rel , air $1 75 688-475.7:.. ___~ G8r8'ij8"apt 1 br near West Gray and Montrose $225/mO Call between 5 pm-9 pm. 524-4529 - GALLERIA AREi(INSIDE LOOP) 2-1 hardwoods throughout. skylights. large country kitchen, nice v1ewt $4S5tmo 4311 Bettis. 965-0589 Heights. 4-plex. 1 bedroom. appha;;ce.­$ 285 bills paid Garage apt . wood floors. appliances. nicely done $300 plus ges and electric 95&8671 H8oghtsg.;age ap_a_rt:m-_e_n,t. .'""c=-oz--y.-1a:--rg-e elhc1.ency Shade tr- $235 Leave mes­sage 862-7399 A~Ye~1de your bicycle f rom Rice to our quiet and friendly 76 unit adult c9mmun1ty One bedroom apartments 11(1th pool. covered parking. security and cable ready Near Museums and Medical Center. $325 bills paid · Ask about our move-tn special Located between B1s­sonnet and Richmond 1ust off Mandell Come see us 524-9787 ;:or-Lea,;.-Ne;-pooiSide 'iOwn~ w est u. 2-2•;,.2, WiD, fireplace. 523- 7104. owner/agent - - ROOMMATE WANTED __ _ Responsible G1 M to share 2 bedroom home Heights $250 plus ut1ht1es Jim H-862-5t23. W-941 -0790 ~ vOicE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent that house or apartment through a Montrose Voice Classified Call 52!}-8490. And charge 11 on your American Express. Diner's Club. Carte Blanche, '.AasterCard or Visa HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce It here then stand back tor tho crowd Call 529-8490 or visit the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard sale announcement EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Go Go Boys N.e,,"'8(l,\pply on person at 534 Westhe1mer HAIRDRESSER WANTED Established salon. chair lease and com­mission Plans. Great opportunity Antoine and Northwest Freeway area 688-4840 (MISC.) FOR SALE PRESENTING BLAIR PRODucn­C1ll 522-6365 FREE GIFT To introduce our large line of self- 1mprovement audio "subl1m1nal"' cassette tapes to new customers, we are ottering a free cassette tape (your choice) $18value free. Write for our free catalogidetails and select your free tape. Top1ca range from ~r::g~~v,~~ts~~~a10~~~1:~~::'e!rt~r~n1a~~ (dept M) POB 1002 Port Hueneme. Ca 93041 - - - FoR YARD SALES See ads under " Yard Sales" at the end of the Montrose ClasS1f1ed WORK IS HELL The 1ob itself 1s tedious The office poht1cs (whether you're closeted or not) is nerve wracking Don't take 11 home? If you can't leave 11 at the office. leave 1t on my table Massage by Bil O'Rourke (License #122) 869-2298 BODY MASSAGE Full body massage. Hot 011 1n or out Bruce 622--0370 - - HEALTH BODY MASSAGE Galleria David (713) 622-4530 E. T - CADILLAC OF MASSAGE "D of ET (713) 622-4530 PERSONALS CREDIT COUNSELING EXPERTS Good. bad. or no credit Specialmng in ~:~, ,~~~~?s2~~~;;;~~4 h'::ur:xpanino CHUBBY WANTS CHASER 6S~IOl8 DESPERATELY SEEKING 10S4LB Too shy to say hello before. Now I can't fond you Reply Blind Box 253-P Clo Voice Gay and Lesbian Sw•tchboard 52!}-3211 - - GWM. 32. 6', 155. blonde. blue. good Jooking. mascohne. secure. stable Inter­ested m meeting masculine. good look­ing. well built. stable outdoor types not Into bar scene Send letter W•th photo and phone. Discretion assured Box 253T Clo Voice. ~n1H8;rlans Adl•st Info $2.00 Ha" 59 West 10th. NYC 10011. BECOMING INCREASINGLY LONELY GWM. 27. Blond1blue. 155. 5'9" Seeks attractive. versatile, possible boyfriend. 24-35. Like music. movies. video. out­doors, workout Downtown Y. wrestling, body builders Bored with bar scene Rather find something better to do. Send pertinent info with picture. 1f possible, 10 Blind Box 251-L Clo Voice OUR POLICY on Sexually-Explicit Adver­tising The Montrose Voice does not believe that human beings engaging •n sexual acts with each other is immoral It is abnormal. in fact. for a person not to engage m sexual actMty Therefore, our readers are encouraged to advertise here to seek relationships, encounters. adven­tures, etc. All advertising must. ho°" ever. not contain language that would offend an unsuspecting reader G M. G F Runners and 1oggers wanted Front Runners 681-5679 A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? JOhn Preston and Frederick Brandt ca,, show you how to have active fun or play passive games w th the personal ads ln their new book. ·c1ass1f1ed Affairs " they'll tell you how to write an ad that really stands out. what to expect when you place or respond to an ad. and even what all those funny little abbreviations mean Send $8to ··c1ass1f•edAfla•rs " Aly­son Pub . Dept P-5. 40 Plympton. St • Boston. MA 02118. (Also included w•ll be a coupon tor $5 off on your next Personals 1n your choice of 25 gay publications including the Montrose Voice ) PLAY SAFE Safe sex •s hot. erotic Play safe, for your sake, for your partner's sake YARD & GARAGE SALES HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce it here then stand back for the crowd Call 52!}-8490 orv1s1t the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard sale aP1nouncement PA 0 AOVCRT EMENT Student/Houseboy Despite great effort and very sincere intentions, I have not yet found the one or two 18-20 year old (no older, no younger, please; birth certificate required) males(s) whom I am seeking. I do, however. remain determined to find just the right person(s). And, so, I continue my search. This is what I will do for you if you prove to be the right person(s): 1. Subsidize your education at a four-year college or arts school in the New York City metropolitan area. 2. Pay for your trip to New York. 3. Fully care for all your financial needs (cloth ing. food, travel, books, sports, recreation, cultural, educational, hospital and medical insurance, dental needs, etc). 4. Give you the security of a stable home. 5. Give you the security of a long-term, protective relationship. 6. Expose you to the good life of New York City (either theatre, ballet, opera, sporting events, dining out at better restaurants, etc., a least once weekly). 