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Montrose Voice, No. 165, December 23, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 165, December 23, 1983 - File 001. 1983-12-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4415/show/4390.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-23). Montrose Voice, No. 165, December 23, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4415/show/4390

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 165, December 23, 1983 - File 001, 1983-12-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4415/show/4390.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 165, December 23, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Hyde, Robert
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 23, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Our Montrose Band & the Holiday Spirit Billie Duncan Photostory, p .9 Also, in 'Montrose Live,' starting p.16 A Queen Judges an Impersonator Hal and David at Rascals The Montrose Singers Debut The Newspaper of Montrose Dec. 23, 1983 Issue ••• 165 Published Every Friday s 0 I c E Equal Employment Ordinance Finally off ta City Legal Dept. By Hollis Rood City Councilman Anthony Hall recently referred some changes in the wording for the city employment code, specifically to guarantee non-discrimination on basis of sexual orientation, to the city legal depart­ment for study. If approved by the consulting depart· ment. the ordinance would read: "No ques­tion in any examination shall relate to sexual orientation or political and reli­gious opinions or affiliations." EEO (Equal Employment Ordinance) pro­tected cl888es and may not be discrimi· nate<I against by reason of their sexual orientation in hiring, firing, discipline, promotion, grievance procedures or city contracts. "B. The City is not required to acquire data or statistics concerning sexual orien­tation, nor to include a person's sexual orientation in any reports on affirmative action in hiring or promotion. Jay Hollyfield, KS/ AIDS treasurer, receiues $20()() check from Westheimer Art Colony'• Michael Groues The recommendation also applies to Section 12·84 of the Code of Ordinances so that it would read, "but no questions in the application, or in any other portion of the examination, shall beao framed as to elicit information concerning the sexual orien· tation or political, fratamal or religious opinion or affiliation of the applicanl" "C. Nothing in thi1 Affirmative Action Program is intended to require a City Department to hire or to promote any per· son because of a person's sexual orienta­tion. However, City Departments are directed not to discriminate in the hinng, discipline or promotion of any person baaed upon a person's sexual orientation." KS/AIDS Gets $15,000 from Art Colony, Dianas By Robert Hyde The Westheimer Art Colony Association and the Dianas added much needed funds to the coffers of the KS/ AIDS Foundation la~t7:/:;.ard meeting held Dec. 15 at Ber· ing Memorial Church, the foundation 's treasurer, Jay Hollyfield, was prese~ted with a $2,000 check from the Westheimer Art Colony. The funds were part of the procttds from last fall 's festival The Dianao' more hefty sum of $13,000 came from last month's Neiman-Marcus fur extravaganza at Baja Sam's. Kent Sumrall, spokesman for the foun­dation, reiterated that AIDS is not going away. "In just the last two weeks, we've had three deaths atM.D. Anderson Hospi· tal." On a more positive note, Sumrall menti­oned that Mayor Whitmire's office is actively assisting the foundation in find­ing housing for AIDS patients. Recent donations from the foundation have been $1 ,000 each to the Gay Switch· board for their educational services and t-0 the Montrose Clinic for their PACE screening program. Section 12·188(b) would be amended to read 0 No dieciplinary action shall be taken by the commission, the mayor, a supervisor, or department head against any employee because of sex, race, color, creed, national origin, sexual orientation, or because of membership in any political, reJigious or fraternal organizations." An amendment to the Affirmative Action Program was also recommended These proposed amendments have been referred to the legal department for study to determine if they can constitutionally be included in the Code of Ordinances. If this action is approved, it will represent a major break through for gay rights in Houston, because trends show once rights are guaranteed by civil ordinance, private industry soons follows suit in hiring fir­ing practices. and reads "In the Statement of Purpose Previously, an individual could not sue add the words 'sexual orientation' at the the city for redress because "sexual orien­end of the first sentence.. .. tation" was not considered a protected right under law, hence there was no "A Persons of whatever sexual orienta- recourse. If the amendments pass, it will tion are entitled to all the protection of the give legal leverage to individual rights. MAY YOUR HOLIDAYS BE AS JOYOUS AS YOU'VE MADE OUR FIRST YEAR HOUSTON DEC. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Zoning is No Longer a Dirty Word in Houston to Some By Arlene Battista Developers are losing their grip on City Hall, and in 10 years Houston will have a zoning ordinance, predicts John Mixon, professor of law at the University of Houston-University Park. Houston is the only major American city without a zoning ordinance and resi· dents here are beginning to feel the pinch of office and condominium towers rising next to their homes, he says. "There is increased dissatisfaction among aware, affluent homeowners in this city," Mixon says. "Residents of River Oaks, Southgate, Southhampton and Tanglewood are getting tired of people in high-rise towers staring down into their backyards." Many subdivisions enforce deed restric· tions, but this method of control is not as effective as zoning, he notes. Deed restric· tions are enforceable only within a subdi­vision's perimeters and do not cover fringe-area development. River Oaks, for example, is heavily res­tricted, but it cannot control what happens in areas immediately adjacent to the subdivision, along Kirby, Westheimer, or Shepherd Drive. According to Mixon, zoning is oversold as a mechansism for long-term city plan· ning. Only after an area has established itself as a residential neighborhood will itR members desire protection from industry or other outside intrusion. If citizens become angry enougn aoout property and privacy infringement, they will ban together and accept a zoning ordi· nance, he says. At that point, a block ?f homeowners, notjusta few neighbors, will favor zoning and the idea will be accepta· ble and plausible. "Those wanting zoning will most likely have to put up and elect a zoning slate," Speech Betrays Social Status What time you eat, theshapeofyourdrive­way and whether you go for poinsettias or rhododendrons reflect your social status, says cultural critic Paul Fussell, who has written a book dividing America into nine social classes, reports the Philadelphia Inquirer. You can try to boost your class, says Fussell, by stocking your place with antiques but speech always tells the tale. For exa~ple, he notes, if you pronounce "exquisite" as "exquisite," you are operat­ing with a major cultural disadvantage. Boys Will be Girls Sexual stereotypes in America may be breaking down, but the news hasn't hit the nation's toy stores yet, reports USA Today. Retailers report that little girls still love !~~st ~~s c~~~o~~::.~n~~~~~~~ :~!~ prise to Florida State professor Charles Wolfgang, who says kids' attitudes arethe same as they were 50 years ago. But Wolfgang does see some change on the horizon. He says a few boys are start· ing to experiment with dolls. Straight to the Unemployment Line A San Francisco man has filed suit against his former em~loyer for allegedly firing him because he 1s not homosexual, reports the Chicago Tribune. . Paul Sacks says he was unfrurly termi­nated as sales manager of a local TV sta­tion because he is heterosexual .. His attorney, Melvin B~lh , says, "Straights as straights ar~ enti~led. to. the full protection of laws 8gamst d1scnmma­tion." Mixon estimates. "Once elected, it will take two to three years to draft an ordi· nance and present it to the Houston City Council in a form that can be adopted." Zoning has been considered at least two different times in this city, the last time being in 1962. Both times it was defeated, primarily because black precincts voted heavily against it. "One reason was a targeted campaign in black neighborhoods indicating that zoning would increase formal police-type intervention into residents' homes," he says. Traditionally, homeowners have been intimidated into believing zoning is an unnecessry evil, Mixon says. They believe that somehow zoning is bad, and even res· idents of subdivisions experiencing in ten· sive development next door can be heard saying, "you can't get zoning in Houston." "Right now you can see the seed grow· ing. You can see neighborhood elements making zoning acceptable for the future," Mixon says. "Generally, zoning helps Citizens estab­lish and maintain some order in their lives by preventing unwelcome high-intensity commercial development," he says. "It increases a city's attention to general pub­lic interest problems connected with land use. "On the other hand," he continues, "zoning increases the cost of development and makes some development impossible. It tends to sanitize commercial and resi· dential design and to make cities even more dull than they otherwise would be." Houston has had some desireable devel· opment which might not have occurred if Voice Publishing Company MONTROSE VOICE HOUSTON DALLAS GAY NEWS AUSTIN/SAN ANTONIO STAR zoning laws were enforced here, he say. Greenway Plaza and the Galleria, for example, might not have been allowed if city government had been concerned about the traffic implications of such intensive land use. If Houston voters did pass a zoning ordi­nance, existing commercial uses in resi­dential neighborhoods would generally be left alone, Mixon says. Nonconforming uses are subject to eventual elimination, but they must be left undistrubed for a length of time sufficient for the owner to recover the investment. "Uses classified as nuisances could be terminated immediately," Mixon con­cludes. "For other nonconforming uses, a phase-out time of five to twenty-five years might be required, depending upon the ordinance,'' 4 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 23, 1983 Montrose Mouth By Amanda B. Recondwith Ho, Ho, Ho .MERRY CHRISTMAS! Believe it or not, it's here, and Amanda just doesn't have her shop­ping done, and the cousins and nephews are coming over to wreak havoc on the crystal do-dads on the coffee tables All my friends are leaving the city 1f they can get out through the impenetrable winter haze up north, but there are a good number of us die-hards who are sticking 1t out here 1n good ol' Montrose! -c- Perhaps some of you made it downtown this year to see the Texas Commerce Bank Christ­mas program in the lobby of the old bank build­Jng Although the stage setting was its usual tacky self. the lobby was fabulous in its art deco grandeur. The choir, however, just didn't sound the same as in previous years. It was smaller, and the program tended to be a little dull and slow Hon, when you're standing there ln that lobby with an arm full of Christmas goodies, all foot-sore and holiday-minded, you don't feel like listening to funeral dirges! -c- So~e say that they were Christmas spirits, while others say that the drugs must have been just loo good, but everyone agrees that the five carolers who stormed the House of Pies on Kirby Sunday night were the hit oflheevemng. Was that actually Marshall Maxwell and Marilyn Roark causing a public scene again? People are going to start talking about those two' But thanks for the Christmas cheer! -c- Our illustrious managing editor, Robert Hyde would love to know why Jack M (you know who you are. honey) would offer a hand in friendship and then take it back so rudely. Maybe the days of Edwardian charm and social he1rarchy aren't quite dead. -c- Oh yes speaking of Robert Hyde. a reward is being offered for the idenllty of the httle Castro-looking number who attacked him this week at Mary's Poor Robert got quite a fat lip when this character came from nowhere and pounced on him, apparently without motive It's all rather shocking when you think that Mary's is usually such a nice, quiet, friendly place• We worry about Robert, and wonder whether we should invest in a body guard for him. Hmmmmm. Maybe Jack M. would be a good candidate -c- Well. we all had fun at the Montrose Voice Christ­mas Party at the Officer's Club Tuesday night. There was plenty of loud disco music, and lots of beer and drinks and real barbeque from Mat Garner's A good time was had by all. and there may be a few more errors in the paper this week while we all try to recover from it. -c- Think about this on Christmas Day Songwri­ter, composer and gay community friend Mor­ada Jane Benton Is 83 today. She wrote "Ditch D1ggin' Daddy" and "I Love Texas," among others, and now lives in Houston, where she socializes at gay clubs. -c- M1ss Charlotte's and The Lone Star's bar tour was a great success. Amanda has heard that those who belonged to the social clubs involved (Mustangs, Colt 45's. etc.) had a greet time checking out the local scenery. Among the bars they toured were the Barn, the Brazos River Bottom. the Officer's Club and Al's. We hear that the group was onginally to tour in a double-decker bus. but the bus overturned on the way and another -Nas found for the job. It's also a nice surprise to see the Brazos River Bottom and Miss Charlottes' get together for this event, putting competition aside Now that is community effortl -c- Gene Howle must be very pleased these days, since three of his entertainers were in the Female Impersonator of the Year Pageant. He must also be extremely proud of Ms. Naomi Simms who won the coveted award. Well. that's great. Naomi is a wonderful example of pride and beauty for the Houston gay community. -c- Oh no• Amanda has 1ust heard that our own celeb , Robert Hyde. has been cast to play Allan 1n The Boys In The Band. DiVers1ty Theat­er's next play at the Pink Elephant. We didn't know Mr. Hyde was such a talent, especially having to play this part. For those of you who are not familiar with the play, the character Allan 1s straight' -c- Now don't forget that all you Christmas orphans who couldn't get a jet or ride or wha­tever out of Houston this year (or just decided to stay to avoid the airport hysteria or highway ice-death). can all go participate in numerous free Christmas Buffets at Houston clubs on Christmas day. There is absolutely no reason for anyone to feel alone and depressed when your brothers and sisters are out there, caring for you. So 1f you're alone and don't want to be-DON'T BE! -c-lnc1dentally, we here at the Voice would really like to thank Leatherworks for the loaning of their leather gear to Billie Duncan (for her role in EJ's Holiday Show) and Robert Hyde (for presence at the Ripcord Fashion Show). We would only like to know what to do now about their coming into the editorial room, craciong those nasty whips and flinging an artist or two over their shoulders and carrying them off while dressed in all that wonderful gear. I'm not really complaining. It's just that Amanda just isn't used to being tied to makeshift ply­wood plllaries and being told to write "I love leather" over and over on the editing terminals. Please inform us on what to do about this prob­lem . . -o- That's about 11, gang. It's going to be a wonder­ful Christmas, and Amanda wishes you all the BEST in the coming year. But then, there will be gobs of things to do for New Year's' Take care, and enjoy plugging and unplug­ging (trees) and stuffing and eallng (turkeys). MERRY CHRISTMAS! Buckle Up Surviving a car crash can ruin your whole life, says the Michigan Psychiatric Society in the Detroit News. The society is backing a state law requir· ing motorists to wear car seat belts. They say being in a craah where someone died or was disabled can have "catastrophic" mental health consequences and leave permanent psychological scars. * BC Club Houston 2205 Fannin 659-4998 MEMBER CLUB BATH CHAIN Come Hoine for the Christmas Sunday, Spm til 2303 RICHMOND HOUSTON (713) 522-7616 330 SAN PEDRO SANANTONIO (512) 225-2353 C Dec. