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Montrose Voice, No. 148, August 26, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 148, August 26, 1983 - File 001. 1983-08-26. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4077/show/4048.

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(1983-08-26). Montrose Voice, No. 148, August 26, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4077/show/4048

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 148, August 26, 1983 - File 001, 1983-08-26, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4077/show/4048.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 148, August 26, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 26, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Cleaning Up from the Winds & Rain By Billie Duncan Photo• by Billie Duncan and Lyt Harris Alicia was a flirtatious lady and on Thurs­day, August 18, she batted her eyelash right over Montrose. She was also a rather angry lady. As this very southern belle headed north, she flicked her skirt and sent objects flying every which way, including loose. Even Montrose fell for her in a big way. Bits and pieces of Montrosean ambiance littered, covered and blocked the streets after Alicia's very unladylike temper tan­trum. The major damage in Montrose from Hurricane Alicia was from falling trees. Although many Montrose residents wi1J be without power perhaps even through this woekend, the area came through the storm remarkably well, city officials said. They pointed out that there was no major flooding, no reports of looting and very little roof damage. A spokesperson of the office of Council­person George Greanias explained that a dollar figure had not been assessed for Montrose area specifically. "But the latest eatimate for the city of Houston is $1.5 billion. They still have not pinned that down." She went on to aay that City Council was awarding bids to contractors for the emergency clean up. The first allocation was to be $2 million. The major priorities in the aftermath of the storm, according to Greanias' office, are restoring power, removing debris and expediting trash pick-up. Immediately after the storm, the city was basically concerned with getting the power to hoapitals, police stations and the water pumping stations. Individuals in life-threatening situations were also given high priority. Now that the recovery from the storm is in it.a 11econd week, most Houston resi­dents have had their power restored. Houston Lighting and Power is estimat­ing that power will be reatored to 99% of the city by the end of this weekend. A apokesperson for HL&P said that full power should be restored in Montrose by Saturday, 0 except in an isolated one or two instancea." The last people to get their power back will be those individuals whose drop lines (the lines leading from the street cables to the individual houses) have been broken. "But even in that case, they should have service by Saturday," he said. "One thing that people don't seem to realize," he said, "is that if their breaker box or meter is broken, HL&P can't do anything about it until the box is fixed. The homeowner has to get an electrician to fix that before we can connect their lines back." The main reason for the power outages, he said, was trees falling on the trans­formers and knocking them out. "And Montrose certainly has its share of trees." Damage in Montrose was mostly tk>wned tree•, power lines and sign&, but littk Btructural damage. Shown here: light pok at Holman and Travis and downed sign at Houston Sign Company, 1300 Westheimer. MONTROSE v a I c E The Newspaper of Montrose Aug. 26, 1983 Issue -148 Published Every Friday This past week clean-up crews roamed the area Also, some transform.era were knocked out by power surges. "Because of winds, the linea would alap together and short out, and the aurge would knock the trana­former out." However, he pointed out that because there was 10 little flooding with Alicia, • 1the underground service fared pretty well." The last item on HL&P's fix-it list, he said, was reconnecting traffic signals. "They're not as important as houses." Next on the overall list for the city is the removal of debris Greanias' office said that the main tho­roughfares were being cleared first, then the workers were moving to side streets, particularly those with esplanades. "Peo­ple are piJing debria on the esplanades," said a 1pokesperson for Grenias, "and then the people driving down the streeta cannot 8t"e around the comers." In order to clear as much as possible ln tht> next 30 days, the city is hiringcontrac~ tors who will work on a systematic remo­val of debria. The city will be divided into ten sectors with three crews in each sector going from street to atreet in the clean-up. The major problem for the city workers in clearing the debria has been a shortage of equipment, according to Greaniaa' office. However, that was not a problem for HL&P according to Steve Gonzalez. "! think we had all the equipment we needed, but the damage was so massive that it couldn't be done all at once." Trash removal ia a separate problem from he removal of debris. but it is being complicated by the fact that people are putting debria in with their garbage Garbage has awollen in lllontrooe (as well as in other areas), in any case. because so many people had to throw out a large quantity of food that spoiled as a result of the power outagea. To further complicate the problem, the Beechnut • tation for garbage service contmiud page 3 ,. 2 MONTROSE VOICE I AUG. 26, 1983 1ST ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION DEFEAT OF 21.06 DALLAS UNION HOUSTON ~ACK SPORTSWEAR/HAIRCUTTING 3S18 CEDAR SPRINGS (214) 528-9600 (713) 1212 WESTHEIMER HELP SUPPORT TEXAS FREEDOM WEEK COMMAND PERFORMANCE: MAJESTIC THEATRE BENEFIT NATIONAL A.1.D.S. LOBBY SUNDAY SEPT. 4 TICKETS AVAILABLE AT UNION JACK Some Slept Threw it but Most were Awake continued from page 1 maintenence, which services Montrose, has been without power since the storm. Power had not been restored as of W ednes-day, August 24. Aa a result, garbage pick· up in Montrose is quite a bit behind schedule. All agencies concerned with the chore of getting the city back on ite feet after the fury of Alicia stressed that this was not a job that could be accomplished overnight. The city government, HL&P, the Hous­ton Police Dept. and the U.S. Weather Ser­vice, all urged that the citizens should be aware of the problems and how they could help. The following is a compilation of their suggestions as to what people in Montrose could do to expedite the recovery of the neighborhood and to keep any more prob­lems from occurring. 