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Houston Voice, No. 857, March 28, 1997
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Houston Voice, No. 857, March 28, 1997 - File 016. 1997-03-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4453/show/4431.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1997-03-28). Houston Voice, No. 857, March 28, 1997 - File 016. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4453/show/4431

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 857, March 28, 1997 - File 016, 1997-03-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4453/show/4431.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 857, March 28, 1997
Contributor
  • Michelak, J. C.
Publisher Window Media
Date March 28, 1997
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript ++ Toward A More Perfect Union by Elizabeth Birch On this long journey that is our quest for equal rights, no goal will be more symbolic, have a more tangible effect on our lives or be more difficult to achieve than securing the right to marry. As a cultural institution, marriage is so highly revered that it is assumed each of us will experience it. From the moment we are born, we are socialized to dream aboul the day we will wed, and to look forward to that as one of life's pinnacles. Those of us who grew up knowing we might be gay faced a conundrum: How were we to reconcile our expectations of marriage with the fundamental desire for a partner of ihe same sex? Most of us resolved this dilemma by forgoing any dreams of legal mamage, or by creating our own marriagelike ceremonies and institutions. That situation may be aboul lo change, which is really quile miraculous to those of us who never conceived of the possibility in our lifetimes. Given that lesbian and gay Americans have been fighting for equal rights for only about 30 years, Ihe fact lhal we stand at the brink of winning equal marriage righls in Hawaii in 1997 is breathtaking to ponder. Our community started on this path almost by accident-three gay couples, strangers to each other, decided to file what looked like a pie-in-the-sky lawsuit in 1991. Yet at each level, they won, lhanks to hard work, thick skin, legal brilliance and coordination. We all owe a great deal to the courage and dedication of Dan Foley, the attorney in Hawaii who continues to champion the case, co-counsel Evan WolfsOn from Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, the leaders of the Marriage Project Hawaii and many others in the wonderful Aloha Slate whose faith is an inspiration. Thc Human Rights Campaign is committed to the fight for equal marriage rights. And, as a graduate of the University of Hawaii, I feel a personal commitment not only lo the issue but to the magnificent state from which it emanates. Through at least five major waves of immigration and olher struggles, Hawaii has a rich history of fairness and nondiscriminalion. HRC has purposely not engaged in the court case because it is in very able hands, and because litigation is not part of HRC's mandate. But now that the issue is moving beyond the courts and onto political ground in Hawaii, the value HRC can add has come into focus. We must treat the situation in Hawaii with the same investment and commitment that we applied to defeating the anti-gay ballot initiatives in Maine, Oregon and elsewhere. wimimm I The skills we honed in those confrontations j will be directly applicable to Hawaii, which is why we are poised to conduct cutting-edge polling in Hawaii, and to work one-on-one with those leaders in Hawaii who have brought us to the current crossroads. HRC recently sent two staffers-National Field Director Donna Red Wing and Senior Policy Advocate Nancy Buermeyer—to Hawaii to meet with the activists on the front lines. The information they brought home is sobering. The issue is moving along several tracks. The stale Legislature is working furiously to pass a constitutional amendment, which could go to the people for a vote as early as November in 1998, a second possible avenue to alter the constitutional convention will be convened in 1998, a second possible avenue to alter the constitutional provisions on which the remarkable court case is based. The latter approach would noi only provide an opportunity to change Hawaii's equal rights amendment but to alter other progressive aspects of the state's constitution. Assuming that the state Supreme Court again affirms the right of same-sex couples to marry in Hawaii, our mission is to hold onto that gain. To that end, HRC is planning to conduct much deeper polling and research to determine how to reach the hearts and minds of all Hawaii residents. We know we are correct in our conviction that lesbian and gay Americans deserve equal marriage rights, but how do we convince those who fear we are threatening this sacred institution? HRC conducted research two years ago to come up with methods to frame our messages around gay marriage. We published a manual based on that polling, which has been used by activists across the country who are warring against anti-gay marriage bills in their state legislatures. And we never wavered in our efforts lo defeat the hideous Defense of Marriage Act, knowing full well lhat it was a carefully engineered election- year ploy. In the meantime, we have a long way to go to convince our heterosexual fellow citizens lhat gay marriage is no ihreat to them, or to the underpinnings of society. Our research shows that if we break marriage down into many of its basic components, most Americans agree that we deserve the same rights and responsibilities-which is a very positive sign. Winning equal marriage rights is a crusade thai sprang from the deepest grass rools of our community, and from our shared desire to be full, responsible, valued citizens. Indeed, it is our birthright as Americans and we will, ultimately, claim it. Elizabeth Birch is executive director of the Human Rights Campaign, the largest national lesbian and gay political organization, based in Washington, D.C TTTTTTTTT ___fl___ __ Timeless Film Classic Returns To The Big Screen by Chris Rundquist In honor of its 25th anniversary, Paramount Pictures is re-releasing The Godfather. This culling edge crime-drama was first released in 1972, and launched the film careen of Al Pacino, James Caan, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton, Talia Shire and others. It was also the highest grossing movie in history, up lo that time, earning over$100 million in its initial release. The Godfather was based on the best selling novel of the same name, written by Mario Puzo. The book sold over 10 million copies making it one of the most widely read novels in history. Mario Puzo collaborated with Francis Ford Coppola to write the screenplay, earning Ihem an Oscar for Best Screenplay Adaptation. In all Ihe film earned 10 Academy Award Nominations, and won three: Besl Picture and Best Actor (Marlon Brando), as well as Best Screenplay. In 1990, the film was further honored by being selected by the Library of Congress to be included in the National Film Registry. The re-release differs from the original only in the soundtrack, which has been digitally remastered from its original monaural sound into THX stereo. Also, the original negatives were remastered to retain the original visual feel of the film. However, by today's standards, the film has more of a grainy picture than we have become accus- lomed to. Make no mistake, The Godfather was, and still is, an excellent film that should not be missed. However, as nice as it is to see the film on the big screen, the video version is just as compelling and forceful. Unless you are a film purist, don't rush out to the theaier in fear thai you will miss someihing new. HAPPY HOUR SILVER AND GOLD GRAND PRIZE DRAV APRIL Ist! You can win 1 Troy Ounce of Pure Silver! A 1997 Silver Eagle Collector's Coin Every Weekday in March at JR.'s! ' We invite you to join us for our All-American Happy Hour. Houston's friendliest staff serves up Happy Hour prices until 10 pm. 4 pm until 7 pm $2.25 Well Drinks $4.50 Doubles $1.75 Domestic Longnecks ZBSS with the Santa Fe Bar & Patio Register to win our daily Grand Prize...A 1997 Pure Silver Eagle Coin Drawings Mon.-Thurs. nightly it 8 pm. Every Friday, We will select five winners, drawings held at 6, 7, 8, 9, 10pm. drawing for 1 Troy Ounce of Pure Gold -A 1997 Gold Eagle Coin Drawing to be held April 1st (No Foolin'!) at 9pm. Ask your favorite bartender for an official entry. No purchase necessary; however, you must be present to win. !*«•,* -AMERICAN HATTY HOUR TOP SHELF Ll QJJ OR UNTIL I 0 804 &808 PACIFIC ■ .713.521.2519 „ R _ M m-ixjmi.
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