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 ommentary Neartown Home Take a Peek at My Christmas Wish List Tour Planning By Joe Ba ker Begun Remember when you were a kid and would write your Christmas wish list to Santa? What am I talking about-we all still have a wish list! My wish list this year is a mixed bag. There's things on it for myself, for friends, the gay community, people I don't know, people I would like to know. Some things are serious, some are light. Take a peek: I wish a gay-or even a straight­medical researcher would discover both the cause and the cure for AIDS. I wish the Michigan Lottery Bureau would send me that registered Jetter I've been waiting for all year. Merchants Organize on Curve A group of innovative Westheimer mer­chants have formed an association dubbed theOTC-"On theCurve"-forall the businesses in the 1300 and 1400 blocks of Westheimer. Hank Iglecia, owner of Creative Stained Glass and What's Up, initiated OTC while planning Christmas advertising. Reason­ing that there is strength in numbers, he consulted his neighboring merchants­nearly a dozen businesses-and formed the loose coalition for purposes of improv­ing security, decorating and lighting the area. "The OTC is why you can feel protected while you shop at these stores this Christ­mas," said Deborah Susman, owner of Muscle Beach T-Shirt Company, because a security person is now employed to patrol that portion of the street. OTC businesses are designated by the laurel-draped doors and windows. Other businesses include Appearances, Nothing Sacred, Stop the Clock, Tiz Avenue, Creative Beveled Designs, Fri­day's Florist, Dragon and Rat, Facets and East Texas Diner. The Neartown Firehouse serves as the meeting place for OTC. Interested persons should call 523-3431. .I wi~h Broadway playwright Harvey Fierstem (of Torch Song Trilogy and La Cage aux Foiles fame) would ask me to ~ollaborate with him on his next big pro­iect. I wish John Thomas of the Human Rights Campaign Fund would sponsor a w_eenie roast besides $150 per plate dinners. I wish the federal appeals court in New Orleans would uphold the unconstitution­ality of Texas anti-gay law 21.06. I wish a certain restaurant critic would start inviting me out to dinner again. I wish I had my car paid for. I wish I would be invited to at least one New Year's Eve party this year. N eartown Active in Beautifying Neighborhood Neartown Civic Association is again at work beautifying the neighborhood. This time the project is the esplanade in the 3300 block of Yoakum. Thanks to the generosity of Steve and Vicki Hance, owners of A-Arrow Lands­cape, it has been stripped, resoded and covered with St. Augustine grass. Handicapped Center Slated for Montrose The City of Houston's Community Devel­opment Department Division, a federally­funded program, has purchased a seven and one-half acre tract at Waugh Drive and Metropolitan for construction of a Multi-Service Center for the Handicapped. The center will be a unique venture­nothing else in the city will be like it-and is intended to serve the special social and recreational needs of visually impaired, hearing impaired, mobility impaired, mentally retarded and otherwise disabled. I wish Joan Rivers would stop picking on me. I wish somebody would send me fresh flowers-just once. I wish that a certain bartender would ask me out. I wish that I had enough courage to ask him out. I wish he would give me an indication if he would like me to ask him out. I wlsh sombody would give me a pair of leather chaps. Preferably with a hot man in them. I wish the bars had 25¢ drinks every night. I wish a certain blond would realize what a great couple we make. I wish breaking up didn't hurt so much. I wish rejection didn't hurt so much. I wish Congress would pass a gay rights Jaw. I wish Richard Longstaff would win approval from the U.S. Supreme Court to become an American citizen. I wish my mother would quit asking me if I am dating any nice girls yet? I wish I would tell my mother that I am dating some nice men, though. I wish the Rev. Jerry Falwell would be arrested for "flashing" little girls and old ladies at at a shopping center. I wish somebody would ask to be my groupie. I wish I was a teenager again-just for one week. I wish I had the buns of death. I wish my novel was written. I wish somebody would give me a male model es· cort for Christmas. I wish I really enjoyed working out. I wish everybody who is gay could come out of their closets. I wish the Dallas Gay Alliance would sponsor a reception for Ronald Reagan during the Republican National Conven· tion in Dallas this summer-and he would attend. I wish a very good friend wasn't hurting so much, and that I could help him. I wish he realized how much he has going for him-and thathe can make it on his own and have a great new life. I wish New York was only an hour's drive from Texas. I wish everybody a very Merry Christ­mas and terrific New Year. The Neartown Home Tour for April is in the planning stages, and persons are needed to work on publicity, in sales and in operations. "This year we'll continue to have a few 'wow' houses, but we hope to emphasize smaller homes that are liveable, practical and full of ideas," a representative said. Interested Neartown members, or would-be members, should call John Ben­zon, 524-1239, or Cindy Pierce, 526-5103. Christmas Flops Business may be great this Christmas, but not everything was moving like hotcakes, reports the Wall Street Journal. Telephones, which many stores had great hopes for, are flops. So are video­discs, and a Montgomery Ward spokes­man says video game cartridgeti are "about as close a thing as we have to a bomb." One hopeful note for lovers of peace on earth: those big portable boom box radios are losing popularity, too. Soviet Vodka The cold war between American eateries and Russian vodka is thawing a bit, reports the New York Post. Some of New York's poshest restau­rants, including Luchow's and the "21" Club, have ended a boycott that began after the Korean jet disaster. But not every innkeeper is so forgiving. Says restaurateur Mel Dansky: "I won't sell Russian vodka until they recognize that each human life is precious." Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 f.lrntroee Vo-ce PubLtlh~ Co CIACU.ATION Montf'OM VOIC9. 11.000 cop41-.., Oa ... Gay Niews I ODO c:opes __..ly Aust~" Antonto Star. 4.000 c:op.et b""'911Wy IOll l Te.•.,... 11 000 cop.- ..... l)i. a'1'Q Contents copyright •1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg pc.bh>­Robert Hyde m•n~1ng«l1tot' HoH11 Hood ,......~''"' Chuck Meredith •port• «Jttor 81lhe Duncan Peter 0.rl<Mn Jon Cheelwood Joe L Watts ~,.,,.,,~ Ac.I Clar1< Mfd1'.elor Jell 8'8)' gropllu Sonny Davia eccount1"9 Lyt Harns -""'fld­M- arlt. D. .r. a..g, o ~~= Greet• MonttOM Busrneea Gut d Gay NW'IS.IWCN lntemettenatG1yNew9Agency, Pac1r.ctwews s.rv-. L•ny Buoh (Woohu>gton O C.) Synd1e1ted FMtcn ~ & Wflt9f1; (San Franaeco) Chfonide Feetu,_, Unhed FMture Syndteate. Jeffrey Wilaorl, Randy Alfred. Stonewall Featur.. Syndicate. Brian McNoughl Joo Bnw POSTMASTER Send lddr ... ccwrectron1 to 3317 Mootroee 1308. Houalon. TX nooe SubecnptlOtl r•I• "' US '"Ma/9d ~ $49 pw year (S2 - i. s211per1,.monthl (21S-1. ors1 25per_,_ !hon 211-1 Bo<:k - S2 00 MCI\ NatlOl't l «Jwrt1111111 ,. pr.,.,,t1trve Joe 0'5ab.to. R•vendell Markellf'G Me 6ttl A¥enue. New YOl'k 10011 ~ 212) 242-ell3 Ad'lef11&i1J9 dHdflM Toeed•'f 5 )()pm. tor IDOi,....., F~ doy ..... ng NOIJU to ad\-erti&era Local actv«t ... ng ,.,. schedule So -A ., .. •ffectfv• Juty 1, 1913 Raponaibll 1¥ twtontrose Votce'" doel noc euume ~ bdtty tor aovertis ng clt ttnS RelOWI lhOuld 11«1 ~ontrOse V0tee" 10 any deceptrVe 10vettts1ng 6 M ONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 23, 1983 l\1ontroseis ................. ~ for the Birds Did you know that there are some 80 differ­ent kinds of birds that pass through the Montrose area every year? So says Bob Behrstock, vice president of Peregrine, Incorporated, a birdwatching tour com­pany in the Neartown area. Behrstock has identified at least 55 spe­cies in his yard, including the Cardinal, Blue Jay, Starling, Mockingbird, Chim­ney Swift, Common Nighthawk, Purple Martin, American Robin, Kestel and Cedar Waxwing which winter here. Gay Politicians Issue Questionnaire for '84 Campaigns '"l'he direction of our efforts has shifted beyond seeking acceptance by the rest of aociety to a clear demand that we, as American citizens, must be involved in the decisions that affect our lives." So reads the briefing paper which accompanies a questionnaire being issued by a collective of national gay/ lesbian organizations, reports the National Gay Task Force. The material will be sent to Presidential candidates and will raise questions as to whether the candidates -will support passage of a gay civil rights bill, -will eliminate exclusion of gays from military service, -will oppose discrimination based on eexual orientation in immigration, -will use the Presidency to support the Equal Rights Amendment, -will support funding for AIDS research. The documents are part of an "84 and Counting" voter registration drive organ­ized by the National Gay Task Force, the Human Rights Campaign Fund, the National Coalition of Black Gays, the Gay Rights National Lobby and the National Association of Gay and Lesbian Demo­cratic Clubs. You 're Reading the MONTROSE VOICE One of Amef/ca·s Ma1or Gay Community Newspapers Christmas Cards Reflect Anxiety of BO's You can still find a traditional Norman Rockwell-style Christmas card, but greet­ing cards have changed to reflect life in the anxious 80's, reports the San Fran­ci8co Examiner. There's one for a child to send to his divorced father's new girlfriend, and another showing prairie dogs frying tacos under the mistletoe for newly-arrived sun belt residents to send back home. Some of the other trendy scenes this Christmas: Santa playing video games, watching soap operas, or dodging nuclear missiles. America's Biggest Gift Givers It's the season for giving, but for some, it's Christmas all-year 'round. Town and Country magazine has compiled a list of America's most generous millionaires. At the top are publisher Walter Annen­berg and art collector Paul Mellon, who have shelled out more than $100 million each in their lifetimes. The youngest philanthropist listed is Star Wars creator George Lucas, who gave nearly $5 million to set up a school of cinema-television a t his alma mater, the University of Southern California. AM/PM SHIFT EARN OVER $300 WEEKLY Join the hottest radio promotion to ever run in the Houston area. We need 50 people in our promotional office with pleasant personalities and voice. No experience neces­sary We will train. Our office has a cheerful, comfortable atmosphere. Plus cash bonus daily. Guys, girls, homemakers welcome. HIRING NOW Apply in person 10am-3pm or 5pm-7pm every Monday thru Satur­day. 2727 Kirby Dr., suite 203 (on bus route). ALL NEED A LAWYER? YOU CAN AFFORD Judith ~ugfa~ ATTORNEY AT LAW DWI POSSESSION DEBT RELIEF BANKRUPTCY PERSONALINJURY FAMILY LAW Reasona~le Fees & Terms Sat. & Evening Appts. 303 W. Polk at Tait 520-1370 24 hours General Practice of Law Now ... :I: > "ll "ll -< :I: 0 r 0 > ~ ~ gj :n -< () :I: :n ~ ze Cooling s24ss * Transmission Service s24es * 011 Change and Lube s1995 1411 TAFT- 522-2190 ~ > (fl & HAPPY NEW YEARS TO ALL Ride in Widebody Comfort to Los Angeles ... EASTERN'S L-1011 Wisperliner Departs Daily at 5:35 P.M. -o- Starting January 9 New Widebody Service to New Orleans; Miami and Las Vegas. Check our Affordable Fares! Call your travel agent or Eastern Airlines in Houston at 738-8615. EASTERN, Houston's oldest and largest major carrier serving you since 1936. EASTERN America's favorite way to fly .. (/) a: w :::;; 0 1- (/) :::l (.) 0 z <( (/) 0 z w a: L1- DEC. 23, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 Christmas Day OPEN AT NOON Drink Specials .................... Maybe! Special New Year's Night at IVlarv's (Se!! next vveek"s Voice"'Jor details) Ha.poy Holidays From ttie nftanagement & Staff of Mary's NIGHTLY HAPPY HOUR 10PIVI TIL 12:30AIVI 1022 Westheimer-528-8851-New DJ Wayne Barton, Hot! Hot! Hot! 8 MONTROSE VOICE I Dec. 23, 1983 0 0 • 0 b 0 0 0 0 c 0 0 • 0 l> 0 • et OPEN CHRISTMAS DAY AT NOON HOURS Mon-Sat 10am-2am Sunday noon-2am HAPPY HOURS Monday-Saturday 10am-7pm MERRY CHRISTMAS 0 TO FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS FROM LARRY & LINDA AT THE HOLE 0 • • • • • 0 0 A L 1ra11k ~~· .t\.ll ,.