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The New Voice, No. 570, September 27 - October 3, 1991
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The New Voice, No. 570, September 27 - October 3, 1991 - File 001. 1991-09-27/1991-10-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4363/show/4334.

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(1991-09-27/1991-10-03). The New Voice, No. 570, September 27 - October 3, 1991 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4363/show/4334

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The New Voice, No. 570, September 27 - October 3, 1991 - File 001, 1991-09-27/1991-10-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4363/show/4334.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The New Voice, No. 570, September 27 - October 3, 1991
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 27, 1991-October 3, 1991
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 24648896
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript 'New Voice' Gay Personals One of Americo·s Largest LJSfings' ALL LOCAL. ALL REAL. ALL FRESH See Bock Cover lot DetOf]s, GAY NEWS FOR SOUTH TEXAS ANO LOUISIANA 0 "The Montrose Voice"O SEPTEMBER 27-0CTOBER 3, 1991 r.. 570 AUSTIN (5'2) 478-4245 CJ HOUSTON (713) 529-8490 D NEW ORLEANS (504) 524-3279 D SAN ANTONIO (~12 2'.t6-1833 T T T DATELINE: HOUSTON Politicos await gay conference ... State Rep. Glen Maxey-pictured here The reception, hosted by Danburg and ,.,th Toni Knight, president of the Hous- HGLPC, was attended by oeveral Houstan ton Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus; officials, including council members Chris Hacon, host committee co-chair for Sheila Jackson u.e. Vince Ryan, Beverley the ln!l'rnational Conference of Openly Clark and Eleanor Tinsley. Maxcy is Tex· Gay/l..csbian f.lect~d and Appointed Offi· Clala, and • tate Ht_.p. Debra Dan burg-was a11' fil'8t. openly gny state legislator. guest of honor at a preview reception for The conference will he held in Hou•ton thA 1·onf Prtn<·e Friday, Sept. 20"=--~~~ No' ~i4. TT T DATELINE: SAN ANTONIO Train, bike and skate • •• The Lambda Bike Club, Lambda Rollerskating Club and Chain Gang Bike Club got together Jru;t Sunday for the long awaited "Train, Bike and Skate" trip to Galveston. The group rode the Texas Limited train to trc island whPre they b1cy-cled around Galveston, then took the ferry to Bolivar and shopped the historic Strand. The grou pi; "ill plan other trips m coming months; for more informa­tion on skating and biking events, call (713) 523-6381 evenings. fends reduced charge in slaying; family retains lawyer By BOBBY MAYES fNV San Antonio San Antonio attorney Martha Fitzwater has taken on repre­sentation of the family of a gay man killed during a sexu­al encounter at a local motel. Fitzwatei; a volunteer for Lambda Legal Defense, said the family of Charles Resendez, the 37-year-old schoolteacher killed in the en­counter, is considering what action to take. ''Whatever action is taken will be token so the truth will TT T DATELINE: HOUSTON come out!' she said in refer The judge of the l 86th Dis-ence to questions raised by the trict Court of Bexar County, lenien~ sentence. given former Terrence McDonald, heard Pfc. Nicolo G. G_1angrass~, a Giangrasso's plea of guilty to 19-year-old Manne reservtst . fr Tr t N J h the charge of voluntary man-om en on, . ., w o was 1 h d d h" 10 res1'd "m g m. S an A n tom . owh "l l e s aug ter an. grante im taking police training at years probation Lackland Air Force Base. Complete story, page 8 John Paul Barnich and Brian Bradley elected to AIDS Alliance board By SHf.HI C OIU:N UAHUONNE TNV Ed1wr Two n<W member• of the Greater Houston AlllS Alli nee board of directors were chosen 1n parnw elect1one last Wedncs· clay.Sept 18andSnturday Sept 21 tofill p 1t10na mandated by recent chnnges ta the Alliance'• bylaws Joh"I P Bnrmch was picked to repre-sent th~ gay et risk commu"·'y on the GHAA lionrd in a runoff election held S~pt I~ at the Montrose Palace. Almost iOO prop turned 01: ta vote m the runoff. Barr an attorney and former chair • • the ~ard of AIDS Foundation H1 ue tan,r 1vedl!Ovot.,.Theother ontend er, ll1 u la• Moon, was clos• • nmcl Mth AA ' · • The election wao foc1litated by the AlllS hqu1ty IA"Ul!Ue Bar~ -h 1e a also member of the AFH board and a well known activist with both AllJS nnd gay lesbian organizat10ne On Saturday, the referenced electrnn for a Non Medically lncligcnt PW A of HIV Positive l'.reon" was held at the Metropol· 1tnn Multi Service Center, faciht.ated by bod> Pos1t1ve and the PWA Coalition AIDS act1V1st Bnan ll. Bradley led four L • lenders, rece1 vb g 66 of n total 85 votes cast m the election. Bradley recently g~n~ national recog mlion when he was d1sm1ued from a nura- Bradley: MW PWA board member mg pos1110n ct M D. Anderson Hosp tal, presumably .,...., occordance with then ~ew ly adopted Centers for Disease Control rec­ommendations rcgarcling health nre workers with HIV lie 18 now working m another position for the hoap1tal and hae a lawswt pending He Wllll scheduled ta tcli hie story on the Oprah \\ mfrcy tcleV1B1on te!k ehow Wednesda) (Sept 25) Steven Bradley who cume m occon 1s th• alternate board member, nnd will rep­resent th1e poa1t1on on the board 111 the event that th" elected board m•mber 1• un· Rob falktt~ president of the AIDS E " •y Le~. introduces conurukrs John p,,,J Barmch and Doug Moon and Sue ( p cxecutlte d<Tector of the Greal.rr Housto" AIDSA/lance be~ r /cut\hdne dayse tor.f rthe'"gayal.rUJk"GHAA~Beat able Othe con I<' rs f r the pc ,;ion duced at the Alliance bon.-d"• ,,_xt rcgu)a. were Robert Timothy (Tim Luke and\\ en meett:-g,,. htch w 111beheld1"ur8d&J; Oct dell D McDonald J at the Multi Sen'lce ce;er. acrording w The new board members wul be intro- Sue Cooper, GHAA ,_...,utive dil't'Ctol 2 THE NEW VOICE / SEPT 27-0CT 3, 1991 Hopefully we have made it clear in this space that we greatly admire Juan Palomo, once again with the Houston Post. We have certainly expressed this personally to Juan. By the same token we do not reserve our slings and arrows solely for those we may not hold in high esteem. Thus we must take issue with Juan's Thursday op-ed column (for the uninitiated, op-ed means opposite the editorial page, usually reserved by the newspaper for signed opinion pieces). In Juan's column he supports, first, restrictions on grants by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) based on "taste" and, second, concludes that perhaps all artists should be required to mass market their skills. In other words, produce only that which is commercially viable. Juan begins his argument with an analogy of his hobby, painting, becoming a career and seeking support of that pursuit from his loving aunts who, in tum, would object to, say, a graphic description of two embracing nudes. The two aunts rightly would be offended and either refuse his request or require only "suitable art." He carries this analogy to the NEA; in fact he "sees little dif/erence between my demanding money from my relatives for art they find objectionable and artists demanding money with no strings attached." Citing Andres Serrano's plastic crucifix immersed in a glass of urine, Juan concludes that "there are a lot of good, decent people across the country who don't like it for verY good personal and religious reasons. We ought to respect their views:' On the face of it, Juan makes a logical argument (particularly if you are a firm believer in censorship). The only problem, however, is that Juan /ails to consider the "intent" of the law creating the NEA. It was not to subsidize "popular" or "majority" art but rather to support and encourage the cultural expressions which would otherwise be lost or undeveloped. Congress's original intent was to create the I~ r--:;l. SHEER INSANITY • ~ OAOUIRI FACTORY WESTHEIMER NEA free of political and thus "majority" pressure. Like all Western European nations before us, Congress clearly saw a need to promote and preserve a varied artistic heritage which the marketplace would otherwise ignore or suppress. The living proof of this is the theater in New York. Broadway productions, generally, are lavish productions geared to popular taste, most often, the flood of tourists. We recently saw "Miss Saigon" and "Will Rogers' Follies" and both are entertaining spectacles with the latter containing little of substance. It is generally conceded that the playwrights of tomorrow must be showcased Off-Broadway, most often in NEA-supported theaters. And more often these days the best plays come forth from regional playhouses, again usually NEA-supported. It is unfortunate that the critics of the NEA, including Juan, always cite what to them are the extreme cases to challenge the whole. Who determines the popularity of art? Certainly Andy Warhol became immensely popular-and rich­through media blitz and hype glitz. But reading Warhol's diaries one would certainly question whether tracing a picture of Marilyn Monroe is art. In essence, the NEA is one of those rare Congressional creations which attempts, if not always successfully, to preserve and foster that which would otherwise die in stillbirth in a pure democracy. Just as our society must sometimes lend unequal support to many forms of minorities-special education, affirmative action, hate crimes laws-so too we must take special measures to insure "minority" talent. This is not an act of defiance toward the majority, but rather a wise act of a maturing nation. Just as freedom of speech does not require a majority vote to protect sometimes distasteful language, so too our society must serve future generations with the heritage of the broadest possible culture- not something homogenized on the altar of majority taste. If nothing else, Juan's logic could be bent to justify the extinction of "undesirable" minorities, such as the one which we share with Juan. 1424-C Westheimer (at Windsor) 522-5156 • T ·Shirts • Magazines • Cards • Books • Leather • Accessories • Necessities Video Sales & Rentals SEPT 27-0CT 3. 1991 /THE NEW VOICE 3 T T T HOUSTON QUICK NOTES Coleman and Boney in runoff; Cable cancels controversial video Garnett Coleman, who received the Hous· ton Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus en· dorsement in the special election for •late repre•entative in Dist. 147, will face well known black activist Rev. Jew Don Boney in a runoff election on Oct. 15. The runoff will decide a replacement for the late Larry Evans. In interviews with the GLPC screening committee, Coleman nceived the highest posinble rating by the committre, accord· ing to GLPC officers. Honey wao reported ly second in preference of 11 candidates vying for the seat. C..:hris Bacon, chair ofthescreenmg oom­mittoo, called Coleman a "young idealist progressive'' with an impressive aware­neas of lesbiantgay iasuN. -"Todd's Greatest Regret" Houston Access Cable, the city's only free public access televi•ion station, has can· ccled showings of the controversial film "Todd's Greatest Regret" after learning TT T DATELINE: AUSTIN that the video was not produced or filmed in Houston. The film, made by a fundamentalist group based in Pale•tine, Texu, ohowed the final days of a man dying of AIDS and also depicted his mother praying for her son to die. The cable station canceled the contract with the film's Houston promoter this week, saying the film would not be aired again unless the producers pay $100 per hour for past showings, as well os pay· ing in advance for any future airing of the video. Acee.,; Cable alr& locally produced vide­os free of charge; howC\·er, out of town pro­duOl'rs are required to pay a fee of$100 an hou< Meanwhile, local AIDS activists are planning to produce a video m response to "Todd's" to be BlJ'ed on Acce88 Cable Un· like the firot ,;deo made os a response, Mike Morrow's ''The Minister Mike Show:• the new film ts expected to take a senous approach and to concentrate on AIDS. Project Transitions' hospice issues call for more volunteers Project Transitions Inc., which main· tains central Texas' only residential AIDS hospice for individuals in the fi. nal stages of HIV disease, i• in need of volunteers to provide a variety of servic­es including physical and emotional support to residents, fundrai>ing, hou•e work and cooking. The next volunteer training Sll88ion is scheduled for Sept. TT T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA 21, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. at the Ch~:ch .~ the Resurrection, 2200 Justm Lane. For more information or to request a volunteer applicaUon and make a reser· vation for tra1mng, contact the Proiect Transition• office at (512) 327- 2326. Inquiries by mm! should be sent to Pro­ject Transitions Inc, 2525 Wnllingwood 705-N, Austin TX ib703. Researcher says he's developed saliva test for AIDS virus GAIN~:SVU.LE, Fla., Friday, Sept. 20 (AP1-An inexperuuve over-th~ounter saliva test for AIDS hns been developed by a University of Florida researcher who clmma 1t is quicker, easier to use and safer than conventional tests for the virus. Ro11er Clemmons, a professor at UF's College of Veterinary Medicine, said his simple "dipstick" saliva screening test al· so is effective in detecting hepatitis. He now is working to expand the te11t to detect other Rxually transmitted diseaMes. in· cludin11 genital herpes, gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis. "We now can a1multanrouRly diagn~Et several di1teasee with one devict:;• auid Clemmons, who was granted the first pat· ent for the test in July. Three other patents are pending for refined applications of the wat, which is similar to a home pregnancy test. C'lemmona' test takes le88 than eight minutes to detect HIV, leas than five min· utes to spot hepatitis, nnd will only cost about $5 per test, said David Fowler, presi· dent of FutureTech Inc., the Gainesville company licensed by UF to market the test. It will be sold abroad beginning in Marth, but cannot be sold in the Unites: Stah'8 until it ie appro"·ltd by the Food and Drug Administration in about 18 months. The big advantage to the test, Clemmons said, 18 that it can be admini.s­tt ·n-d ulmo•t in•tant11nN)u•IY by anyone and doesn't require the handling of blood and urine. It also does not have to be sent to a laboratory. In more than 2000 tests on hundreds of people, Clemmons' test proved to be 100 percent sensitive in detecting HIV anti· bodies in saliva and 98.6 percent accurate overall. Another advantage of the test is that it giv111 no false ncgotives, which means someone not infected with the disease po8· sibly could test positivf', but no one mfect· ed with the disease could test negative. u1r you could 11p1t jn a cup and do a very simple. very reliable, Vf'ry mexpenstve oelf.test for AIDS, wouldn't you want to?" Fowler said. "Conceivably, people could even bring it on a date and exchange te•ts before mov· jng ahead in tht'I rdnt1on•hip~· he •aid "But in the United States, it probably nev· er will happen because people here view AIDS differently than people in the rest of the world:' "REMEMBER WHEN II-IE 5AFE1Y~TROlJU<;T HELPED us CK055TJ..IE 511<EE1 !.. II Michigan regents vote to leave housing code intact ANN ARBOR, Mich., Friday, Sept. 20 (AP)-The University of Michigan Board of Regent.. on Friday reject<'<! pro· posals to allow homosexual couples to live in university family housing, de­spite complointa of di•crimination. "The regents have considered the question of the eligibility policy con· cerning family housing and find no need to change it;' read part of a pohcy adopted 7-0 by the regents. umvers1ty spokeaperson Wono Lf'e said. Spokesperson Joe Owsley said the current housing policy allows only mar· ried couples, couples with depcndPnt children, aingle parents with dependent children and a single person in certain cases to live in the university's family housing. Regent Phillip H. Power abstained from 1''riday's vote, saying he wanted more time to review studies that allege discrimination against gays, Lee said. The regents voted following a hearing Thursday m which some campus groups asked that gays receive the same family housing consideration as hetero­sexual families. The university's Housing Law Re­form Project and the Study Committee on the Status of Lesbians and Gay Men urged that both same-sex couples and unmarried heterosexuals be allowed to rent in the 1668 married apartments. Attempts to get comments on the n.,...