1. Unless it is a life-threatening situa­tion, do not keep calling HL&P or various city services. Be patient. 2. If you have power, leave a porch light or front room light on so that the night crews of HL&P can more easily determine who has power and who does not. 3. Do not use candles unless you are absolutely forced into it. Use battery lamps or flashlights. 4. If there are large trees or limbs down near you and you have the equipment, cut the branches into six foot lengths for rem· oval by the street crews. The more that private citizens pitch in for the clean-up, the Iese of their tax dollars that will be spent on private contractors working over­time. 5. If you cannote remove the debris from your own yard, move it 8S far from your house 88 possible. Rotting debris is a fire hazard. 6. If at all possible, remove the debris from your property and take it to one of the emergency dump& that have been set up. One dump is in Montrose in thel400block of W. Gray and another ie in the 100 block of Harvard in the Heights. 7. If the attendant ie not at an emer­gency dump site when you go to deposit your debris, move your debris in as far as possible eo that it ie not blocking the access of other people who wish to use the dump. 8. Remember that many traffic signals continued page 5 "Lake Southwest Freeway" on the evening of Alicia's departure Is this Roger's Supermarket? No, Kroger, without the "K." AUG. 26, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Montrose Mouth That Storm This is your Hurricane Alicia photo souvenir issue. Save it -CJ-Some strange things happen in a storm. After Alicia left town, the Southwest Free­way between Mandell and Woodhead was flooded. Apparently someone used some of those motorized skiis and took a JOY ride Assistant Police Chief John Bales told reporter Billie Duncan (while she was gath­ering information about the aftermath of the storm) that the story was circulated around the department "That's not one of those things that you write a police report up on," he laughed. "It's just one of those things where an officer comes in to the station and says, 'You're not gonna believe what I saw today'." -CJ-Among the things that Hurricane Alicia did last week was putting the phones at the Gay Switchboard out of operation. But they're all back in full working order now .. and that number is, in case you need the Gay Switch­board some day, 5~3211. -CJ-While Dirty Sally's softball team 1s off to Ch~ cago next week for the Gay World Series, other Houston teams are planning on mak­ing a few regional tournaments. The BAB team will be heading to Tulsa for an invitational while the Montrose Voice team is going to Kansas City. The Brazos team will be guest bartenders this Wednesday, Aug_ 31, during steak night, at the club, to raise a few dollars for their Tulsa trip That hurrican&-delayed softball awards banquet has been reset for Sept. 16. Adrian (alias "Maria Fingermore"), bar­tender at Mary's, is a contestant in Miller Beer's "Ugliest Bartender Cont~t," being co-sponsored by Eastern Airlines. The Mouth has no idea how one goes about vot­ing in this contest, but 1f you find out, ~drian would appreciate your vote ... _ Speaking of Mary's, they have to get the award for the best hurricane preparedness They re~ted a portable generato.r before the storm hit and was able to stay in business continuously, despite the fact they didn't have electric power from HL&P for a week The University of St. Thomas presents Edgar E. Martin. pianist, in a series of three historic recitals to benefit the Music Scholar­ship Fund The first program will be this Sun­day, Aug. 28, in Cullen Hall at Mt. Vernon and W. Alabama It will include baroque and classical works of Bach, Cepin, Haydn, Loeillet, Mozart and Soler -CJ-As the show ended recently and the fights went down at Risky Business, the phone rang and an unidentified voice told Jay and Andrea that "7070," the stuffed star of their new show, had been dog-napped A ransom note was found with a clipping of the dog's hair with instructions The ransom money was paid and Toto was found Tuesday m good condition at the Total Animal Care Center where he had been abandoned Gay International, a San Franc1sco-baseo company incorporated In Utah, has pur­chased a 26-room hotel on Salt Lake City that is hoped to be the forerunner of a chain of bed-and-breakfast establishments Robert L. Hunniecut, a lawyer and direc­tor of the company, said that Gay Interna­tional has raised more than $2 million since it began selling its stock at 35 cents a share three months ago. Gay International has paid $400,000 for the Wishing Well Hotel in downtown Salt Lake City. The company also owns three condominiums in Honolulu and 300 aces on the big island of Hawaii, where it hopes to build a gay resort Hunniecut hopes to establish two dozen bed-and­breakfast hotels across the United States and others m London, Pans and Munich CASH PRIZES 1st Prize $75 2nd Prize $50 Jrd Prize $25 Tuesday August 30th at lOpm JR~6th/ock Short Contest! GRAND PRIZE Special Guest M.C 'Tmestine" J Nights-4 Days at the Beautiful Hotel Malibu in Acapulco, Mexico, for 2 persons. Includes round trip air fare, hotel, hotel tax & airport transfers Grand Prize will be awarded at ]R's 13th Contest AUG. 26, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Trees Came Tumbling Down all over the Place continued remember if that was just before or just --,..-.,.,..-r.::m• are still not functioning .. Treat all major intersections without signals as four-way stops. The city is printing and putting up stop signs as quickly as possible. 9. Drive carefully. Visibility on many streets is hampered because of piles of debris. 10. If you are a senior citizen or know a senior citizen without power, there are cooling centers for relieffrom the heat. For informatin, call 757-7822. 