7. Offer you my maturity and sophistication. 8. Guide you in your studies and development. 9 Offer you my avuncular (l ike an uncle) love. 10 Train you to enjoy serving and fulfilling the sexual needs of a mature man. This is what I require of the right person(s): 1. Be between 18-20 years of age. 2. Appear 2-3 years younger than your chronologic age. 3. Be happy that you are gay. 4. Appear very boyish; not effeminate. 5. Possess a strong urge to further your education without possessing the financial facility to obtain that education. (But. please, do not respond to this ad if you believe, that by so responding, you are selling your soul to the Devil in a last­ditch effort to obtain your education. Please only respond if you believe that you would truly enjoy the particular type of gay lifestyle which I offer, as well as desiring having your education subsidized). 6. Truly enjoy serving and fulfilling the sexual needs of a man older and more mature than yourself. 7. Truly enjoy playing light bondage "games" (You can be totally assured that you will never be physically hurt by me; but if you are not excitied/ thrilled by "games" of bondage, you will not be happy living with me and should, therefore, not respond) 8. Be prepared to be totally honest with me. 9. Have no involvement with or interest in the gay bar scene, drugs, alcohol, or cigarettes, or be ready to totally abstain from these activities. 10. Be intellectually bright and/or artistically talented. 11 Be prepared to work quite hard to maintain a 3.0 or higher college average or the arts school equivalent. 12. Be prepared to work quite hard to maintain my 10-room penthouse apartment in Westchester County, 10 miles north of New York City. 13. Be prepared to work quite hard to satisfy my sexual desires and needs. 14. Have a strong need to be loved and cared for by a surrogate "uncle." 15. Be as determined to maintain a long-term (at least throughout the 4 years of your undergraduate education) commitment to me as I am determined to commit myself to you. 16. Physically, be short (5'9" or, rreferably, less), and (even more importantly) quite slender, 130 lbs. or, preferably, less. 17. Have wavy hair (or be willing to have your hair permed). 18. Be extremely boyishly, youthfully handsome. Son, I know how much I, sincerely wis.h to help you if you are one of the right persons. I am not engaging in idle play exercise by placing this ad. I do, very much, want to care for, love, and help you, while, at the same time. playing my "games." Son, I know how much I want my relationship with the right person to work very well. Please respond to me if you are the right person (and only if you are the right person.) I possess the financial, intellectual, and emotional facil it ies to, significantly and beneficially help you and to serve your present and future needs. I ask, in return, that you possess the willingness and determination to fulfill my needs and to make me happy living with you. Kindly call me collect, 914-428-3991 (New York Eastern Daylight Time) weekdays 7AM-8AM and 7:30PM-9:30PM or weekends 9AM-9PM. If no answer or the line is busy, call again. If you, the reader of this ad, do not fit my particuiar age or physical requirements, but happen to know the right person (who might not have seen this ad). please do him and me a great favor by showing him this ad. IT IS A TIME' FOR SELF - ASSES5MENf - A TIME TO ASK Ml<SElf SOME VER<-{ DIFFICULT QUESTIONS LIKE, I~ \\ 11Mt FOR n\AT UTILE TOlCH 0:- GRE({ AROUND lf{t. TEMPl.fS ~ 20 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 30, 1985 Good books aren't always expensive! listed in this ad Just $15 gets any three books A1Iirmmg, C&:/Jntmgand ~izirrg Gq..Wl.dian~ THE TWO Of US, by Larry J. Uhng, S7 00 A pracucal hand­book about how to make a gay or Je,b1an relat1on~h1p work, wtth •pec1al empha•1s on the relig10us aspects of gay unions THE ADVOCATE GUIDE TO GAY HEALTH, by R.D. Fen­wick, wtth Nathan Fam, S7.00 AIDS bn't the only health hazard facing gay people; here is infor­mauoo on many other aspects of staying healthy that arc too often overlooked. ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, SS.00. The story of a teenage love affair that should have been '1mple - but wasn't THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE, by Hemz Heger, SS 00. The true, grippmg, hfe­and- death story of a man thrown mto the Nazi conceotra­uon camps for bcmg gay - a nearly forgotten piece of our history COMING OUT RIGHT, by Wes Muchmore and Wilham Hanson S6 00. Practtcal advice on many a'pects of life for gay men - &om what to expt.-ct the first time you cater a gay bar, to the essen­tial infonruiuoo you should know about msurance, livlDg-together anangcmcots, and health. Values to $28.00! DEATH TRICK, by Richard Stevenson, S6.00. Meet Don Strachey, a private eye ID the classic tradition but with one difference he's gay "Death Tnck is a sexy tale wntteo with uncommon wtt, grace and per­cepuon. As a writer of gay mys­tenes, Stevenson 1s nght up there at the top," says author Wallace Hamilton. STATES Of DESIRE, by Ed­mund White, SI0.00. An enter­taining look at gay culture and lifestyles throughout the U.S !Hardback.I A DIFFERENT LOVE, By Clay Larkin, SS.00. Billy and Hal meet and fall ID love in a small Mid­western town. But then they move to Sao Francisco, and soon have to face the problems of 1ealousy, mistrust, and temptation. DANNY, by Margaret Sturgis, S7.00. A high school teacher starts out the new year by challenging the admmistrauon over censor· ship issues - and end' up by faJJ. mg m love wtth his most talented student. LEGENDE, by Jeannme Allard, S6.00. Elaboratmg on a legend that IS still told in France, Jean­nine Allard has created a haunt· mg story of two women in the 19th century, who have to in­vent their own way to