\uael"ieaat 1So)'l'9 New books from y s 0 N P U BLI CATIONS D THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Fnedel, $7.00. The entertaimng coming-out story of Bunon Raider, who is so elegant that as a child he reads Vogue in his playpen. "The wnting 1s fresh and cnsp, the humor often hilarious," wntes the L.A. Times. "The funmest gay novel of the year," says Chnstopher Sueet. 0 ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $4.00. One teenager in ten 1s gay; here, twenty-six young people tell thei:r stories: of coming to terms with being different, of the decision how - and whether - to tell friends and parents, and what the consequences were. 0 THE BUTI'ERSCOTCH PRINCE, by Richard Hall, $5.00. When Cor­dell's best friend and ex-lover 1s murdered, the only clue 1s one that the police seem to consider too kinky to follow up on. So Cordell decides to track down the killer himself - with results far different from what he had expected. D ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, SS 00. "I've known that I was gay since I was thirteen. Docs that surprise you! It didn't me " So begins All-Amencan Boys, the story of a teenage love affai:r that should have been simple - but wasn't. 0 CHINA HOUSE, by Vincent Lardo, SS.00. A gay gotluc that has everything: two handsome lovers, a mysterious house on the hill, sounds in the night, and a father-son relauonsh1p that's closer than most. D THE ALEXANDROS EXPEDmON, by Patncia Sitkin, $6.00. When Evan Talbot leaves on a mission to rescue an old schoolmate who has been impnsoned by fanatics in the Middle East, he doesn't realize that the mp will also involve his own commg out and the discovery of who it 1s that he really loves. D DEATH TRICK, by Richard Stevenson, $6.00. Meet Don Strachey, a private eye in the classic tradition but wtth one difference: he's gay. TO ORDER Enclosed is $ ; please send the books I've checked above. (Add Sl.00 postage when ordenng just one book; if you order more than one, we'll pay postage.) D Charge my (cucle one): Visa Mastercard acct. no. expuauon date: ____ _ signature:------------------ name address c1ty ___________ state ___ z1p ______ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 DEC 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Montrose Symphonic Band Spread the Holiday Spirit P hotostory by Billie Duncan The holiday conc1>rt last weekend by the Montrose Symphonic B1md wd.s too good for words, so here are some pictures. The New Covenant Singers provided charm, flair and rousingly good voices in Act I Here is Andy Mills conducting the band in the first act ... And here is Andy Mills conducting the band in the second act The Bayou B'lu singers delighted the crowd with a seril's of mini-concerts The Montrose Country Cloggers put a little country into Christmas Et·en in their det•er disguises, the audienc(' rl'COl(mzed tht' Montro.~e Symphonic Band Thi' p1cturl' ib blurred but th1• gesturl' u·as bl'autifully defined. Enmorv Lingu;ood donated$/()()() to the.band to aid them in their trip to California. Happy Hp)1°da)$! 10 MONTROSE VOICE DEC. 23. 1983 An Elusive Peace on Earth By Robert Hyde Almost 2.000 years ago, a miracle was reported to have occurred in a stable in the small town of Bethlehem just outside Jer­usalem: a child was born to a woman­miraculously through natural childbirth-who had been inseminated by a supreme being who cared intensely for the race of men he had created. Matthew and Luke wrote of this birth briefly. yet colorfully enough to keep the story alive for centuries. Luke reported shepherds being inter· rupted from watching their flocks by a choral spectacle in the heavens where angels promised peace on earth and good will to men. Matthew reported that astrologers from east of Judea had followed a traveling star acr°"" wild wasteland to the site of the miraculous birth to offer gifts of gold, fran­kincense and myrrh to a child whom they hoped would put an end to the iniquities of mankind. It was a good beginning. Almost immediately the supreme being's plans began to fall through. Mat­thew reported that all children in Bethle­hem under the age of two were slaughtered-the first reported ill conse­quence of a divinity who chose to interfere with the established game plan. Then some 30 years later, after a minis­try advocating peace on earth and good will to men, the same child-now a man­was reported by the .. e same writers to have been crucified by Roman oppressors. Yet the man was said to have lived again three days after his death, and after a short stay on earth, he returned from where he had come. Finis. But the man had launched a dream-a disturbing one-for it inspired unrealistic expectations that mankind could live in peace and good will with his fellow man­a dream which refuses to die. Yet something has happened in the intervening years. In the beginning, men and women who followed this dream were severely perse­cuted by Roman emperors and had to speak of their benevolent expectations for mankind in !lecret. Approximately 60 year,; after the dt>ath of the peace-giver during the reign of the Roman Emperor Domitian, Revelations, a letter laden with symbolil'lm and hidden codes, was penned by a member of this new sect. It stands today, ironically, as an apocraphal vision where that same prince of peace-who had been attended by the wise men-returns to oversee the destruction of mankind whom he was reported to have loved. There was much dissension among the early organizers of this new religion when they gathered to decide which books would be included in this new testament to their faith. Some saw this visionary apo­calyJ) 8e for what it was and wanted it excluded. But the ones who won the debate saw it become a part of the canon which would be distributed throughout the I I - -r-- ;- -+--- known world. And it was a fitting epitaph to cement the damnation of mankind begun by Paul and left recorded in his let­ters to the new religion's converts. But how strange the Alpha from the Omega. Would the wise men have made their long journey had they known the consequences heralded by that illustrous TRAVEL CONSULTANTS rnm~~, ~~ruu, u&~~ m&!*!k ce(O)f!]~flll'&~ ~E!k ~~~lllf'~~~~ ~!§!k ~©~fl'iTA~~ Special Texas Departure January 31, 1984 star? Perhaps they saw in that birth a moment of peace which would have trou­ble surviving in a world of thorns where men, discontent with the beauty and hope of the beginning, would instead prefer to dwell upon the weakneRses of mankind and appoint therruielves as members of a heavenly choir-a position for which no Editorial human being is qualified nor has the men­tality to understand. Looking back over the years-the long years-how far away from that cold night in Bethlehem we have come. Peace on earth, good will to men is still but a dream. Condemnation and self-righteousness have become more tangible realities and incite more concrete emotions than wish· ing your neighbor well. We, as members of the gay community living in this time and place, are part of this heritage, but must continue to carry our own crosses in our personal cold nights because the society built on the ministry of a prince of peace chooses to hate and fear, rather than love and accept. Perhaps life would be easier for us in another country, in another time. Maybe then a gay community church would not have such a difficult time becoming part of a national body of Chris­tians. May be then they wou Id not have the desire-or the need-to join a group which prefers divisiveness over Jove. Maybe then we could embrace more eas­ily our families and hold more closely our loved ones and hold our heads higher than we ever have before. But why not here? Why not now? Ultimately, the choice is ours. Regardless of the years and the direc· tion that our Judeo1Christian society has taken, that cold night in Bethlehem still speaks to us about peace on earth and good will to men. Christmas reacquaints us with that intangible dream. So in a quiet moment this season, per· haps when you're alone or with someone you love more than anyone in the world, look for that brilliant star once again and realize that it shines as much for you as it does for anyone. We at the MONTROSE VOICE wish each and everyone of you a very Merry Christ­mas. Store Santa's Becoming Endangered Species Next Christmas, department store Santas may demand a no-cut clause, reports the Wall Street Journal, because a growing number of emporiums have given St. Nick his walking papers. The reason: Kris Kringle and his sleigh take up valuable floor space that could be used to hustle home computers and Cab­bage Patch Dolls. Many unemployed elves are bitter. Grouses one: "You'd think they could sac­rifice a little money. But what do I know? I'm not an accountant. I'm just a Santa." New Freedom Christian Church Cordially invites you to our Christmas Eve and ® Christmas Day Services December 24th. at 11 :45 p.m. December 25th. at 10:00 a.m. New Year's Eve Watch 11:30 p.m., December 31st. New Year's Day Service January 1st. at 10:00 a.m. 912 West 11th. Street (3 blocks East of Shepherd) Phone: 591-1342 \:OME AND SHARE THIS JOYOUS SEASON WITH US! • Gays Don't Fit Stereotypes "Husband" and "wife" are not roles rou­tinely assumed by gay couples who have been together for a long time, says The Male Couple: How Relationships Deuelop, by David McWhirter and Andrew Matti­son, psychiatrist and psychologist, respec­tively, at the UC San Diego School of Medicine. Their new book also says that sexual fidelity is not as important as in heterosex­ual marriages, from information gained by interviewing some 156 couples. Some older couples fit the stereotyped husband and wife roles, said McWhirter, simply because for years they have been told they should. The five-year study, begun in 1974, interviewed 312 men asking them 240 questions dealing with everything from the couple's sex lives to their long-range plans together. Based on the interviewed, the authors found that fidelity was defined in terms of emotional commitment rather than sex­ual behavior, and that the longest lasting relationships involved an age difference of at least five years. It's Time for Christmas Allergies You don't have to be Scrooge to sneeze at Christmas. Allergist Stanley Wolf says in USA Today that many of us get the snif­fles from Christmas presents, derorations and especially trees. He says, "Standing in the lot to- long makes them moldy and du11ty.' I yv 're ll holiday sneezer, Wolf ~uggests ouy.ng an artifical tre<> ond vacuuming ii frequently. And watch out for Christmas dinners. You may be allergic to the nuts in the chestnut stuffing. Engineers' Gravy Train Runs Out of Steam Bad news for engineering students hoping to l'atch the gravy train to riches: while members of the clllBS of '82 could practi­cally write their own tickets, this year's graduates are facing a 50 percent drop in job offers-and starting pay, reports the College Press Seruice. Also down are openings in chemistry, agriculture and earth sdences. The hot new field11 arr math, biology and, of course, computer science. Get Off the Roads by Dark, At Least by 12 If you drink, don't drive-but if you do drive makeeureyou'rehome by midnight. That' advice comes from a University of California researcher who says you're 60 times more likely to get in a fatal accident after 12 than during rush hour, reports the San Francisco Chronicle. Mathematician Sherman Stein says he studied three years of traffic statistics and was astounded at how dangerous late­night driving is. The reason, he says, is that a large proportion of cars on the road then are "drunken missiles ready to fire." The worst time of the week, he adds, it just after the bars close Saturday night. And here's another reason for heading home early: a separate study has found you're more likely to get a ticket if you're stopped by a cop after dark. Researchers at San Joee State Univer­sity say they found only 58 percent of the drivers stopped during the d~y were tick­eted, while at night the figure1umped to 71 percenl They think one factor may be that cops are more irritable at nighl ITALIAN BEEF HOUSE • Italian Beef Sausage (with green peppers) • Ital/an Sausage Sandwich (with green peppers and grilled onions) •Italian Meatbsll Sanawlch •Polish Sausage (grilled onions, mustard and relish) •HotDogs (Chicago style) 2703 Montrose at Westheimer ORDERS TOGO 526-8709 DEC. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 20°/o OFF E" E ~...,,,,,-.. I .. Ci * * Books * Fish Tanks Patio Furniture * Puppies * Kittens * Birds * Fish 12 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 23, 1983 Open Late Christmas Eve for Your Last Minute Shopping. Cfnfatmo.J. c.cais, 1A!w.p, gi./ti, Cf's an.J sweat sf.i.ils, moic c.iittcu and fnau tf.an cv c'f.!! L011U. .:Sh.au tf.c df.fa9i.c. 'JhL J.ta{{ o{ Cii.ttns <•!a.nt to tf.a.n' aff of you and wi.sf. y ou a vny :::7tfcn.'1 Ch.iiilmas and a <:P-io spuous dVcu• <ycat 636 cflawfhotru- .::::llouston Cfuas 77006-,29-S299 Op•n d(o1;J":f thiu 9tlk!J 10am-9p,., Open .:£uto.nda!I 1oam-6pm. MASTERCARD & VISA ACCEPTED f!~~~~rl ~!:"~ ~~a~:':~:; ~~{~~,~~~~c:;~k llJlll I mqnicatlons i1 the ~ay_ et?mmtkJ!ty. i Thp GNIC Network is a rrw1t1:J$er n8W$. in~f!dcommu~ 'lc8t'Ath~phorl8 · over 2sdcitie$,in the U.S.¥ Canpda' Qu:J~nse fJmer' are fpst~o~rfy ratps art lawf omrf5·25111r/. . , t PJ111Cli/ws.i1 can incJ4de: c "1~ bLJUrun d. y 1 ne , /~al a iso a m lti-u r ch4t faci ·1y, a d ~fh , 171uch ore. ou 1 joifl ss e 'ull · , wef wiH Bil yoqr owrt per; nel fh(sam.aaywere&ive ur !ica on. r,yo canj inon iiialfn I su9scn.J11on and r~tVe 1 the ne s of ribula~mem rsh lu two Ii ee hours of acceJs. Then if ydu wis , you can }Jin as f reg arm mbe .for o m~. t 1 I , I _J_~-~ ~l~~~~i:Ll_L 0 Regular Subscription $30 0 Trial Subscription $15 D Send me more information, please. ANdadmroe. . ...-._ -_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_- - ~ City. _________ State __ Ztp ____ _ Type of Computer. _______________ _ Clip and Mail to: GNIC NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 HOUSTON • 2327 Grant at Fai rview 528-8342 MONDAY NIGHTS by J.D. ARNOLD WITH GUEST BARTENDER OF RICH'S HAPPY HOUR DAILY 12pm-6pm KRAZEE HOUR NITEL Y~ 9pm-11pm 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer J TUESDAY J~l 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer ~ \~ w~~~~v V~ 2-for-1 Well Drinks IA .. ~ : J ff 9pm-m1dnight f \JJv-·v d Plan Now to Attend the Gay Press Association Southem Regional Conference ,AY January 27-29 Hotel Savoy Houston Workshops, Speeches, Entertainment If you ore wooing in the gay media ex are a gay person wooing In the non-gay media (either journalism. advertising ex administrative). plan to join your colleagues in Houston Also. fcx officials of gay cxganizatlons who are NOT in the gay media but who would like to learn how to better Influence the gay media. local and notional. we'll have a special wOll<shop. To Henry McClurg. vice president Gay Press Association. 