· test from AIDS researchers at the Uruver· s1ty of California ot San 1''ranc1sco, San Francisco General Hospital, and Johns Hopkin• Medical Instll11te were unsuc­ce, sful. Researchers either refused to com· ment because thcv were unaware of Clemmon~• work o.r call• "'ere not re-­turned. When the teal goes on the foreign mar· ket, it initially will be used by doctors, den· tIBts, emergency room penoonnel, the mili· tary and po"sibly by immigration officials to quickly determine 1f people have AIDS A home test ver~ion "ill be available out· e1dei the ll R , .cry "°on oiu-r that. Fowler said. The test will beu•eful anywhere that a<' ce•s to central labs is limited. that includes rural areas as well ao the Third World ThE NEW VOICE .ssue s7 SEPT 27-0CT Published Fridays hlabl shed 1973 H th• Houalon Monlrou Stat , ..... atabltstleG 1980 as the HcX.ts1on ..-on110M voec:e :icorporat ng 1991 the ""'""" Orteana C111$Cr. City Star "The Montrose Voice" 408 Avondale Houston. TX n006 (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1991 Office hours 9am-5 30pm Henry t.AcClurg ..,.,..,,., Snen Cohen Oart>onne. .uor Leonaf'd Earl Jct\nson. con•*POftd.,., 8a"Y Bass. pl!OfOpf'llpMf ADVERT SING ::.....c.SoEPAR,.M£NT AustinlChna l.Jlher HoustorvRoberl DeCota HoustorvT1<1 Netsor New Orlol~ Lee Weiss San A.ntoruO'Eshcol Richard Wnghl Austin (512) 478-"245 Houston (713) 5~•'l0 ~'" Orleans '504) 524.;,279 San Antoruo (5,2' n&-1833 ------- POSl lolASTEA Send .odr•• ITtlC;tlOM to .t08 Avondaie HOuslOn TX 1 ..xl6 3M9 5'ibsc pr tat• US 0ycarne10tUSUa s· "5perweek $32.!IO per 6 monlht Of SG5 per ,_, NaltOn# Ml"'•" a ng te/)le#lltafTYe MCNel Or•voia. Riven Oe lr.tarktiU'tQ PC. eo .. 1268 P&atnl etd N. 1061 (908 180- WO ~Ml tmplay edvwttttp dffdfne 5pfn Tuetdai fnday pubhc.ahOn Nol1C9 IO «lvwtMrs Actvet11-1ng rat8 achedt* Tan ........ lldive hb '~ 1991 ANporw.e.;:..ry W•donoc......,.rinancatr~ t) IOI Claims by •dvel'tiMrl bUI rNden .,. a•.o to 90vlM lh9 ~otanysuap;caonor1rw:tuten1or~ad'i'ft l•tftCI and susoeck>nl .., be 1nvest~ted VMibef Auoci&Wd P,..., Natronal Ga:y ....... Guld 4 THE NEW VOICE I SEPT. 27-0CT. 3, 1991 TT T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Administrator charges school fired her for admitting AIDS student FAR HILLS, :o;.J., Wedne;;day, Sepl 18 <AP}--The former director of a private day school charged in a lawsuit that she was fired for admitting a child whose brother is infected with the virus that causes AIDS. The student never enrolled at Far Hills Country Day School because an other school official. headmaster Charles Scranton, asked his mother to withdraw the application, saying par· entb pay the school $10,000 a year to "in· sulate" their children. The school subse­quently reinstated the offer when pub­licity grew about its actions. but the boy chose to go to public school. Marilee Ostman, of Bethlehem, Pa., said in a lawsuit filed last month that Scranton fired her from her$41,200post for fru:ing to notify him she knew the boy's brother had the virus and admit­ted him anyway. Oatman, a school employee for 12 years, said her firing July 19 violates laws prohibiting discrimination, laws she said she was following when she ad· mitted 0-year·old Kurt Walther of Clin· ton Township. She said when Scranton learned about the brother's medical history, he asked her to resign. When Oatman re­fused, Scranton said the school's admin· istration was being reorganized and she was no longer needed, the lawsuit says. A school spokesperson, Richard Smith, said the allegations were inaccu· rate and that O•tman had been notified about deficiencies in her work both oral­ly and in writing prior to her finng. "The school denies that the admiS11ion of Kurt Walther was the reason for her termination;• Smith said. Ostman said she'd never been in· formed about problems with her job per· formance. Lawmaker objects to state grant for lesbian and gay film festival HARRISBURG, Pa, Frid~J. SepL 20 (AP}--A state lawmaker has threatened the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts with loss of its aid if it gives a $4,000 grant to the Lesbian and Gay Film Fes· tival in Pittsburgh. Ron Gamble, a Democrat from Oakdale, said he was shocked to learn of the grant. "It is a betrayal of the public trust to provide funds to support an activity which glorifies such illegal and immor-al behaviot.' he 88.ld in a letter to council chairperson Carol Brown. Gamble asked her to cancel the grant or he would try to cut or eliminate the counol's $757,000 state appropriation. The festival, in its sixth year, is being held Oct. 11-17 at the Fulton Theater an· nex. Richard Cummings, the festival's ex· ecutive director, said it has received state funding for the last three years. Film festivals in Chicago and New York have shown the films and one shown last year, Common Threads, Stories From The Quilt, won an Academy Award, Cummings said. "The films we show have artistic and socio-political importance;' he said. '"They are all films we are proud of and proud to be presenting in Pittsburgh:' He said this was the first time a state lawmaker has objected, although some people in a South Side neighborhood ob­jected to the film festival being held in a theater there last year, Cummings said. But the local Chamber of Commerce and a city councilman came to the festi· val's defense and it was held. Cummings said no decision has been made about responding to Gamble's let­te~ Derek Gordon, the state council's ex· ecutive director, said he would toke up the issue with Ms. Brown and the coun· cil's executive committee. Governor to be an honorary chairperson of gay fund-raiser ST. ··ALL, Minn., ,'uesuay, Sept. 24 (APJ-Gov. Arne Carlson has agreed to be an honorary co-chairperson of a fund·raising dinner for the nation's largest gay and lesbian lobbying group at the Minneapolis Convention Center. The move 1s almost sure to widen the rift between the Independent-Republi· can governor and hi> party, an IR leader said. "I don't think there's a chance ... that Ame Carlson is going to reconcile him· self with the party after doing some­thing like this. It's the last straw;• said Minnesota Republican national Com· mitteeman Frank Graves, a staunch conservative who is stepping down from his post partly becau•e of philosophical differences with Carlson. Graves' likely successor, Minneapolis businessperson David Printy, also ex· pressed disapproval 'It's a lifestyle that"' not embraced by the public, and while I'm the first one to speak out again•I discrimination-I have employed gays in my business-I don't understand why the governor is endorsing these groups and hwm't even met with some Republican groups;· he said. Carlson said today of the criticism, "I can understand dissent. The problem is that we have to begin to appreciate the fact that if we want equal opportunity in America we have to work for it and we can't put any ands, ifs or buts after that phrase:' The governor also said he was con· cerned about the criticism. "I certainly care, I care a great deal. But I think we have to understand there are going to be differences m political parties;• he said. Although Carlson won't attend the Saturday night event, leaders of the gay and lesbian community say his name on the agenda represents a breakthrough on a national level. "We're seeing more and more politi· cians in both parties recognize that the lesbian and gay community is part of the mainstream of politics;· said Grego­ry King, the communications director of the Human Rights Campaign Fund, based in Washington, D.C., which is the beneficiary of the dinner. The group gave $525,000 to congressional candi· dates in the 1990 election and hopes to contribute $1 million in 1992. "The politicians see the polls and the polls are moving;' King said. "Every poll that's been done shows that a ma· jority of people favor an end to discrimi· nation:' The percentage of Americans disap­proving of overt discrimination against gays in employment, for instance, has risen from 59 percent in a J 982 Gallup Poll to 71 percent recently, accordmg to Bob Meek, a veteran DI>'L (Oem0<·rat) political adviser and a volunteer for the Twin Cities event. Meek said that several years ago not one member of the Minnesota congres­sional delegation, Democrat or Republi· can. would agree to cosponsor the feder· al Human Rights Act, which would for· bid discrimination against gays and les· bians in jobs, housing and public ac­commodations. Now it has thP support of four DFLers-Sen. Paul Wellstone and Reps. Martin Sabo, Gerry Sikorski and Bruce Vento. Wellstone, in particular, has been a staunch supporter of gay rights and has spoken at several gay-rights fund· raisers across the country, Meek said. The event coincides with the state par­ty convention in St. Cloud, where Carl· son will deliver the keynote address Sal· urday morning. Attorney general announces settlement of lesbian credit case BOSTO:o;, Tuesday, Sept. 24 IAP)-A Jes bi· an couple allegedly demed a car lease be­cause of their sexual onentation won Sl,500 in a settlement agamstthecardeal· ership and a national consumer credit company. The attorney general's Civil Rights Di­vision filed the complaint in Nov. 1990 with the Massachusetts Comm1Ss10n Against Discrimination. The complaints named General Electric Capital Auto Lease Inc. and Metro Mitsubishi in Westboro. The state's gay civil rights law prohibits discrim1nat1on against homosexuals in the areas of credit, employment and hous· ing. Under the terms of the settlement agree-ment, filed in Suffolk Superior Court Mon· day, General Electric Capital Auto Lease agreed it would not ,.fuse to grant loan• to non-spousal cosigners on the basis of mar· ital status or sexual orientation 1be leasing company also agreed it would disclose on all credit applications used in Massachusetts that Htate law pro­hibits discrimination based on marital status or sexual orientation, according toa statement by Attorney General Scott Harshbarger. The dealership, now domg busmess as Gli"k Nissan, agreed to po•l•tat•mentsm its showroom making CUHtomers aware of their rights. The company also aicreed to provide written instructions to its 1•mploy· ees about the state's civil rights law. Regardless of bankruptcy, transsexual wins right to sue airline WILMh'WTON, Del., Wednesday,S,,..t, ·" !APl-A former Continental Airlines pilot who was fired JUBt prior to ha,·1ng a sex­change operation hos won the right to sue the troubled earner. Jessica Stearns, 51, of Pnnct'ton, :-.·.J., was John Steams until August 1990. John Stearns wo.a a decorotcd military pilot, fly· 1ng 300 missions during the Vietnam Wa:r. On 1'u<Sdny, Ms. Stearns rece>ved per· m1ss1on to sue Continental from the lJ S. Bankruptcy Court, which lifted federal protections that shield companies from suits during bankruptcy reorganization. She intends to file a discrimination suit m ~ewJerseycourta, butahefirstmustget permission in Delaware where the bank· ruptcy action •• IA king pluce. ''This 18 an unusual Sltuation;· said US. Bankruptcy Judge Helen S. Balick before granting Ms. Stearns' request. 1be judge noted that Ms. Steams bad tried to resolve the problem by going through company channels. Continental argued such a swt would distract management from the iob of reor· ganizing the rompany. Ms. Stearns was a married man with one child when he Joined the company in 191\4 He notified the airline m 1989 thlll he was considering undergoing a sex change operation. He was terminated from his $49,()()().a.yenr·JOb a month before h• hnd the surgery. Dartmouth to drop ROTC unless homosexual policy changed HANOVER, :-; H, Thursda,, Sept. .:I (AP1-Dortmouth College will drop its ROTC program unless the Defense De­partment changes its policy preventing homosexuals from servtng in the military. ''This ts not an anti-ROTC policy;' said college spokesperson Alex Huppe. 'It's clear .. thot the trustees want to keep ROTC on campus but itisindirectconflict with the college's equal opportunity poli cy:' The Ivy League school would abandon ROTC unless the government policy 18 re­versed by April 1993, Ira Michael Heyman, chairperson of the board of true- • s01d in a atatemenL Dartmouth s equal opportunity state­ment guorantecs the school will not dis· criminate on the basis of sexual orientn· tion, as well as race, colot religion, sex. age, national origin, disability or veteran status. "The Defense llepartment has failed to provide some rational basis for \barnng homosexuals). relying instead on unsubstantiated predictions that m earli­er times were used to bar racial minorities and women from the opportunity to serve their country m the military:• Heyman said. Dartmouth will kecp working with other colleges and universities to get the govern· ment and Congress to ehmmate the ban, officials said. In !!*JI. eight studl'nts graduated who had ROTC ocholarsh1ps and another eight are to graduate next spring, Huppe said. In letters sent in August 1990 and last July, llartmouth President James Freed· man urged llefense Secretory Dick Cheney to reconsider the homosexual ban. '"Those charged ,.,th the high obligation of defending our country'• liberties should be m the vanguard of extending 10 all Americans freedom from every form ofm· vidious discrimination:· he said in the July letter. Dartmouth has had some form of mili tary officor tra1mng proicram for most of the past half-century. For nearly 20 yeurs, students have be.on able to attend IJart• mouth on an ROTC scholarahip and get the necessary officers' training through arrangement& with Norwith University m Vermont. Meanwhile, a small, private univtrs1ly in Tampa, Fla., 1s taking on the Army Ix• cause one of it.a gay students 1s being turned away from a ROTC leadership course taught at ita campus. Homosexuals may be prohibited from participating in the Army ROTC, but t:ni· versity of Tampa officials believe oexual preference should not be an !Ssue when it comes to crodited courses. SEPT. 27-0CT 3. 1991 /THE NEW VOICE 5 T T T NEW ORLEANS QUICK NOTES Visiting Gov. Wilder refuses to comment on Virginia's gay bar ban By LEONARD EARL JOHNSON TNV Ntu.