be in love. FRANNY: The queen of Prov· incetown, by John Preston, $4.00. A highly-acclaimed look at gay history and pnde, through the eyes of a wonderful character who has seen 1t all THE AGE TABOO, ed by Daniel Tsang, S6.0'.l. Essays exploring the controversial issue of man/boy love from many perspecttves KINDRED SPIRITS, edited by Jeffrey Elliot, S7 00. Twelve science ficuoo stones offer gay and lesbian characters m new contexts. IRIS, by Janine Veto, S7.00. The retelling of an ancient Greek myth of love, devouon and vengeance - this ume with a lesbian theme. THE HUSTLER J O HN HE NRY MA C KAY TllAN Sl. ATf.D •Y HUii.ii l 1. lfU U.D'f' THE HUSTLER, by John Henry Mackay, translated by Hubert Kennedy, S8.00. This early gay classic, first published in 1926, tells of Gunther, a l S-year-old youth who runs away from home to Berlm. There, he discovers hustling as his only viable means of support and his story provides a fascinating look at gay life in the BerllD of the '20s. THE PRINCE AND THE PRE· TENDER, by Vmcent Lardo, S6.00 A new novel of 1ntngue and romance, centering around the heir to the Russian throne - from the author of Chmu House ONE TEENAGER IN TEN, ed by Ann Heron, S4.00. Twenty· eight young people describe their coming-out experiences. GAY AND GRAY, by Raymond M Berger, S8 00. A fascinating portrayal of how six gay men have gotten the most out of getting older. LIFETIME GUARANTEE, by Alice Bloch, S7.00. The per· sonal and powerful chronicle of a young lesbian faced with her sister's impending death from cancer. THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Friedel, S7 00 Burton Raider's problems begm m high school when he falls m love . wtth his friend Roman. As he gets older, the problems in­crease - and so docs the humor of his situation. IN SUCH DARK PLACES, by Joseph Caldwell, S7.00 This widely acclaimed novel - wmner of the Rome Prize - tells about a gay photographer m New York, a boy he meets, and their mutual need for love, fatth and commit· ment. THE BU'ITERSCOTCH PRINCE, by Richard Hall, SS 00. When his best friend is mwdered, the only clue is one that the pohce would consider too kmky pursue - so Cordell decides to do it himself. CHINA HOUSE, by Vincent Lar­do, SS.00 A gay gothic that has everything: two handsome lovers, a mysterious house on a New England hill, and a father-son relationship that's closer than most. SWEET DREAMS and GOLDEN YEARS, by John Preston, SS 00 each. Who says heroes can't be gay! Not Alex Kane. Alex Kane has suffered too much from homophobia now his only goal 1s to wipe 1t out, by any means necessary. These are the first two books in the new series, "The Mission of Alex Kane." FIRESTORM, by Gerald Wening, S6.00. Two men fall in love ma rural m1dwestern town, only to have religious homophobia dramatically alter their lives . THE WANDERGROUND, by Sally Gearhart, S7 .00 Absorb­ing, imaginative stones of a future women's culture, created in harmony with the natural world ---------, TO ORDER I Enclosed is $15.00: pledse I 11end theM> three books: I (For fewer than 3 books, send full price listed plus $1 po'tage.J Vosu and Mast.•r<urd accepted, enclose ucc01111t no., l'.tJI. date, and <1!(11<1t11re. ndme --- ----- I I I I I I I I dddress --- -- I ___ I state_ zip I ALYSON I city __ PUBLICATIONS I Dept. P-5 I I 40 Plympton St. I I Boston, MA 02118 ---------~ A UGUST 30. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 On the Town /~ ACCOMMODATIONS (for Visitors to Houston) Hou1tr.in Guest k 1use· t06 AV("ldale- 523- 2218 WE ARE A MONTROSE VOICE REGULAR DISPLAY ADVERTISER Ea1i"19Cr9ltTnn 104 AvOndaie~ili GAY BARS B1cchU1 - 523 Lovett-523-3396 lesbian B;m771oP K'1t1c- 528-9-427 cou.nc.;tcry,__ _ B1iQUL;nd1ng- ~ Welthetmer - 52~7519 opening WE ARE A MONTROSE VOICE REGULAR DISPLAY ADVERTISER iiMchet-2700 A~ swim pool -- WE ARE A MONTROSE VOICE REGULAR DISPLAY ADVERTISER Brazos R1ve;BO"ttom- 2..00 Brazos-52~9192 country WE ARE A MONTROSE VOICE REGULAR DISPLAY ADVERTISER Heaven- Pac he at Grant - 621-9123 disco WE ARE A MONTROSE VOICE REGULAR DISPLAY ADVERTISER Hote- 108 Tuam- 52&__-:9 .•:.2:;S__ _ Hooter1- 22t2 Converse- 521 e2310 JR I .8()8 Pacl11c- .521 ·25,9 - :.;;_.;._ __ _ WE ARE A MONTROSE VOICE REGULAR DISPLAY ADVERTISER Mary·1 1022 Weatheimer- 528--8851 WE ARE A MONTROSE VOICE REGULAR DISPLAY ADVERTISER ~ontroH Mining Co- 805 Pac•fic-529-7488 WE ARE A MONTROSE VOICE REGULAR DISPLAY ADVERTISER Mother LOCI• Cale & Seloon «M Pl~ ~11 WE ARE A MONTROSE VOICE REGULAR DISPLAY ADVERTISER N...iJ..m. ben 2-300 W~5~6551--rn:; fien'd1zvou1 - t 100 WHtheimer- 523-2422 ""'"° ~-~- fiiei11- e11 Hyde Pork- 52&-9079 __ _ WE ARE A MONTROSE VOICE REGULAR DISPLAY ADVERTISER ~2063 W1r1 Rd- 827-1113 ~.N~Mi~ WE ARE A MONTROSE VOICE REGULAR DISPLAY ADVERTISER HCXJ CAN wt STOP ROD FROM MAKING COl'l£'0 ~ ME? TH£ L1'.il'>UIT WAC. THROWN WI OF WJRT ... .. AND I.MN lcUJ MAD( A~l> W>tE.c; Of HIM, HE. DIDN'T Ml\\[) A BIT - HE THCOOiT l'H(I{ WER£ BEMIFUL. PRIVATE GAY CLUBS 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Club Houston BociY'Cen"tre --2205 F1nn1n=~ 4998 WE ARE A MONTROSE VOICE REGULAR DISPLAY ADVERTISER French Ou1rter Theiter - 3201 Lou1111n1- 527· 0782 Mtdtowne Spa-3100 F1nn1n- 522-2379 P.OUUs~OS.he --s24-P1Gs VACATIONS VISITING SAN FRANCISC0o?