11. Help your neighbors, especially those without power or with major dam­age. 12. Remember that it will be a month or longer before everything is cleared and fixed. You are in a major disaster area. o Mary Wentrek and Her Not So Jolly Green Giant The major damage caused by Hurricane Alicia in Montrose was from falling trees. The story of Mary Wentrek, who lives at the corner of Castle Court and Mandell, is similar to those of many Montroseans. Like residents throughout the area, Mary wae up early on Thursday, August 18, because of the storm. Right a round 6:00 a.m., things started to happen rather quickly for Mary. For one thing, the power went out. "My clock stopped at 6:15, but I don't MONTROSE V 0 I C E The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contentacopyright •1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm HenryMcClurg putJlj11*1et11tor Acel Ctark g raphic. J.t,;. f.fB..r.a.y So~n~:lt HolhaHood lfNnaf}H1fJklitOr Chuck Meredith •l'O'f•«fllor Jon Cheetwooct Joseph Lee conl rlbut jnpwrit.,. Bob Jonea, Mary Cadena, Julie Hollingsworth. John Cooper, Larry Popham COtllflbu/1nf}photog1ephe11 Lyt Hama 1tlv#t11/ngd1'9CIOf Mark Drago ~llllnfJ Jon Cheetwood CIHS1f1k/S<herf1llf'tf/ =d~1!!:~.:: GrNIW MonlroM B1.111nee1 Guild, G•y :;::!'rv~ ln1ern1t10t\1IGayNewaAg«tey.PacihcNew1 A1111in8vrH11 C.pilolNewsS.V.ee Syndontkl Feature ServtiClll & Wrilet• (San Fr1nc1sco) Chrot1UFHlur•.UrotlldFNtureSynchc1t1.J1ftr9)'W11&on R•ndy Allred. Stonew1U Featur• Synd1c1te. Brian McN1ught.J018Jiker POSTMASTER Send addr911 correctoon1 10 3317 MonlrOM 11J0e. Hot11ton.TX77008 StJbac11pt10nflt1H'IUSm1HledWJt;9J~ . S49peryHr(52 ~11u .. l. S29per11•mon1h1(2t1UUM).orS1 25perweek(leu th1n2e•tue1) Nll10rH1lldv11111mgrepr1H11t1t1VI JoeOIS1bllto,R1vendeU M1rket1ng.&666thAvenue. New York 10011, (212)2'42·&963 A~tr•mfJ d11dlm1 TuelClay. 5 30pm lor lnue rele1Md F rl­d1y~ n1ng Not1c1loedverl1..nloc•l1Mrt11U1fJt1111CtiedUllF1 ........ wu 1t1ec11ve Oct 1. 1912 Local 8dVerli.log r1t• achedule So1·Aw1ttbeett.ct1V9July 1, 1983 RuponslbJl•tr MOt\ltOM Voice- OOll not IM4.Jme raponM­blkty tor •dvlrt•_.ng cl.,m• Rude,. should alen ··MontrOM VOtC1' ' to•nydec41PIMedvolft•IMng after the tree fell." The tree was a shady green giant that graced the back yard of the building in which Mary resides. As the gusty winds of Alicia bore down on Montrose, they tore the tree with its massive root structure out of the ground. When the tree was wrenched from the earth, it crashed on top of Mary's building, "' bending a metal staircase, knocking off part of the roof and shattering the electric meters. "I thought the whole back half of the continued page 6 Mary Wentrek next to the {alum tree in her back yard, Castle Court at Marukll The trunk of the tree in Mary Wentrek's yard -- ~ --·-- •'\'··---···~-·-· :---~- ----- ~- ·~-::- Broken window at Savings of America, 1099 Weotheimer sh 6 MONTROSE VOICE I AUG. 26, 1983 The Story of Alicia in Montrose frompage5 house was being ripped off," Mary said. But the tree waa not through causing problems. The moat spectacular part was yet to come. When the power came back on in that section of Montrose Friday morn­ing, Mary's tree was lying amid a tangle of broken power lines and smashed meters. "The whole thing just lit up," explained Mary. "The tenant next door, behind us there, was looking out her window. She aaid it looked like a Christmas tree, spar­kling like that." Like moet people hit by the otorm in one way or another, Mary had her bl ... inga to count. 0 We're lucky the house didn't catch fire." Al. of Wednesday, Auguat 24, Mary'• building waa otill without electricity. Houoton Lighting and Power cannot con­nect her power back up until the owner of the building clears the tree and fixes the meters. o Billy Staggs Woke to Some Surprises Billy Staggs had just moved to 4202 Stan­ford on Wednesday, August 17. He was exhausted from a 26-hour bus ride and alept until late afternoon on Thursday. When he woke up, he had a few sur· pnsea. There were a couple of things he expected to have that he did not have­like power and water. There were also a couple of things that he had that he did not want-like a strange new look to the landscape in front of his apartment and a amall swimming pool where the sidewalk used to be. Ama88i~etreein front of his apartment had been npped out of the ground by Hur­ricane Alicia early on Thruaday. As the roots of the tree were wrenched from the ground, they had tom out the water pipes that led into the apartment building. Staggs shook his head as he ourveyed the damage. "Thia tree just took our water lines right out." He explained that his roommate usually parks his car in front of the apartment "right there where the tree is now." The roommate, Staggs explained, moved the carmfearofflooding. "It's a good thing he did. or it'd be squashed right now under that tree." Asked if he had heard the tree fall he ~eplied. "No, I was ao tired from the trlp, I !hl:,;.~nt to sleep and missed the whole Staggo had never been in a hurricane before. "And I still don't know what it's like." o Some Houston Hurricane History The last time a hurricane scored a direct hit on the city of Houston was back in 1941. That was before huuicanes were named. The 1941 1torm had winds up to 83 MPH, and it came in at Texas City. Al. far 88 how it compares to Hurricane Alicia, which whipped through Houston Auguat 18, with the eye p888ing over Montrose, Ron Stagno, preparedness meteorologist for the Houston-Galveston area, said, ''They do comparisons in dollar figuree, and the dollar damage in 1941 compared to 1983 well, there's no comapri· son." Al. far 88 the winds are concerned, Ali­cia waa a bit bigger than that storm. Alicia was classified as a major storm with top winds prior to landfall of about 115 MPH. The top winds recorded at the Galveston weather station (which was not located at the point of highest estimated winds) were 103 MPH. At Alvin, winds were at 73 MPH, and at Intercontinental Airport, they were clocked at 78 MPH. However, there was an unofficial reading of99 MPH at Hobby Airport. ''The reason it's unofficial." said Stagno, "is that they were without power. They could oee the needle on the wmd Two viewa of Billy Staggs amid the torn roou of his falkn tree, 4200 Stanford, which ripped up water lines gauge, but they couldn't get a readout from it." Because of the tall buildings in down­town Houaton, Stagno said that the wind gusts there could have exceeded 100 MPH. Another storm that followed the basic path that Alicia took this year was the killer storm of 1900 that hit Galveston and left well over 5000 dead. That storm had offical winds of 120 MPH, but according to the book, A Weekend In September, the weather equipment was blown away by the storm before the full fury of it hit, so there is no way to know how strong the storm was. In terms ofloes of life, however, the 1900 storm stands as the worst natural disaster to hit the continental United States. Stagno believes that the most powerful hurricane to hit the Texas coast in this century was Carla in 1961. Carla made landfall at Matagorda with official winds of 145 MPH and unofficial gusts