• Orkan• Virginia Gov. Douglas Wilder visited New Orleans SepL 19, meeting with Mayor Sid­ney Barthelemy and delivering the first Ern ... t P. Moria! Public Affairs Lecture at Xavier University. Wilder is the nation's first black governor and an announced Democratic candidate for president of the United States. He is considered to have virtually no chance at the nomination but is campaigning to have "some greater ef· feet on the body politic:· The lecture and accompanying award are named in honor of Kew Orleans• first black mayor. A 1951 Xavier graduate, Mona! was mayor from 1978 to 1986. He died on Christmas Eve, 1989. Moria! and Wilder were contemporaries in the civil righta movement. Both were attorney• for the NAACP LPgal Defense Fund when re-­taring U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall led the division. But in recent weeks, Wilder's human nghta record has hit a snag. He has come under fire from lesbian and gay citizens in Virginia for refusing to denounce a 1930 state law he defended as a state senator in the 1970's. The law bans gay bars. He said Montrose Auto Repair FHt;r. ESTIMATES AI.I. WOHK GUARANTEED lOOPacific Wt: 00 OLD CARS 526-3723 CAHBUHt:J'ORS HEBUll.:r t;J .t:l'THICAL REPAIRS ALI, llHAKF. WOHK WITH DOWN PAYMENTS AS LOW AS $300 ON SOME MODELS! INDIANA AUTO SALES 271 1 TIDWELL HOUSTON 697-3325-ROB ART It ARTISTS •••TED New gallery specializing in works by new and established gay and lesbian artists. All mediums needed. Send photo, info and bio to: P.O. Box 60 I 0 Washington, DC 02005 that he and other legislators declined to overturn the law after a "rather graphic" presentation from the state attorney gen­eral's office •bowing that some of the es­tablishmenta were sites for "lewd and las­civious conduce' When asked, Wilder refused to say what he thinks now about the issue. The law makeo it illegal to hire gays or serve as a gathering place for them. Lesbians are not opecifically mentioned. In August, an AJ. exandria, Va., bar named French Quarter Cafe filed suit to overturn the rarely en­forced ban. Wilder refuoed further comment on the discriminatory law, saying he did not know enough to comment, "especially since the issue is in litigation:' He did say he opposed "blanket statutes whirh dis­criminate." "You can•t sit on a civil rights fence:' said Robert Bray, a spokesperson for the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force. "The governor will be 11ttking gay and 1 ... bian votes as he rune for president. With­out a clear statement that condemns insti­tutional discrimination, we remain incred· uloue of his 1upporL Now ie not the time to waffle:• MEMBERSHI~ REQUIRED I Open24 Hours a Day New Daily Membership $5 Patrick Heck. spokesperson for Virginians for Justice, said he had hoped that Wilder's own expenencewith discrim· ination would make him more sympathet­ic. "I would think that he particularly would have ineight inwour plight, I would think that the governor would recognize the problems with this and would not side­step the issue:• A series of phone calls to local Louioiana political action organizations, both main· stream and lesbian/gay, revealed very lit­tle awareness of the Virginia governor's waffling on the gay isaue. Kew Orleans Mayor Sidney Barthelemy'• office pointed out the mayor hos made a strong state­ment before city council supportmg legis· lation outlawing diecriminauon of gay, lesbian citizens. -NO AIDS "Man To Man" Man to Man:' a half day seminar on 18· sue• and problems of gay male relation­ships, will be sponsored by the !"Ot AIDS Task Force on Saturday, Sept. 29 from 9:00 a.m. to noon at the Maison Dupuy Hotel. JOO! Rue Toulouse. Participation is free. The Session 18 lim­ited w fifty participants. Re&ervationa are recommended and may be made by calling David Kiviaho al 945- 4000. The ,etrunar will explore the pleasures and problems of gay male relationships. Discussion• will include factors affoctmg relationships, such as homophobia. com· ing out, mental health, communication, and health and previous relatiomJnps. Other topics to be addressed include com· m1tment. communic-ation. "relationships rules;· acceptance and emotional open· net;.t; as essential ingredients in a aucces~ ful relationship. Workshops are to be con­ducted under the duection of a profession· al therapist and social worker. -Women/ AIDS conference Planned Parenthood ofLouunana Ill coop­eration ,.;th the !'O AIDS Tusk Force IS sponbOring the third annual Women and HIV I A.JDS Conference Saturday, Oct. 12 from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. a t Southern University m Baton Rouge. The confer­ence theme is "Women: The l'ew Face of HIV I AIDS:' Workshops will address health care. family relationships and po­litical issues related to HJ\'/AJDS and women. Day care will be provided by Southern University. For Ulformation contact Angela Shiloh-Cryer at (504) 94f>.4000. r:usr =SENT~S co::N A.;::E OF::ECK-:i r:usr ;:;;:;,ENT-:S cO::N AT-:E O;:ECK-:i Good for Bring This Coupon to the ONE FREE LOCKER with purchase of One Time Mcmber.ihap S5.00 or 6 Month Mcmbe"hip SI 7.00 exp 1CV31191 One Coupon per Customer _J I L Club Body Center for ONE FREE WORKOUT Moo., Tues., W<d. & Thur;. 5pm-9pm only Meet Wayne, Our Weight Instructor exp. 10!31191 One Coupon per Cusaomer 6 THE NEW VOICE I SEPT 27-0CT 3. 1991 T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA San Francisco faces new challenges, daily, in fighting AIDS By CHRISTINA D. MUNGAN FOR TH( NEW VO.CE SAN FRANCISCO, Wednesday, Sept. 18 (AP)-Almost every day of the year, day in and day out. four more San Franc:U;cans likely will die of AIDS. Half the city's gay men and 5 percent of ita residenta overall have the HIV virus, according to Public Health Department epidemiologist Dr. George Lemp. "I would say that's the highest rate for any city in the country;• he 118.id. Thia July alone, 149 San F'l'anciacans died of acquired immune deficiency syn­drome. bringing the ten-year total to 7,.559. That same month, 141 more cases offull­blown AIDS were reported. Locals like to point to the San Francisco "model" of caring for people with AIDS. It includes agencies ranging from ward 5A at San Francisco General Hospital, the na­tion's first designated Al DS ward. to Peta Are Wonderful Support. one of some 200 non-profit AIM-related agencies. But a number of recent studies have challenged the effectiveness of the city's war on the lethal illness. Despite exteru.ive public education campaigns, AIDS may be spreading fB11ter than evei; even as funding drops. In August, two local statisticians an­nounced that after following 88.559 AIDS CB11es nationwide for five years, they had found white gay men live an average of 13.7 months after diagnosis, while blacks and Hispanics live less than 12 months and women eurvive only 11.4 months. In June, a survey by the San Francisco Department of Public Health found that 47 percent of the city's Hispanic men, 34 percent of Filipino men and 20 percent of American Indian men engaged in unpro­tectro sex during the previous year. In yet another project, Public Health tes­ted 258 young gay men outaide several bars and found unexpected and alarming levels of unprotected sex and HIV infec­tion. Among gay men aged 17 to 19 in the test, 43 percent had engaged in unprotected sex during the previous six months and 14.3 percent tested HIV·poeitive. Among 20 to 22-year-olds, 25 percent had engaged in unsafe sex and 14 percent had HIV; among 23 to 25-year-olds, the figures were 30 percent and 10.4 percent respectively. On the day the study was released, "a oollective shudder went through the oom­munity of gay men of all oolors, because on that day we oaw history repeating itselC:' said Ken Joneo. director of Stop AIDS. Stop AIDS closed 1ta doors in 1987 as the HIV infection rate dropped and the battle for the public mind seemed to have been won. But they reopened two years later to fight a new holding action. Some 95 percent of people with AIDS m San Francisco are gay and bisexual men, compared to 67 percent of cases nation­wide, said Ernesto Hinojos, director of the education department at the San ~'rancis­oo AIDS Foundation. As a result, city edu­cators have tended to disregard drug us­ers, women, youths and minorities who didn't fit the model. "The populations that are infected are changing dramatically;• said AIDS Foun­dation Executive Director Pat Chruten. 0 We've become rather oomplacent in San Fran­About 3000 march for AIDS funding & understanding in Milwaukee cisco that the population that's susceptible is artic­ulate and well-read and knowledgeable:· That isn 't nec""8arily the case for the younger men, the Hispanics, and 1 the poor women with AJIJS whose numbers are MILWAUKEE, Sunday, Sept 22 (AP)-An estimat­swelling, she said. ed 3000 people marched to a municipal park for a rally Sunday to protest the social stigma against AIDS Rep. Peter Bock, D-M1lwaukee. whose brother died of AIDS three years ago. said his brother was able to find a willing nursing home only because of the assistance of the Milwaukee AIDS Pro1ect. Groups hke MAP are important for 1mprov1ng government help, Bock said The second annual march sponsored by MAP raised about $286.000. a 50 percent increase, spokesperson Tim Kennedy said. People attending the affair included Mayor John 0 . Norquist and Milwaukee Brewers president Al­lan Selig Selig and his wife Sue also sponsored the AIDS Walk Leadership Breakfast, attended by Attorney General James E. Doyle Jr .. Sen. Herbert H. Kohl. D-Wis and other dignitaries. Hut even as AID8 cases rise and public health workers find new popula­tions in trouble, care giv­ers are finding a new issue to confront: '4donor fa· tigue:• "There's almost the same source for what you might call donor fatigue and the fact that the infec­tion rate among, especial· ly, young gay men is soar­ing:• speculated John Stafford, a local United Way spokesperson. "There's a need to sus-tain public attention on both the public education front and the fund-raising front. This ia something that needs to be s&d:' Stafford said the number of United Way donors allocating money to AIDS has dropped steadily since the organization first began allowing them to designate in 1987. Local donors to Umted Way allocated only $571,000 in 1990 to AIDS, down from $639,000 in 1989 and $950,000 in 1988, he said. Part of the problem may be the reces­sion. Also, since last year, AIDS has be­come only one of a number of causes for which donors can designate their gifts, Stafford said. The Umted Way has drawn on ita gener· al fund to make up for the drop. The organ­ization actually increased ita total AIDS· related funding to $1.5 million for the year beginning July 1 from $1.4 million last year, Stafford said. But more money is being granted to iust two big organizations, the Shanti Project and the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, he said. Correspondingly less goes to emalle~ le88 cost-efficient organizations. One of th08e is Kairos House, founded in 1988 to treat some 3,000 AIDS care givers complaining of battle fatigue. Kairos has run into severe funding problems, says founder John McGrann. "As well as burnout among care givers, there's burnout among donors;• McGrann said. "We're 10 years into the epidemic. After people have given so long they just get tired of giving, or they don't have any more to give, or they have died ... and many people in San Francisoo are tired of going to fund·raiaers:' "There's a bit of a backlash, too:• he add· ed. "People are saying, hey, there's other dU.eaaes, too-diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's, and we should fund them, too." The agency spent $12fi,OOO last year and hopes to find !172,000 this year, but so far leea than a third of that'• bt·tm rai1u-d, McGrann e&d. Debra Kent Friedland, development di· rector for the non-profit San Francisco AIDS Foundation, said it's hard to dream up fund-raising even ta " that people will re­ally love and ke<•p coming back to year af­ter yeaT.' But overall, she said, the problem might be less compassion fatigue than the in· creuing number of servicee competing for funding. California has almost 60,000 registered charities, and they oollected $30 billion last year. Both figures are the highest in the nation, but the pot ia not bottomless. "Among AIDS organizations it's becom· ing more competitive:· said Friedland. "Not in a cutthroat way, but there are just so many services and as the number goes up, the funding for each goes down:• The Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control's recent decision to define AIDS by the patient's level of disease-fightingT· cells rather than by opportunistic infec­tions could aggravate the problem. City officials say they fear the new defi­nition could make some 5,000 more people eligible for AIDSservicesasofJan. l with­out any oorresponding jump in public and private funding. People newly definedoould become eligi­ble for Medi-Cal, MediCare and disability benefits, but the change will also increase the number of cities with enough AIDS cases to qualify for federal funds, said Dr. Sandra Hernandez, head of the city's AIDS office. Currently, 16 cities qualify, including San Francisro, which received $12.8 mil· lion for 1991. Under the new definition, 29 cities will qualify, and competition for fed· era! dollars could increase, Hernandez said. Eric E. Rofes, executive director of Shanti, which provides a variety of servic­es to people with AIDS and isoneofthecit.­y's largest and oldest AIDS organizations, said he thinks the only way AIDS groupe can survive is by merging and coordinat­ing their work. "I support the existence of services targeting specific communities; it's very important to say that:' he said. "But what we do in San Francisco is that we pretend that there's enough money for AIDS, and we can fund 125 organizations. I think groups would be able to get their money if we were focusing more on 70 organiza~ tions or 40 or 90-if we were focusmg more:' One merger Rofes cited as a prototype came at the end of July when Project Open Hand, which provides hot meals to over 1000 San FTanciscans w:ith AIDS, took over a food bank from the San ~'rancisro AIDS Foundation. "With AIDS dollars becoming increa&­ingly scarce as the demand for HIV servic­es skyrocketa, AIDS service orga nizations must make every effort to maximize r& eourcee and minimize duphculiun of ..,rv·-~~~~"" ice.;;• said the AIDS Foundation 'a Chris­ten. Investment banker Michael Rudder, chairperson of Open Hand's board of di· rectors, said his organization believes it can cut food bank costa through buyinl( in bulk and combining delivery OJ)('rations with tho•e for the meal service. But both Rudder and Open Hand execu· tive director Steve Bums emph88ized the impetus will have to come from the gra..,. roota. " It's not our place to say ... a hundred of the•e can be oombined with all these and save so much money. It can't rome by fiat. It can't come by some AIDS czar.• Burns said. Still, Rudder expecta more mergers. "It hasn't happened before, here, and there'll be more of that;' he said. "What'• beginning in San Francisco i.a, we believe, that people are doing what they do best ... and not doing a lot of cross-over.