­DOLOAES ST BED & BREAKFAST 41f>.861•5887 OR WAITE MARC 381 DOLORES ST . S F. FOR INFO For Ho~ston tra;elagents. !S~ Agents" in the Greater Montrose Bus>­ness Directory, next page - NEW ORLEANS GUEST HOuse- 1118 Ursuhnee, (504) 566-1177 See our display ad monthly In the Montrose Voice SAN FRANCISCO: LELAND HOTEL 1315 Polk. 1-11~253-5263 or (415) 441 - 5141. See our display ad monthly in lhe Montrose Voice ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular classi­fied rates of paying "by the word," you can purchase space here "by the inch " When buying by the inch. you can include special art. logos or fancy typestyles . REGULAR RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3" $49 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3" $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3" $39 Sun AUG AUG 30 31 SEPT SEPT SEPT SEPT SEPT 1 2 3 4 5 Criteria tor inclusion 1n 7·0ay C11end1r and Mont rote Reeourca 1. Event or group must apec1ficany pertain to neigtibomood of ~ontrOM or Houston'• gay c:omrnunity unieea me,or crty. stateor n•ttOf'lal hOhd•y or maior 1"11t10t11I QIY event 2 Strictly commerc 11l event1not1ncfuoed 3. Buslt\el.S. cav\C and soc•al groui:is and their events ire gener111y quahfled 4 Politiclt •ents wher9 onty one view of 1 sut>teet. cend1d1te or party ts d0min1nt not qu1hhed For 1dcM1onal tnrorm1tion or phOne numbers. k>ok tor the IPOf\IOnog organrz.1tton undef Resources • Typestyles 1nd1cate events' location: Eventa in Houston. Events of Local Interest Elsewhere. Events of Area Interest SELECTED EVEN TS THROUGH 7 DAYS • FRIDAY; 149th birthday of City of Houston, Aug. 30 • FRIDAY: "Breakthrough" lesbian-feminist program, KPFT, FM-90, 8:15-10:30am •FRIDAY: Montrose Country Cloggers meet 7pm, MCCR, 1919 Decatur llFRIOAY-SUNOAY: Conclusion of Serie& 9, Men's Softball GC7)' World Serl• . Miiwaukee, Aug 27·Sept. 1 llFRlOAY·SUNOAY: Concluslon of 1st Annual GC7)' Women's Softball World Serles Aug 29-Sepl. 1, Miiwaukee llFRtOAY-MONOAY: Notional Annual Convention of Chubb!• and Chasers, Seattle, MCl'(flower Hotel, Aug. 29-Sepl. 2 • SATURDAY: KS/ AIDS Foundation meeta 3400 Montrose, no. 501, llam •SUNDAY-WEDNESDAY: Houston Outdoor Group acuba diving in Cozumel, Mexico, Aug. 31-Sept. 4 llSUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays 9am-noon, MacGregor Park • SUNDAY: Frontrunnel'8 run from Memorial Park Tennis Center llSUNDAY: Women's bowling league plays, 3pm, Stadium Bowl • SUNDAY: W.W.B. Bowling League, 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanet1 • SUNDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett mMONOAY: labor 0C7)', Sept. 2 •MONDAY_ Frontrunners run from Golf Center Hermann Park •MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain SfUESDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center SfUESDAY: MSA "Fun Volleyball League" plays, 7pm SfUESDAY: Montrose Symphonic Band meeta Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm •WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center •WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Caucus meets 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm Sept. 4 •WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League competition •WET'. ;~SDAY: Overeatel'8 Anor._ mous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold llTHURSDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center • IN 1 WEEK· Houston Data ProfN.ionala meet.t 7:S()pm Sept. 10 • IN 1 WEEK: Neartown Business Alliance meeta 7pm Sept. 11 , Liberty Bank, 1001 Weetheimer • IN 1 WEEK: Avondale Auociation meet.I 7:30pm Sept.12. Christian Women'• Cen~r. 310 Pacific • IN 2 WEEKS Baytown Lambda meets 7 l'.lpm Sept 13 • IS 2 WEEKS. Garage oale to benefit HouslDn Tenn11 Club Sept. 14 91N 2 WEOO· T•m ffMdom Fel!!Yal, .,.Ide 01: 65." Ooltca. Sepl 14-22. wtth T•m FreedOm l'arode and "'Ceiebfallon •on lM l'arlt" Sepl. 22 • IN 2 WEEKS Houston North Profeuionala met'ta i;30pm, Sept. 14 • IN 2 WEEKS GPC'a 10th Anmveraar)' Dinner Sept. 14 • IN 2 WEEK~ Houaton Tennia Club ~ineleo Champ1oneh1p Tournament Sept. 15. 22. 29 • IN 2 WEEKS Cho1cee meeta lpm Sept 15. Mutn9on YWCA, 8615 Willia • IN 2 WEEKS Parent.I FLAG moeta 2pm, Sept. 15, ~byterian Cen~r. 41 011111lrrl11111I• • IN 3 WEEKS: KSlAIDS Foundation t:rainine weekend SepL 21 ·22 • IN 8 WEEKS Houaton Atta Gay & LeebUUl Engineen I: Scientiata meet 7pm Sepl.24 • IN 3 WEEKS Montroee c;,;c Club INMrl<lwnl m...u '/pm Sept. 24. 1413 W•theimer • IN 3 WEEKS Yom Kipper, Sepl. 25 • IN 3 WEEKS: Greaur Montr08<' Buaineu Guild meot. 7pm Sept. 2.5 Brennan'• Reataurant, 3300 Smith' • IN 5 WEEICS: Human Righll Ccmpolgn Fund annual awards. Waldotl Allotlo Holel. N-Yortc. Oct 9, honoring TV hoc! Phil Donohue. publisher Gl0tlo Slelnem I: lambda Lego Defense 1: Ecaicatlon Fund •IN 6 WEEKS T•C»OU Football Weekend, Oollca •IN 6 WEEKS Annual l•bion I: Goy Pride Conr.enc.. A. louderdole . flo_, Columbus Doy Weekend DINING OUT IN MONTROSE 00000000 STHURSDAY: "Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFT Radio, FM-90 STHURSDAY: Mixed Bowling League, 9pm, Stadium Bowl. 8200 Braesmain •JN 6 WEEKS Columbus Doy, Oct 1' •IN 6 WEEKS· Al&motion,Goy ond l eoblon Mormons notional c:onlefence. Son Diego, Oct 14-15 • IN 7 WEEKS Fall Westhwntr Colony Art Ft'tlUval ~ 19-20 10()1 Weetheimer ' RESTAURANTS Ali:'iiESTAURANTS LJSTED HERE­SERVE AS DISTRIBUTION POINTS FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE S.ba Yag1·1- 2807 Qr~~ Boulevard C11l1• ~ 521· 1015 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Looking for a CLEANING & JANITORIAL SERVICE? Look in the Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory in f't ''"Y ISSUf• of thf' Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE M ssourl Street Cate~ 11 1 7 M111otm-529--1264 M7-~-Tlier- 2405 S Shephen:t -$24~~1 O·er1en·s Oyster S.r -&08 Wntne1 me~ 010!> SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE P~ichmood at Kirby- 524-0075 Aii'Ph-1-:.:515 W Alablma - 5~8900 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Rastaii=-2102 K•~ ~v.