of up to 200MPH. Houston recorded wind gusts of almost 100 MPH during Carla; however, the wind damage from Alicia was much greater. Carla was a huge storm in terms of rain and wind, dumping enough water on Houston to flood most of the city for sev­eral daye. Many people feel that if a otorm the size of Carla had taken the path of Alicia, Houston would have been devastated. Stagno sayo that it could happen. "In any eiven year, the likelihood is 20% that a hurricane will hit the upper Texas coast. And on the average of every ten years we get a major hurricane." Problems arise, Stagno said, because people forget how destructive a hurricane can be. "Apathy sets in after so many years without a 1torm." But he warned that people should not put down their guard this year just because a storm has already hit. "You have got to be prepared all during hurri· cane sea.eon . Every person, every family, every household should plan what they should do if a hurricane should hit this area." He explained that hurricane prepared· nese pamphlets are available from many locations, including moat local TV sta Wade Williams stands next to large tree that went dJ>wn in vacant lot at W. Alabama and the S. W. Freeway tione. "There is no way of knowing when another hurricane could hit ue. Alicia was early in the season for a hurricane to hit the upper Texas coast," he explained. 4'The worst month is still ahead of us." Awnings at the 3317 Montro•e Building were ripped apart like Pop•icl~ aticlta AUG. 26, 1983 I MONTROSE Vorce 7 ------~-------~------~---------,------~....-....,_ IN CONCERT SPARKS FRIDAY AUG.26 AFTER THE CONCERT-GUEST DJ ERIC PUYO FLESHTONES MONDAY AUG. 29 DENNIS BROWN TUESDAY AUG. 30 Tickets Available from Record Rack and Ticketmaster Dancing to New Music Every Wednesday and Thursday FREE Cover Sunday 6-BPM 8 MONTROSE VOICE I AUG. 26, 1983 Living with AIDS By David Muenier The news media has created the idea of AIDS as an automatic death sentence, cauoing us lo 888ume all AIDS patienta are confined to hospitals. The truth of the matter is that many AIDS patients con­tinue to live at home, go to work, and carry on the everyday affairs of life. Coping with a life-threatening illness on a daily basis presents challenges that most of us have never contemplated. The adjustments in one's lifestyle are exten­aive and require a great deal of courage, determination and flexibility. A person finds inner strength that he may not have been aware he poesessed. Appreciation of things that have always been taken for sranted becomes more intense-time more precioua. Three very different men, linked by the common bond of the illn088 they share, have each taken a different approach to living with AIDS. They have taken the time to 1hare their aperiences, so that we all might have a clearer insight into what living with AIDS ia like. For obvious reasons, the stories are fac­tual, but the nameo have been changed. Tony: 111 think I'm realistic, not nega­tive." Looking al Tony sitting on the sofa in hia living room, it's hard to imagine that he ie aick. He runs his hand through his curly black hair, smooths hia well­groomed beard and smiles. "l never know how I'm going to feel from day lo day. AIDS rules my life." He doesn't like ii, but hu learned lo accept it. Tony, a Midwestern native who moved to Houston eleven yean ago to pursue the good life took full advantageofthesunbelt weather. Hewaaactiveinoutdoorsporta­joggin11, 1wimming, going lo the gym. But hie good life also included the bathe, book­stores and heavy weekend partying. As Tony approached his mid-308, he began lo alow down and pay more attention to hia lifeotyle. Late last 1ummer he became concerned about hi1 perpetual fatigue. In October, he developed a fever that would not respond lo any antibiotics. By November hew as in the hospital for ten day1. This would be the lint of many timeo. It wa1 in November he was diagnoeed aa having AIDS. He tried working half-days for awhile, but hia company wanted someone who could work an eight-hour shift. He tried it in January, but only lasted three days. He hasn't worked since. Fortunately, he has been with hie company many years and hu a good disability plan. Hi1 whole lifeotyle changed. He can no longer do the thing1 he lovee. No more jogging or work-out. at the gym. "I have no more aocial life," he siad. Thia ia not to say that Tony'1 friencls have abandoned him. He i1 usually too tired to do anything or go anywhere. "My friencls hesitate to call now. They're afraid I'll be 1leeping and they will disturb me." If Tony does go out, it's in the afternoons to a movie or to a restaurant. Pan of this curtailed lifestyle ie due lo fear. "I'm afraid of crowds," he said. Avoiding pla­ceo where there are likely to be lots of peo­ple h&B become a challenge. Tony worries about being exposed to germs that his non­functioning immune system simply can't handle. So he stays home to read, watch TV and occasionally entertain friends early in the evening. Tony, like many AIDS patienta, takes experimental medicines, usually on a four week trial basis. He must sign a statement that the doctors or hospital are released of all responsibility in the event of unknown aide effects. He also goes in every other week for akin tests lo determine if his =~.';f%.!':~~mJ~~i1~~~ :;~~~ is at its lowest point since he was diag­nosed. If a cure for AIDS was found tomorrow, would Tony return lo hie former lifeatyle? "! think I would have enough sense to cul back," he said. He's become more content with hi1 quiet lifeatyle and doesn't miss the use of n!Creational drugs or alcohol. He'• remained celibate for eight months, and is afraid of having sex with anyone until he's sure he is cured. The thought of pa88ing on a disease that has so greatly changed his own life, repulses him. uBeing healthy ia more important than sex.," he stated. Tony hopes to return to work full-time, take up jogging and once again belong to a gym. He doesn't give a lot of thought to dying, but has considered the possibility realistically. Sometimes when he drives by a crowded bar or bookstore he said he thinks 11Youjustfeel you wanttogoinand tell people, look, I have AIDS-be careful." Jerry: "I wish they'd close the baths." Jerry, blond, slight and intense, looka around nervously in the restaurant where we met, then Jeana forward to tell his story. A year and a half ago, while study­ina art in Loa Angelea, he noticed unusual fatigue and awollen lymph nodes. He, like most AIDS patienta, knew something wa1 wrong before he received his diagnosis. Since he had begun