• Map charting spread of AIDS worries image-conscious towns By JEFF DONN FOR THE NEW VOICE AMHERST, M8Jl8., Monday, Sept. 23 (AP)-A poeter mapping out the spread of AIDS from Bo.ton to M88bachusetts' hin· terland worries some image-conscious otate officials. The poster, developed at the Umvennty of MaMachUM'tt.a, shows that AIDS has touched more than a quarter of the state's 351 cities and towns. Uruvennty r"rir....rapher Roy Doyon. who based the l>O"ter on information from the atate Department of Public Health, plane to print 1000 copies with$500froma private ooUege foundation. Officiate at the MIU8achusetta AIDS Surveillance Program told him they have no money to help. ao he plane to deliver it himself to teathen1 and state lawmakeTI1. Kathleen Gallagher, atate program au perviaor, wrote to Doyon that his poster oould "actually be misinterpreted, causing people to •terootype certain cities and towns." Gallagher later referred questions to Kate McCormack of the state Department of Public Health. McCormack •aid, "Put· ting a map up -· in various 1chool1 re­quires an explanation of what the maps means. That requires further reeourcee.'' Doyon believes the mapo will help con· vince people that AIDS has movtd beyond big cities and can strike anyone, not just drug users and homosexuals. Demse McWilliama, director of the AIDS law proiectofthe Boston basro Gay and Lesbian Advocates, agreea. "l think people feel that HIV ia an ill­ness that somehow ia locked in a ghetto someplace-either a gay ghetto or drug u11- ing ghetto or an urban ghetto;• she said. MU8achusetts has 4063 recorded ca•es in a population of 5.7 million. At leHBt 27,000 people have rontracted the HIV vi· ru& that causes AID8. State officials ex· pect about 36,000 reported cases by 1994. Furor over gay marchers in New York divides Hibernians NEW YORK, Saturday, Sept. 21 (AP}­Mooths after they invited a gay Irish group to join them in the St. Patrick's Day Parade, a diVlSlon of the Ancient Order of Hibernians has been expelled by the Manhattan branch of the order: The decunon came Thursday in a I 7·!i vote by the New York County Board of the Ancient Order of Hiberruans, mem· bers &atd Fnday The Hibenuans spon­sor ~e annual Fifth Avenue parade. The New York Times reported that sources said the dispute with Division 7 was 0&tensibly over whether the divi· sion would cooperate with a grievance procedure but actually stemmed from the invi tation to the gay group. The iBSue of the Irish Lesbian and Gay Organization marching in the po· radc was a political hot potato last March. Mayor David Dinkins extended the parade after the order said there was no room for the gay group and marched be­side its members. Dinkins was booed and briefly sprayed w:ith beer. Dinkins said he was " greatly con· cemed" nod "extremely troubled" to learn of DiV1Sion 7's expulsion from the order. Bernard Morns, acting pre81dent of Division 7, told the Times he could not comment because the d1v1sion 1& • bound by an oath of secrecy:• City Human Rights Commissioner Dennis del..eon told the Daily News his office is continuinl( to investil(ate dis­crimination charges agains t the pa rade committee stemming from the hrouha­ha last March . "We hove an open 1nvest1gntion into the charge by the gays and les bians tha t they were not permitted to ma rch hy thtt parade committee: deLeon said SEPT 27-0CT 3, 1991 / THE NEW VOICE 7 T T T DATELINE: TEXAS Boy Scouts say they won't reconsider anti-gay policy By TERRI LANGFORD FOR THE Nf.W VOICE DALLAS, Wednesday, Sept. 18 (AP}­The Boy Scouts of America says it will stand by its policy against homosexuals despite the San Francisco school sys­tem's ban on Scout activities during school hours. "It is ina ppropriate to change those values, just to expand the rank oftheor­ga n ization ;• s a id Bla ke Lewis, spokesperson for the Irving, Texas­based group. The San Francisco Board of Educa­tion voted 5-1 Friday to bar a new Scout program, Learning for Life, because of the Boy Scouts' ban on homosexuals. The program had enrolled about 9000 }\ ANDE RSON N S U RANCE lnsur1n1 our community with are I . Low cost mAJor meclal lnsur.tnce wlCh unllmltrd payout for .tny llneu or &<ddent. NO EXQ.UD£D IUNESSI 1. Presutpdon d iscount ards, <cwertn1 most meclc.atlon s. 3 . Disability <OYerAS~Y to obtain, ..,ry low costl 4 . LWe lnsur.tnce-ush \<Alue or tum. No........_, no blood-. M.oke your io..,r your bendlclAry. 5. Dent..i lnsur.tnce-u low u S8 per month, Cosmetic dentistry lnducled. Conftdenti.I consultations honored for •II Teus ruldents. Ull M. SIAter Anderson At (511) 734-7911 In s..n Antonio. public school students. Earlier, a committee of the Oakland, Calif., board of education recommended Scouts be barred for the same reason. The full board has not voted. Learning For Life was introduced in San Francisco schools this fall after the Bay Area United Way, spurred by charges from a gay civil rights group that the Scouts discriminate against ho­mosexuals, withheld a $9,000 grant. Girls, homosexuals and atheists ages 9 through 18 are welcome in the pro­gram, which is separate from tradition­al Scout activities. Traditional Scout programs continue to bar homo~exuals, a policy based on (713) 524-1682 ~ MIDTOWN FLORIST RICK BELFORD MANAGER 806 RICHMOND HOUSTON, TX 77006 Charlene Torresf CSW•ACP/LPC Counselinq-Psycholherapy Depression, Anxiety, Relationship Issues Individuals/Couples 6300 w. Loop South #480 r ft• A~AR I TLe J;;\ TEJAS AIR, · Air~ I C. · Air Cond1t1oning and ~ '~ Heating Specialists T ACL A0061 OC All Work Fully Guaranteed Over 13 Years Experience HOUSTON (713) 880-4629 ~~ENT~CAR{ .~ ... ' \_ I \_I l (' • \ I (_ [ !!I • Gay/ Lesbian Issues • Chemical Dependency • Depression & Anxiety • Outpatient & In Hosp11al • Sexual Abuse & Trauma • Psychological Testing • Couples & Family Issues • 81ilngual Services Diana Quintana, Ph.D. Judy L. Stange, Ph.D. 840-8871 4801 Woodway 110 Cypress Station Drive $1.50 well drinks, wine and margaritas Free Buff eta Fridays 4-?pm ~---------, I 2 for 1 I I Good Monday-Thursday I after 2 p.m I Buy One Dinner, Get the Next One I I of f"jual or l.c\\er Value I I FREE! I L ::1r:_u:!;· _!.!~r:;1!;1!_bc= .J EX:f'tRCS:.J->l "' q1 5'f u th.en tic Mexican Cuisine 10 14 South Alamo In lhc hrart of downtown, 4 block\ \outh of 1hc f11 lton Hotel 223-1806 Open till 2am Wed.-Sat. New Hors d'oeuvres menu 10-2 Wed.-Sat. the Scouts' oath and laws, both written in 1910, that require members to be "morally straight:• Lewis said The or· ganization also excludes girls and a ny­one who will not take a religious oath. San Francisco school board member Tom Ammiano sponsored the ban, ch a rging that the Learning for Life pro­gram is a " separate-but.equal" remedy. The ban won't affect the Scouts' right to use public schools after hours. Ammiano, who is gay, said he realized it was risky taking on the Scouts, an 81- year-old organization with 4.5 million members. "But it's like a member of your family. You tell them, 'When you're wrong, you're wrong; .. he said. The ban was one of several recent challenges to the organization. In Miami thissummer,ajudgerefused to order the Scouts to accept 8-year-old Margo Mankes, a girl who wanted to at­tend camp with her brothers and filed a sex discrimination lawsuit. Also this year, a court in Los Angeles ruled the First Amendment gave the Scouts the right to dismiss a gay assist­ant scoutmaster. On Friday, a Sacramento, Calif., judge refused to Jet the Scout.. keep the organization's sexual ablltie records se­creL The judge ordered the Scout.. to sur­render the fileh to a lawyer fora boy who claims he was abused by a scoutmaster. GENITAL ~ HERPES FREE treatment for qualified participating PL'l'.JSt$;~0 \{~ lit) on completion of study 'I 7' If you have recurrent genital herpes (at least 4 e pisodes per year), you may be eligible for free treatment in a study comparing a new anti­herpes drug to acyclovir (Zovirax). For further information, call (713) 333-2288 The University of Texas Medical Branch Center for Clinical Studies St. John Professional Building, Suite 200 2060 Space Park Dr., Nassau Bay, TX 77058 VAC DUST BATH RMs MOP& WAX KITCHEN LAUNDRY Mary's Maid Setvia Genera[ Hous~ Hone.st & Depend'ahCe.! NEW SERVICE SPECIAL $35.00 for 3 ~ 2 6atli caa NOW (512) 824-4735 SAN ANTONIO 8 THE NEW VOICE r SEPT. 27-0CT 3 1991 TT T DATELINE: SAN ANTONIO D.A. defends reduced charge in slaying; family retains lawyer By BOBBY MAYES TNV San Antonio San Antoruo attorney Martha Fitzwater has taken on representation of the fanuly of a gay man killed during a sexual en· counter at a local motel. Fitzwater, a volunteer for Lambda Legal Defense, said the family of Charles Reeendez. the 37 -year-old schoolteacher killed in the encounter, is considering what action to take. "Whatever action is taken will be taken so the truth will come out:' she said in ref· erence to questions r81Bed by the lenient sentence given former Pie ;o.;icolo G. Ginngrasso, a 19-yeer-old Manne reserv 1st from Trenton,:-;.J., who was res1ding1n San Antonio while taking police training at Lackland Air Force Base The Judge of the !~6th Distnct Court of Bexar County, Terrence ~kDonald. heard Giangrasso's plea of guilty to the charge of voluntary manslaughter and granted him 10 yenl'll probation. Giangrosao, an avowed heterooexual, bas given several vel'l11ons of what hap­pened on the night of the killing, but his constant defense has been that he was drugged and led to the motel by Resendez fo.~. a homoeexual encounter against hi.; Wlu. According to the evidence presented at the hearing in the l/l6th District Court, G1angrasso said he awoke on l';ew Year's Day of 1990 in a room at the Casa Linda Motel and found himself in bed next to Resendez, who was undressed. He also saw a condom, apparently used and left ly· ing on the bed, and noticed further that his O\'eralls were undone. In a rai:e at the prospect that he had been sexually used, he said, he kicked and beat Resendez to death But, in view of statements end reports of others, much controversy bas arisen over that version of the facts. Robbery or theft may have been in· volved. according to a statement given by Erwin Russell, Giangrauo's senior enlist· ed adviaor at Lackland AFB. According to Russell, Giangrasso admitted to taking $40 from Resendez'• wallet, along with the keys to Resendez truck, while leaving Resendez'• savagely beaten body on the motel room floor. He admitted also to try­ing to take Resendez' truck. but said he was unable to get the vehicle started and therefore had to take a cab back to his bruJe. Although Giangrauo later stated that he did not learn that the beating he had in· flicted was fatal until he saw the story on television, he admitted to Ruuell that 8lJ he left Resendez' body at the motel, hehad already suapected that Resendez was dead. While Giangrasso has maintained that he met Ret1endez downtown during the !\ ew Year celebration near the Alamo and was unaware that Resendez was gay, the family of Resendez maintains that Resendez had gone to a gay bar that mght and that Retlendez met Giangrasso there and they left the bar "ith the intent to en· gage in sex toi:ether Though Giangrasso has claimed that he was drugged, no drug test results were pre­sented to the court in support of that claim. The lightness of the sentence has stirred the most controversy; 10 years probation with deferred adJudication, o procedure whereby the charge against Giangrasso will be dismissed if he successfully com· pletes the period of probation. When asked about the sentence in Giangra88o's case, Bill Harris, the chief proeecuto~ told The ~ew Voice that only District Attorney Steve Hilbig could speak aboutthematte~ When interviewed, Hilbig explained that the charge against Giangrasso wa• reduced from murder to voluntary man­.3ughter because Giangrasso'a action was from "Sudden pass10n arising from t. eq cause:· T T T HOUSTON QUICK NOTES But it 1s that explanation that has stirred the gay commuruty, becau•e it im· plies that Giangrasso'o crime is to be ex· cuaed, or the puniohment mitigated in view of his supposed shock at finding him· self in bed with another male. But Hilbig explained further that his office handled 27,000 since January of '91 and that the prosecutors had a limited amount of time to spend on Giangrasso's case. More to the point, he said "there simply was not the evidence to prosecute this as a capital case. I agrel'd to plea bargain the charge down to voluntary manslaughter becau"°, again, the evidence was just not there to prove a charge of intention al mur­der:• Asked whether Giangrauo'e being in· toxicated at the time that he killed Resendez had anything to do with the Jeni· ency, Hilbig said " abeolutely not:' Exactly why the district attorney's of· fice did not have enough information or proof to sustain a conviction for murde~ Hilbig could not an•wer, but he admitted that the police did an adequate job in in· vestigating the case. Hilbig oaid he allowed the charge against Giangrasso to be reduced from murder to voluntary manslaughter 00- cau•e a jury could have found him guilty of an even lesser offenee, involuntary man­slaughter, which carries only a two to 10 year sentence, whereas voluntary man· slaughter carries a possible two to 20 year sentence. In regard to the probation or deferred ad­judication granted by the court, but not part ofthe plea bargain. Hilbig explained that even murderers with no prior record of crime are the least at nsk for committing another crime, and thot the recidiV1sm rate ib extremely low for the sudden rage type of murder. But he conceded that if "plain stupidity were a misdemeanor and absolute stupidi· ty a felony under Texas law, Giangrauo probably would have been given a death sentence~' Hilbig also pointed out in mitigation of Giangrasso's guilt that Giangrasso had shown remorse and had tried to commit suicide by slashing his wrists. Asked about a letter presented by Resendez'• family to the Court that sen· tenced Giangrasso, Hilbig said he had never heard of such a letter and that to his knowledge there was none. But Dennis Poplin, coordinator for the Lesbian/Gay Media Project, said he had seen such a letter included in the stipulat· ed evidence submitted to the Court for con· sideration at the sentencing of Giangrasso. In response to the attempted suicide alle­gation, Poplin argues that "if Giangrauo has really tried to kill himself, then why isn't he in the cemetery along with Cheri .. Resendez, instead of at home with his fam· ily in New Jersey:· Hilbig'• statements on the Giangra880 matter have drawn the fire of attorney Fitzwater, who in an interview on radio station WOAI has characterized Hilbig as a .. heterosexiet racist." Giangras•o's attorney, Eddie Garcia, was evasive when asked about the light sentence. "He (Giangrasso) can't be retried, so I don't know why that is still open to specu· lation:• he huffed. "That was the DA:s and judge's decision:' The New Voice contacted U.S. Marine Headquarters in Washington to find out whether Giangrasso was separoted from the service for homosexuality. According to Maj. Nancy LaLontas, USMC. of that office, Giangrasso entered the Marine Corpe in July, 1989 and was odministro· tively separated in March, 1990. However, she said she could not reveal the reason for separation since the Privacy Act prohibit· ed rele8"e of that information. Gay and Lesbian Hispanics Unidos holds annual awards ceremony Gay and Lesbian Hispanics Unidos held 118 annual awards banquet Sunday, Sept. 22. at Biraporretti's on w .. t Gray. The re­cipients included Robert Hernandez, who was named Distinguished Individual Sup­porter (non-member), and AVES (Amigos Volunteers In Education and Services), Distinguished Community Organization. Ben Santellan and Jeanene Gonzales re­ceived the awards as distini;:uished GLHU members. Reop1ents of cash awards were AVES. $1500; Texas Human Righi.. Foundation (for 21.06 courtcase"Moraleo; etal"),$750; the Montrose Clinic, $.iOO; and LLEGO (the national Latino Lesbian and Gay Or­gan12ation), $250. A &pec!al recoirn1t1on award went to Brad Veloz for hie service as president for three years, and for "outstanding leader· ship and dedication to GLHU" -Jewish Gays And Lesbians A JeW18h community dialogue on gay and lesbian tssues is planned for Oct. Tl from I 00-5:00 p.m. at the Jewish Community Center Registration and book sales begin at noon. Andy Roee, co-editor of "Twice Ble88ed: On Being Gay and Lesbian and Jewish" will be the featured speaker. along with parents of gaye nnd lesbians, Rabbi Roy Walter and representauv.