3317 Montrose #306, Houston. lX 77006 Enclosed is my $25 registration fee (fcx GPA members) ex $30 reQistration fee (non-GPA members) fcx the Southern Regional Conference. (Include $10 additional if postmarked after Jan. 13) I am in the gay media I worl< fcx the non-gay media 8 1 do not wOll< in the media but would like to attend the wOll<shop on influencing the gay media and other events of the conference Name ~-~-~-----~---~-~~ Address ---~-~~~-~--~- Phon~s) ----~------~~~~ O I am a member of the Gay Press Association o I am NOT a member of the Gay Press Association (tt arMng In Houslon i:,,. plane.''°" a bus. let us knc7Nvou timeolarlvaf ondwewillplckyouup al the oorpoll 01 depot ) \Nhen we receive your fcxm. we'll send you a conference schedule and a brochure on the 5o.KJ.; Hotel so you can moke res01Vations (You do not have to stay at The 5o.KJ.; to attend the conference.) The Sava.t Is within walking distance of several 9°'1 clubs Addtfionally. busses will be available fOf tours of Montr050 nightspots. Your registration fee will Include tickets fcx free and discounted admlS$10f)S to several dubs Letters Thanks from Gay Switchboard From Rick Grossman During the past month, the Gay Switch· board of Houston has had two highly suc­cessful fundraisers. We have raised close to $2500. That's a substantial chunk of our $13,200 budget for the year. We'd like to publicly thank Gian Rum­sey for providing the space for our Art Auction and his other help at his Waugh Drive studio and frame shop. We must also thank Walter Strickler, Terry Clark and Cody at the Barn for all of their support for our Bake-off/ Auction. Thanks also go to Jim Lambert of the Mustangs and Reenie Sharpe of the Sun­dance Cattle Company who mobilized their groups in support. The Gay Switchboard staff and board of directors salute these fine people for all of their help. He Pans Atheists' Spoof From Bob Adams The American Gay Atheists presented via phone (see ad in Montrose Voice, Dec. 16) their spoofy production of"A Wayward in the Manager" featuring some creepy female voice making fun of the Virgin Mary and trying to imitate Mae West as Mary. (What an insult to the late Miss West!) They would have done better to use an imitation of their own sex symbol, Wfltfl Us Lett11rs to the Editor. MONTROSE VOICE We Want to know Your Opinion on Issues of Interest to Montrose. Madalyn Murray O'Hare (whose own son is a born-again Christian and has exposed his lovely mother's cause many times)? The "message" on the phone was blas­phamous and in the poorest of taste. I am sure it offended many gay Christians (or otherwise). To add a little mystery to it all, I found it interesting that "666" appeared in the phone number (457-6660) in their ad. While the American Gay Atheists may not be "the Beast" they are certainly doing some of his work for him. On Behalf of Nikki From Gregg Russell In the heat of an election, things are some­times said and done in a campaign which candidate has little or no control over. Anyone who has been involved in a cam· paign must agree that there is no way a candidate can control the many thou­sands of dollars spent, nor does a candi· date have control over the actions of organizations or the people who support them. I feel it is important that people know of the extreme uneasiness Nikki Van Hight­ower had with some of the supporters backing her and their actions. A good example of her concern was displayed one evening when she suggested that certain people leave her campaign headquarters who were telling racist jokes. "If that is why you joined my cam· paign," she said, "we have nothing in common." This is the outspoken Nikki Van Hight· ower whom I continue to admire. As for those who chose not to support Nikki Van Hightower because of her GPC backing, I can only conclude that such reasoning is the basis of our problems in this community. Nikki Van Hightower is no more responsible for the problems of the GPC than she is for the problems of the PTA I was proud to be a Nikki supporter. FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE CALL DAVID WORTHY (713) 529-0027 NEOn mn11N I I I 11' I UWI I DEC. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 "MISS O" and "OLE D. Q ." ~ WISHING YOU YOUR ~ ~ Jf/ FINEST STOCKING STUFFING EVER Servicing the Montrose for over 1/ 100th of a Century 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER)-523-2794 Centurions 14 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 23, 1983 Babs Plus 14 Equals Christmas Films B;r Steve Warren Via Gay PrM1 Aaaociation Wire Service Barbra Streisand's first musical since A Star ia Bom is a prime contender for your year-end movie dollars. Opposing her will be (wouldn't you know it!) a couple of screenfuls of Nazis; Clint Eastwood's latest (take THAT, Charlie Bronson!) one­man war on crime; Johns Travolta and Olivia Newton-in their first non-musical together; Meryl Streep in an American nuclear tragedy; Burt Reynolds as a hete­rosexual; Pacino Cubano; Shields in the sand; other assorted tales of mice, men and women; and an oldcarthatjustmight run over them all. With , a few exceptions, this year's Christmas crop of Hollywood's biggest, moi;t expensive and hopefully best pie· tures sound less promising than last year's-and most of those turned out to be duds. Still there's sure to be something in Santa's cinematic sack to lure you to the Artificial Trees Become More Popular than the Real Thing The tree sheltering many Christmas gifts this year grew up in a laboratory, not on a mountainside, reports USA Today. Americnns bought eight million artifi· cial trees in 1982, and industry spokesmen say their orders were double this year. Christmas shoppers give several rea· sons for switching from the natural pro­duct. Some cite conservation, and others say it's safer. But motit say they're just tired of cleaning pine needles out of the carpet. Strict Christmas Rules at Pentagon Yes, V1rgmia, Chr-IBtmas has come to the Pentagon, but subiect to military disci· pline, reports the Washington Post. The Defense Department issued strict guidelines regarding holiday decor: trees must not be over four-feet high, and prefer· aby should be artificial. Only round orna· ments are permitted. Forbidden are candles, gl888 or pointed objects, as well as fake snow. Holly and other material may be u,.ed, but only "sparingly." The man in charge of enforcing the regu· lations is Capt. L.W. Freeman, who says the rules "speak for themselves." Any questions about them, he says, must be submitted in writing. popcorn palace of your choice, so here's a preview: Christine-In the third movie from a Stephen King novel in four months (after Cujo and The Dead Zone), hell hath nothing like a Fury scorned.John Carpen· ter directed the story of a 1958 Plymouth which is unusually possessive; D.C. Cab-Mr. T. and Gary Busey try to better themselves by starting a taxi ser· vice in the nation's capital. Irene Cara also appears in the wacky action comedy; Gorky Park-William Hurt is the KGB detective assigned to investigate a triple slyaing in Moscow in Michael Apted's film of the Martin Cruz Smith bestseller. Joanne Pacula and Lee Marvin CO-$tar; The Keep-Michael Mann's first film since Thief finds Nazis being spooked in a mysterious castle/fortress. Scott Glenn (Personal Best, The Right Stuff) and Jur­gen Prochnow (The Consequence, Das Boot) head the cast of the season's sole special effects spectacular; The Man Who Loved Women-Burt Reynolds has the title role in Blake Edwards' remake of Francois Truffaut's gentle comedy. Julie Andrews is the psy· chiatrist who gets to hear of Burt's pursuit of Marilu Henner, Kim Basinger and many others; The Rescuers-Mice and the voices of Bob Newhart and Zsa Zsa Gabor save Penny and her teddybear from Madame Medusa in the 1977 feature that was Dis· ney's best animated work since Lady and the Tramp (with Mickey's Christmas Carol, a new Disney featurette in which the cartoon stock company goei; to the Dickens for a seasonal plot); Sahara-Brooke Shields roars through a 20's trans-desert auto race, and nothing gets between her and her Calvins but some sand and an occasional sheik; Scarface-You won't think Marielitos are fans of Hemingway after seeing Al Pacino aa a Cuban refugee who becomes a cocaine kingpin in Brian DePalma's bloody, updated remake of the 1932 drama which was loosely based on Al Capone's career; Silkwood-Meryl Streep stars as Karen Silkwood, who died in 1974 in a car "acci­dent" which may have been a nuclear reaction to her attempts to expose dangers at a plutonium plant. Mike Nichols directed a cast that includes Kurt Russell and Cher; Sudden Impact-Honky Tonk Man was such a bomb that Clint Eastwood has had to make Dirty Harry IV to re-establish his box office clout; and if "Go ahead-make my day" becomes a new catch phrase, we'll know he's succeeded; To Be or Not to Be-Are you ready for one more remake? Are you ready for Mel Brooks and Anne Bancroft replacing Jack Benny and Carole Lombard? If so, you'll find out how many Polish actors it takes to outwit the Nazis; Two of a Kind-A would-be inventor and a bank teller have a chance to save the world in this romantic comedy which reu- ON BEHALF OF THE EXILE AND MYSELF, I SINCERELY WISH A MERRY CHRISTMAS & HAPPY NEW YEARS TO ALL MY PATRONS AND FRIENDS. MA YYOU ALWAYS HA VE WHAT YOU WANT AN WANT WHAT YOU HAVE. SINCERELY COougQas ·~~.._ ,.....- ...., --...... . ' ...... ;. '-t.:.. .. " .......... , -::- - Burt Reynolds stars as a man with insatiable appetite for beautiful womema nd Julie Andrews is the psychiatrist who tries to cure him in "The Man Who Loved Women" Olivia Newton.John and John Travolta form an unlikely pair who eventually fall out of love with making it and in love with each other in "Two of a Kind" nitee John Travolta and Olivia Newton· John; Uncommon Valor-Taking up govern· ment slack, Gene Hackman goes to Viet­nam to hunt for his son and other MIA's, organizing a band of veterans to help him; Yentl-A century ago a Hebrew school (let alone a convent!) wouldn't take a Jew· ish girl, so Barbra Streisand masquerades as a Jewish BOY to get an education­with the expected complications. Though publicity suggests Babs made this movie singlehandedly, Mandy Patinkin's on hand to keep her from having to make love to herself. In addition, Rear Window should be replaced during December by Vertigo, my personal favorite in the series of five long. unseen Alfred Hitchcock classics. James Stewart falls in love with Kim Novak twice in this romantic suspense master· piece; and even though Hitch didn't want Novak (his choice, Vera Miles, got preg­nant), no director ever used her to better advantage. That's the list, barring last-minute addi­tions and local exceptions. Have a merry moviegoing Christmas! In-Store Coupon Special ~.coreshn VERY RARE' ~.cot.c~ ~~ishlJ 86 Proof- $1. 75 Liters ONLY 12.99 Regular $13.59 OFFEFf EXPIERS 1/1/84 MASTER CARO VISA AMERICA"! EXPRESS 1402 Welch at Waugh Drive 529-9964 ----------------------------------~ DEC. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 How Do You Do as a Houseguest? Quiz By Roz A11hley What kind of houseguest gets invited back? And how do you rate on that score? Get in the mood and reminisce about the last time you visited a friend. What really happened? Did you strip your bed before you left? Did you strip yourself so your friend's mate could see you? Did you strip your host/hostess? Or did you simply strip the bathroom of that great cologne you found there? Be honest on the following quiz; you'll have fun and also get a brutally frank rating on your chances of being invited back to all the "right" houses. Circle the answer that most truthfully completes each numbered paragraph. Skip any items that don't apply or seem stupid to you. Answers (and scoring) follow the last question. 1. You arrived at the apartment ofsome friends a few hours ago. Now everyone has gone to sleep, and you don't know which towel to use. You: a) don't wash; b) use the little lace one on the rack; c) use a paper towel from the kitchen. 2. You've been visiting a good friend who didn't mention how long your stay should last. The atmosphere is getting tense, so you: a) pack up and throw a good­bye kiss; b) wistfully ask if you should leave; c) offer drugs. 3. Your friend is on a diet, but you love to snack. What do you do? a) Nibble secretly; b) bake brownies and share; c) bake brow­nies, but scarf them all up yourself. 4. On a visit to a friend, you stain one of the towels badly, so you: a) apologize; b) rinse it out; c) take it with you when you leave. 5. Your friend has gone out, but his/her lover drops by. So you: a) chat, but avoid flirting; b) offer half of your newspaper and settle down to read; c) serve a strong drink, maintain eye contact and hope your friend will be gone for at least an hour. 6. A hostile dog guards your friend's place, and you must enter alone after a date. You have a key, but you're afraid. You solve the problem by: a) placating the animal with raw hamburger in advance; b) wearing dog repellant; c) making a night of it. 7. You're visitng friends, but you forgot to pack toothpaste. So you: a) wait a day and then buy some; b) ask for some and use it; c) use the toothpaste in the bathroom and complain about the flavor. 8. You get up early, but your host/hos­tess likes to sleep late. So you: a) read in the mornings; b) run the water in the tub, take a bath and flush the toilet a lot; c) turn up the stereo and do some aerobics. 9. You're leaving your friend after a visit, and you're selecting a thank-you gift. You buy: a) replacements for every­thing you've broken; b) a book you intend to borrow back right away; c) some wine to share during your last dinner together. 10. You're on an extended visit with a busy person. You plan to: a) go your own way each day; b) ask every morning, "What are we doing today?"; c) ask every morning, "What are you doing today?" 