-,...._3619 Washlngton--882·8773 Sj',ina.h FIC>'Net- 392' M11n-869-1 706 SpucW-Like-~m.r::5"20-05S.c ~Ua-=2TI'l" Nor1ol1t -52Mii) ~1\'Egg~•23fMontrose-52M135 T1~ M;;;c;;;ca~ W A~ina-12&- 2394 ~ c;;;'lA 243 WISl~m~ ~ ~Sh0p-1S25 Wnt"8uner 529-- 22811 W1lh81 880- W•tMtrner • I Mon~ 5'111 SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS • IN 1 WEEK: Houeton Gay Health Advocatea meet 7;3()pm Sept. 7 • IN I WEEK: Gay Aaiana & Fmnda meet 3pm Sept_8 • IN I WEEK: Integrity meet.I 7;.10pm SepL 9, Autry Houee, 6265 Main • IN 1 WEEK· Montroee Art Alliance moeta SepL9 • IN 1 WEEK; KS/ AIDS Foundation & Montroee Coun.eling ~nter AIDS Ri•k ~uction (Safe Sex) Workohopa, 8pm Sept.9 • IN I WEEK: Let!bian' Ge,· Resource Servi.,., Univ. of Houaton. meeta 2;,'lOpm Sept. 10, Spmdlewp Room, Univ. Center, Univ. Park • £N 1 WEEK: Lotherana Conremed meet.I Sepl 10, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh •IN I WEEK: Citiuna for Human Equality meet.I 7;30pm Sept 10, Hou.ton Houe, 1617 Fannin, 9th Ooor • I!" 8 WEEKS Houston Triathlon I\' Oct. 26 ' •IN I WEEICS Hall~. Oct. 31 lllN 9 WEEkS Election Doy. Nov 5 • IN 10 WEEKS Houslon T ennls Assn "Hou-T• V' Nov 9-11 •IN 10 WEEKS Yel•on·s Doy, Nov. 11 •IN 1CH 1 WEEKS· T•m Goy Rodeo. Houaton. Nov 15-17, Wllh judging Mr I: Ms. Rodeo Nov 1' •IN 12 WEEKS Thonbglving, Nov. 21 • IN 12 WEEKS Turkey Trot Fun Run, Nov. 28 • IN 15 WEEKS Jingle ~II Fun Run Dec. lb ' • tN 16 WEEKS Clvislmos, Dec 25 lllN 17 WEEKS N-Yeo.-S Eve Dec 31 • JN '9 WEEICS Goy~ ll Aug 9, 1916. Son ffoncilCO •IN 97 WEEICS· Un'-sot Fellowship IX Melropol! on Community Churc:heo I: Dignity lnlemofionol slmuttoneous lnlemotionol confwencea July 19-26, 1917, MIOmV R. l ouderdole 22 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 30, 1985 Greater Montrose Service a, Shopping Directoiy TO ADVERTJSE ON THIS PAGE OR IN THE MAlN ffiONT PAGES OF THE MONTROSE VOICE. CALL 529-8490 'MEKDAYS 10AA1-5:3CFM. Im----- ADULT VIDEO RE NT AL WE DELIVER VIDEOS Your gay video service 1420 Westheomer 522-4-485 Mnfli;H~imff ______ PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep ot listed here on the Montrose Voice wnere literally thousands turn each week VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advert15e your profess1onar service through a Voice c1ass1f1ed Call 529-8490 ~~ ~g~:Sk ~.~:,;gc1~~.n ~~[e~::d~ Vasa or Carte Blanche STEFFECK AD-VERTISING ~3333 (See our display ad In the front section of the Voice) f!!llimlilm~i _____ ----SEWING BY SAM Get a head start on your HALLOWEEN COSTUMES 11 Alteratt0ns-New Con­struc11on 862-2104 n1111111111mmrtt Fnid & Ethel's Car Clean. Free pock up and delivery service 520-1424 AUTO SALES LEASING ASCOT LEASING, LTD. 1303 Upland, 973-0070 (See our d1solay ad in the front sec1t0n of the Voice) fdlll1l;lijl!11;l ______ _ Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Maior1M1nor Repairs Gas or Diesel Electncal Reparr 526-3723 2110 Farrv1ew Gay Owned & Operated ALL PAINT I BODY SHOP - 1510 Leeland. 65i.-3131 (See our display ad on the front section of the Voice) TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1411 Taft 522-2190 (Sec our display ad 1n the front sectt0n of tile Voice) PISTO"'Hs'UP--~ 1901 Taft 52&-1001 JSee our d&Splay ad in the front section ol !tie Voice) CHIROPRACTIC CARE ROBERTS CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC 1305 Waugh. 521-2003 ISee our display ad 1n the front section of the Voice) CLEANING JANITORIAL SERVICE PLUS - PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOTHERAPY ASSOC. 4622 Walker 92&-2182 (See our display ad 1n the front section of the Voice) 1111m~1@ RONPETERS, D.D.S. EXAM, X-RAYS, CLEANING $25 523-2211 !Hml~iii-------- HG PLANT CO. 2600 Houston Av 862-1213 {See our dis­play ad In the front section of the Voice) FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch. 52&-3851 rtmm----- FITNESS EXCHANGE 2900 Richmond. 524-9932 (See our dis­play ad 1n the front section of the Voice) HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPB CLINIC 5401 Dashwood #1D. 661-2321 (See our display ad on the front section of the Voice) '=~•lP-____ RON'S HAIR STUDIO 1310 H.wlhome 521-3000 Your Barber/ Stylist in NW Houston is Hank Wierzba 680-3166 682-9495 Barchus Barber Shop 727 N.W. Mall Bm11111mm1H---- TIME A/C RE PAI R? BE READY FOR SUMMER'S CONTINUING HEAT. $25 plu1 part1 CALL 643-03111. Mid Town Air Buy I Mii window A/C Sefvlce oll brond1 AJC1 s21-- 1 ay1 m~111mu1111 ------- For all your onsura"ce needs Call Joan Brownndge. 524-3939 MAINTENANCE GENERAL F:s.L. GENERAL REPAIR SERVICE 850-1122 (See our display ad In the front sec1t0n of the Voice) ~.~~4~,<~h": ~~.~~;splay ad 1n the front l~llnllt!ll!U!I _____ _ .Seeks Cleaning Specializing in Bars Professional Service We Care How You Look 528-9427 (8am- 11•m) COMPUTER RELA TEO DIMENSIONS tN SCANNING 1820 Heights Blvd. 864-7845 (See our display ad on the front section of the V0tee) !Bm~11;1111111m1 WILMARK -CONSTRUCTION CO. We do remodeling, room additions, minor plumbing, electrical. No 1ob too small or too large 521- 1377 STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. 2801 Ella Blvd , su1le G. 868-4535 (See our display ad on the front section of the Voice) LEGAL SERVICES D AVIJ> SO~lfflEE ATTORNEY AT LAW a lawyer who cares about Montrose H21-Hf)HH NO CHARGE for 1mt•al consultation AFFORDABLE FEES-quoted upfront Evenings and wee"°end appointments o DWI o Possession of Drugs o Prost1tUt1on o Lewd Conduct o Debt Relief o Bankruptcy o ln1ury Claims o Job & Accident and other areas Jn\"1- J·'Hmt ~!!00 3816 W. Alabama. Swte 212 Member Hams COurit1 Cr1m1nal Lawyen AssodatJOn David Sosebee (SOZ BEi • littnNd by the Te•as Supreme Court and CondUCtS •General Pnc11ee NI Cert by TX Bd cl Lg Spee LAW OFFICES OF R.R. RAINOSEK Genern1 pract11 ~ free consu1ta11cns DWI. DIVORCE. BANKRUPTCY INCORPORATIONS. PER· SONAL INJURY JOB iNJURY OTHER LEGAL SERVICES Reasonable Rates 222· 7144 ANS 24 HOU!lS ~by the Tt.1a Suptetnl' Cour1 •nee '972 MEUSER OF THE rf•AS CR M NAL DCFE"ISE LAWYEAS ASSOC A rtON Not Cetl by Te• B'd. 'JI Leval Spec19etza11on IMll@IH --------- ---t.io-vE'MAsTERs Boxes. too• Visa, MC. AMEX welcome 1925 Westheomer 63<>-6555. Moving? Bulldog Movers. Reasonable Rates. 