- of the Je,.,ish gay and lesbian community The program te intended to speak to nil memben of the JewlBh community and i• open to the pub­hc without charge The dialogue ts being sponsored by the Women's luues Committee of the Ameri· can Je,.,~sh Community and co-sponsored by many Jewish communal and congregational group» For more informa· tion,call theAJCofficeat(713)524-1133. -Marsha Stevens at MCCR Singer and composer Mal'llha Stevens will perform at Metropohtan Community Church of the Resurrection on Sunday, Sept. 29 at the morning and evening serv­u: es. Stevena is an internationally recog· mzed entertainer who is be•t known for her hymn "For Those Tear• I Died:' and the two solo albums ohe released. Marsha descnbes hereelf as "a born again le•bi· an" who seven yeara ago, with the support of her spouse Leona •·winky" E•tabrooka, began her musical m.miatry to the gay and Maroha Steuen1 will gwe two concert. at MCCR on Sunday, Sept. 29 lesbian Chnetian community. Stevena will perform at the 10:45 a.m. morning service, and again (in full con· cert I at the 7:15 p.m. service. Both are open to the public. In other new• from MCCR. the popular course "Gays, Lesbians and the Bible" will be intluded in the church's fall educa· lion semester: The course is free and is open to everyone It will be taught again this season by Carolyn Mobley, assistant to the pastor, and Rev. Ralph Lasher. asso­ciate minister and executivedirectorofthe Montrose Clinic The cla88 will examine carefully the pri· mary passages of scnptures interpreted to put down gay and lesbian people. It will look at the theological perspectives from which different people and groups ap­proach the scriptures, said Mobley, couree instructor. The clauet1 will be held each Thursday evening m October from 7:00· 8:30 p.m. m the MCCR Fellowship Hall, lo­cated at 1919 Decatur. Also. at noon on Saturday, Oct 5, Rev. John Gill will perform the annual "ble88· ing of the animals" in honor of St. Francis of Auisei at MCCR Before the ble•sing. Dr. Jacquelyn Marahall, DVM of Kleinbrook Animal Hospital will provide a vaCC1nat1on clinic from 10:00 a.m. until noon for a minimal charge. All proceeds will benefit the church's building fund . Anyone who w1shet1 to bnng a beloved pet ia invited to the church to participate in the apecial bless1ng1, membera said. -Women's Spirituality Workshops "Rise Up and Call her Name:· a woman· honoring examination of global earth based spiritualities, will be held Mondays, Oct. 7 through Dec 9, from 7:00-9:00 p.m. at Fil'llt Unitarian Universalist Church, 5ro<l Fannin. •'Through hentorical information, mu· 1ic, visual images, hands-on project.a and discusaion, participants will travel around the globe, experi•ncing spiritual and god· dees-revering traditions of indigenous pe<>­ple; · organizel'll explained. "Returning to our own communities, rich with the know I· edge we have gained, we will develop to­gether ways to share our personal discov· eries. Participants will "visit" the cultures of the Americas, Africa and Egypt, African America, India, Southeast Asia, China and Japan. This is a Unitarian Universal· ist Asaociation curriculum designed by Liz Fisher; the course will be facilitated by Anita Louise, director of religioua educa· tion. There is no fee; suggested donation is SI per Setlsion. The group will close after the eecond eesaion. !''or more information or to sign up, call (713) 526- 6ro<l. -"Wilde-n-Stein" schedule The ''Wilde-N.Stein" lesbian 11ay radio program has announced its guest and fea· tu re schedule through Nov. 4. On Sept 30, the show will feature a discussion of free speech with Eugene Harrington. On Oct. 7, the show will include a guest appear· ance by gay Houston musician l.y Lciema and a discuasion of the coming National Coming Out Day (Oct. ll). On Oct. 14, members of HeartSong, the Houston community women'• chorus, will be on the ahow to talk about the upcoming National Women's Choral Festival to be hosted by the group in Houeton. A apecial show on Oct. 21 will interview both candidatet1 for Houston City Counril Dist. C, incumbent Vince Ryan and Annise Parker. Then, on Oct, :.!8-Ju•t in time for Halloween-Wilde-N-Stein will present "interview With A Drag Queen" The Houston Gay and lab1an Political Caucus endol'llemenUI for the Nov. 5 tlec­tion will be broadcast on Nov. 4. ''W1lde-N-Stem" a1r1 at 9:00 p.m. Mon· days on KPFf, 90.1 FM. with co-hosts Bruce Rec>ves and Deborah Bell. -Women and AIDS The AIDS Regional Education and Train· ing Center for Texas and Oklahoma, headquartered at the Univel'llity of Texas Health Science Center, will sponsor a con· ference dedicated to AIDS issues affecting women on Saturday, Oct. 19 at the r'our seasons Hotel-Houston Center. 1300 Lamar. The conference, "Women and HIV AIDS! An Emerging Epidemic:• will run from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and is det1igned for health care provider•, social workera, educators, community leaders and women affected by HIV I AIDS. The registration fee, which covers lunch and all materials. is $40; continuing edu· cation credit will be available. Registra· tion deadline is Thursday, Oct. 3. The con· ference is funded by a U.S. Public Service Grant along with support from Burroughs· Wellcome, the Montrose Clinic, Critical Care America and the Greater Houston Women's Foundation. Morning and afternoon workshop• will address topic:a; including epidemiology and medical manifestations of HIV I AIDS in women, substance abuae, reproductive and pediatric i88u .. and 1sauea facing var· ious population groups, euch aa minori­ties, let1bian1 and the hearing impaired. For more information, contact Deborah Brimlow at (713) 794-4075. -Montrose Clinic award The Montrose Chnic waa honored as Out· atanding Organization of the Year at the Deaf Pride Banquet held Sept. 21 in Hous· ton. The award is given to the or11aniza· tion voted as contnbuting the m001t to the welfare and understanding of the hearing impair~ community. "Thia was truly an honor and a aur­prise: · said Bert Bares, program manager for the clinic's deaf HIV eduration pro­grams. Bares noted that the clinic was not even on the list of candidates. The Montrose Clinic, throu(lh its affili· ate, the Audette Center, began an HIV edu· cation program for the deafin July of this year. In addition to receivin(I the award for outstanding organization, Scot Pott, Montrose Clinic's HIV educator for the deaf, was elected "Outstanding Deaf Man of the Year" for h19 activities and leader· ah1p. Pott was also named M~ Deaf Inter• national at the conference of the Ram bow Alliance for the Deaf, held in Dalla• in Ju· ly SEPT 27-0CT 3, 1991 /THE NEW VOICE 9 TT T DATELINE: SAN ANTONIO 2 San Antonio facilities named official AIDS research center By BOBBY MAYES TNV Son Antonio Two San Antonio research centers, South· west Foundation for Biomedical Research and Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, have been selected to be among 12 official national centers for AIDS research, repre­sentatives announced Tuesday. The San Antonio civilian and military research facilities are among only 12 cur· rent U.S. AIDS research centers in the country, and the only in the Southwest. Regarding the potential impact on Tex· as, Dr. Ron Kennedy, head of the depart· ment of virology and immunology at the Southwest Foundation, said the designs· tion might help awaken state legislators and others to the seriousness of the AIDS epidemic. "In terms of Texas, I think a lot of people in Texas would like to believe AIDS should be ignored, because its a 'dirty' disease. - ·this (site selection) may make them ask, if this is true, then why is the federal government still pouring so much money into it;• Kennedy said. Bt'Cause of the inclusion, the San Anton· io researchers will benefit from a three year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseas· es. The grant will fund a laboratory that will be used by both Southwest Founds· Karlos Barney "Am floor, l>Mement, .. rth'I cruet, molten cen!M . . . Wholl So<ry, loflcs, my mlotalot." Kingdom Community Church COME EXPLORE HIS KINGOOM Sunday Wo rs h ip Service 11 am 614 E. 19th Houston 862·7533 748-6251 ) HOLY TRINITY CATHOLIC CHURCH 'TR:INIT ARIAN CATHOUC. MASSES: SUNDAY 11- & 6:30pm, TUES.· THURS. Sam, SAT. 11am 1218 WELCH, Hou1ton 523-8412 FR. MICHAEL OBER DIN, PASTOR CounMllif'IO Support , Sp1rllual 1 ., . l ~..· .,. \lP <I:ljrrr ffeninte Sunday: llam Wt'<lneoday & Eve of Holy Dayo 7:30pm Byzantine Rite 2,..,07 Montrose #32, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 524-9184 W.Odingt.<UNOnS Rl't• of ,._.;• Alethela Praise & Worship Center Ronald Pigg-Pastor SeMce Times Sunday 1 lam & 6:30pm, Thursday 7:30pm so I East 18th, Houston, TX 77008 (713) 863-8846 tion and Wilford Hall. To qualify as a federal center for AIDS research, 8811ociated researchers must be already receiving $750,000 a year in feder· al funding. Wilford Hall is known as an internation· al military referral center serving HIV·in· fected AIR Force personnel and their fami· lies. It is also the site of human tests of an experimental AIDS vaccine based on age­netic copy of the outer coat of the HIV vi· rus. There vaccine has already been tested in 12 people, and the study will now move into the second phase, a double blind test involving at least 200 people, all active du· ty military personnel. T T T IN MEMORY OF -David George Weidler June 6. 1956-Sept. 22.1991 With clear skies and a full moon overhead on Sept. 22 at 4 15 a m., David ended hos one and a half year ba1tle woth Al OS David was a warm and caring person who dedicated his life to help persons w•th handicaps obtain their greatest potentials 1n life, helping to eradicate pre1ud1ce assocoa1ed woth mental or physical disabolitoes I would Joke to thank lhe special people who stood v1g1I at hos bedside during hrs to­nal 48 hour:•. Our loving rnends Dave, J en , Trudy, Robert, Davod. Jorn and the wonderful staff at Park Plaza Hospital (seventh floor orange), especially nurses John Kenward and Anna Doerr. who gave great comfort to David and me. David rs survived by hrs lofemate Bill Wanless, Houston: parents, George and Robert Weidler; brother Robert and sister-in-law Jan. and brother. George J r. all of Poughkeepsie. (Excerpt from our favorite poem. •stop­ping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening·• by Robert Frost): Gfa31 and Lesbian Catholics U Friends · Mft M .. • ·Ufday 11 7.30pm at lSOS Nevada CnMICOINnOl' ... ~ Todol blen .-nKIOI' 01gnity1 Houston 528-0111 ~ : EASTERN& ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN GAY MEN& WOMEN A resource and support group. First meeting Thursday, Sept. 19, 7:30pm. For information call (713) 524-9184 i"e Bond 0 r;;f:t.\~~1 . 'l'/01 ~ ~-Hous~~n M1ss1on _ ~ Chwch 1505 Nevada at Commonwealth 529-8225 Worship Services Sunday 1030am Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research is knov-.-n for its animal studiea, and its researchers are credited with pi~ neering AIDS experiment& in African green monkeys and chimpanzees. Other federal AIDS research centers are Harvard University; Dana- Farber Can· cer Institute in Boston; Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York; Johns Hopltins University in Baltimore; Duke University in Durham, N.C.; Purdue Uni­versity in We.;t Lafayette, Ind., Stanford University in Stanford, Calif. b nd the Uni­versity of California at Sa~ Francisco. (The ~ew Voice Editor Shen Cohen Darbonne also rontribut.E<I to tlu• report). "The woods are lovely dark and deep. But I have promises to keep, And moles to go before I sleep, And moles to go before I sleep ~ You kept those promises and travelffd those moles bravely. David. and row. my blue eyed angel, you can sleep -Forever. 8111 -WILLIAM F. MATHERS Wrlloam F Mathers. 45, died Friday, Sept. 20. after a broef illness Mathers was a long tome employee of Hams County Precinct 1 Con­stable Walter Rankins' office. He Is survived by his mother. F ranees Mathers of Corydon. Ind : two aunts. one uncle and several cous­ins. as well as spec1al lnends, Kenn Rankin, and Walter and Mildred Rankin, and pets. Lucy and Spoke. Memorial servtees were scheduJed to be ~eld at 6:00 pm Thursday, Sept 26, at Heights Funeral Home Chapel Those de­siring may make memorial contr1but1ons to the Bering Community Services Founds· toon, 1440 HarOld, Houston, TX 77006 orto a charoty of choice. Spectal acknowledgment 1s extended to Dr E Gordon Crofoot. M 0. and h fs nurses, Karie a nd Shl r fey . •nd arr employees of Harns County Precinct 1 Constable·s office, for their relatoonshops with Sill cood Shepherd Church U.C.A. 1218 weich-HOuston sun. 31>m wed. 7:30pm Bishop St•ven K ft>well l pastor "Everyone \lolelcome" "tome AS IOU Are" 524·3620 METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION Rev Elder John Gill. Pastor MS Carolyn Mobley. ASst to cne Pastor 1919 Decatur, 861-9149 OFF WASHINGTON & SILVER Rt sept 27 7pm Game Nghe Sat. sept 28 7pm ChOir FestliCOSpel Concerti sun sept 29 11 Spm concert with MarSha Stevens Yottshrp services SUnday 10 45am & 11spm. 'M!dnesday 6 4Spm 10 THE NEW VOICE I SEPT. 27 ·OCT 3. 1991 TT T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Portland could become first Oregon city to guarantee gay rights By '\\'JLLJAll McCALL FOA THE NEW VOtCE PORTLA~D. Ore~ Monday. Sept. 23 (AP)-The City Council faces strong oppo­sition from o conservative group in its e{~ forts to pass an ordinance protecting the rights of homosexualo seeking jobs or housing. The proposed ordinance was written by City Commissioner Mike Lindberg. A draft already has been signed by Mayor Bud Clark and the other three comrms· sioners on the City Council. "It's very cleat,' Lindberg said Monday. "We think people shou Id be judged on their performance and their character. not their sexual orientation:' He 8ald the mewiure was written after city attorneys studied civil right,; ordi· nances passed in more than IOOU.S.cities to protect homosexuals from discrimma· tion. Portland also needs the ordinance be­cause hate crimes against gays and le6bi· ans have increased, Lindberg said. The ordinance is opposed by the Oregon Citizens Alliance, led by Lon Mabon. The alliance has propo8ed amending the Ore­gon Constitution to declare that homo•ex· uality is abnormal behavio~ "We oppose any effort, no matter at what level, whether it's city council or state, to enshrine homosexual behavior in· to protected status:• Mabon said Monday. He claims the majority of Oregonians oppose homosexual behavior. "There should be no special protection for beha,;or of any ltind;' Mabon said. "The particular behavior we're opposing is considered immoral by most people, I be-- lieve:' Lindberg said the ordinance has the sol· id support of the council and he is confi· dent it will be approved. "The Oregon Citizen• Alliance creates more divisiveness in the state, and I think generates more bigotry, at a time when we really need to respect therights of every in· dividual;' Lindberg said. If approved, Portland would join I 07 other cities acro88 the nation that protect the rights of gay men and lesbians. The ordinance would 0 prohibitdiec-rimi· nation in housing, employment and public accommodations on the basis of race. re­ligion, color. sex, marital status, familial statue, national origin, age, mental or physical disability, sexual orientation or source of income and provide for enforce­ment." Lindberg said some landlords have used source of income as an excuse to refuse housing to the poor. But Emily Cedarleaf, executive director of the Multi Housing Council of Oregon, said the main iHsue is the city's lack of af· fordable housing for the poor, not discnm1· nation. She said her group will oppose the source of income provision, which Lindberg said Monday may be amended. The latest proposal comes after the de­feat of a civil rights bill in the 1991 Oregon Legislature. The bill wouldhavemadeitil· legal to discriminate in housing, employ· mentor public accommodation• on the ba· sis of sexual orientation. At least three hearings have bo>en ached· uled on the proposed city ordinance, begin· ning this week. Lesbian protests refusal of time off when lover was hospitalized DENVF.:R. Friday, Sept. 20 (AP>--A city worker is appealing her supervisor's deci· eion to deny her time off from work to beat the hospital bedside of her critically m· jured lovet Mary Ross' lawyer, Lino Lipinsky De Orlov, contended that the refusal to grant paid leave violates a 1988 regulation pro­hibiting discrimination against homo.ex· uala. He said it waa absurd for the city to take such a position when the mayor and the mayor"• predcce880r ran on pro-gay rights platforms. - City policy allow• workers to take sick leave to care for Bick or injured family members. But the city refused sick leave for Ross, who had taken threedaysofflast winter to be with her injured "life partner:' Jeannie DiClementi, 49, who has lived with Ross for 3 112 years, suffered head in· juries after a fall. At a Career Services Authority hearing on the appeal Thuraday, an expert in fami· ly structureti testified that Ross, a 29-year· old social worker, and DiClementi share a ~F B~r.tr.