11. You spilled red wine on your friend's rug. You tried to wash it, but the spot onl! got bigger. Wh~t do you do? a) Have 1t cleaned, pay for it and co.nf~s all; b) move the furniture so the spot 1s hidden; c) cry a lot. 12. You're visiting a tnend whose par­ents arrive unexpectedly from out of town. You: a) offer them your room and sleep on the couch; b) leave gracefully; c) claim squatter's rights. J 3. Your friend has just come ?own with a case of the flu. Y ?u: a) serve ~h1cken soup and hang around m case you re needed; b) take Vitamin C and leav~ for the day; b) take Vitamin C and stay m your room. 14 It's very late and in order to get to the bath.room .vou woulil have to pa11s thro.ugh your host:~ heclr_oom when an overnight guest is being "entertained." What do you do? a) Tiptoe past them without looking; b) stay out, because you've planned ahead; c) walk through, apologizing at great length. 15. At the end of a relaxing soak at your friend's place, you: a) scrub the tub shiny clean; b) use the back brush to wash your back; c) use your friend's lover to scrub your back. And now, to get your Houseguest Score and Rating, add up the points for the answers that you chose: 1: a-1, b-0, c-5. 2: a-5, b-0, c-0. 3: a-5, b-0, c-0. 4: a-2, b-5, c-0. 5: a-5, b-5, c-0. 6: a-0, b-1, c-3. 7: a-5, b-5, c-0. 8: a-5, b-0, c-0. 9: a-5, b-'h, c-'h. 10: a-5, b-0, c-0. 11: a-5, b-0, c-0. 12: a-1, b-5, c-0. 13: a-5, b-0, c-0. 14: a-1, b-5, c-0. 15: a-5, b-3, c-0. 2700 ALBANY Houseguest Score: *-24. On a "welcome-back" scale of 1-10, you rate a 0. You're a real disaster. Go to a motel next time and check in under an assumed name. 25-49. Not too good; not too bad. On that "welcome-back" scale, you get about a 5. If you invest in an impressive house gift and give your friend a long time to forget, you may be invited back. 50-73. So you got a high score. If you didn't fib, you rate a 9 on the scale. You're sure to be invited back. In case you're cur­ious about why you didn't get a 10, it's just that I'd hate to ruin your personality by making you arrogant. By the way, what are you doing next weekend? Ashley is a personal counselor. CJJ983 SU>newaU Features Syndicate. Metropolitan Community Church In the Woodlands 28077 1-45 North Sunday Worship at 7:30pm Starting 1-1-84 t-l~PPV' t-IC>l.JR C>~IL"Y Noon-8pm 523-4084 ~ MILITARY,-1·~ ~~ MADNESS c::> IF=" IF=" = --<> ....,, c::il - ~- _. - ....,, - ~ IF="<>._.. ~ .., t 16 MONTROSE VOICE / Dec. 23, 1983 Losing Weight Is No Easy Game Health By Harvey Thompson, M.D. "Trapped inside every fat person is a thin soul struggling to get out." That cruel generalization is not true. It doesn't take into consideration thatessen· tial differences remain in the obese, even when weight is lost. Obesity is a life-long problem that cannot be cured, only con· trolled. Like hypertension, obesity rarely has definable and treatable causes. Seldom is any hormonal imbalance discovered. No single etiology explains all cases of obes· ity; different causes exist for different peo­ple. Obesity is an eating disorder, but its mechanisms are not reversed by simply limiting food intake. This metabolic dis· order is incompletely understood. Like alcoholism, obesity may have aspects of a medical illness. The alcoholic learns that he has a prob­lem shared with others which can con· tinue even without booze. Obese people are "different," even when thin, and must rec· ognize their overweight as a continuing problem Some justification for this think· ing follows. Appetite seems to be controlled by the hypothalamus, a feeding and satiety cen· ter. Body mass seems to influence the activity of this gland; the obese person appraently has a fixed point for degrees of obesity. That accounts for the tendency of overweight people to return to a certain level of obesity. The problem is not to lose weight, but to keep it lost when the "ther· mostat" wants to bring it back up. Since the cerebral cortex influences the hypothalamus, psychological, social and genetic factors affect food intake. Obese people are more sensitive to external sti· muli than non-obe..e persons. A "normal" pen;on eats when hungry, as a result of internal cues presumably related to physi· ologic appetite regulators. But the obese person eats because it is time to eat or because the food is appetizing. He responds to external cues that make food a source of pleasure or a relief from bore­dom, not thinking of food as a calorie source. Obesity is partially genetically deter· mined. Animal models show clearcut genetic causes that are more difficult to evaluate in humans, but there are definite patterns that can be shown. If one parent is obese. 40 percent of the children are. Eighty percentofthechildrenoftwoobese adults are overweight. And, though less than one-third of obese adults were over­weight children, almost all overweight children become obese adults. Adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase is a big fat word for an enzyme that can make fatty acids from lipoprotein in the blood and allow the excess fat to be stored. The level of this enzyme is elevated in the obese, and remains so even when they are at normal weight. This accounts for their tendency to regain weight loss; there may be some genetic predisposition for high levels of ATLPL in the blood. There seem to be two types of obesity: hyperplasitc and hypertrophic. The hyperplastic or juvenile-onset type is char· acterized by excess replication of fat cells during some critical period in childhood. Studies actually indicate that if a child can be kept from obesity, there is far less Barbie Goes to War She walks! She talks! And she can blow you away at 50 yards. She's Courtney Krieger the roughest, toughest doll on the battlefield The Seattle Times reports sheis joining her pal G.I. Joe on toy store shelves, all part of the continuing boom in war toys. Says one retailer: "We can't get enough of them this year ..•. I think Grenada has a lot to do with it." Courtney, who sells for $10, is a pouty· lipped, voluptuous redhead decked out in tigh t-fitting khakis. But she uses more than her good looks to disarm the enemy. You can also buy her a tank, complete with 12 deadly missiles that will zap the foe from any direction. likelihood of overweight in adulthood. Hypertrophic obesity does not result from an increase in fat cells, but from eat· ing too much and exercising too little. It's a self-increasing situation, since obesity itself leads to inactivity. The vicious cycle can be altered through discipline; as weight comes down, activity is easier. "Overeating" is relative, though. Increaseing age lowers caloric require­ments, so that a 11teady eating pattern can cause overweight even if exercise remains constant. The obese try to defend themselves with "my body doesn't burn off calories like other people's." True, the energy required to metabolize foodstuffs is often lower in obese people. It would be attractive to blame obesity on this more efficient ther· mic response, but that seems secondary to the already obese state, not an initial cause. The body "learns" to be storage­efficient. Some societies idolize the "generous· "figure. In the United States, thin is in, and some people literally starve them· selves to be chic. In a gay dance bar, "love handles" may be too much; to a chubby· chaser, 100 pounds of fat is delightful. What is the definition of obesity? The best definition is that obesity is overweight to the extent of a threat to health. The Framingham Study showed that weight in excess of 20 percent over ideal is the danger mark. About one-third of all men and women fall into this cate­gory. Measuring fat folds is another indi· cation. If you can "pinch an inch" off at on your triceps area (back of the upper arm), you're overweight. The treatment rate for obesity is less hopeful than that for cancer. Only five to 10 percent of the obese are able to lose weight. In the first place, just getting a fat person to move is a major project; gaining weight makes one an efficiency expert for exertion. The obese person figures out how to do everything with as little effort as possible, yet exercise must be a part of any weight-control program. Four minutes of running can burn the calories from a glass of milk, a piece of buttered toast or an orange. Anorexigenic drugs for obesity control are controversial. Less than half of all internists will prescribe them. When they do, non-amphetamines are more com· monly used becauseoftheaddictivepoten· tial of amphetamines or "speed." Laws that require a triplicate "narcotic" pres· cription for the substances makes physi· cians even more reluctant to use them. Thyroid medication is of no benefit. Thyroid hormone actually causes more lean tissue loss than fat, and is associated with cardiac toxicity. Human chorionic gonadotropin (or HCG) was popular in many weight-reduction clinics until stu· dies showed that it worked no better than salt injections. The weight loss that resulted from its use was more a response to frequent medical contact, a placebo effect, or an associated diet. The multi-million dollar rewards of the weight loss industry has spurred as many diets as there are therapists. However, there is little evidence that any one hypo. caloric diet is any more successful than another. The only virtue of "fad" diets is that at least patients are motivated to try them. More drastic measures such as intestinal shunting, gastric stapling and bypass are reserved for the extremely obese. Each "style" of diet has its dangers. Low-carbohydrate diets are by nature high in fat, so hypercholesterolemia can result. Prolonged-sparing fasts can increase ketosis, which can suppress the appetite, but can also cause acidosis and death. On the other hand, short-term total s tarvation seems remarkably well­tolerated , but becauRe of potential compli· cations. it requireb medical supervibion. The key is the boring truth of calories. Each pound offa t holds 3500 of them, !lo a daily deficit of 500 calories will lo~e a pound in a week. To achieve that or better resul ts, the obese person has to be moti· vated to give up food, regardle!!s of hiF susceptibility to a wide range of stimuli. Behavior modification techniques are being tried with some success, teaching the fat person new patterns of eating. The techniques work best in group situations; weight loss is greater in a group of siJn­ilarly affected people than in single indi· viduals. Competing to see who can lose the most poundage can be fun and rewarding, but each person has to find his own motiva­tion. One slim and trim man I know did it with the help of a very easy device. He simply put a mirror on his refrigera· tor door. Dr. Thompson practices medicine in Sacramento, Calif., and is co-medical director of the Kaposi's Sarcoma Founda· tion there 1983 Stonewall Features Syn· iicate. come see our new look downstairs DWI CRIMINAL DEFENSE PERSONAL INJURY FAMILY LAW FREE CONSULTATION JOHN PAUL BARNICH ATTORNEY AT LAW 3317 MONTROSE, SUITE 318 (713) !523-5006 NC· llV Tll'.XAS B<>A"'{; Of- L£ •AL SPCCl.A~l?ATlON JN,..,...,.. AJUA Dining Room Hours Lunch 11:30 to 3 Mon.·Frl. Dinner 7 to 11 sun.· Thurs. and 7 to midnight Fri. & Sat. Sunday.Brunch noon to 3 SATURDAY NIGHT Live Entertainment Featuring Victor & Patricia CHRISTMAS DAY Enjoy Dinner with us Tonight <Closed tlll 4pm - Sunday Brunch moved to Monday> MONDAY,DECEMBER26 Brunch - Noon til 3pm <This week only - Sunday Brunch Is Monday Brunch> SATURDAV,DECEMBER31 New Year's Eve Spectacular Live Entertainment with Luisa Amaral·Smlth 2 shows at 9:00 & 11 :45 New Year's Eve Package includes Special Menu Dinner, Champagne & Party Favors­only $30 per person <or $10 door charge includes champagne and party fa~ors> Make Your Reservations NOW! Hal & David: A Truly Gala Musical Comedy Duo By Billie Duncan "We certainly take our relationship on stage," said Hal. Said David, "Well, we can't help it any­more because we tried before ... " "To be very cool about it," said Hal. "It didn't work," said David. "We are obviously lovers and it comes across." It certainly does. And in a very relaxed and charming way. However some members of the audience are a bit ill at ease seemg two gay men performing in the cabaret circuit. "I was talking to an older man in the bar last night," explained David, "who liked ~s, but he said, ' I don't believe in trumpet­mg 0 my sexuality.' And I said, 'We simply dun t have a choice anymore. We are what we are.' He had a hard time with it." " "He was from the old school," said Hal. The older generation." David smiled. "I said, 'Listen, Steve and Edie have been foisting their relationship on the public for years. Give me a break."' Hal and David are a musical and comedy team who are playing Rascals through tomorrow night (Saturday), and they do have last names. In full, they are Hal Pederson and David Rada.No wonder they leave them off. Most editors I know would automatically change "Pederson" to "Peterson" without a second thought. And Rada! But the story of how they started their muscal symbiosis is more interesting than their names. . Hal was the director of a CETA program f~r performers in Pasadena, Calif. David came in to audition as a pianist. Music was definitely made. They became an item. But they did not start performing together until they had been romantically together for three years. "We weren't nearly ready to go on stage together. We had to work the kinks out of our relationship." Hal paused. "Well we left some kinks in." ' David had grown up in Pasadena but Hal was from Vicksburg, Miss. He h~s no ~.race of the sourthem drawl, however. That's because they used to send me away to school. They'd always send me north. I don't know why." . "They were going to beat him up in Vicksburg, that's why," said David. Explained Hal, "I was just too pale." Other than that, Hal has not travelled much. But they are about to remedy that situation. Next month, they are taking off for Europe. David looked at Hal. "We decided abut two months ago we were going to do it come hell or high water.'' Hal glanced at him. ''There's no good time to do it. You just have to go." "It's part of your education as a per­former." "I think we may find a little bar some place and do a couple of numbers." They explained that this was not to be a work­ing holiday, however. Just for the flavor, they have added some European songs to their show. Actu­ally, they do not do any of the material ~hat they did ~hen they first started. They 1ust keep commg up with new stuff. , "We talk things. together and I'll say, Dave, I really thmk we should do this song, yo.u know. And he'll go upstairs in the music room and work on it for a few days and them call me up. And I'm always amazed at what he comes up with " Wherever the ideas come from, they are wonderful. A lot of the material is only understandable if you