lo slow down from life in the fast lane earlier, he hoped it wouldn't be AIDS. Overnight hie life changed. He had to give up hie studies. Hi1 friends and eepecially hi1 roommate were "wonderful," and since his family already knew he waa gay, they were supportive when informed of hia condition. Jerry and hi1 lover decided to stay tog eh ter. Then they made an even more difficult decioion, there would be no more oex between them. Jerry ie afraid of giving AIDS to his lover. Jerry had returned to Houston to be near his lover, but in doing ao, left the supportive circle of friends in l.D8 Angeles who knew he had AIDS. He hasn't told anyone in Texas. As he said, "You just don't walk up to someone and say, 'Hi, I'm Jerry and by the way I have AIDS."' Jerry ha1 been mostly an out-patient going to the hospital weekly to receive his medication. First by I. V ., but now orally. IM<O>W SIHl<O>WOIMG DIRTY PICTURE SHOW AINllO PRIVATE SELECTION Physically he remains strong enough lo continue working about 25 hours a week. Jerry said that his lifestyle helped to contribute to hia getting AIDS. "I uaed lo think it was alright to fulfill all your fanta­sies." Now he views it differently- "lt's a breeding ground for disease." Amazingly, he does not seem bitter when he makes this statment. Instead, he conveys con­cern that many others will contract AIDS unless they begin to examine their lifes­tyles. In the future, Jerry hopes to be able to return to school and lead a normal life. 0 l'm real ti.red of being sick," he said. Yet Jerry manages lo keep a good sense of humor, and as we talk further, relaxes enough lo joke around. You begin to gel a glimmer of Jerry's out-going peroonality when he is at ease. Jerryspentalotoftime in self-examiniation learning a great deal about himself. Perhapa moat of us will never be forced to know ourselves quite as well. "/ usec;I to think it was alright to fulfill all your fantasies ... " One observation he made as I was get­ting ready to leave stuck in my mind. In reference to the many years he made hav­ing a good time the focus of his life, in reflection he discovered, 11Sex was not neceB88rilY what I was looking for." Jerry, like moat of us, was looking for warmth, human contaet, acceptance. Now realizing that he is able to view people and the world differently, there ie a positive side to AIDS. Deopite everything, Jerry continues lo plan for the fulur<!, while liv­ing a day at a time. Scott: "I'm healing myself." Scott, with hi1 shon hair, clean-shaven GQ look, ie the type of man that you would notice in a crowd. Even more noticable is the poeitive energy that radiate& from him. 1982 wa1 not a good year for Scott, a Houston native. From February to August he fought with diarrhea, fever, night sweats and fatigue, the whole range of AIDS 1ymptoms except for swollen gland1. Scott said he "was always sickly" so he was not overly alarmed at first. As the 1ymptom1 dragged on, and he could no longer p888 them off as the flu or colcls, he decided to seek medical attention. In December, he·waa formally diagnosed aa having AIDS. Looking back, Scott said he feel1 he brought some of his illne88 on himself-"! lived in the bookstores" and he "practiced poor nutrition." There have been major changes in his life in the area of attitude and lifestyle. He haa been forced to take "a closer look a t my health and pay more attention to nutrition and sleeping habits." Still Scott manages to continue working full time and be active in social and community functions. Since his family does not know he's gay, he hasn't told them much about his illness. He too has taken experimental drugs, and at one point went every week for tests. He attributes this to hie recent interest in epiritual matters. Although never reli­gious, he haa begun lo attend church. He feels spiritually he'a being healed, and now thinka "I could beat this thing." At one point, Scott said "I though about death a lot," but now ie making arrange­ments to buy a house and 04have no inten­tion of being sick.." Once Scott felt the need lo be in the mid­dle of the action all the time. Now he feels ' 4J'm more interested in people than sex." Being a pan of the AIDS suppon group has also brought positive changes. "The eupport group is wonderful .. . I need it," he said. "I would never go back lo my old lifestyle," he stated. There is no question that Scott has found a new direction in his life. He has gained fresh insights about himself, but at a high price. One cannot talk to Scott with­out feeling that he will beat this thing. Although Tony, J erry and Scott have different attitudes about some of the iuues involved, there is a common mes­sage that our lifeatyle iasomehowtied into the syndrome known a1 AIDS. If they are right, then many of us could be walking timebombs, ready to explode. Thal in itself is a frightening idea. AIDS ia not going away tomorrow or the next day. It may be yean before we fully understand it and learn how to combat it. In the meantime, we all need to examine how we live our lives, and how we conduct ouraelvee:. We can only hope that 1hould we, loo, become AIDS victim•, we will have the remarkable inner strength and courage these men have found . Living with AIDS ia not eaay or pleasant, but we can take bean from the fact these few are doing it. The newa media haa played up the nega­tive aide, perhaps making us all a little paranoid. We need to understand that not eve­ryone that contacts AIDS is nece88arily 11oing to die. Some will get better. Wein the gay community need to take the lead in being supportive and in Btre88ing the posi­tive, to gtve of our time, talents and love. U we can do thia it will show the public in general, that we are willing to care for our own. Presentin11 a 1olid and unified front will do much in calming the mounting AIDS hysteria. Thequestionofthegaycommun­ity'• survival may very well rest on how we respond to those livin11 with AIDS. A TASTE OF MEXIC0-24 HOURS DAILY THIS COUPON GOOD THROUGH 9-23-83 closed Tuesday 10pm; re-open Wed 1oam ~~~~Pm~~a&~ ,. I 10 MONTROSE VOICE I AUG. 26, 1983 Damage at St. Thomas University A tree landed on the Art Dept. of the Uni­versity of St. Thomas. The Modern Lan­guage building was also damaged by a falling tree. A temporary building situated next to 1117 W Main had halfofits roof blown off. Crooker Center suffered water damage and was still without power Wednesday, Aug. 24 Couple pas••• clipped-off tree on Louett The new Jerebeck Athletic Center had a portion of its roof torn off. Rev. William J. Young, president of the university, said that the maintenance department was still working on a solid estimate of the damage, but added that the casual estimate was between $10,000 and $15,000. "b·:r:::·~~~: ~:~~·~ :!