@m~At.. r--- family relationship. Ross is actively involved in raising DiClementi's 10-year-old daughter and 18· year-old son, and helps pay their school tu· ition, University of Denver sociology pro· fessor Anne Rankin Mahoney testified. However, Assistant City Attorney J Wallace Wortham argued that a Career Services Authority policy written in the early 1980s does not include live-in lovers in its definition of family members. He said the regulation wae applied fairly in Roi;s' c""e and that no discrimination took place. Hearing officer Margot Jone6 isn't ex· peeled to rule in the case for at least two week&. The case originated during Mayor ~'ederico Pena's administration and has spilled over into the administration of his successor, Wellington Webb. Both were en· dorsed by gay groups, and Pena helped de­feat a referendum in May that would have removed homosexuals from those protect­ed by city law against discrimination in housing and employment. Army and university at odds over gay activist in ROTC class TAMPA. Fla., Wednesday, Sept. 18 IAP)-The U.S. Army ond a pnvate uni· vers1ty were at odds Wednesday over the enrollment of a gay student activist in a ROTC leadership course. "This is an academic freedom i8"ue;· David Ruffer. UniversityofTampapres· ident said Wednesday, supporting the student's right to take the ciaos. Michael Gagne, a 21 ·year-old psychol­ogy major, aaid he took the ROTC lead­ership course to help prepare him for his new role aa president of the fledgling gay·nght.11 organization on campus. While homO!lexuals may be prohibit· ed Crom participating in the Anny ROTC, university adminL.trators say sexual preference should not be an issue when it comes to credited courses. Army regulations recognize the uni­versity's authority to decidewhoiB eligi-ble to enroll .n credited courses, Ruffer said. ''This is not an issue of sexual prefer­ence. I don't care what his preference is. It's an is•ue of who is in control and it's an issue of academic freedom:· Ruffer said ... We do not diiicriminate here. In fact, it would be illegal to do so'.' Gagne enrolled in three credit ROTC courses. These are open to students, re­gardle8S of whether they are in the ROTC. But the Army maintains one course is off limits to Gagne because he is gay. The other two courses-introduction to military science and fundamental leadership-pose no problem, according to Maj. Bob Shepherd with the national headquarters of the ROTC Cadet Com· mand at Fort Monroe, Va. They nre giv­en in a classroom setting, with lectures and studenta taking notes. The leadernhip laboratory, however, requires the i88uance of a uniform and involves exercising, marching, other military drills and learning rifle marks· manship. Relflllations state those in the labors· tory course must meet all criteria for be­coming an Army officer, r('gardleBB of whether they in tend to join the military, Shepherd said. This not only eliminates homosexuals but others because of age, or mental or physical handicaps, he said "The other clas8es have open enroll· ment. Where the line divides is in the leadership lab;' Shepherd said, "From our View, it's a fairly clear-cut issue;· hesoid. "lttaoDepartmentofDe­fense policy and the Army really hos no room to interpret it differently:• Caught in the croSB·fire is Gogne, the son of a career U.S. Navy man who was born in Hawaii and finished high school in Jacksonville. "Today, when I went to physical tram· mg, ROTC Col. Robert Ryon escorted me off the drill field;' Gagne soid Wed­nesday. The PT class is part of the lead· ership cour•e. 'Tm in the middle. I left. I told him I'd be there Friday when the next PT claBS is scheduled. I'll keep going to cllll!s. I'm going to fight:• A sophomore with aspirations of go­ing to law school and not into the mili­tary, Gagne said he signed up for the ROTC courses "because I really wonted to take them. "ROTC produces good. productive leaders and I think I can get a lot out of the class;· he said. ''It has become a mat­ter of principle. J don't like being treated like a second.cJoss citizen:• SEPT 27-0CT 3, 1991 I THE NEW VOICE 11 'Y 'Y 'Y HOUSTON SOAP Full moon got weekend hopping; another one is on the way By TAD NELSON TNV Housten Hello Houston! Ae I promised a while back, it's Full Moon week again and on this Monday, etc. I did notgooutandgetin trouble.Not by my choice though-my car made that d<'<'ision for me. I really didn't know cars were affected by the moon. Probably ere· ates great high and low tides in the gas tanks. And we all know a car knows every time you receive money or make a bank depoeit, cause just like kids or the IRS they want every epare nickel you have. C'est la vie, or in my case, say Taxi! In the early pull of the Full Moon last weekend, things were hoppin' around town. Down at the Venture, quite a crowd showed up Friday and Saturday nights. Barry Hass, our staff photographer and bear about town, caught popular OJ and bartender Chuck playing tune" for the hunky crowd. And believe me, there were hunks galore at the VN last weekend. On· ly my favorite hunk wasn't present­Woor. Woor. Kenny. JR was at Miss Kitty's on Friday night to get pictures at the live concert by Viola Wills. If you weren't there, you missed a great show. And over at the BRB, Barry was there to witness the contortionistic fiddle playing of Yogi Baird, who played to a full and amazed crowd of Hot Cowboys. Speaking of hot. Houston's own contro­versial gay activist celebrity, Brian Brad· ley, was at Dillard's on Tue,day with about 5000 other lucky people. Brian waa lucky enough to be allowed to present Liz Taylor, who was there to promote her new scent, with flowers and thank her for her work with AIDS. When lll<ked now that she has everything what else could she possibly wlllh for, Liz responded simply "A cure for AIDS:' Brian and l.iz received a bigroundofap· plnus<- from the crowd. With those great words in mmd from such a great actress/ humanitarian-I'm laying off the bucket of chicken jokes forever, Llz; and yes, the f&Hter microwavP. too! But I reserve the right to Betty Ford Clinic and marriave jokes in the future. Coming up thie weekend Houston, there's a lot to choose from. Thursday nights 6:00·9:00 it's 50 cent burger• and 75 cent cheeseburgers at the BRB with Burt, who ie one of the BRB's hot new Dallas imports. He has a happy hour 'till 9:00 p.m. on the patio. There's al· so $1.50 lonimecks nil day and night. Ask Burt to seu hill long neck and don't forget CIW dance lessons at 7-:!0 Thursday rughts. Also Thursday at Et J's, Brittany Paige B1gJ1m, I "/I race you w Mary'• with one arm behind my back Viola Willa at Miu Kitty'1 la1t Fnday, with owner Jay Alkn Yogi Baird and the TexaCa1una playmg at theBRB Rita kissing ... at Gentry'• and Co. have a super show with many spe­cial guests at 10:30 p.m. Friday night is the Leather and Sweat Warehouse Party to welcome the 1'ational Leather Assodation to Miss Kitty's. Saturday will be busy all over with Miss Kitty'• "Last Dance" 'l'rosh Diaco Deluxxxx!; the NIA Bar Run beginning at the Venture-1' at 7:00p.m.;aTGRA benefit show at Gentry at 10:00 p.m. with the DJJVJ at J.R.'1 i1 Barry Browder. he makes a mean vi<ko 'Y 'Y 'Y DATELINE: NEW ORLEANS Chuck in the airy booth at tM Venture-N playing those greQt tune• TGRA members and royalty candidata providing eome gr'"'t entertainment. At the BRB at 9:00 p.m., it's C1W music with Cheyenne. And at E, J's it'• the Saturday Super Show with Mt and Misa E/ J"s and Co. doing a takeoff on The Wiz. Sundays usually beg;n at Mary's, don't they? Well, we are with the Mies Mary's contest with emcees, Chuck, Pickles and Brucella DeValle doing their sick best to crown a new title holder at Mary's ... natu· rally. Pickles says anyone can enter the Camp Drag Con teat. See him or Chuck at Mary's for details. That's at 6:00 p.m. on the new stage I'm sure! Sunday also has Blue Light Speciale all day at the Venture. While BRBwill be hav· ing a Casino Night and Variety Show 3:00- 8:00 p.m. It's Crazy Sunday at E J 's, danc· era and steak night at Gentry, and Miss Kitty's will be having a •Curtain Call"-n super showca•e with Jenrufer St. John, Victoria West, Rhonda Blake and numer ous cameo •pots from guests of the past. If you haven't caught on by now with names like "I.oat Dance" and "Curtain ca11:· Mi88 Kitty's is cloemg Its doors and Jay says all artwork and decor are for sale. But don't panic! They will reop•n soon as a "shocking" new dance club that will blow you away, but I can't tell you that yet. Gawd, I hate secrets! Commg Od. 11 ;,. the Coming Out Day party Diverse Wo rks, sponsored tn part by Queer Nation and bunches of other hosts, from 7:00 p.m. 'till midnight that Friday night. And Oct. 13 will be the Mr. Lone Star Country Contest at the HRH. If you want to be him, get your applicat10n at the Side Pocket bar at HRB. Gentry's will begin Saturday night tal· ent competitions for aspiring entertainers, singers impersonotors. comics, magi· cians, dancers, etc. who will compete for cash prizes. If interested. call Maude at (713) 862-8836. Richard, Rita, Val and Tommy at Gen try's, serve you( "Miss Thang"-aka Randy Ormes, werr you demoted or cruumg the strttts? Midtowne Spa is taking bids for their "soon to be" new waterfall in the pool area. Call if you're intere>ted in placing n bid with Larry at (713) 522-2379. BRB U. looking for applicants for staff positions like barback, floor persoru; and bartenders. Call between noon and 3:00 p.m. Tue.day through Thursday at (713) 528-9192. Anyone with information on a mi.ssmg 1991 red Toyota Camry, four door, tag 1'o. FKR321', call Barry Basaat(713l529·8490 or (713) 520-75311. There is a reward for its return! Now for the dirt' Darlene (Jo's OutPost) &Bid she has " Don't Wanna Be Wonder1n"' classes at the OutPost on Wronesday nights to an swer all th0&e important questions about women ·ti sex habits of tn~rest lO men. Think and go. (You're sick, Girlene)! Daniel (Charl.e sJ, Bi.Jy tells me you' re good at getting rock off the mountrun At least I think that was the proper order of those words. John Lawrence (Mazy a); Yea, I know you still bartend there Monday through Thur,day 2:00·h:OO p.m. and yes, you do qualify for The Bartender From - (You know I can't pnnt that word Yes I can. Hell.) !'ow Vera. wa' Maude performing under your ·Rill 'lbp" or hPr own? I hear Herman tcJ.sses a mean salad at the BRB on Sundays. Are you under con· trol of those portions. Manly yes? Lulu (611), Duke says if we rub your St(lmach we get our wishes. Big Jim \Venture-:\), I'm sorry I didn't realize you wen• on skates when I tied your laces together and told you to back up. Happy birthday to my Grandpa. "0 D • Don Dowden, who turns 45 this Friday. Enough for this week. Y'all be safe and say your prayers each night. Pray for my car. And Kenn-our thoughts and love are with you. Episcopalian Clergy form old fashioned anti-gay-lesbian group By LEONARD EARL JOHNSON TNV N•w Orl•an• Und1·r the banner of opposing "theologi· cal modernists" who "destToy old fash· ioned church values:· a group of local Epis­copalian clergy met re<:ently to form an "lrt•naeua Fellowahip of the Diocese of Louisiana:· Irenaeue was a theologian and Bishop of Lyons, France, in the First Century, A.ll. Chapt~~s of the or..:anizauon have air pe11ri!d nrt•und the llnitro States accord· mg to the Rev. Inn D. Montgomery, rector ofSl Phthp'a Episcopalian Church, where the meeting woe held. The church is al .l642 Aurora Drive, Algiers. The group holds to the interpretations of Christ's teachings similar to what they feel were adhered to by the preachers of the Gospel in the first hundrrd years following the crucifixion. Montgomery charged that the Episcopa· lion church has stood by while some among its ranks have publicly denied what he Rees a& the "basic teachings" such RR the vir1em birth of Christ and theResur­r1• 1·tion. He aloo charged that the Episro­pahnn church has errantly condoned sex ua.l relations out.side of m-arringe, tnclud· mg homosexuality. Homosexuality, according to Montgom· ery, 1s forbidden by both the Bible and church tradition. Montgomery BSld some f.plllcopalum church leaders Wlllh to sub-vert traditional teachings to conform to "societal practices:· Many relig;ous schol· ars question the historical authenticity of the lrenaeua Fellowship's teachings. The mainstream f:piscopalian Church has ordained four openly lesbian or gay persons since 198:J. The most recent is the Rev. Barry ::itopfol, ordained St·pt. 14 m 1'ewark, N ,J. by tht• Right Rev. John Spong, Episcopal Bishop of !l:•wnrk. Stopfel said of his ordination, "To me the important thing about openly gay and les· bian people being ordained is that now we can speak with our own voices African Amencane, :--; nta\·e Amen cans and women were nil drnJed the nght tospc.ak for them selves by the church and as the11 voices were fret'<!. then messages have deeply changed the church for the better. At the Algiers meeting, the Rev We.le) Nel,on, president ofEpisropalians l'mted al•o •poke. f:piscopalians United is a four year old group simiJarly ronc·t'Tlled with what 1'elson called "theological liberal· ism m the Ep1scopnhnn Church:' The group's headquarters 1s in :-;hnker Heights, Ohm !'.'elson is a reurro pnest m Garland, 'I'>:. He smd his visit to 1'ew Orleans' ,. est bank neighborhood of Algiers was not connected to the lrenaeus Fellowship The hostini: Re'·· Ian Montgomery pomted out that he (Montgomery) Ill also a member of Episcopalians Umted. 12 THE NEW VOICE f SEPT 27-0CT 3, 1991 T T T SAN ANTONIO SOAP Only three weeks until Gay Fiesta; San Antonio awaits you B> ESllCOL RICHARD '''RIGHT T/'.'l' Han Antomo Gue88 what? It's less than three weeks un· Ll Gay Fiesta. That's right. Sunday, Oct. lJ, is just around the corne~ The San An· tomo community can"t wnit to say "Hola'." to all our brother• and sisters from Hous· ton, Da!.as, Austin and Corpus. So start mak ~g plans today Did you make it to the Wild Club's Wild West Party? Every caballero m town was there. And the performances by High Lonesome were first rate I swear those guya knew every C&W song that the audi· ence requested. If you'd like to see more of them, mosey over to the River Walk next :::.unday I hear they'll be opening John Connally'• ahow for KKYX. Hey. Randy. Are you looking for an idea for your next theme party? How about a aoiree baaed on Dante'• inferno. We could call it " the party from Hell.' 1 had a mce vunt last week with our fnends Marian and Barbara, the new pro­pnetora of Memones. As part of a long range plan to renovate their club, they've moved the bar to provide better acces• to the patio. Better atill, they've put in a new dance floor. parquet no le.;s. One of their ideas ia otill in the formative stage. They're considenng making the patio a lot more intimate with some soft jazz and cou· pie'• seating. I like the sound of that. If you're a Memories patron, you already know that thJB ia the place that has a 'Happy Day' instead of a mere • Happy Houi' In other words, the longnecks go for Sl.25 from 7:00 a.m. 