are an old movie freak or a lov~r of collectable music. Their medl.eys a re m credibl~ clever, and their rewntes of other peoples lyrics are diabol­ically delicious. David holds down the piano while Hal holds forth at the stand-up mike. He sings he dances, he expounds. ' If you grew up on television, the old com­mercials that they have unearthed should bmg a smile to your face, especially in the context in which Hal and David have managed to put them. For example, they do an old RCA color Hal and David at Rascals television commercial as "A new National Anthem." But perhaps some of the most outrage­ous and inspired moments come when David plays straight man to Hal's Judy Garland, Ethel Merman, Betty Davis and Joan Crawford The single most wonderful character in Hal's closet of zanies, though, is the per­fect debutante, Auntie Mame's Gloria Upson, who imparts all the absolutely essential information necessary for dress­ing for an atomic war. All in all, they have Steve and Edie beat to hell and gone when it comes to being entertaining. o Duncan's Quick Notes Rich's does a clever little thing every now and then. They surprise the audience with the appearance of a live star on stage . Last Sunday, they had Lisa, the wild woman who sings "Jump Shout," a song that has the distinction of being the only hit I can remember that rhymes "the clock" with "hot jock." "We've been in town since Friday," said Lisa. "We did a record signing at Down­beat." Lisa resides in San Francisco by way of Detroit and prefers to call disco "techno­soul." One of her trademarks as a performer is to get involved with the audience. "Iliketo go into the audience and get them c~cited." ~he Rich's crowd took just a tiny bit to get mto the swing. "By the time she got through," said Thomas Moore, assistant manager of Rich'.s, "the floor was filled, and they were dancmg and screaming." Lisa had similar results in Galveston at the Ritz. "I got them all on the dance floor." This was her first trip to Houston but she said that she hopes she's coming back soon. I hope so, too, because she is a fascinat­ing woman, and I'd like to do a whole fea­ture on her. Bravo to Rich's for having her. That same Sunday night, down the street and around the block (just about), was the grand reopening celebration at the Exile. Little Bobby outdid himself in putting together a show that had more variety than Heinz. Every performer was grand, I'm sure. The acts that I saw were terrific, especially Roxie Starr doing the alcoholic version of the "Twelve Days of Christmas." Owner Douglas Bone should be very proud. The place looks super, the enter­tainment is charming and the people working for the club are warm and DEC. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 - - -- Lisa was outrageous in the office of Rich's friendly. Happy reopening! More in the heart of Montrose, there was another opening of a bar. It was the Trail· ride on Westheimer across from Texas Renegades. Manager Sam Bass said that there will be a grand opening after the first of the year. So far, though, the club is doing nicely. It went from being a dark, depressing hole to a comfortable, clean place with a friendly country-western flavor. It's the sort of bar where you can go and sit and actually talk to other people. They have planned some very interest­ing community activities, so keep reading this space for further Trailride news. Meanwhile, the latest word on uniform contests comes from Al's. It seems they had a well-attended competition last Sat­urday night. What a good idea! Even if you don't win, you get to parade around in front of eve­rybody in your finest duds-if those duds are leather, military, police, etc. The winner of first place Saturday ($50) was Thomas James. Skip Milhauser and Jack Sorce came in second and third with $25 and $15 bar tabs, respectively. Aren't contests fun? After all, you can always go up to one of the winners and insist that he should have come in first and just maybe he'll share a little of hi~ bar tab. Hmmm? This is beginning to sound more like bar news than an entertainment column, but Tom Groves of the Mustang Band tries to pick and grin at the same time Montrose Live bars are entertaining. And while we're on the subject of enter· tainment, I've heard that the Mustang Band may be planning another tour. That means that you'd better catch them this weekend at the Brazos River Bottom while you have the chance. And while you're there, say hello to the new owners of the BRB, Joe DiBona, Alan Pierce and Bill Brown. They have been out and about to almost all the other bars recently. Joe is from Boston and he loves every bit of Houston. And I love Joe because he thinks I'm wonderful. I admire a man with superb taste. Joe and Alan came by to the Houston Off Broadway show at E/J's on Tue:;­day, and, of course, HOB trashed them unmercifully. They loved it. Also getting the sharp end of the tongue that night was Roxie Starr (a.k.a. Jimmy Emerson) who had booked Houston Off Broadway for the Outlaws' Christmas eve show. Rumor has it that the gracious Miss Starr is still having them as guests. It should be a lot of fun . Happy holidays to every single one of you. And if you plan on tying one on, be sure and have cab fare. Little Bobby shines on the Exile stage Montrose Singers director Mark Janus with muzzo-soprano and the boys of the chorus Montrose Singers Debut By Robert Hyde Last Fnday, Dec. 16, atSl Stephen's Epis· copal Church. the Montrose Singers made their choral debut with their Christmas concert under the direction of Mark Janus. The two-hour program gave the group a chance to show off their vocal abilities, as well as their shortcomings. But it was an enjoyable concert, primarily because the lrUYS in the chorus sang their hearts out, which is just about all that is required of performers during the holiday season who simply want to spread a little Christmas cheer. For a group that had only been rehears· ing since late September- and bear in mind they are amateurs-they performed surprisingly well, especially in the more cl1U1sical "Frostiana" and in their haunt· ing processional. And their support of mezzo-soprano Stella Zambalis was com· mendable. Zambalis, herself, was excellent singing the traditional "O Holy Night" and "Silent Night," the latter of which was joined by the audience singing softly and catching the spirit of the season. The group's comic antics in the concert's second half were, well, cute. But it's time now for members of the chorus to ask themselves how serious they are in developing their talents to meet Janus' expectations. If the Montrose Singers are be a warm community group, that's well and good. If: instead, they want to achieve a more pro­fessional standard, then their work is cut out for them. They have the talent. ST ART YOUR NEW YEARS RIGHT BY DINING AT BOULEVARD CAFE WITH OUR FABULOUS NEW YEARS MENU ~~~- CLOSED CHRISTMAS EVE 3:00PM TIL 7:00 TUESDAY -------· 521-1015 Open Weekdays 7am-11pm --------11111 .. ••••••••• Weekends ti/ Midnight Sat. & Sun. Breakfast at 9am .. ••••••••• Sunday Supper ti/ 10pm ••••••••• .. &/YL~ 0 ,..QAJ~w,μ~~ * L*P 's * EP's * T-Shirts BUITONS *IMPORTS* ETC. Don't buy until you check our prices on "Top 10" and most new releases Reg. retail 899 OUR PRICE 6 99 C'mon in and Face the Music 2024 Westheimer- next to Academy-520-8800 J Factory Leather Sale Sunday 12-6 • Monday 10-8 THIS EUROPEAN INSPIRED LEATHER SOFA RETAILS FOR OVER '2,00000 WE'LL SELL IT FOR '999. Leather Sofas $999 Your Choice of 5Styles,13 Colors LEATHER CENTER Designers & Builders 10175 Harwin #102, Houston 981-5874 r-:-:::~~~ VISA. MasterCard F1nanc1ng Available Layaway Delivery Available 5 Year \Narranty Monday 10-8 • Tuesday-Friday 10-6 • Saturday 10-6 • Sunday 12-6 DEC. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 ~The Glow Of The Tree . . . Wherever You're At And Whoever You Be . .. May You Remember And Know Good Tunes And Good Cheer; And Your Holidays Come Every Day Of The Year. Miss Texaii U.S.A., Laura Shaw in the pageant in Houston. But Naomi really knocked her out. As Lyle Waggoner said about Naomi's win, "She deserved il It really couldn't have gone any other way. Such a good performer. Looks greal" He shook his head in amazement. ''That number she did of Liza Minnelli?" He whistled. "She had euery move down. An accomplished dancer." So, now it's over and Naomi Sims has another title, Laura Shaw has gone on to dedicate more supermarkets (or whatever) and Lyle Waggoner has headed back to California along with ~host Ruth Buzzi and a massive team of television people who taped the show for broadcast on cable after the first of the year. All that remains of the night are the memories. "I ordered a tape of the show," said Lyle, "but I don't think it could be captured on tape. You had to be there." I second the motion. It was sensational. 20 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 23, 1983 ...... 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The best busi­ness deal you woll make thlS year 523- 3223 $175 PER MONTH Gay couple -ks mature roommate Share 2-2 Aloe! townhome. 87!Hl821 GREENWAY PLAZA AREA Roommate 2 br/2 bath on Timmons Male or female $225 per month • ~ electric Dan 850-0769 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED FOLEY'S DISPLAY PERSON FOiey's 1t Wiiiowbrook Miii iS seelung an experoenced fulltome trimmer Prefer knowledge of home atore doaplay Foley's olfeB compatohve salary. benefits. dis­count Ou1lil1ed oppllc.nts ready to meet 1 dem1nding chlllenge should 1pply In person, Folev'a Willowbrook Personnel, FM 1960 1t FM 1• 9. Monday-Friday, 2- 6pm. MANAGEM£NT POSITION Sought by GWM, 30. BS degree. with broed management background; inctu0- 1ng warehousing. lou pr_,,hon, d11- patch/oparatlon1 (pohce emergency oervoeea) retail customer aervoca Hove IUpetVIMd 600 ll\8n hou~ per week Dis­crete, dadoc.tad, ready to meet the chal­lenge. For complete ra.ume wrote Box 165-8 C/O Voiee FOR SALE, MISC. FOR IA.LE Olfiee furniture. delks, ch••~. tables. file cabin.is. also sot ... lernpe. buffet. Clll 529-3780 Ask for Boll GAY BARS HOUSTON-e Al'a-2212 Comr.,._522-7381 • Barn- 710 PK1f11C- 52&-9"'27 CCH.1ntry e 8raz0& River Bottom- 2400 Bruos-528- 9192 country e 8r511r Pai'Ch--229-4 W Hokombe---665--9678 i"Cifctt--.1-49'5._.1rtinlutnerK1n~1-2521 diOcO - ----- Cl'uc:ken Coop--535 Wwthelmet"- 521--2240 .~ RocrunorMl-52S:-225s d•K-0. ~ - a Dirty Sally 1- 220 Aw<>ndale-529-7525 e DoubloR ~731 Kirby 521-1 .... - Houaton, TX 77006 620..()664 Legal help available at affordable prices Noon-Bpm weekdays 10am-6pm Saturday Christmas Special Por supuesto, hablanws Espailol Car titles, contracts1 leaaes, will.8, criminal casu, agreements, collections, divorces, nanie changes, corporations, adoptions, deeds, child support, pers'?nal injury, workers comp., notary public, bail bonds available Old Fashioned I with salad s400 2505 N. Shepherd at 25th 880-0831 RAY HILL, MANAGER Hopkins, Low & Y ounll, Gener al Practice not Boa.rd or Speclalriat.lon Certlnt'd I 11 I 1 I WITH THIS AD offer expires 12-31-83 . ......__-------------------- • E/J's- 1213 Rtehmond-527-9071 e Exde-1011 Bell~-S3- ----- • Galleon-2303 Richmond-522-7918 e Hole-109 Tuam- 529-9128 _ e JR"1-ll08 P1clloc-S2t·2519"~---­e Ju11 Manon & Lynn·a-111 F11rv1ew-528- 9110 lesbian • Kindred Spmt1-52.t5 Butf•Jo Speedw•y .. 665-9756 t.b11n • Lazy J- 312 Tuam-5~9343 • Locker-1311 W•the•mer e Lol•·• Oepot- 2327 Gr•nt-5.28-«M2 e Mary·s - 1022 W•thtlmer-528--8851 • Memonal Pant Motel Bar-50W.uoh Or-811· 1311 • M•dn1te Sun- 53.4 Westheimer-528-7519 dtlCO, •hows • Mru Ch•rtotte·s- 911 W Orew-52~ country ~ M•n•ng Co-805 Pac;itic-~7488 • Numbers 2-300 Westh11mer-52&-8338 d•ICO e Ott1cer'1 Clu~270o Arbany- 523--40IM a OM on One-1018 W Groy-5~­e Outl•ws-1.t19 R.Ch~-528--8903 e P1nk E .. ph•nt-1218 Leel•nd-659-00.CO ohows "iA;n:;;:;=0820'.t M•1n-521_H;7-3'-0'---­e Aucals-2702 Kirby-524-6272 d1n1ng hve mu11c e R1ch·1- 2.C01 san Jacinto-650-0789 d.-cc> • A1pcord- 115 F11rv1ew-521·2792 iRiSkYBu;;n;;=-2100A lbany=m:38--,,­ilhei1i= 811 Hyde P1rk • T1xu ReNtQ1del- 13iiWntN!l'Mf--=5'21- 3475 • Tratlrtc»-1225 W•the11r'9r • Twms-535 WeslMtm«--520-024' ~·•n. d•ICO e V.-itu,..N- 2923 M•in-522-0000 • W•I P .. yland- 3012 M1lem-~ ALEXANDRIA-BEAUMONT-GALVESTON-e Fly-2101 0'~763-9&<2 • Robert'• Llf11t1-213 kempner-785-Mll e Tromm~7 Wlnni.-763-1247 LAFAYETTE- ~~;.;IJ;;:' ;=.rtce (Windwood Shopping I.AKE CHARLES-ORGANIZATIONS Ul.ECT£0 ""TIOIW. OROAHIZATIOHS-Goy ~·- -tion--¥08 DI05. w ... . DC 20033-(202) !117-2430 GoyAlgnlaN-~1192 W-­DC 20013-(202) S.tl01 - Roghll ~ ,uncl-l'Oll 1-. w- - DC 20013-(2021 546-202:5 L.-nbde lliglli ~132 W <Ord. ,.,.._ YOttl: . NY 10C!ll-(212) - Med.. Fund fot Hum.In "ttt\tl (Gay Pr ... ~tion)-P08 33t05. Wutnng1.on. DC 20033-{202) 387-2'30 Nabonal Maoc.tMion of 8w1neN Coundl9-8o• 15145. 5-1'1 FrMCilCO. CA M11S-(.t'S) -.s.-8313 Ntitionat ANoc~bon of Gay & ltllb!Wl Oemocr•tw: Ctubl- 17.t2 Mli• lw SE Wuhtng'°'1. OC 20003-(202) .. ,.,,,°" ,._tlONI Gay HMlth EOUC.bOn Founde1ion-80 8th Av l f:l>S New Yon. NY 10011- (212) 20&-1008 Nl.honai Gay Rights Adw>clltee-5"60 c .. tto. S.n Frllndleo. CA .. 11~415l 113-3124 Nit~ Gay T• Forot-aO Sttl Av New Yon. NY 10011 - (212) 741 -MOO NGTF'a ~.,,. (800) 221·7CM4 i 0!..1'9.0. New YOftl. St.le) TP.11 Gayfl~n TNt F~B AK.. Dwlk>n 79201 - (817) 317-1218 A Capetta Cho-ru,-_,-,..,,.-°"-,-,--,~C-ho-r-ch~of Cl'msl - 777·9298 A Place an the Sun-clo Gracdyf"tft 8ooll1 70.C F11rv11w - 522· 7895 1ubg,oup o f llH lttc concer117pm ~T.~.: ..: :...~~~~­ACLU- t236 W Groy-52._5825 Alos Holun;:;Q G;y Swrtcnboard-529-3211 Ameran Goy At--457~ - - Astro Rainbow Alliince:..520-9-451 (voice). 520-0552 (TTY) ~:~~r:~=s-Aobert Moon, d1r. 209 Montrose Classified =~.~~~~~11;ed.:!~:~~c~'S~~- a1•ck & White Men Togelher cBwMn-etOGiY Sw•tchbollrd, 529--3211 Chri1t1•n c"""hUrehOtltie Good Shepherd ·1707 Montrose MrV1Cet tpm Sun. 81ble1tudy 7 30pm Thurs (Montrose) Church of Chrtst-1700 MOntfOM- 777·9286 Mr¥iees 1 tem Sun Church of Chrllt11n F-a,th- 217 F•lrv+ew 529-8005 1erv1ce1 10 .t5am Sun & 7 15pm Wed, 81ble study 7 15pm Tues & Sun; choir practice Wed •fter services ~f Pcec-n.t.e;c;.:..:;o_st_11_u_n-1ty- 1217 R1chmornt=' 850-7286. 520-5699. Servic• 730pm Fri, 11am Sun Choices S.bl•n group-c/o G•y Sw1lchboerd. 