~t!.:-;· Young, GPC Meets on Eve of the Hurricane AB Hurricane Alicia continued her omi­nous approach, about 40 hardy souls braved the threatening skies to attend the August 17 Gay Political Caucus meeting. After Preaident Larry Bagnerio greeted the new members and explained the GPC's new committee structure, he opened the floor for further nominations to the vacant GPC board position. With only one candidate, Jack Valinoki was unanimously elected to the Media Com­mitte board seat. Bagnerio reminded those present of Valinski 's previous media work for the community in preparing GPC's "get out and vote" commercial last fall and a commercial and press package for this year's Gay Pride Week. Following a brief Screening Committee report and a short discussion about gay participation in the upcoming March on Washington to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Civil Rights March, Bagnerie informed the Caucus of how Texaa Eastern Corporation was courting the gay community to win gay support for the Houston Convention Project. The fact that Texas Eastern was seeking gay sup­port for the upcoming bond election was cited as the business community's recog­nition of both the economic clout and bloc vote of the gay community. Newly elected Board Chair Anise Parker announced that 518 GPC memben would be eligible to vote in the Endorse­ment meeting Augu1t 31. The upcoming reception honoring atate Jobbyiat Bettie Naylor of Lelbian and Gay Rights Advo­cate& waa announced for Auguat 30, 5:00- 7:00 p.m., at the Meridian Hotel. When the Caucus moved into new busi­neaa, board member Ray Hill made a motion to censure Caueua maverick Gregg Russell for violating acreening committee rules. Specifically, Hill charged that Ruaoell had violated "Rule 13" that prohibited members from bringing any written mate­rial into the acreening aes&ion. Further­more, Hill charged that Russell was rude in his questioning of Eleanor Tinsley. But Hill's interpretation of the event was chal­lenged by another member who, having attended the aame screening, said he did not think Ruaeell waa rude. Ruaaell admitted he brought a abort written queation to the sesaion, but claimed he sought and received Hill'• approval before aaking the queation. When Ru11ell tri.d to read the question and explain why he brought it, he was ruled out of order since the issue was not the merit of the question but hi1 violation of the rule1 in bringing written material into the screening aeHion. RuBBell claimed that the censure motion was a deliberate attempt to deacredit and intimi­date him. With only a handful of abaten­tions and one or two no votes, the Caucus voted to censure Russell. Immediately thereafter, Hill made a motion to bar Ruaoell from any further acreening seseiona of which be was chair. ~,:~u~;di::.::ec1i~.::.H~~':e~~~; Ray made hia second motion, an agitated ff:u&1ell de!1ounced his membership, picked up h11 renewal check and walked ouL Some memben accused Hill of mak­ing a personal, vindictive motion. As debate continued, aeveral other people left. After several amendments, the Caucus voted to amend the acreening committee rules to allow the co-chaira to "temporar­ily" exclude a member from further acreen­inga until the full Screening Committee met, August 29th, after screening wa1 over. Claiming that the GPC was "making a mountain out of a molehill," member Neil ii bin made a motion to reacind rule 13. Hia motion waa 1oundly defeated. Claiming that the last city election endoraement meeting wao diarupted by aeveral drunk memben, loben made a motion to ban alcohol from the endorae­ment meeting. But, citing profits from the 1ale or alcohol, the Caucus voted an amended motion to serve soft drinkl and all alcohol except Coon Beer. In a third motion that was also heavily defeated, labin called for a two thirds plu­rality vote rule for the endorsement of a candidate. Claiming there could be a serious community division over the endorsement in position 4 for City Coun­cil, which feature• feminist Nikki Van Hightower and black activist, councilman Anthony Hall, !shin stated that if two thirds of the active gay political commun­ity could not agree, that division over on race 1hould not be allowed to destroy com­munity support for the GPC elate by forc­ing a narrow majority decision . Countering, Terry Harria said that dual endorsements was a ridiculous and asai­nine idea. labin then challenged Ray Hill and Terry Harrie to prove their public aaoer­tions that there existed an executive order, signed by the mayor,prohibitingdiocrimi­nation based on sexual orientation in hir­ing and promotion. labin said that his research (National Gay Task Force, City Secretary's office, Asel Personnel Direc­tor and Director of Affirmative Action) indicated no such executive order, and that he bad challenged Hill and Harris one week previously to prove their asser­tions. Hill admitted hie error, but aaid he had really thought such an executive order existed. Furthermore, Hill said that he had "invoked" that order at lea1t four times in ae many years in order to prevent the firing of a gay employee. On that note the meeting adjourned. Motorist Slain in Montrose Houston police were searching for two men who shot and killed another man early Aug. 20 after they pulled alongside the man's C8l' at a stop sign in Montrose, reported the Houston Post. The news report quoted police as saying that Emeraon Aahby, 27, of the 12ro0 block of Zavalla, waa ahot in the face and neck about 3:00 a.m. in the 1900 block of Dunlavy and that he died at the acene. Aahby wao aaid to be driving weat on Fairview taking a friend home when he atoped at an intersection and a vehicle with two men pulled alongaide. One of the men pointed a gun at Aahby and told him not to move, police aaid. When Aahby began to accelerate, he was shot and his car continued west on Fairview through aD intersection at Dun­lavy and then veered through a chain link fence, the report said. o Who is the Average Gay Texan? MONTROSE VOICE columniat Joe Baker would liks to know. la the average gay Texan a tran1planted Yankee from up North? la he or she a conaervative Dallaa businesa person or a Houston activist? Ia the average gay Texan a rancher, a farmer, a redneck, a cowboy or a preppie? Does the average gay Texan work, or care about hia or her future? Doea he or ahe spend all their time in hara? Was the