'till 7:00 p.m. six days a week. (There's an even better drink ape. cial on Wednesdays that features SI longnecka and 75 cent draft 'till 11:00 p.m.). Tuesday nights are $5 steak nights at Memones, and every Thursday at 9:00 p.m., Jania Dumont emcee• a show that features boy and g;rl stripper&. Memories is a club that suits every taste. My weekends usually are filled with cov· ering goings on about town for San Anton· io Soap, so I'm always intere.;ted in ways to combat the withdrawal pain• on Mon· day. Well, the solution for me is Talent High UlM•ome tore dou·n the house at the Wild Club'• Wild We•t party T T T LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Bonham Beauti"a: thi.a wttk'1 uneup at the Bonham'• 1ensatwnal Sunday shows Night at the Bonham Exchange. The show is hosted by beautiful, blond blue-eyed Beth Evans, the former Misa Gay San An· tomo whose gowns sparkle almost as much as her personality. And some of the participants are clearly deotined for star· dom. Speaking of talent, the big bar owners party last week at the Noo Zoo brought out all of the local stars. Did you see Papa Bear? He sported a figure flattering red se­quined gown complimented by combat boolB. You had to lift hia beard a little to see his cleavage, but it woe worth the effort. Evan, of SAAF. was there to unveil the new Gay Fiesta T-shirts. They're beauti· The big fi.ah, Orea, at the Bonham E:x· change (we love ya, Jny)! ful, and the $12 coet benefits the San An· tonio AIDS Foundation. Congratulations to Lollie and her staff for a great party. Other SAAF benefits on the horizon in· elude a show on Wednesday, Sept. 25 at The 2015. Maxi is pulling together a new array of talented impersonators. (Can you imagine JJ in drag)? So pick up a roll or two of quarters, head to The 2015 for some high comedy and support a worthwhile cause. Speaking of quarters, it only takes two of them to buy a raffle ticket for Gay Fies· ta. The prizeo? How about air fare for two to New Orleans, which was 11enerously do­nated by Anchors Aweigh, or a weekend for two at South Padrecourteay ofthe Sea· horse Inn. If you like to stay closer to home. imagine dinner for two at four of San Antonio's trendiest restaurnnts, in· eluding our old favonte Rosario's. Hats off to Evan for coming up with some great prt.tes for this year's Fiesta celebration About a month from now, all of you wit.ches and war1ocke will bf, polishing your broom handles and getting rendy for Halloween. Then, if you've got the holiday in perspective, you'll head to the Bonham Exchange. The boys and girls at the Bonham will be turning the rlub's office wing into-you guessed it-a haunted house! Thia may add new meaning to Vin cent Price's observation that " It's fun to be scared~' Want to contribute to Soap'! Call me at (512) 824-4735. Student group calls Houston police officers' objection to tra:ining absurd From JIM ISAMAN, director, San A ntoni~toallmembers.Conaldertheterrlble Lambda Students Alliance person&! peril allcttlzenswUlfaoelfarmed The oll)ectlon of some Houstonpubl1c peace omcers are granted a spec!&l ''right to be amoers to queer sens1tlv1t;y t.ra1n1n8 on the pni)udloed~ Such a precedant would e1fec· b8sts o! persona.I reilg1ous be11efs ts &beer Uvely lnsUtuUonallze pol!ce bruta.IJ.t;y. lutely absurd Clearly, It 18 lmperauve that communlcy Some churches support.(ed?) the rel!g· groups everywhere sta.Y alert and prepare IOuS belief that IV!groee do not have souls to act on thlB ISSu8 In ~port o! thl8 HPD and that men should totally dominate program. women Ha'mM!r, botll groups now have -GHAA on AFH funding cuts t.her!gll!.tovoteandoopubl1c peaoeot!!oer •·rom SUE COOPER, exenitive director, cauld J\.IBtJl)' actions contrary to thlS, re- Greater Houston AIDS Alliance gardless of their own personal belief. On behalf of !.ho Greater Houston AIDS Llkew1se, the pereon&l rellg!ousbell.efso! AIJJance, I would I.Ike to respond to tha re­an otftcer oertaln.\Y give no valldlt;y to ab- cent allegations of the AIDS Foundauon stalnlng tr-am t.l'ILlnlng progr&ms. In fact. It Houston regarding the Alll&noe 's role In re­ts t.hoee~wU.bbatBroeexlstpNdud1c· cent funding cute t.o th8 org&nlz&Uon. es who mO&I. urgmuJy n-1 that t.r&ln1ng to Tbe l"ound&t1on's statement.a that the tuncUon properly In tbalrpos!Uons. Sens!· ALLIANCE alashed thell'fundlngforsel'VIC· uvtcy tra1nlng regardlllS a:J k:1nds o!people es Wtlre completely tnaocure.te. Tiie Alli· should be standard for anyone who works anoe 88l'V88 as lead contractor for over all< wtth the publlc. mllllon In federal and state grant funds It 1a utterly unoonac:lonallle th&t the Part o! !ta role 18 to facilitate the gr&nt (Houston Polloe omoers AaeoclaUon) &ward prooesa. In th8 recent round o! th8 wouldoonalderle«a! actlonaj(&IIWtthepo- Tu.u I»p&rtZmnt of Ho&lth (TDH) fund· 11ce "8p&rtmmlt to prewnt m&ndr.tory lnC awarda, th.I Alll&noe did that by oon· tralnJng &lch action would be especlally ductln( all of the log18tlcal &rr&ngeme:nta detestable at a Uma when Houston la the for the ProceM to ta.ke plaoe and servtn& as eouroes of ln!orm&Uon and technical guid· scene of so lil&l\Y ca.a of violence against anoe for the Extern&! Reviewers The !xtar­men, women. and youths (even a recent n&l Review Panel, chOeen by commun.l!;Y street murder) 81Jnply because o! percep- consensus for thalr ollJecUvlt;y and expert­uons about ons 's atrecUon&l orlent&Uon. 1se 1n the HIV/ AIDS tleld, were completely However. It ts not surprtalng to tlnd amoer responsible for m&ld.ng the funding p~ lnactcywtthsuchalong.hldeoua aW&l'da Tboee &W&l'da were be.-1 on the and varied history of po110e bruta11cy. qua11cy of the applleauans and th8 demon· !wry Amer!o&n abould be alarmed by et.rated need for the aervlce requested to re­t. bls altu&Uon. In a eoctet,y af d1verse bell8fa, cetve fund.Ing AtooUmadld I oranymem· !gDOr&OOe borne h&tl'9d 18 a dangerous bar o! my stair vote on UJ3 of the funding awards. Also, the l'ound&Uon'a statemente Im· plied that the External .Revl8w8rs cut fund­ing for the l"ound&Uon's Fln&nc!&l Asstst.­anoe Program. TDHtlmdBcannotcurrent.ly be used to fund dlreet tln&nc!&l assistance to cllente 'lbanl< you for the opportunlt;y to re­spond ID the lnaoCUr8ciSS. -New GHAAmernber From JOHN PAUL BARN I CH I would l1l<e to tak8 thlB opporturUt;y to thank the people whovotedformetobe the re~ntaUve for the g113 at risk popul&· uon to tha Oreo.tar HoustonAIDBA.lllance. I would I.Ike to t.h&nJt the people who voted for my opponent.a for C&J'lng enough to tAke tha time t.o vote, and I would Ulte to t.h&nJt my opponente !or being concerned~ to run for the pos!Uon. For those who are not farnlli&r wtth the OrMter Houston AIDS All.18.nce. It Is an um· brell& org&nlz.aUon compoeed af rep.-nt­au..... af the clt,y, 00W1f3, hospital dlatrlot, AIDS Ml"llloe provld8N and others. 'Ihe l\Jnct!on af OH.AA ts to determine how grant monies from federal, state and other aourcee wtll be spent. AS a member of that board, I pledge that I will do my beet ID ees t.hat monles are spent In a manner that wtll beet benetlt persons with AIDS. To t.hat end, I am &8k1ng for In· put from tha ~ commun.lt;y. The Greater Houston AIDS All1&nce mseta tha tlrst. Thursday of each month. I will be holding imeUngs at my home the preceding 8unda.Y evenings, beglnnlng Nov 3 , 1991. Anyone who ts Interested ts aallad to attend, or call me with your suggesUons My omce phone ts 739-0202; my home phone ts 628- 6666, and my home address Is 411 West Bell. -M1Bs Ca.mp America From JOHN COX, preaident, Mioo Camp America The 23rd was Camp America Pageant was held Sept. 14 at the Houston MUSlC Hall. ThemembershlpofWBsCampAmerl· ca Inc. wishes to thank our friends and guests for their conUnued BUpport.. For the second consecutive ye&r, was Camp America Inc Is wry pleased to do­nate a portlono!the proceeds from our JJ&C· eant Ucl<st. sales and our othar club act!V1- uee to local AilJS.related charities. This yee.r our membership selected the Aaa!St­ance P'Und,Berlngllent.al Clln1c,and the Pot. Patrol as our benetlcl&rlee. We &lao shared our spec!&l 8V8n1ng with PW& by provld· tng them compl!mentary tlCk.eta ID the pag eant. Bee&.- of ~ tenerrua support, Ml8s Camp America donated '10,878 In ouh and. ueuta to our oornrnuntt.y Klaa Camp America Inc. «!Vllll 1pecl&l thanks to our program advertlaera, Arr pearanoes, Basic Brothera. Colt 48'a, Irnpe­rts. l Court o! the Single Star, The New Voice and This Week Inna.as for their ext.raord1· nary support. We also wlah ID t.h&nJt all of the lndlv!duals and org&nJz&tlons who as­sisted us throughout the year. The 60 members o! Ml8s Camp Amerloa Inc. are proud to be able to otrer our oom· mun.Icy an evening o! laughter. We'ra cer­t& l:nly glad you choee to be a part o! "Tbe Magic of .• MlBs Camp Amerloa. We a.re en· tert&tnmentl" SEPT 27-0CT 3. 1991 I THE NEW VOICE 13 T T T AUSTIN SOAP Weekend was 1\. Tale of Two Cities' for the party people By CHRIS LtrrHER 1NVA.,.tm Many thia paat weekend took a road trip to Dallas for their Gay Pride Weekend. Un· like San Francisco and Loe Angeles, who until this paat ye&r had competing GIL celebrations, Texaa' ''megatropoli" of Dal· las and Houston reached a-er-gentle­men 's agreement several yeare ago. Hous­ton would celebrate during Stonewall weekend while Dallas would close up the summer with an event of equal magnitude. They did this past weekend in style, It waa a beautiful Indian Summer day as the parade, themed "Together Jn Pride;• float· ed down the street. This year's parade waa the largest ever, comprising over 25 entries and taking one and one half hours to pru;s the viewing atands at the corner of Cedar Springa and Throckmorton. The parade waa just part of an entire weekend of eventa, including the Gay and Leebian bodybuilding contest, ''A Night of Pride" and the Coalition of Lesbian1Gay Student Group's annual conference. Houstonian and 21.06 plaintiff Linda Morales addressed the rally following the parade. Rain bow flags bedecked Cedar Springs while lesbian and gay people from a ll over the Southwest and t he coun try filled gay restauranta and clubs. Back in Austin this past Sunday, Chan<> es once again packed the house, cliff and volleyball court with an amalgam of peo­ple listening to wonderful mUBic. Austin's own Stick People, Chris McKay and John Ritinour were among the many outatand· ing artista who filled the cool evening with hot music. People danced in the sand aa the Stirk People'• Mal ford Milligan belted out aome powerfully aoulful sounds. The event was a combination that spoke pure Austin, music some-where in between B.B. King and Susan Vega and a crowd that looked like the Z..ndick Farm at a Phranc concert. Too much but at the same hme very comfortable. The event was brought together to bene· fit the Austin Immune Health Clinic, a seven Yt'ttr old fac ility that focuf'ee on hol­istic approaches to immune deficiency that supplement traditional western medi· cine. Staffing the table at the event waa Our ca11U!r<U caught "Mikey" Norvell and Eric Thom.u of Texaa A&M outaUk the Chain Driue AIHC volunteer Cliff Taylo~ Cliff is a PWA who was fir11t diagnosed with HIV infection five years ago. After going through an alphabet soup of treatment& and medications, including ex­hausting AZT, he turned to the Immune Clinic for its approach. He credita his rou­tine of meditation and stre88 reduction, aerobic exercise, acupuncture and mBB­eage therapy to hie increalled health and stabilization of his diseaae. "This benefit is real important because most of the AIDS money raised goes to education/pre­vention and research;' Cliff commented, "Very little money is ever allocated to long term wellneHB programs:' When combined with traditional medi· cal care, holistic care is showing great promise. Our wishes for continued success to Cliff and the Austin Immune Health Clinic. Over near the "40 Acres;• Charlie's Dis· ro pulsated to the theme "Think Pink'.' Bows and ribbons held the place captive as studenta and their admirers looked on, On Saturday evening it waa SRO as Char­lie's welcomed dieco mUBicatar Viola Wills to Austin. In anticipation of great shows, people began arriving early, and by 10:00 p.m. the bar was packed. Nobody was dis­appointed , ,,. .~ally tho•4" proctiood in the art of lfl'oping. At midnight Viola came onto a tiny stage set up near the back of the bar, one Many Auetm1te• to traveled to Dallaa kut weekend, to watch or participatf! in the pa· rade and other euenta T T T DATELINE: HOUSTON Alfonao Duraldo of KNON'1 gaylle1bian radio program "Lambda Wttkly" 1nteru1f!w1 Lori Thnmaa and Scott Thoma• of the Coalition for Lesbian and Gay Student Grou1» just big enough for a hunky dance~ But there, according to doorman Greg, ''she worked it:' Viola sang all of her hita includ· ing "Up On The Roof,' "If You Could Read My Mind;' "Stormy Weather;· "Gonna Get Along Without You Now" and, of course, "Don't Stop the Train:' That evening that girl shared her music, her energy, and heck, she even shared her stage, bringing up a fan or two during the show to dance with. Thunderous applause and two call backs signaled Austin's approval of her show. Although only 15 when Viola made her first hit, Charlie's !<»cute- for·words bar· tender Darren already knew he had the disco beat built in. Thia coming Friday night, Darren will be celebrating his 24th birthday at his home away from home. If you get there early enough you might •till be able to icet a piece of cake. Charlie's G.M., David, once again show. that he know• how to treat his "family:' Reserva­tions for the sparkling line are filling up fast, frat boys are encouraged to bring their padd 1~a. This weekend will bring the 2nd annual Oil Baron's Ball w Buckles Saloon. Thi• event will recognize some of the leading contributors to local area AIDS and Gay/ Lea bi an service organizations as well 88 Buckle's faithful clientele. Ao door pnzes Stick People'• Malford Milligan and Kria McKay were among the entertamf!rs at Chances' benefit for the Auatm Immune Clmic on Friday night they will be giving away ticketa to George Strait's saturday night concert in Austin. On Saturday, Buckles will be giving away a fabulous weekend travel package to TGRA'e annual rodeo in Dallas. Sunday night. there will be a dance conte•t and prizes that include two enormous belt buckles. The weekend at Buckles will be a ball. See y'all there. For tho•• who are looking for a different place to dine on Sunday afternoons. you may want to check out San Fran Cisco' a. To compliment thell" 50 cent Coors Light beer bust from 5:00-9:00 p.m. they will be serving beef or chi!'ken fajitas on the pa· tio. lfthey servcchiclcen anything like the way the)· have been serving grade A pnme beef over the past couple of weeks you will have your plate full of one delightful meal. In the ounce of prevention department, and as a service to thecommuruty, Cisco' a will be providing self-defense cl888es on Tuesd&)'> from 7:00-9:00 p.m. The claao. taught by Gerald Penny of the Austin Gay and Lesbian Anti-Violence League will fo. cua on .awarem.