529--3211: meets 12 30pm 3rd Sun: also ... Le.bl•n Mothers Get Texas' Three Great Gay Newspapers­Home Delivered Texas now has three great, local gay community newspapers from MVP (Montrose Voice Publishing). And we offer special combination subscription prices. Get one, two or all three-home del ivered, anywhere in the country. Montrose Voice Houston-published weekly Dallas Gay News Also serving Ft. W:>rth and Oklatioma-published weekly Austin/San Antonio Star published every other week Each of the three newspapers has exclusive local and national articles and features. Plus all three subscribe to virtually every gay news service and syndicated writer, including the Gay Press Association Wire Service, Stonewall Features, and a dozen independent writers who relate gay life to everything from business to movies to politics to sex. ········· ···· ·· ··········· ···· ··· ···· ················ ···················· ······ ' Yes, send 0 Montrose Voice 0 Dallas Gay News 0 Austin/ San Antonio Star for 0 6 months 0 1 year. RATES: Montrose Voice OR Dallas Gay News- $29 for 6 months or $49 for 1 year. Montrose Voice AND Dallas Gay News- $44 for 6 months or $74for1 year. Austin/San Antonio Star- $16 for 6 months or $29 for 1 year. The Star with either the Voice or Dallas Gay News- $37 for 6 months or $64 for 1 year ALL THREE NEWSPAPERS-$52 for 6 months or $89 for 1 year. Name ~-----~~-~----~~--~~~ Address Enclosed is 0 Check 0 Money Order (Make payable to Montrose Voice Publishing), or charge to my 0 Visa 0 MasterCard 0 Community Credit Card. (If charge, give credit card expiration date and number Montrose Voice and Dallas Gay News are published every Friday The Star 1s published every other Friday Subscriptions will usually arrive in your mailbox on Saturdays in Texas or Mondays elsewhere Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat DEC. DEC. 23 24 DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. 25 26 27 28 29 For 1dd1t1on11 1nlorm1t1on or phone numbera fOf' events llated ~ow. look tor the aponsonng org1nlZ1lion under "Org1n111t1ons .. In the Montrose Clasaifled Selected Events through 7 Days raFRIDA Y: Committee for Pub­lic Health Awareness's "Shar­ing Group for the Worried Well," 7-8pm, Montrose Coun­seling Center, 900 Lovett rJSUNDA Y: Christmas, Dec. 25 &SUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays 10:30am-1:30pm, MacGregor Park U!ONDA Y: AIDS victim sup­port group meets 6:30pm, Mont­rose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 U!ONDA Y: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • TUESDAY: Montrose Sym­phonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm •TUESDAY: Lutherans Con­cerned meets Dec. 27, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh •TUESDAY: Houston Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers & Scientists meet 7pm Dec. 27 • TUESDAY: Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) meets 7pm Dec. 'J:'/, Bering Church, 1440 Harold • WEDNESDAY: Interact meeting, Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm Dec. 28 •THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFI' Radio, FM-90 •THURSDAY: Integrity meets Dec. 29, 4008 Wycliff • THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN 1 WEEK: Lesbian /Gay Resource Service, Univ. of Houston, meets 2:30pm Jan. 3, Spindletop Room, Univ. Cen ter, Univ. Park 9/N 1 WEEK: Greater Mont­rose Business Guild meets 7:30pm Jan.3, Liberty Bank community room, 1001 Westhei­mer • IN 1 WEEK: Gay Political Caucus meets 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm Jan. 4 9/N 2 WEEKS: Choice's Les­bian Mothers' Group meets 6:30pm Jan. 7, 210 Fairview, apt. 1 9/N 2 WEEKS: Lesbillll8 & Gay People in Medicine meet 7:30pm Jan. 7 9/N 2 WEEKS: Memorial ser­vice for Robert Schwab, Jan. 8, Rothko Chapel, 3900 Yupon 9/N 2 WEEKS: Citizens for Human Equality {CHE) meets Jan. 10 • IN 2 WEEKS: Houston Data Professionals meet 7:30pm Jan. 10, East Room, Holiday Inn Central, 4640 South Main 9/N 3 WEEKS: Choices meets 12:30pm Jan. 15 • IN 3 WEEKS: Unitarian/ Universali st Gay Caucus meets Jan. 15, 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin 9/N 4 WEEKS: NOW's Les­bian Rights Conference, J an. 20-22, Milwaukee •IN 6 WEEKS: Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference, J an. 27-29, Houston 9/N 6 WEEKS: GPC's Night at the Alley Theater, "Cloud 9," Jan. 27 9/N 7 WEEKS: Lincoln's birthday, Feb. 12 9/N 7 WEEKS: Blueboy's 6th Annual Man of the Year Con­test, Feb. 12, Union Club, llO E. 14th, New York 9/N 7 WEEKS: Valentine's Day, Feb. 14 9/N 8 WEEKS: Washington's birthday, Feb. 20 9/N 10 WEEKS: Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday, March 6 9/N 12 WEEKS: St. Patrick's Day, March 17 9/N 14 WEEKS: April' Fool's Day, April 1 9/N 16WEEKS:1984 Rain­bow Festival, Galveston, Bless­ing of the Shrimp Fleet, April 14-15 9/N 17 WEEKS: National Gay Health Education Founda­tion l et Southeastern Lesbian­/ Gay Health Conference, Apr 21, Atlanta •IN 19 WEEKS: First primary party elections in Texas and party precinct conventions, May 5 9/N 20 WEEKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleans, May 12, lasting to Nov. 11 9/N 21 WEEKS: Texas Sena­torial District Party Conven­tiona, May 19 •IN 22 WEEKS: Gay Press Association 4th National Con­vention, May 25-28, Los Angeles raJN 22 WEEKS: Memorial Day, May 28 • IN 23 WEEKS: Run-off party elections in Texas, J une 2 • IN 26 WEEKS: Texas Demo­cratic Party Convention, J une 15-17, tentatively Houston 9IN 26 WEEKS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins, 15th anni­versary of Stonewall uprising, national slogan "United & More in '84," June 15-24 llEARLY JULY: Lesbian and Gay Bands of America concert, Los Angelea • IN 26 WEEKS: National Gay Health Education Founda­tion's let Intunational Lesbian­/ Gay Health Conference, ''Toward Diversity," New York, June 16-19 raJN 30 WEEKS: Democratic National Convention, San Francisco, July 16-19 9IN 36 WEEKS: "Seriea 8," Gay World Series Softball Tour­nament opens Memorial Park, Houston, Aug. 26 (tentative), lasting to Aug. 31 (if necessary) Citizens for Human EqU11llty (CHEi Poe 3045, nm-680-3346 board fMet 2nd T~ Cll-ro- POB"i58:°Rlchmond 77"8,!_..._ C01t • 571--meets at er.Zoi""R;Bottom, 2400 Bruoo - 52&-9192 _______ -;;:;;;; Comm1ttM rof'"Pu-blte Hulth Awareneas- POB 3045. n253-521H1333. 522-5084 "Shlrong Group tor the Worned Well" m.et Fri. 7.1pm. MontrOM CounHhng Cen1er _ Com~ Gospel Center- t 700 MontroN- 523-eQ11~~---~-~,,.;:;:,-,;;;,­conq-- Aytz Chaylm - meetl at CCf, 21 6 7 FaJrvrew-W.8991 servtce & eoc,1al Spm 2nd •th Fr1 Cfil";; Hothn•-~?8-1505___ - DEC 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 0111-a-Gay-Athe,.t:-.&57-6660 American-Gay Athe•Sll D.ana FoUndat1on -2100 Mason- '62•·5791 ~y~;:~~:~ ~~~ ~~~·~ .~~ 7 30pm 5a:.I ---~ l11Un1tanan Church-5210 F1nn1~7,­servlce 11 151rn Sun ~ners.:...5. 29-1288 Gay & Al•ve Shanng Expe--;;;oce {GASE)- 5211-131 1, 528-0891 Gay & Lesbi1n Arch1vn of T1xa1 atM11te of 1, H inc Gay Asian Clut>-2615 W1ugh #124 77008 Gar H15J,.n.cc.~Cus--ai&-52s2 - Gay Nurses Alliance-880--9'8-6 '-~~~­Gay Political Clucus (GPC}-POB 66664 77266-521-1000- meet 4600 Mam #217 7-30pm 1st & 3rd Wed, Night 11 the Al~ benefit Jan 27. Alley Theater, with "Cloud 9 .. Gay Sw1tchboard-P09 362•. n253-529-3211 1nrorm1tton. counsehng. referrals. TTY, AIDS Hott1ne Greater t.ilontrOM 8u1mes1 Gudd-contact through Montrose Vo1~ meet• 7 30pm. 111 Tues. community room. Liberty Bank, 1001 W.ahetmer Greenspomt/FM1960 Arel Far·Awry Fnends- 821-9681 Homoptuie Interfaith Alhanc.-729 Manor 523-eeee Houston ArN Gay & LNb•an Engineers & Soenhata-524-7• 98. 7-10pm meets 7pm •th Tueo • Houston City HaH-901 Bagby Houston Communrty Clowns-882--131• ~ata Profeu1onals-mee11 m East Room. Holiday Inn Central. "6'0 S Mam- 523-6922 mMI 7 30pm 2nd T-,-,.,---,,, Houston Motorcyc .. Club-c/o Mary's. 1022 Westhelmer- 52&-aa51 Houston North Profe111onal1- P08 3840. Humbte 77338- 8111 at 821-7126 l /H Inc-PCB 18041 77222-894-1732 ~~=~r~;~n a~~::::.;~ !'0~,~~ a~: :~·~~~: Montrose Art AnLance. Gay & Lesbian Arch1vu of TexH. Gay Sw11chboard Montrose =rr~ar;c!i ~~1:.(v~~o~,=:~ educ.honal forum 7 30pm 3rd Thurs Ingersoll Speakers' BurHu~POB 311, a..1;;; no101- ~~~ n\::i~::~~~~~=f Interact- PCS 16041, n222-~7014 "'"' •th W9d. Bering Church. 1.UO Harold, 7 30pm e KPFT Radio. FM-90-•19 Lovett BIYd- 52fS..4IOOO 'W1kSe ·n St .. n .. gry radio show Thurs. 730-900pm KSIAIOS Foundation-1001 W•thetmer f193-- 524-AIOS Lambda B.cycte Club-OavK! M2-045e. Carot 5N-4975 Lesbian/Gay Rnource $er\11ce-Unive<s1ty of Hou•ton. 4800 C.lnoun. bOx 308. 77'004- 74•12'3 ~ 2 30pm a11ema1a Tue.da}'9. SptncUetop Room. 2nd tloor, Unlvera1ty Center Lambda Cente;Gay .Atcoj ~ &. A n -•214 Jo AMte-521-9772 lnbians i"G.YP;op;-rn ~IC ne- .a80-SM8e "'"' 7 30pm 111 Sat ~~~up of ChOk:~ 111 and 3rd Sat 8 30pm, 210 Fairview apt 1 Lut"her1'11 ~Concerned-meet• a t Grace Lutheran Church 2515 Waugh- 521-o863 453-1143· meet 2nd & 4th Tl.let ..,_,mgs Men Againat O.Cept1on Courtety Club- POB s.1a11. n 25' • Metropolttan Community Church of trie Reaurrection tMCCR)- 1919 Oe~atur - 861-91.t9 pat..Juck dinner 7·30pm 1st Sat monthty, serv1Ce1 10 45am & 7 15pm Sun & 7 tSpm Wed, membership 1nqu1rert c1111 -7-30pm Tues. education cl11Mt Tuee & Wed Montrose Art Alhance-521-2481 1tt11ietliiH Inc. meet 2nd Thurs ~tf=l~~og~~~fC~ffll:~~l~I~ f~~:-~ Mulberry MonlroH C1v1c Club: aee Neartown Auoc11tron e MonlroM Clinte- 104 Weatheimer-52&-5531 open weeknights ~ 10pm Montrose Counseling Center-900 Lovett 1203-529-0037· AIDS vdttn auppart group meets 6 30pm Mon Montrose S•ngen-Can LaWf'9nCI n .... 3591 after 6pm reheerul Mon ~- Beong Church, 1.WO Harold MontrOH Tennis Club-Rteh at 52•2151 ptay Sun. 10"30lm--1.30prn. MacGr9g0r Park MSA/Mon N.ght Bowling-play Stadium Bowl. 8200 Braeamain-52&--4576 or •99--9038 ~;:1:;~mN::.!1.t~~r;=ua~~~:,~~ MSA/Greater Houston (Men'1) Sottball - 523-Mal! day, 5:!3-<M13 ... MSA/GrNter Houston (Men"s) Softball Sen• I Commun1cat1on Comm1ttee- P08 22272. f,~!.,;~~~ ~oG:l. ~:,'!,~P:'nt opening MSA/Women·s Softbtlll Leegu.--72~71 MSA/ Volleyball-880-2930 games 7 30pm Tues Gregory-llncOln achoOI. 1101 Tatt Montroae Symphonic Band-mee't"s' "lt"a;:;;;Q Church, 14'0 Har~d-527-9669 meet 7 30pm Tuea. atfillat• llH Inc Montrose Watch tubgroup Nurto* ri A.Moc 'MLiatang1-meets at the Barn. 710 Paofc- 528-9427 ctvb night Thurs Natt0na1 Organizauon for Women ~NOW) LoobMlnR~h~Tul<Force-POB440422 . n244 Neenovrrn A.uoc1aboo (Montroee CN.c Ctub)­rMetl at Bertng Church. 1uo Harold- 522-1000 ..-7pm 4111 Tu. New FrMdom Chn1tian Church- 912 W 1 tth- 591-1342 _..._ 10om Sun. 7 30pm Wocl Park People-c/o Neartown Community Firehouse-7-'1-252• I I ~~ ~ ~ f I I ~~J -~~JD~ ';he g~t an agreement with my parent.II. They TIJ!Uer told me ere 8 no Santa Claus and I neuer told them I'm a faggot Tiu s 8.y Area G-v Youth-33'2-3737 Ol--ly Texai Human R.g'hta FoundatJon-191 5 Commonweatth-52'2-2824 Teaa RtOcn-c/o Mary~ Westhe!mer- 5211-8851 uniif.al'\/1.Jn1versahst Gay Cai.JCUS-c/O 1st Un1t1n1n Church. 5210 Fannin-520-9767 52•5842 meet 3n::I Sun afternoons w .. lAy; n- Fei10W$tup-864-8899 __ Weathettner Colony Arts Assoclation-1001 W•theimer M 117 women 1 Lo~ Aft11oce-C Chetsea-521"'°'39 BAVTOWN- 81ytown Lambda Group-it27-1378 meets Fnday1 CONROE-Conroe Area Lambda Soctety-Jan at I 409) 756-0354 or Ray at (409) 756-4097 cc;n-,.o;. ArN L•b11ns-K1thy at f 409) 756-9069 meet 8pm 2nd & •th Fn LAKE CHARLES-Oign. ty-Rt 1, Box 216C. LongviHe. LA 70652 MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS ---ev£N1NG TO REMEMBER With "Gee". Profess.onal and private male model 524--1555 MASSAGE Le salen massage for relaxer.on. Profes­soon1I masseur Nonsexual. 526-1649 RELAXING SENSUAL RUBDOWN $15 Chuck. 521-3496 HANDSDMEVE_R_S~A~T~IL~E~E~So-C::ORT Buck. 52(H)735 -- TEXESCDRT- 524-9511 Models. escorts & masseurs 'We do care enough to send 1he very best • Ma1or cred•t carets honored Monthly medical cert1f1cate. Ha\le a real fun time with the right guy f0< you FUU BODY MASSAGE Tension release, relax & en1oy Very sen­sual C1n fO< appo1otment Tom (713) 524-7163 RELAX I ENJOY The BodyW0<ks masaage. F0< appoint­ment, call Bill, 52&-2470. llODY MASSAGE In 0< out. Bruce. 521-2009 PERSONALS TOP TRAINER NEEDED Bottom trainee wants to expend BO, SM. toy experiences Call Mac, 52&-3140. 22 M ONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 23, 1983 . i' Murray is caught desecrating the secret appliance burial grounds. " Ernie's a chicken, Ernie's a chicken Gary Larson's two books, "The Far Side" and "Beyond the Far Side," are available at the Montrose Voice offices. 3317 Montrose, suite 204, for $4.00 each The Far Side by Gary Larson "Oh my gosh, Andrev l Don't eat those! Those are POISON arrows!" FURRY TYPES WANTED for permanent relat1onship/friendsh1p by monogamous. sens1t1ve, sincere, affec­t1on1te, arttst1c, endowed Scorpio cuddler (WIM. 33. 170. OK/BRN. hazel) Varied interests Serious replies only to Box 164-A c/o Voice LOVERS SEEK 'FRIENDS' We're 25. 5'7"', 145. moustache; 38, 5'9'", 185. beard Your photo, info, get ours Write Suite 1183. Box 66973, Houston 77006 SUE LOVES RITA I love you and I always will. My love lor you is my gift to you Sue MAN WANTS MAN GWM, 23, Mature, 511 • 16~ lbs. blon­de/ grn. moustache. masculine looking for some 25-35. Desire a relations hip. Let­ter. photo please, 165-Z C/O Voice - OUIET, RESERVED, FUN loving. GWM. 31 . 5'7". 130. seeking same for fun, friendship, good times. Write 165- C, C/O Voice AIDS CONCIOUS? W!M. 27. looking forothermascul1nemen who need 1 hand Will. Box 2510, 1713 Weslhe1mer. Houston. 77098 GWM COUPLE Attractive. slim couple. early 30's, finan­cially secure. seeks single or couple for entertainment Letters with photo ans­wered lirsl Write Box 165-A c/o Voice ~TTENTION YOUNG STUDS Studs serviced by GWM. 35. 140 Write Paul, 2615 Waugh. No. 146. Houston 77006 SHORT ON CARDS But not on wishes Happy holidays lo Skip, Billy Nail, Bnan and John al the old haunt. and all the girls on our lirst Christ­mas away lrom MGA. Love you a111 Wayne - TOGETHER WITH MEANING Allractive GWM. young 35, 5'101>". 158, sensual, sens1t1ve. monogamous. Chris .. 118n, nonsmoker, seeks special guy(s). ages 26-36 John. 520-6734 (keep trying) PARTNER (18-35) WANTED for Vo sessions with rubber toys and Porno 31, attractive Write Ad 165-XX. c/o Montrose Voice AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHER GM interested in hearing lrom other pho- 109,.pt,ers lnr short trips. portrait ses· ~g~;~c."~~le;·~-9~~t~~;~~~~· etc BIG BEAUTIFUL BLOND GWM. 6' 175 lbs. 30. very attraet ... • architect. into art, remodeling houses. exerc1Se. touching Seeking new friends. lovers, 18-30. trim. no drugs. Send photo to Box 164-Z c/o Voice SPANKINGS & PAODLINGS wanted by GWM, 31 w rite Jim. Box 35833. Houston 77235-5833 TIRED OF BARS GWM. 20, 5· 180, looking for .. me. Wnle "Todd." Box 2355. Modlan<l. TX 79702 ATTRACTIVE, ATHLETIC a!lec11onale. v cute. GBM. 26. 