average gay Texan born here? lo he or she young, old or in between? Doea the average gay Texan wish he or she was somewhere else? What does he or she like about living in Texas? If you think you are the average gay Texan, write and tell Joe about yourself. You don't have to include your name if you don'twantto. Commentswillbeprintedin one of Joe'e future columns. Write him in care of the MONTROSE VOICE, 3317 Montroae, Suite 306, HoUl­ton, TX 77006. AUG. 26, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 . · 'HousToNI · 13t1I \~~:ff4ll (713) 523-4084 ~J~~~]~- 2700 ALBANY oi_ffibu CWB FRIDAY 50¢ Happy Happy Hour All Well Drinks 50¢ 5pm-8pm Upper Deck Disco Open for Dancing 11pm till ... No Door Charge SATURDAY Continental Breakfast 10am to 2pm, served poolside Upper Deck Disco 11pm to4am After-Hours at Officer's Club SUNDAY All the Draft Beer you can drink, $1 Spm till midnight MONDAY 15¢ Beer Bust 9pm to 2am, No Door Charge WEDNESDAY 25¢Night All Well Drinks 25¢, 9pm to closing ($2 door charge) We squeeze our own fresh orange juice daily Open Daily 1 Oam, Sunday noon 2700 Albany, Houston, 523-4084 12 MONTROSE VOICE I AUG. 26, 1983 Thanks for the ~v':S:~!~:::.,t?.~~a0~~~~~i;;:~~e;,~:~~~: Kind Words se~i:~!:~:~:i;;~e~fsi;:,::.:,::~~·:ut Our endorsements aren't sold. They are not auctioned off to anyone for a pat on the head or a vague promise. They are based on a candidate's past record o.nd their solid commitment. The caucus, as a body votes for the endorsement. Not one, no' two, not a dozen people, decide who wt endorse. We certainly have individuals in the caucus who would love to be that pow­erful, but they are not the ones currently in office. From a community member of context. The Jetter leads people to To the Gay Switchboard believe that our endorsements are sold to I a~ writing this note to thank your organ­ization in general, and one unknown coun­selor in particular, for speaking with my mother when she called your group recently. I am 32 years old, and have been "out" to everyone (except my parents) since I was 22. I have been obsessed with coming out to my parents for years, but especially in the past two or three yeares, but for many reasons (cowardice being the biggest) was never able to do iL I finally decided it was time, and wrote a Jong and heartfelt Jetter about four weeks ago, not being able to do it m pereon, or even by telephone. Over the past few yeara, I have felt myself becoming much closed to my father. and far Iese so to my mother. My expectations were that my father would be u supportive as he could be and that my mother (a Catholic Fanatic) would freak out. A week after I mailed the Jetter, my mother called me, and cried for a fu11 two minutes before she could even say "hello." She attempted to be rea1ly supportive, but the closest she could 1iet was, "It could be worse-you could have been a murderer." At any rate, it was a devastating conver­sation. made especially so by the fact that my father absolutely refused to talk about it. neither to my mother nor me. I gave up, and decided to let my parents make the next move. whatever that might be. Last week, my mother wrote me a beau­tiful, lovely letter. After speaking with me, she talked to her prieot, who referred her to Parents of Gays and Houston Gay Switch­board. Whoever she spoke with in your groupa rea11y helped her out immensely. She mentioned in her letter that the man ohe spoke with ie 25, and hae been out to his parenta since he wae 18, and ehe said :::::e ~~~:i:~;.,=j~~i:: !'::i h~~'. est. I was a ~taffer at the Washington, D.C., Gay/Lesbian Switchboard for two years and I know how imports.nt and rewarding it is to be helping people learn to embrace their gaynese and/or gayness of their loved ones. To whomever it was that spoke to my mother. I thank you for your sensi­tivi_ ty and lovingness. To Houston Gay ~:.,':'.'11board, I thank you for your exist- I have been in Houston twice to visit my parents, but I have yet to see what I'd consider to be the "real" Houston. (All I've seen eo far has been Gilley'e, Ninfa's. Gal­veston and two malls.) Please accept my heartfelt thanks for making my mother feel good about who I really am! Problems with the 'One-Man Crusdade' From Leslie Larson Recently a close friend of mine brought me a letter he h~d. received from a member of th.• Gay Political Caucus asking him to JOm the caucus. He had several questions about the letter and the person sending it After reading the letter. I decided to seek ~ pubhc forum to air problems that I have wtth this one-man membership crusade. The letter in question appears to attack the leadership of the GPC, of which I am a member. The letter's writer accuses the "leadership," which I assume to mean the ~oard of directors and its officers, of being a small group (havingl gotten control of an extremely powerful political machine and (havin1il effectively driven off many good, dignified. and talented members of our community." He also writes that "those who have had control of the GPC for so long will continue to determine who will get the GPC endorsement and, conse­quently. the many thousands of votes that blindly follow that endorsemenL" He states this will happen unless people like the highest bidder, that our leaders move solely in their own selfish, personal inter­ests, and that the women and men of our community are stupid when following GPC's recommendation in electing candi­dates to public office. I have never worked with a group of more talented, dedicated and selfless peo­ple than the board and officers of the GPC. They spend unlilJlited time and energy to further only one goal and one cause: gay rights and acceptance of the gay commun­ity. They are elected by the caucus as a whole, not by some small group of elite political animals. By mandate, their inter­ests and those of the caucus are OQ.e. If you don't like the way they operate, vote them out. The letter's author also requests that the GPC membership application included in the letter, along with a check for the proper amount, be sent to him directly so he can "ensure that your memberships are regis­tered in time for the screening and endor­sementa." This comment directly attacks the honesty and personal integrity of both the GPC membership co-chair, who is also chair of the board, and the GPC treasurer. Never has there been a case where some­one had their membership application stolen, lost or "misplaced ... Comfort, Convenience, Absolute Elegance The St. Lauren is in the heart of City Post Oak, allowing easy access to the city's finest dining, corporate and fashion addresses. Located one minute fron the Gal­leria Mall. After the work day is done, sam­ple the cuisine al mtemationally-acclaimed res­taurants or shoN at such J:resti· ~:k:!