-.a and conflid nvoidnnm as well &ti simple deft-ntoiive lee.hmques. Gerald, who was recognizoo for his work in an Auotin American Statesman article one month ago, is proact1vely trying to prevent the kind of hate-bas.d violence that hos bt'<'n plaguing Houston's gay commuruty rff<'ntly. The charge for the cla•• is $5, with proc,...ds going to the An· tt-viol•nce k.ague. Go and arm yourself with a little kno,. ledgt•. You will need o sdf-dofen1eclaas 1fyou ever call Cisco'• stained glass windows "faux" (a miatake made in thlS column tn two weeks 111?0). True, while the windows are falae, the stained gl888 is 88 real 88 a Sunday mornmg hangover. Last week, Cisco'• owner Janet called this reporter and graciously offered to let me "feel" the window up close. Cisco'• went to lfl'•&t ex· pense to bring these gor~eous antique windows all the way in from New orleans to give this new barmorethanju•ta touch of class, and jll8tly de.erves credit for their efforts. So remember. Cioco's i.b the bar where the fun, the people and the STAINED GLASS WIJ'l:OOWS are real! Oh, yeah, and de•p1te the typos, every· body has their own hBll', too. HLGPW '92 questions feasibility of large scale, two day festival By SHERI C:OHt:N DARBONNE TNV f:d11m Houston Lesbian and Gay Pride W..-k l!l!J2 may include a new "pre-parade" or "post parade"' event-direction and struc· ture ao yl't unplanned-instead of a two day festival like the "Star Nite" events 1h111<"d by MontroseAC"tivity Center for the last two years. Members of the celebra· lion's planning cumm1ttee decided at the monthly Pridt• Week meeting Monday, S1•pt. 2:1, to eHtablish a sulx·omm1ttec that will look into the feasibility of the festival and other prid1• weekend eventa held in the past. This year would be the first time the committ1'<! 1tselfhas had the responsibility of or11anizmg and planning the festival or "pc18t·parade event:' Jn early years, the Houston Gay and [..,sbian Political Cau· cu• put on a political rally in a nearby park; more recently, coalitions of gay/ ].,.. bian organizations exp<:rimented with both art craft/ information mini·festsand entertainment events, and in 1990 and 1991, MAC and the Metropolitan Commu­nity Church of the Resurr..-tion co-spon· sored the Star N1w fe•tivals. Co·chairo Carol Clark and Jack Valinaki not<>d several factors that will in· flul'nt<' the fe•tival. event plans this year. inrludinic MAC'• decision to turn the pride wt"<·k event over to the HLGJ'W committee and the fart that the frst1val has never made money. They alao pointed out that some bu•mess people felt the festival's h111hliicht was usually set at a time that •·competed" with area gay businesset\~ hurting attendance at both "Wed like to see this ycor 1f there's any way we can "'ork with the bars in this, tn· stead ofcompeting with them;' Clark said Outreach comm1ttH' chair Diane Wil· Iiams suggested that by holding ita own event before the paradr, LGPW would be helping the buHinesses sinrf' the crowd atM tendinic the parade would be fnoe to go where they choose afterwards. In other bu•inesa, the co-chairs re1><>rted that the process of establi•hing non·profit 5011c)3 •talus for the pnde oricanizauon will take at lea•t one vear. \'alin•ki said they would ask the MAC board if HI.GP\\' could remain of the umbrella corporauon until the proc""8 11 complete. The following chairs were appointed to head committees on the •·executive team"~ marketing, Bnan K"'"''" and Dave Hemmer; newsletter, Don Mumma, fundraismg, Dean \\alradt, evcnta, Morla Eismstadt; outreachllned1a: Diane Wil· Iiams, and parade, Marvin l>nVIB and James LaQue. Members voted to appro-. the appointml'nts. \'alinski and Clark announced that they would be att.l'nding thcmtemauonal pnde week planning conference to be held Oct. 11·13 in Boston. It was announced that volunteers would be needed to staff HLGPW booths at Queer :-;ation'a!Sation· al Coming Out Day Part)' DiverseWorlr.s, 7 00 p.m.-midnight Priday, Oct. 11, and dunng the fall Weothetmer Art Festival, the weekend of Oct. 19-:n An executive retreat to set planning deadlinl!ti for HLGPW '92 \\'88 tentatively set for Oct. 26. 14 THE NEW VOICE SEPT 27-0CT 3. 1991 Houston's Inner Montrose -< l<ULPH • E/J ' s llESTWEl•ER •Lobo • Pot Pi e I ~1 HYDE PARK • ii611 Hyde Pa r )<; PUb ••Miss Kitt s • Mont rose M;in · ngPACIF1c r et Sta. .. he New voice~v..,,,OIOO=~~~ .P.triuro •QT'~ • -llESlHEI ER/ElGIN Mother • · LOVEn <TAFT Warp Factor Kmlos Barney 'OK -1 admit I - wrong llbout the aky flllllng. Bui I'm pretty aure l'w got• handle on lhlo ozono loyer bull.-." Houston's Greater Montrose • * EARN INCOME * " 91 " fAIRVIEll llESTMEIHE~ W. ~LABA14A <GREENlllllAR I ......... YOURS TRULY IN A SWAMP ~ WRllPPltlG NOVELTY GIFT ITEMS ~ EARii $200-$500 WEEKLY t Send a stamped sell-addressed I O&O ~~~~11~~t~~~VICE I p 0 . BOX 601532 f.llllP.11. FLORIDA 33160 ___P _ii_nt_e_x_P_l~_s_=l WE OFF.ER ALL OF THESE SERVICES: (713) 524-4365 E ASL.A PAI >L 0 ~ X'Z I {X)6 California group 's 'Thumperwear Party' in the Quarter a unique experience By 1..EOSARD EARi •• JOH:-OSOS T.VV 11/tu Or~ans I had lunch recently 111 the posh Sterhng Club ot 700 Rue Burgundy m ~ew Orle­ans raggedly cine French Quarter. My lunch date WWI Lhe dazzling Holly Woodlawn, thespian of ages and CToao dresser to the masses. We had good wme, delicousB11ndwiches and laughably hmp souffle pollltoeb. Our charming bartender invited us to aspecnl p11rty. "Here in the Quarter.' he exclaimed, '11 F.V ;>;' Parties (of Garden Grove. Cali· fom101 party! .. 'Whot is o EUS Parties party? .. Holly asked, bntt1ng her un·made up. lashl""s eyes. She w11s tn no mood for undefined fun. It was the crock of noon ond we had Just n11vigated the Department of Perpetu· al NaVlgntion's lotest digs along historic Rue Burgundy We walked, dodgmg barricades, to the Sterling Club from upnver Gregory's Ber where a bonafide truck dnver flirted shamelessly "'th Holly. causing her to se­nousl) consider abandoning our lunch date I obiected. not canng to be left m the re'llaming rompany of three l11rge, snaggle-toothed ind1v1dunls proudly dis­playing &erond11ry sexual charoctenstics of all the sexes. The Sterling'• bartender batted his own ample cyea ond 1111d to Holly, "My fnends are having it 11nd I know they would love to hnveyou come;' he smiled. "You too;' he added, tossing 11 glancing look towards me ''.Actuolly it 18 open to anyone. Its a kmd of rubber wear party. A kmd of Tupperware Porty. You know, a Thumperwear party'" Holly let out a deep, cot-like purring. ''Well, sounds hke fun;' turning from the canary to ask. "What do you think, Leo­nard?" I said, sure I was planning to be out that night anyway, Holly had given me tickets for "Women Behind Hara," the show she wos in town to do at the Toulouse Theatre The bartender s01d I could bring another guesL The show was great (It is sttll in town but, alas, the great Holly Woodlawn has fluttered hllck to Hollywood). I went with Geoffry, a formM" Hoy Scout turned watter at the Emptre (the new, high priced place on Dumame, where the old, high priced Bombay Club used to meet). Geoffry claimed to have prior 11cquamtonce witn the r:US. party host. "I know both of them;• he B11id. "They're both named Mt· chael:' Sounded funny, but so did the por· ty. After the show, Holly dropped out and Geoffry and I strolled 11lon11 a French Qu11r1er street oddly lackmg excavation I how hnd they missed this one?) until we came to a dork house seemingly without a door. Closer inspe<tton found a door be­neath a "indow. Inside, the two Michaels were seated among guests and edible things in colored jant. Everyone wae watching a handsome blond man voguing in red lace and black stockings. "This is not what the Hoy Scouts prepared me for;' Geoffry said. ·• Hut wasn't that thetr mists.kt', I've never been bitten by 11 snake .. In a flash he was in the bathroom chonging mto a set of undtC8 showjng hts grace and charm to 118 fullest. Fama Faye Moley, r: U N. Port1es repre­senllltive, handed out her pale pmk cord with phone numbers only and 11 pink and white order form. Then she possed among us dabbing an 11rm here, a chet·k there with creams and lotions Each hod an exotic name, like "Hot Fudge Ftreworks. 'Shem structed us on which wns and which wos not edible. She even pnssed out little slicks with testable samples. And rub-a-dub cloths. "Love Mittens come in regular, de­luxe 11nd super deluxe:' she B&id Bo ttery powered to ye were a sensation. F11mn ~·11ye caused quite a stir displaying a device she clrumed was molded '"exactly from Jeff Strykd' Two men on my ri11ht &wore loudly and proudly that they knew better. As a EU.N. Party-favorwee11rh got a lit· tie pmk primary male sex chararterist1c. It looked like it might fit on the end of a pt'n· cil, like an eraser. l wonder why"! (Thi• is it. The contt•st to n11me in on<• sentence what Wheee' The Prople of the USA won m the Persian Gulf War ends Monday, Sept. 30, 1991. All entnes must be postm11rked before that date All entru"' must be m an individual envelope and mailed to ContestJYours Truly In A Swamp, l~O. Box 72002, New Orlenn&, La. 70172. The better ones will he rt•pnnted here ma few Wf'('kff and tht> winner will re­ceive a "BourbonStreetNo. 13 .. poster Tho contest will not be eo<tended, not even m the event of a new v.or to r~WJn whatever 1t 1s we "'on in the first one). CharliefPs iJREAKl'AST-; 1.UNCI 17i51NNFR • DESSERTS 24 I !OURS A DAY LIVE ENTERTAINMENT // ;fhurs-Sun 9pm-1am '!Ne smart, fmfi m11{ affortfa6fe frmcfi afternatitie. CHARLIE'S - Its not ju.(t for 6realfast any1rwre. 1100 WC'$lhC>imC>r 522-3332 to go orckrs available OUSTON EIGHT BALL TOURNAMENT STEAK-N-TATER HOT MALE DANCERS 5PM SPM NOW THROUGH OCTOBER 27 VIEW THE EXCITING NEW COLLECTION OF ART WORKS BY JAMES PREUSS, TWENTY PERCENT OF ALL SALES WILL NEXT SATURDAY 10/6 MAUDE'S WEEKLY TALENT SHOWCASE FOR ASPIRING ENTERTAINERS SEPT. 27-0CT 3. 1991 / THE NEW VOICE 15 BEER BASH 4 NIGHTS A WEEK •WED. 4pm-2am •FRI. 4pm-2am •SAT. 4pm-2am •SUN. 4pm­llpm $2 buy-in plus 25¢ per mug from4pm until ... 805 Pacific • Houston 3 in 1 Cocktails, Long necks or Regular Happy Hour until 10pm Nightly Saturday, Sept. 28, &Sunday, Sept. 29 _;__J (Gi:eyiefrnrr"il ?J ~ 9pm /_·. . ~ .. -~ , s~4' . Sunday, Sept. 29 OC.~ :·-~ 1~. ,\ The TGRA Candidates Q ~\Ct 92 present t + 1 ~}, A Casino Night & , ~ .- .? Variety Show .__. t 3-Spm '-. ~ 16 THE NEW VOICE I SEPT. 27-0CT. 3, 1991 'Y 'Y 'Y DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Investigation under way in Cincinnati police beating claim CI!l:Cil'o"";l;ATI, Wednesday, Sept. 18 (AP)-A man says pohce and sheriffs officers taunted and beat him after ar· resting him on trumped up charges be­cause he 1s gay. Gay rights act.VIsts say it's another example of harassment of homosexuals by the Hamilton County !Sheriffs De­partment, and they are calling for the res1gnat1on of Sheriff Simon Leis Jc But authorities deny the charges, say mg Steven O'Banion got some cuts and bruises resisting arrest. Leis has charged O'Banion with three counts of attempted murder for alleged· ly telling officers he has AIDS and then trying to spit blood onto them. A Hamilton County Municipal Court iudge has sent the case to a county grand iury and ordered O'Banion incar· cerated at his Cincinnati home. Police said they arrested O'Banion, 40, on misdemeanor charges of jaywalk· 1ng, drunkenness and resisting arrest on Sept. 3. O'Banion denies being intox· teated and jaywalking, and says police and sheriffs officers taunted him be· cause he is a homosexual. O'Hanion contends that police offi· cers banged his head on a street curb, and that three officers at the county jail punched him tn the face and hit him across the forehead, opening a cut. FaCJal scrapes were Vlsible when he was brought to the Hamilton County Justice Center. sheriffs spokesperson Frank Weikel said Wednesday. O'Banion had a black eye in a television 'Y 'Y 'Y DATELINE: TEXAS interview shortly after hi arrest. "Those wounds could not be self.in· flicted, which iH what they're claiming:• O'Banion said. Sheriff's officers say O'Banion screamed that he had AIDS and intend· ed to infect them. The officers said he spit blood at them and a nurse who had been brought to examine him. "Mr. O'Banion was subdued by our people when he became violent:' Weikel said. "When he Rpit on the nurse, he re­ceived additional injuries here. He got a nose bleed and a black eye. He was to-.ed to the ground to keep him from spitting on the nurse and the officers~' Leis said he would have the officers tested to determine whether they were infected. Leis also said he would ask state lawmakers to consider legislation to require medical personnel to release information to authorities if a prisoner has the AIDS virus. The Gay & Lesbian March Activists want Leis to resign and an outside agen· cy to investigate whether sheriffs offi. cers beat O'Banion. The group said Leis is biased against gays. The group made similar claims last year when Leis' officers investigated a photographic exhibit by Robert Mapplethorpe, a homo•exual whose photographs included sexually graphic pictures. Jim Johnson, chief investigator for the city's Office ofMunicipal Investiga· tion, said the office is looking into O'Banion's allegations. Dentist launches offensive in attempt to dispel AIDS rumor BAYTOW!'.', Sunday, Sept. 22 (AP}-A dentist plagued by false rumors and ter­rified patients mailed letters to 3000 famiJie, and colleagues to dispel the myth he was suffering from AIDS. De David R. Wooten, "~th a 20-year practice, a wife and three children, found himself reassuring nearly all his patients, who had heard he had the con· tagious and fatal disease. Alarmed, Wooten quickly traced the rumor back through more than a dozen people, including a worker at another dental office in town. In an effort to kill the rumor, Wooten mailed about 3,000 letters to patients and other dentists around Baytown, about 20 Ullles east of Houbton. to assure them he was healthy and that he and hts staff had been tested and were clear of the human immunodeficiency virus. "The US. mail is not any faster than a Baytown rumoi.' Wooten said. "I felt open commumcation was the beet solu­tion to everything, rather than just sticking my head in the sand. Because of the nature of AIDS, it is a blank screen for people to project their fears:' He said dentists are getting a bum rap since a Florida dentist, Dr. David Acer. became the first health profe88ional known to have infected patients with AIDS before dying of it himself in Sept. 1990. Some experts blamed the trans­mtiillion of the disease on inadequate sterilization procedures. The Centers for Disease Control in At· lanta says the chance of contracting AIDS through a dental procedure is about 1 m 2.6 million. The Baytown rumors had Wooten be­ing ill lately, losing a lot of weight and watching his staff walk out. None of it was true, he said. "I still have no earthly idea how the rumor started;' he said. "I had not seen any detrimental effect on my patient caseload from the rumor, but I didn't want to take any chances;' Wooten said. "Sometimes I might not see some of them for six months or a year' Though his mass-mailing was unusu­al, some health care workers have be­gun providing signed guarantees that they are AIDS-free, running advertise­ments assuring patients they do not have AIDS or regularly posting their blood test results. The American Medical AsMciation and American Dental Assooation have assailed such practices as unseemly conceRsions to a growing paranoia and, if the worker is infected, not necessarily reliable. "There is a sort of hysteria in the pub­lic at this point. We're worried about the growing epidemic of fear, which has overshadowed science:• said Philip Weintraub of the Chicago-based dental association. Wooten says his letter helped to set the record straight for those who might be too shy to inquire or who simply took the rumor as gospel. In the letter. he told
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