521-1377 !QJ11Mm11m11 PEST CONTROL 993-0663 COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL TPCL #05640 VISA MASTERCARD PHOTO DEVELOPING CALIGULA PHOTO LAB 2513 Elmen, 520-7061 (See our display ad 1n the front section of the Voice) IR•~1t11:Dl=il.i ---p()5TAL BOXES SPECIAL $8 per month. Pnvate. Other services available. 524-5730 1u;m11mtJ _______ _ SPEEDY PRINTING 5400 Bellaore Blvd. 667-7417 (See our dis­play ad on 1he front section of the Voice) INTERNATIONAL PRINTING SPECIALISTS 2103 Yale. 861-0026 (See our display ad on the front section of the Voice) •mmmrn -------- KWIK TAN 3313 Stanford-52&-9170 (See our dis­play ad on the front section of the Voice) ··~ 529-1414 &._THI 11"E f'\ACI ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview 3 Blks West of Montrose TRAVEL CONSULTANTS Complete travel arrangements. All servi­ces FREE Open Monday thru Fnday 9am-5 30pm Sllluray 10am-2pm 2029 Southwest Fwy.. Houston. TX 77098 (713) 52i.-8464 TEXAS TOLL FREE 1· 800-392-5193 VACATION IDEAS? See "Vacations·· following "On the Town" on the previous page. PORT CITY VENDING Juke boxes. pool. pinball. cigare1te machines, coffee service, Bill French. 741-1705 We don't care if you paint your hair blue, rip the sleeves off your shirt or pierce your ear. But don I smoke JUSt to be like your friends Or to be d1!1erent from your friends Or to be anything at all Because with everything we know about cigarettes today. there's only one thong you'll be 11 you start smoking now And that's sorry Sorry you can't get up 1n the morning without coughing you r lu ngs out Sorry you can't c limb a single f light of stairs withou t getting wind· ed Sorry that every tnne you light one up, your nsk of heart disease goes up If you're nlready a smoker. tako some time to s top and think 11 all the way through Right now. i t 's your decision In the long run, 1t s your life W'E'RE FIGHTll\G Fm 'i{)llR 1 fFC American Heart •·••·a Association $;T TW.N\\5-TW!iT DOES mE I'( FEEL BETTt.R <)()!1£\10.J . 8D Montrose Voice Classified Advertising These 1tea: 1y fyto.-K1v.,.1r,ng•'1thJ5&.Ct1onolthenewspa~r F 1egul•td ry 1Ch<et11$1fl9 rates, I Otrt 0 play Advertising Sa1e.s 0.,,.rtment, 529-8490 THE HEADLINE: You get up to 3 words m bold, all capital letters and centered on 1 line, for a total cost of $3. (Or up to 6 words. $6. Or up to 9 words, $9 Etc.) THE TEXT: Then, each add1t1onal word m regular type 1s 40¢. (Additional regular words m "ALL CAPS" or Bold Words not m all caps are 55¢ each Add1t1onal BOLD WORDS in all caps are 70¢ each l If centering Imes m the text or at end of ad, compute the cost of the words individually, then add $3 for each line centered EXAMPLES: Tifls HEADLINE $3.00 Then each add1t1onal word loke this ~ THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each additional word like this 40C niESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLD, $9.00 Then each add1t1onal word l1keth1s is40C ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WORDS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE55CEACH Addition•! bold words Ilk• thla In ....... SSC HCh. ADDITIONAL BOLD, ALL CAPS. WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer, make no copy changes during the run, pay for the full run in advance. and deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same cond11ions and deduct 25% BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number We'll conf1dent1ally forward all responses to your ad to you by mail Rate is $3 for each week the ad runs (Responses will be forwarded mdefm1tely, however, for as long as they come in.) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail your ad m or phone ii in. YO';J can pay by check. money order. Mastercard, Visa. American Express. Omer s Club or Carte Blanche DEADLINE: Classified ads received by noon Wednesday will be placed m that week's newspaper. Ads received later will be placed m the following week's newspaper. ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number, c/o Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006-3028. It will be for­warded. unopened, to the advertiser. Enclose no money. $3 bold line------ ------­$ 3 bold line--------------- $3 bold line---------- ----- text'\vords: ---------- Use add1t1onal paper 1f necessary CATEGORIES· 0 Announcements O Accomodat1ons (lodging for Houston visitors) O Cars & Bikes 0 Commercial Space 0 Dwellings & Roommates 0 Employment & Jobs Wanted 0 Items For Sale O Models, Escorts. Masseurs 0 Personals 0 Pets O Rides O Services 0 Travel 0 Yard & Garage Sales bold Imes for headlines at $3 each· ___ regular words in text at 40¢ each ALL CAPS regular words in text at 55¢ each· - --- Bold words In text at 55¢ each: ~ BOLD ALL CAPS in text at 70¢ each: _ _Additional Imes centered within the text or at the end of the ad, add $3 per lme (in addition to the per word cost) : Bhnd ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my admit malled to me. $125? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Times Wffka: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount tor 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) : o Also. I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week I have enclosed (or will be billed or charged, as indicated below) an add1t1onal o $29 tor 6 months or 0 $49 for 1 year. TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged METHOD OF PAYMENT· 0 Check enclosed 0 Money order enclosed O Cash 0 VISA charge 0 MasterCard charge 0 Diners Club charge O Carte Blanche charge 0 Amerc1an Express charge If charging, card expiration date ------- -------­Credit card number ---------------------­Signature Name----- Address - - ----- Phone(s) for venflcat1on of. ad, 11 necessary MAIL OR BRING TO Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006- 3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 10am-5.30pm AUGUST 30. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 MONTROSE RESOURCES-............... - .............. - ....... .. SELECTECiSTATE NAT ORGANIZATIONS Bat Owners~ of Ta (BOA Tt- 120 Brazos f001 Austin .. ~12) 472·3333 AIDS Action CouneiVfaderalOn of AIDS Related OrganazatlOnS 1115'1; tnuependence Av SE. Wmh111Qton. DC 20003. (2121 S47""3101 Gay & l•blen PT.a losan- POBA. OklChetlea Sta. New York NY 10011 · (2121 981-6822 Gay Righta N•t lobby POB 1892. WMh1ngton. DC 20013-(202) 546-1801 Human R¢t1 Campa.gn Fund-POB 1398. Wah .. tng1on. DC 20013 1202) 546-2025 Lambda Legal Oefenae--132 W 43fd ~* YOfk NY 10039-(212) 944--9488 l•tuan/Gay RtgPits AdYocat• - POB 822. Austin 78767 Media Fund tor Human R.ghta POB A. Okt ChelSM Sta. New YOfk NY 10011-(212) 989-6622 Nat Assn of Busineu Counc•••- Bo• 15145 San Frllf'ICIKO. CA 94115-1415) 886-6363 Nat Assn of Gey & lelb'in Demo Cklbl-1742 Ma11 Av SE. Washengton. DC 20003-1202) S47·3104 Nat Gay HeattPi Educ Foundation-POB 714. N9w YM NV 10038-(212) S&:M3130tOrG(Mf'~U (7131 523-5204 Nat Gty Rights AOvocates- S40 Catro. San Fran­CtSCO. CA 94114- (4151863--~4 Nat Gay Task F0tce 1NGTF)- 80 bth Av N4W YOrll, NY 10011-(212} 741-5800 NGTf~ Ctlsis!lne--(800) 221·70« (outside ,_ Yen State) Rural Coatl11Qn. Clo WalhN' Zanghi. Bo11 g' 1 B.'urn. TX 18627 Ta: Gail\.elbtlln Tesll Fore .. .p()8 AK Denton 76201 - 8f7) 387-82\6 US Tran9¥89ttte-Tral'lffll;ual Contact Svc--- 1017..S E Pike., SeatUe 98122-(206) 82-4-8.266 ATTENTION ORGANIZATIONS Chect< your llstlng Wo list here e•ch week name of organization. address. phone regular meeting dates and times. and ~n~~,~~t~~~:~o~~tt~nf~r~~~d~s:~~~! Voice. 408 Avondale. Hou 77006 THE MONTROSE VOICE-INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY A:d for AIOs::P0B66952·257, 77006- 526-6077 An A Capella Chorua. Church of Crmst"POe 66734. 77266 A Place 1n the Sun-522-7895 A"CLu.:.12:iilwG"riY=S2•--5;9:._2_5_ _ _ _ _ Astro Rarnbow Society tor the O.f-~4-507i (TTY 0< ¥0oee). 645--0074 fTTY) Avondale Man-·POB 960$o4. 71286 meetl 7 30ptn 2nd Thurs. WOtNn"s Chnst••n Ctr. 310 Pec1fic: =or:~~-Robert Moon. <11r. 209 Bering Memorial United Methochst Church- 1440 Han»d-526--1017 l\IC 10 S0a.m Sun Cho"* Unlomotod-POB 70996. 77270-529- 3211 (Goy s .. ocnboord) meet& 1pm 3rd Sun. M•lereon YWCA. 3015 W1lh•. Social Mixer .. 7.30pm elternate Fridays, Sunday brunch 12 30pm 3rd Sun Chnstl&nCiiUTch-oft h'e'GOod"" """"$hepherd-l70i Montrose svc 1pm Sun, B1bfe study 7 30pm Thur> ChUr"ChOt Chr .. tianf.1th-1840 Wea~ 53-8005 svca 10 45am Sun. 81ble 1tudy 7 30pm Wed. Rev Chnl A Race. pastor ~or H~man ·~,.~POB3o45. 71253-381).33..46. 937.-3516 meet 2nd Tu•. Houston House. 1617 Fenn1n. 9lh f'<>Of eclfVlty room C.1iZ~ '°' un·,ted°""iiou <CUH> 3311 Montros• "832-651Hl 148 Cott '5s-meets at Brazos Rrwer 8~ Brazos 52&-9192 CommJn;;;o;---Public Health A•areness POB 3CMS. 77253-621H333. 522·5064 Sharing Group tor the Warned Weir meet Fri, 7""'8pm, Montrose Counsefing Ctr C0mmun;ty Pol.!tlClll .Action COmm1ttee !C .. PAC)-POe 2005. 77252-236-­~ n•ty ~3207 MontrOH-521: 051 t Svcs 11am Sun. 7 JOpm Thurt Congregation Aytz Chay•m-1840 W•thetmer-688-8997, 726-5181 IVC & IOC••I 8pm 2nd & 4th Fri Cnsis Hotbne-22&-1505 o;;;;c:o;nm1ttee 0(th9GPC:.s2&-8834 Oha,.,;e Study Gropup-406 Avondale-524· 9554 01ana Found11t•on-2700 Mason-524-5791 01gn1ty1H"Ou:--3217 Fannrn-529-0111, 523 .. 7644 m-7,30pm S.1 ESOPS Private Profnat0na1 SOCtal Club-9G1 .. 91176 ~of Chant .. United tor Social Servi~ S:.t~~~I~~~ '=!'!'~~r~:!t:!!: CLnte. Montrose COunHln'Q Ctr 1st Unitanan Church--6210 Fenntn-5.26-1571 SVC 11 15em Sun Frontrunt*S-Rand)' 681-5679 or Joe 520-8019 rvf'S Sun Tuee & Thurs M9mof1el Park Tenn•t Ctr runs Mon. Golf Ctr. Hermann Perk o;y& Alive Shanng Ex:penttt1ce (GASE)-521- 1311. 528-0891 Gay & Leabtan ArctuVMof TIC atf1hateol llH Inc Gay & L•btan "'6ormons-1113 W•thelmer 11$)4(), 77098-566-1413 Gay Al .. ne & Fnend9- 2615 Waugh Or 1289- 523-&789. 785--3633 meets 3pm 2nd & last Sun Gay Fathen-3211hnnin-528-0111 ~~~~~oooC: 3~~~;;.~8111 Tt'ci Wed, 10th annw«nry dinner hosted by Pr_.~ dents Oub Sep 14 (Hou) Gii'( Pnde w.-COmmottoe- POB fle821. -77296--Stan Ford 523-7844 or C.thy Lenahan ~. s;.=.~.;i-~. ..~ 91;.1~~~ AIOS Hotline Greal9' Montra.e Busin-.s Gudd M ke Nelson 6J0..0309 Of Bruce Woohey ~ meets 7pm 4th Wed. Brennens R•t. 3300 Smtth The Group thelte< WOtkshOt)-Joe W8t11 522· 220A meets 7pm Thurs Otgn1tyClr. 32t7Fanntn ~~rtcil~Ci0ns=261s Waugh~ 77006 ~esb.an concerts. hee maitmg lt1t Homoph1le Interfaith AUiarw:e-729 u;;;;- 523-6969 Hou Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers & Sctent1st1-POB 66631. 77006-771-6'88. 7- 10pm meets 7pm 4th Tues Hou Bar Owners Assn (HOB0)-<:10 Ventu,._N 2923 Ma•n-522-0000 Hou Community Ck>wns-862-8314 Hou Counol of Clubs-526-8054 Hou Data Profess.onals-523-6922, 6&C-64!»9 meets 7 3()pm 2nd Tues Hou Gay Heatth Advocatn-~94-14 MMt"S 7 30prn 1st S•1 ~~t$Assn-=7i7~309'8 ---- Hou tnler-Fa th AWance contact through lnl&­gtlly/ Hou Hou Mctorcyc1e Club- -c/o Mary's.. 1022 West­he: imer-S2&-8851 Hou No-rth"Piof.U.W11:-POe 38'0 Humble 77347 Boa 01821-7126.meet730prn 2nd s.t ~OutdOOr Group-Ken 522...()699 tr p to South Padre lslar'ld Aug 1&-18 canoe & rah on the Guadatupe RN91' ln Hill COYntry Aug 23-25 1cuba dMng Cozumel Mexico Aug 31-Sep 4 ~~: ;~:~:._52~1.;~f,:~::; Center. pert1c.~nt 1nnu11 T•·OU C1assc., Dallas OCt Hou- Tx V Nov 9-11 tiiiiiiC::pQB 160<17m2=-~ 52i- 7014 affil•aled groups are Interact. 8zzamo1 A Place tn 1ne Sun Montrose An A!Uance. Gay & LestMan Archr-.ies of T.x. Gay $w1tctlt>Gmrd. Mont· rose Sympnon1c Band. board meet 7 30pm 11t Thurs (vaned 1ocat1ons). ectucattGn*I forum 7 30pm 3td Thurs tngetSOll Speakers' Bureau-POB 391 BeU&Jre 77'°1-~06' Integrity/Hou tEp1scopaLian)-POB 66008. 