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Houston Voice, No. 857, March 28, 1997
File 025
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Houston Voice, No. 857, March 28, 1997 - File 025. 1997-03-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 17, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4453/show/4440.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1997-03-28). Houston Voice, No. 857, March 28, 1997 - File 025. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4453/show/4440

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 857, March 28, 1997 - File 025, 1997-03-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 17, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4453/show/4440.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 857, March 28, 1997
Contributor
  • Michelak, J. C.
Publisher Window Media
Date March 28, 1997
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 025
Transcript 1 (3 l_ O B A Ukranian Port City Sobers Up To Reality of AIDS by Angela Charlton ODESSA, Ukraine (AP) - An air of shame clings to the desolate, walled-in compound, a former leper colony now housing AIDS patients. Out of habit, nurses still lock patients behind iron gates, and neighbors steer far clear of its overgrown entrance. "People in this country think AIDS is the plague," said soft-spoken Nadya Stetskova, a recovering drug addict who was propped up on her hospital bed. "Everyone's getting it, but no one's talking about it." Until recently, Ukraine and other former Soviet republics had relatively few cases of AIDS or people with the AIDS virus, and they did very little to help those who did. For the most part, cash-strapped Ukraine simply dismissed AIDS as a rare "foreigners" disease. But with the numbers rising, particularly in the free-living port city of Odessa, the first AIDS clinic has been established, part of a slowly growing network of related programs. Last year alone, the number of people with HIV, the AIDS-causing virus, jumped from just over 1,000 to 5,500 in Odessa. The city now accounts for more than one-third of the country's 14,000 people with the HIV. Nationwide, 230 people in Ukraine have contracted full-blown AIDS. In recent months Odessa has pioneered a needle exchange program, an AIDS awareness campaign for prostitutes and mobile testing clinics, with funding help from the United Nations commission on AIDS. Odessa's historic harbors still teem with people _ and drugs and diseases _ from around the world. "This city has every kind of reputation but a clean one," said Dr. Georgy Pavsky, an Odessa epidemiologist and head of the United Nations AIDS office in Odessa. Pavsky estimates that the official figures are only a fraction of the actual number of HIV cases. Ignorance, fear and social stigmas still run too deep to encourage widespread testing, he said. The biggest increase, here and across the country, has been among drug users. They made up just 10 percent of HIV cases in Odessa at the start of last year and more than 40 percent by the end. Stetskova and her two roommates at the clinic, Yulya and Valya, were once addicted to shots of "makovaya solomka," a cheap and readily available opium derivative. Police call it the drug of choice in the former Soviet Union. It's often sold in individual doses already in a needle, which is then refilled and resold to the next customer. "Most addicts don't realize that AIDS is a threat. They're more afraid of the police," said Stetskova, who was diagnosed with HIV last fall. While she spoke, Valya's 9-year-old son ran by, dragging a broken plastic car tied to a length of medical twine. "It's not much of a life for him here," said Valya. Her son doesn't have the virus, but she has nowhere else to leave him while she undergoes treatment. Talking to himself, Vova played among the weeds on the grounds of the compound on the edge of town, home to 50 people with AIDS or the AIDS virus. But the women praise the clinic, glad to be around people who understand their disease. "At other hospitals, they hide the AIDS people in a forgotten corridor and everyone looks at you like you have the plague," Stetskova said. AIDS officials in the capital Kiev initially resisted the Odessa clinic as a renegade project, but are now encouraging other regions to follow suit. The problem, everyone laments, is money. The Ukrainian government is broke. Ukraine's beleaguered hospitals say they can't afford anesthetics or bandages, much less costly AIDS medication or prevention programs. "AIDS is just one of a thousand headaches for our leaders," said Volodymyr Tarasenko of the government's commission on AIDS. _L__Is__rxijj. 19i)7 Jody Travis Devon De Vasquez Showtime 7:30 cohosted by Nevada, candidate for Miss TGRA :98 Happy Easter! from the management and staff of the BRB....where you'll always find the perfect basket. ■ 2400 Brazos • Houston • 713-528-9192 GfllflXV Houston Voice Exclusive f YOUR BFTHDAY IS THS WEEK: You tend to be overly optimistic or overly negative. Start seeing your partners and cohorts as they really are, not only as you want to see them. Both friends and close associates are going to be particularly important to you (or the next several months. Choose your companions carefully, for they wil! either help or hinder your dreams. ARES: {March 21-Apri! 20) You are in a very practical frame of mind and unusually sharp in all your money matters. In your cando-anything mood, no matter how busy, you will be more than able to take care of everything. Speak softly and avoid disagreements with a loved one. TAURUS: {Apnl 21 ■ May 21) Family is highlighted for now. Heart-to-heart talks with children will prove advantageous. The financial goals you've had in mind are going to be realized in the very near future. Strive (or fairness in all your decisionmaking. GEMN: (May 22 - June 21) Any problems in family or home life will finally be resolved. Keep your cool in the workplace, co workers may be overly sensitive. There are changes, from a distance, which will stir things up at work for the next few weeks. Unreasonable demands may be made. CANCER: (June 22 ■ July 23) You'll start the week in a dream world of your own. It may be best to take time alone and treat yourself better. A short trip may be the ticket to fun and adventure. Work runs smoothly for a change, but there are tensions in the home. Remember your mate. L£0: (July 24* August 23) Listen to a friend's advice regarding financial planning. Once you have your plan in order, take time to discuss it with your beneficiary. Others may accuse you of living with unrealistic expectations ■ don't let it bother you, your best ideas come to you this way. VRG0: (August 24 September 23) This week will bring passion and intimacy with your love. Business and household projects are favored, and you'll be surprised at how much you get done. There may be a bonus for your recent efforts. Take time for laughter, and make plans to further your education. UBRA: (September 24 - October 23) The more you depend on your inner reserves, the stronger you are. Your actions inspire family members to strive for their best. There are some self doubts you have been wrestling with which only you can work through. Self improvement efforts will succeed. SCORPIO: (October 24 - November 22) Spend time with close friends and have some fun. Both your friendships and love relationships are very fulfilling. Keep your cool; someone is trying to undermine your position with flattery or outright bribery. There is a lucrative job possibility in the future. SAGITTARIUS: (November 23 ■ December 21) It's a pretty effortless and pleasurable week. You have the power to make changes for the better. Personal achievements and romance will be high lighted for the next few months. You need to resolve an old misunderstanding with an estranged fnend. CAPRICORN: (December 22 * January 20) This week will start on a very upbeat note. Wherever you are, you are surrounded by luck and friendship. Unexpected money is most likely to come your way. Your work and family responsibilities are heavy, you have people relying on you from all sides, take things one at a time. AQUARIUS: (January 21 - February 19) There are many things that need your attention right now. Try to pnontize, and do the most important things first. Verbal clashes are unavoidable ■ both your kids and co workers will challenge your authority. Check out any opportunities to increase your income. PISCES: (February 20 ■ March 20) Spend some time with your mate and family. You are both assertive and charming. It feels good to succeed at work and know your family's happy too. The week will be full of heavy mental stimulation and many challenges. Innovative and unconventional approaches may work well. r_i-»_-ai
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