5'7' . seeks Simple lun. down-to-earth buddy type. loving relationship with v cute GWM, 26. 5'7"' Write Dean. Box 4400, Houston 77098-1698 GWM COUPLE Both mid 3o·s. professional, seek friend(•) interested in friendship, lun Call 526-5233 MISTER NICE GUY seeks same. 30-45 New 10 Houston Intel­ligent good-looking. professional Near Sharpstown Mall 995-1127 - HAIRY LIFEMATE SOUGHT by 45-year-old man. No smoking. booz· ing. drugs Larry 481-2892. 6-9pm - ATHLETIC, STABLE - GWM. 27, seeks GWM. 20-30, for friend· ship, posSlbly more. Am warm, intelligent, active, attractive Desire a relat1onsh1p that involves more than 1ust going to bars Sincere replies only please Box 164-B clo Voice TOGETHER WITH MEANING a11rac11ve, GWM. young. 35. 5'11 ". 158, sensual. sensitive. monogamous, Chris· 11an. seeks special guy(s) 23-26 John. 520-6734 (keep 1ry1ng) CHRISTMAS ORPHAN? GWM 165. 36. alone- seeks GM lo 44 - let me v1s1t over Chnstmas Eve and Day for warmth and fnendsh1p More 1f possi­ble and wanted Please try Serious only 526-5300 GWM WANTS ORIENTAL ::r;:io i:~:g~ :.~~.:~~~~~h~4~~1e TM WATCH THAT TIDDYI Easy on the l1dd1es, Caesar, okay? I love you. Robby - MASTER HAS DUNGEON Wants bollom slave- lover. BO, SM, toys, SM Call Sir Lou, 528-3140. HAPPINESS IS •.. a handsome, healthy, humorous. happy hunk as your escort or model from • TexEscort 524-9511 Ma1or credit cards honored Security and discretion assured SMOOTH NONSMOKER w1M seeks friend that enioys •Port•. out· doors. home ResPons1ble. mature, any race. Bearded. 53. 5· 11". 175 lbs . unh,. Med. desire 10 please. no drunks or druqs P1c1ure Box 163-1 c/o Voice - SERIOUS FRIEND RELATION~ Professional. mature. GWM, 5·11·, 160 lbs., dark brown ha1rteyes, masculine, loving. versatile. seeks same_ Letter, photo, please. Box 163-G 'Voice -- LOVERS SEEK FRIENDS Both In 30's. blonde. 5·9··. both profes­s1onaJ. like sports. work in city, live near Sugarland. Write Box 56606, Dept 697, Houston 77256 LOUIS MISSES SAMI Sanu Barria contact Louis Anyone else knowing h11 whereabouts, please do same. 163-D,.. Voice. LOOKING FOR FUN? Lovers aeek " friends." Check us out Write Suite 1183, Box 66973, ~:, uston 77006 -- FOR MEN OF all cotors-BWMT-your socia l alernatlve-call Gay Switchboard for information. 52&-3211 - - B WMT-12 DAYS of Christmas Joy-Black & White Men Together Information Hotline 5~211 (Switchboard) ---ru;;ANCIAL BACKER OR partner wanted to build homes in boom­ing Austin Masculine. sane. (512) 445- 5888 UNIQUE GIFT IDEA Give a man. Tex Escort has 9111 cert1f1- cetee available for that special person who hu everything else. For Information call 524-9511 Major credit cards honored BODY MASSAGE In or out, Bruce, 521-2009 EXPRESSION STUDIOS PHOTOGRAPHY Glva yoursell this Christmas-a portrait. 524-0223 - THE TEXAS LINEMAN Lat us fulfill your erotic phone fantasies Mastercard and Visa accepted 960-8082 See dllplay ad tn this issue. -- FREE VIDfO MOVIES Will film good looking gay singles or cou­ples In any desirable scene. (713) 78~ 4696 RELATIONSHIP WANTED Am 21, 5'9"', 1451b. Mex. Am. wish to meet GWM, 21-30 for relat1onsh1p. Am sincere, loving. trusting and affectionate Serious. Write with photo pteasa Johnny. c/o ad 162-Montrose Voice. PRISONER SEEKS HELP Gay TDC Prison inmate requires moral and financial support to process appeal to US Supreme Court Landmark decision would prevent being gay as adm1Ssable evidence to support conv1ct1on on totally unrelated matter. Will respond to all Inquiries. Any f1nanc1al help graciously accepted, and somehow repaid Carl E. Jordan 352893-A. Route #4, Box 1100. Aosharon. TX 77583 --SPANISH SPEAKING ACTIVIST Wanted to share trips by bus/train to Mex­ico John. 523-9061, evenings I WANT YOU GWM. 36. wants to meet younger GWM for lasting relationship. Call 52&-7576. PRIVATE GAY CLUBS • Club HouliO'niiiths-2205 F1nnin-65M99I iFrench"Ouarter Th .. ter-3201 L0\.11si1n1- 527--0782=---------~~ iMidlowne Spe-3100 Fannin-522-2379 • 230il Club-2306 Genes--521H1235 RESTAURANTS e 8111·1-t02 LMtt-527-9866 ~ardc.f.::-808 LOV9tt-521·1015 e Chapultapec-113 RIChmond-Sn.2365 • Cultured Cow-2365 R•C• e Fr1nkie·1-Mon1roH 11 Wffth81m~ 7896 e Matt Gamer BB0-138 W Gray e Gyro Gyros S1ndwich Shop-1536 Westhe•mer-528-4655 • Greek t1l1nd-302T~m-522--:'7<>'0 _. - • House of Ptto-3112 Kirby-528-3818 e La J1lc1ense-1308 M~4-8676-­• Luigi's Beet Houae-2703 Mon1roae iieri=-1303-welt~23 __ _ • One'•• Meal-2019 W Groy-52~ • Perky's-R1chmond 11 Klrby-524--0075 eRnuls-2702 Kirby-524~72 - • Second Verae-3619 WHhtngton • Spenish flower-3921 Main • SpuO-U-L1ke-< 18 Woatheuner-520--0554 e ste1k ·n· Egg-4231 MontrOM-521-e~ • Tim's Cott• Shop-1525 W•th••mw-529- 2288 SERVICES, ETC. RON PETERS, DDS General Dentist, cleaning. exam, x-ray­$ 25, 523-2211 ROLLERSKATEI Skates available for hire at your party! Special group rates for the holiday sea­son. Five pairs-$25 minimum. ID required. 68&-5375. MONTROSE CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING RATES Placing a Classified other than a Personals? Read this: •ANNOUNCEMENTS • CARS & BIKES •DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES • EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED • FOR SALE, MISC. • MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS • SERVICES •TRAVEL RATE: Up to 3 words in bold, $2 each week. Additional regular words 30¢ each per week. Minimum charge $3 per week. DEADLINE: 5:30pm Tuesday for Friday's newspaper. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer, pay the full run in advance, and make no copy changes during the full run, and you can deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13weeksor longer under the same conditions and you can deduct 25%. CHARGE YOUR AD: All classifieds must be paid in advance OR you can charge your classified to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill- except through your credit card-for classifieds. PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in classifieds to (713) 529-8490 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. Placing a • PERSONALS ? Read this: RATE: Up to 3 words in bold and up to 15 total words, FREE. (Additional words beyond 15 per week are 30¢ each.) FREE PERSONALS apply only to individuals. No commercial services or products for sale. HOW LONG? A Free Personal can be placed for one, two or three weeks at a time-but no longer without re-submitting the form. BLIND BOX NUMBER: If you want secrecy, we'll assign you a Bllnd Box Number. The answers to your ad will be sent to us and we will then confidentially fotWard the replies to you. Rate is $3 for each week the ad runs but replies will be forwarded as long as they come in. ANSWERING A BLIND BOX NUMBER: Address your reply to the Blind Box Number, c/o Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. Enclose no money. Your letter will be forwarded unopened and confidentially to the advertiser. CHARGE YOUR PERSONAL TO CREDIT CARD: All charges beyond the 15-word limit or Blind Box charges must be paid in advance OR you can charge to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill­except through your credit card-for classifieds. PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in Classifieds to (713) 529-8490 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. The Free offer does not apply to Personals phoned in. You will be charged the same rate as other types of Classifieds. (up to 3 normal-size words in bold capitals) (free or 30$/word) ---­( free or 304/word) (30¢/word) ---­( 30$/word) ---­( 30¢/word) ---- bold headline at $2 __ _ words at 30¢ each ___ _ Blind Box at $3 per issue ---­Total ---- times ........ weeks - - -- (use additional paper If necessary) Name ----------------- Address ---------------- Amount enclosed (O check o money order, o cash in person o VISA charge o MasterCard charge) If charging by credit card: # _ --- exp date ___ _ Mail or bring to Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #204. Houston, TX 77006 DEC. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 DIVERSIFIED PHOTOGRAPHY Aerial. soc1ai events. portrait. 1ndustna1, Kevon Miiis and James Farnes. 526-0598 ESALEN MASSAGE FOR - relaxation. Professional masseur Non· sexual James Buechler 52&-1649. 781- 8031 . - - PATRICIA ANNE O'KANE Attorney at law, 526-7911 ATTORNEY Jerry Garrett. 4803 Montrose. Suite 11. 526-5237 EXPRESSION STUDIOS PHOTOGRAPHY Professional portfolios priced right 524- 0223 HEALTH HAVEN For all vitamins. minerals and cosmetic needs. 1828 Fa1rv1ew 528-4064 Bnng 1n ad for free vitamin C. • Houston G~t HouM lodg•ng--108 Avon­dale- 520-9767 i 1cenhower Beeuty Schoot-327 W•thetmer­~ 7972 • Leoenc::I• tiair O..gn-908 Westheiiner-527- 0188 • L\onel H•1r O..gn-3220 Yoakum-526-4494 • Magnifique hair car.-2528 Kingston-52•· Oiln •Neonown Garoge-1901 Toft-523-27114 eRon·s H11r & Skin Care-1310 Hlwthome-- 521-3000 • Tift Automohve--1411 Taft-522-2190 ~~{' Barber Shop-2154 Portsmouth- • Tot1l Animal Care-1640 Wutheimer-521· 92n SHOPS & STORES •All-Star Adutt New'l-1407 R.chmonct· -52&- 8406 eAnttque Comef-1921 W•thet~~ • Aey1om-4du'h8ookstor.-1201 Riehmond e BoU Por1< Adull Bookstore-1830 W ANtl>oma ByTycho • Books-Kirby at W.rheuner e Boulevard-Ptua Holet. 5020 MontroM • caai.. Reconn-w Alabame 1t Shepherd ieot;;'eb LIQUOrs-2031 we1tt'le1mer-52&- 295 • Cntterw--.ae Hawthome-529-8299 • Q.,if1ewers-5015 ..-ontroee-522-1 ns i 01n«"1 Adun ~•-240 Westheuner--623-- 8850 • Doubrlv•Jones. the Mu1hote dothtng-1883 W Gray-522-1088 e ec,.,;nbeet Rlc:Oioa=2111 R1chmond-523-- 83'8 • Oramat1ka gtftl-3224 Yoalcum-528-5457 e Googie·s-1004 C.liforrua-52.i-5555 - e Gr.C";iynn ~;:.-704- Fairview-522-7695 e Heelth Seek.e11-W Al1bam1 11 S Shepherd ~t-COft .. BMns-2520 Rice - ~ Ho-;'9&G~ eo.scwer • Kroger-3300 =Mo:::"-"''';:OM~=--,----­~ ~bte FNSt-3827 Ourilavy • Oh Boyl LMIW Goodl-912 Westhetmer.- 524-78511 e Old Engl..,., Fum,ture-1138 W Gra~-521· 91•5 • Poaessaons-4412 Montroee-526--3094 • Record-Rede mu5'c-3109 S Shephetd-524· 3802 e Stud.t AckJlt Newtt-1132 W A~o e TLC-«J:2 W Atibama-524-saeo e Tt'9 Tire P!ac.-1307 Fa1rv....., 529-1.t14 e Un.on .la<* ctottung-1212Westhe1mer-S21- ll600 • Up One Westerntle1ther-BRB. 2400 B<ozoo-524-5737 •Weugh OriYe L.c;uor-1402 Weleh • W•tt'Mt1mer F• Market-1733 Westhe&mer eweathe1mer lnteriors-1727 Westhe•mer- 520-1357 e WHthe1mef Records-2024 Westhe1mer- 520-8fl00 e w1kl 811rs ,_...... & UNd Clothing-2201 WMh1ngion Aw-ur>-8824 e W1tde & Stem book store--802 We&lheimer- 53' 7rl14 TRAVEL e Tfe"91 Conklltants-2029 SW Fwy-~ Fortunes For Frid•y ftVemng. December 23. 1983. through Froday ftVe,,.,>g. December 30. 1983 ARIES-Christmas week could mean some unexpected but delightful travel time for the ram. You'll want to charge right up and wrap up business matters so you can enjoy your fun-filled getaway. Go somewhere you've never been before with someone who's both lover and guide. TAURUS-If the snow hasn't fallen where you are right now, there ts at least the peaceful calm that a blanket of the white stuff brings. The hustle and hassle are over, and you're satisfied and content to enjoy simple basic pleasures. Take a deep breath-ah, yes! GEMINI-This new life you're living requires some adjustments in your routine. Through that one special person, others have entered the picture. Just because someone has a gift to give doesn't mean you have to do the same; consider your pnontles. CANCER-Take it strictly day by day this week. You are bound to be the center of activity, and with all the goings-on, you could burn out fast if you don't take it easy. By the way-don't let that long-distance call upset you; say hello, and say goodbye, end mean it! LEO-Don't let an unexpected guest fluster you. See the situation that arises as a welcome change. You' ll need your sense of humor, and a fair amount of goodwill, too. What looks difficult can lead to something entirely different. Really, it can. VIRGO-Now, you're able to share those memories with someone else-probably a father, brother, or male member of your family. Love of the warm and nurturing kind fills your heart. What you share means much to both of you. Strength and tenderness are beautifully combined. LIBRA-In your sign 1111 week: Mars. You'd like to feel peaceful and full of goodwill, but that's not the way It is this week. The more you try to do what you think you should do, the more it seems to backfire. You're going to heve to be the "you" you feel like to get that peace you're after SCORPIO- In your sign all week: Pluto and Saturn. Things are almost too quiet (Were you expecting fireworks In December?) It's a time for reflection and a break In routine. This Is not a standstill, but rather an interlude from which to draw sustenance for the new year to come. What's wrong with feeling content? SAGITTARIUS-In your sign all week: Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune. While you remain this month's shining star, others around you may be in the dark. In their darkness there may be consternation and confusion. Don't blind them with your light, but at leest >et it shine where it's most needed. Be generous. CAPRICORN-In your sign all week: The Sun. An encounter with someone whose values are different from yours could tum your heart around. That c-.ould affect your new position of Influence in a beneficial way. Listen to the advice of someone you may have previously disregarded. Allow yourself a strong attraction. AQUARIUS-While the holidays provide a brief respite, you still feel llke there are two of you In the world. To reconcile your divided self, you'll need to take a more careful look at what has been and what can be. And, there are times when it's okay to be more than one person! PISCES-While others are relaxing and taking 11 easy, you're out there making plans and taking charge. You're tapping abilities that nicely combine the practical and the psychic to make the future a better place to be. Someone special will make your Christmas especially fine. •1113 STONEWALL fEATl.JRE.S SYNDICATE Last Performance Tonight ••• HAL & DAVID Appearing Tuesday thru Friday, Dec. 27-30 LINDA HEFNER & FRIENDS Rascals will be closed Saturday & Sunday, Christmas Eve & Christmas Day SAMANTHA SAMUELS NEW YEAR'S EVE Ill ONE NIGHT ONLY! 3 Shows ... 9:30, 11:00 & 12:30 ... Sat., Dec. 31 $15 in advance, $20 at the door· Includes Champagne, Party Favors & Show Coming January 3 ... MONTGOMERY, PLANT & STRITCH 2702 Kirby-524-6272 ,r
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