77266-52'-1'89 meets 7 30pm 2nd & .tm Mon Autry HOUH. 6265 Main lnlef"aet-POB 18041. n222-529--701' KPFT Aaelio. FM-~19 L0,;;n~ 4000 ' °!if""Mktt'lrouQh' lel~n-tem1nist pgm Fn a 15-10 30lm.,; W16de ·n Stein'" gay pgm Thurs 7 3().9 OOpo>1 Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE KSIAIOS Foundation-3317 MontrOMBox 1155. 77006-524-2"37 AIOS RISk Reduction (Safe Sex) WorQhops epm 2nd &<th Mon except Oec:. ~~~:.'nt'::.::',:S~~~u;=\~- JfKfY Kauffman Caincer Fund-778-4108 Krewe of Hydra-811 Gracetand-8111 ~' 72&-1032 Lllmbda Ctr Gay Ak:ohohca & Alanon-121.t Jo Anme-521-9772 Lesb1af\..'Gay Retource Svc-Un1ven1ty of Hou. .taoo Calhoun. box 309 770CM-749'-1253 ~s 2.30pm alternate Tues. Sp1nd6etop Room. 2nd lloor University Ctr LetU"SE~terta.n You W8";;;::p;ot~u Council or Club&-52&-80S4 The Lin1e Church-212 Fargo-622-7695 svc:1 ?-30pm Sun Lone SU' NudlSI Group- POB 140572 7727' Lutherans Concemed-meet:s at Grace l.utf\9.­ran Church., 2515 W1ugh-$21i.o863 4SJ..11'3 meei 2nd & 4th Tues evenings McAcSory H~oKSA10Sfound8t"t00. 3317 Montrose 805 115S--624·2.t37 ~7~g-n~~i;;.~. .l ..~ ~~r tneebb~Week::~~~~-~----~-­MeerQPolit8n Community Chucch of the Resur .. rection tMCCR)-19190ecat1.1r-8&1-9149 pot .. 1uck dinner 7 30pm 1st $at monthly SvC9 10 .t5am & 7 1Spm Sun & 7 15pm Wed. member .. ship 1nqu1rers cius 7 30pm Mon. educahon CIUS• Tues & Wed ~- (Hou) Metropolitan Wind Ensemble-529-9610 Meets Sc Stephens Episcopal Ch1.11cn. 7 30 Wed Montrose Art ARta~-1732 868--9314 869-5332 affiliate VH Inc. meets 2nCI Mon Montrose 8us1naa Guitd tee Greater Montrose B~ Guild Montrose=~c"'"hu_r_ch,_o.,.f" "cnr,-,.- . _-,°'1oo~M·on1roae- 777-9286.: svc 11am Sun ~YtCCM;"-iee NM11own Aun Montros.e Clin.c;-803 ~5531 _., Mon Tue. Thurw &-flpm Montrose Coun1ty Cklggerw-•5&-3861 --i 7· 10pm Fri MCCR Church. 1919 Deel:t\,lf Mont.rote COunsefrrig Ctr-900 LOvett •203- 53-0037 AIOS vlCbm suppc>rt group 6 30pm Mon. Women"a Suppott Group 7pm Tue1. AIOS Ro,. Reductoon (S.te Sex) Worbhopo lpm 2nd :s-·~~o~roo~~ oec '" conl"nction •nn Montrote S1ngen--C.rt Lawrenu n-4-3581 ~= =~ehearsal Mon ev•. Benng Church. ~Softball League-POB 22272. 77227- 524-3144 $erlea 9. Gay Wortd s.nes. M1fw&4J .. kee, Aug 2&-Sep 1 MontroM Sports Aun tMSAI ... epec1f1c SYb­g,.- oup MSA.'VoU4PYbal-MarJ 522·1469 ga;;;$ 7pm Tues Gregory-L•oc~n IChoOI 1101 Taft MQri\rose Wetch subgroup Neartown Assn Mustangt-meets at the Barn 710 PK. ttc-5>28- 9'27 dub nogh1 ,..,.,,. ~Gay tteaitri Education Fou-ndaoon.- 523-5204 National Organ11.aoon for Women NOW~ No Rrohtl r .. 11: Force-POB «0422 77244 NMrtown Assn (Montt'Ole C•v•c Ctub)-1-413 Westhe.mer meet 7pm 4th Tues Neartown Business Alhance-529-7010 meets 7pm 2nd Wed Liberty Bank 1001 Westhe mer New FreedOtn Christian Church-829 Ya~- 863-8377 aves 10.m Sun Ovefeatert A"~-°n- y-mo-us--c-:10_,.Mo.,-n"'"1,-o.- C.o =-u-n: =17~~ ~~=~~~,,-~~~o~"'~' Bering Church. 1440 H::•_:'°:.c'd:.....~o--,,,--,­Parent1 & FnendS of LHb•ans & Gays (Patents Fl..AG)-"'64-6963 meets 2pm 3rd SIJ.f\ Prelby• tenanCtr 41 Oakdale:-------­p;; r-p;op1e-c o Neertown Community Flrehouse-'14'-1·..:25:..2:..•------ Pu y Lrberoeoon-POB 600063. 77260-ll62- U76._" _ ___ _ _ _,,-~--- t>iesby1e11ans 1or t..es.b1an Gay COncerna­Preabytenan Ctr 41 OekCaie ~~ meets 730pm2nd Tun ~ Club peS1- pie..oenu GPC -POe 61184' 112e6-523-602• ~' LanC1 FUne1 Comm tte&-Must•no Club proect Ra Unrv Gey LHb an Support Group 529- 32'1 (Gay Swrte11bOllrd_c.>.~--:~=,,­Roth•~~- U09 Sul Rou-524-9839 s;;;rt;"Ot TK counse ng tor le--threeten ng ollnesse> 522,:::..:-5084=------ Sodety for 2nd Setf nr1-Ess1 Gulf Co.ut Transvnt1tt1 CNPter-POB 9033.5 77090 Soc!ety ror the Promott0n of Amazon Sado­M• socN•m (SPASMl-POB 10996. 77270 G•y Sw!lehbOlrd 529--3211 $Undance Cattle Co sociar clUb-cJo The Bam. 710 Padtte-628-9-427 !»th A.nn1verury Aug 1S. 18~~~---~-~~~~~~ fx: Gay ROdeO Assn-Drawer 1,9'. POB 69973. 77006-526-5001 fUdQmQ Mr & Ms Tx: Gey RoOeo Nov 14 TIC Gay ROdeO Nov t.5-11 ~"!.!:tih~~J4oundat1on-1915 Ta: RiOllrl-clO R.pcord 71-4fa•l'Vl9W-521·27~ ~~~-.-: =r:1ia'cs~~~rk 541· WWB -.ng-Myrt 723-U55 """'.. 7 30pm Sun. Post O• Bowt.ng L•nes W•ttlet,,.,- ColOny Arts Aun-1001 We1thet­met 1183-521-0133 tan art fest Oet 10--20 -what E.,... Happ«te\ed to 9aby Jat"!e Bowl ng Leegue ... ThuBdly ao.-1 ng women·• 8o'tirlmg Lggu•-Oebbte 973-1358 5pm Sun Stachum Lanes 8200 Bree51na1n Y...:imMI ·s lobby All1ance-4 Chetsea-521-0439 WGmen ·s SOffball Lugue-6431 P.n•ha<te. nooe-ca.rotyn at 168-6256 1st Annual Gay Women s Sottball Wortd Ser• Aug 29--Sep 1, ::~~~:.....== - =_=====================-­Baytown lembda Group-.t27-1378 IT\eets 73Qpm odd Fn CONROE-Conroe Aree Lambd.I Socte"f)'-Jan at 14091 756- 0354 0< Rll'f •1 (409) 7~7 Con-"""' loml>d• G•y AA- 409 3"-6470 Conroe Area Lesbians-Kat!'ly at -409 756-9069 meet 8pm 2nd ':='th=F-::n=::=::..::.c::-= GALvE5iON Lambda Atcol'IOlics Anonymous-763--'401 Metrapotrtan eon\mun ty cnurch of Ga1v.St0n lsancl- 182• Broodwll'(-~7626 QUICK REFERENCE (Tear Out & Post by Phone) AIOS HoU•ne-529-3211 AMBULANCE-222·3434 Gay Po1tt1ca1 caucus---621-1000 o.ys;uc;-o-52&-3211 Lawyer-CM .:ts or 52_9--32_ 1_1_ _____ Utn'Y-224-5« 1 Montroae Courisekng Center-529--0037 MONTROSE VOICE-5~90 POliCE-222-3131 Ta.it•-~"°'° or 236-1111 Time. 10<nP --M4-7171 ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular class1- f1ed rates of paying "by the word," you can purchase space here ''by the mch." When buying by the inch, you can Include special art. logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3" $49 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3· $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2 $29 3• $39 ' .- 24 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 30. 19&5 • T-DANCE STARTS 4pM HOUSTON TRADITION SuNdAy ANd LAboR DAy 4pM TO 8pM ANd 1 OpM TO 2AM RS Hous10N's VidEoDDANCE Club PAcific AT GRANT D D ~21-912J
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