~~e~aaks FihhaA~e:~~~~ Abercrombie & Fitch, . all located within a two-block radiw; of The St. Lauren. Relax in the lavishly landscaped courtyard under the shade of ::::~~~N; i~u,s:~v~1k:h~~ pool. SPECIAL AMENITIES c Swimming Pool c Walking Distance to Galleria Mall ~ 8~:!~!,fp~m:;ds cUtilitiea Paid o Microwave Oven ~ ~~:,t (;;~~~1osets c Real Marble Vanities f----------sp;~i-~f:F;;; off'~~ ----------: 1 Lease a St. Lauren apartment during the month of : : August and receive absoluetly free- : 1 • I Month Free Rent 1 : Including :,,1!:!~n~~~h~u?J:~t!'t!r~r 2 nigh ta l I Pretient this coupon when you visit the St. Lauren I l 2323 McCue-960-1103 l ·-------------------------------------· Letters These two people take theirresponsibili· ties very seriously, and if there is a ques­tion of a date on the membership received there is a process set up to take care of the problem. I do NOT appreciate this bitchy remark. Finally, as long as someone outside the designated membership routine receives communications meant for the caucus, there is absolutely no way that the "confi­dentiality" of our mailing list can be kept secret. If you send an application to this person instead of its proper place, the cau· cue cannot be responsible for your name showing up in a dozen other group lists. Many groups are not as_ discreet as the GPC in the newsletters they mail. Think about il Anybody who tries to recruit new members for the GPC has my support ifit is done through proper procedure. Change •.. · 2323 Mccue 960-1103 in the caucus is fine; but personal attacks, singly and collectively, on the leadership of the caucus will not serve anyone's best interest. These interests are beet served when the gay community operates in a harmonious, unified manner. Support for Russell From Neil Jabin With the recent censure of Gregg Russell, the GPC confirmed its childish propensity to wallow in the muck of personal petty politics. Although Greggdid violate "Rule 13" by bringing a short typed question into the screening session, it was a minor infrac· tion of the rules. The caucus ignored Gregg's statement that Ray (as chair of the session) gave his approval before Gregg asked the question. Furthermore, President Bagneris ruled Gregg out of order when he tried to read the question or explain why he brought the question that wasn't germane to the issue of whether he "violated Rule 13." From the debate, I thought that I was in a fundamentalist meeting where every word in the Bible is taken literally, rather than in a meeting of intelligent rational people. Intelligent people regard rules as guideposts, not barriers. That doesn't mean they encourage the violation of rules, but it does mean they take into con­sideration mitigating circumstances and revise rules as necessary. Since only core panel members are allowed to ask questions of the candidates, other members are asked to funnel ques­tions to core members. The question Gregg asked was given to him by another member, who because of illness, couldn't attend. Gregg wrote out the queotion to be concise, save time and make sure he got it right. For that he was censured. The action, I should say overreaction, taken by the caucus in censuring Gregg was a product of the same manipulative and secretive mentality that has been poi­soning the GPC leadership and causing them to be obseBSed with their desire to control the gay community. The motion to censure was such an over· reaction that I can only speculate that the real issue was not the minor rule violation, but that the minor violation provided an excuse for Ray Hill (and others who dislike Gregg) to try to intimidate and discredit Gregg. You would think the caucus would have learned from past mistakes, but they haven'l Last fall they tried to sidestep Gregg's critici1m of the Mark White endor­sement by attacking Gregg's character. Although the ACLU and CHE have endorsed Gregg's proposed city ordinance, to date the GPC has refused to act upon it. Was the censure an attempt to sidestep the ordinance . propoeal by attempting to embarrass and discredit its author? Gregg isn't the easiest person to get along with. Even though I regard myself aa an ally of Gregg, I don'talwaysagreeor approve of his actions or tactics. However, I do recognize that he is one of the more aggressive, intelligent, creative and tire· less hard workers that I have ever known. It is too bad that a complacent, elitistGPC leaderahip, obsessed with controlling the gay community, doesn't know how to respond to people like Gregg (or myselO who have been pushing for action. In conclusion, the overreaction by the GPC waa vindictive and petty. By engag­ing in such petty, personal politics, the GPC only 1ucceeda in making a martyr of Gregg while simultaneously discrediting themselves. 'It's Time for the Real Thing' From Greg Ru .. ell uMasturbation can be fun, but it cannot take the place of the real thing. It's ab?ut time the gay community stops playmg with itself and gets down to the real th mg. There are those who settle for crumbs because they feel that is all they can g~t, when in fact, if they seek for more they will find that they, indeed, can get it."­Harvey Milk It is appropriate that I quote Harvey Milk since his efforts to pursue a progres· sive agenda were also opposed by the established gay organization of San Fran­sisco during his life. I suppose I should not be surprised that the Houston GPC, an organizatin which claims to represent gay people, attempts to discredit my ~fforts to pursue a concrete proposal which they have been talking about, in general, for years; an ordinance endorsed by ACLU and CHE, two major progressive rights organizations of Houston. In an effort to move the gay agenda in a positive direction away from m~sturba· tion, if you will, I began drafting the DOMESTIC PRIVACY IN EMPLOYMENT ORDINANCE over nine months ago. Since !::~::n~/i~~~J:~n ~~:~:~~ GPC officials. When earlier attempts to intimidate me failed, I was "summoned" to appear before the board of the GPC, with very short notice, and without notice of the agenda to be discussed. Due to .a conflict in my schedule, I wrote the chair of the board to inform her that I would not be able to attend, but, that if notice would be given concerning the nature of the inqui1ition, I would be happy to attend at a future date. Apparently shocked that I would dare not conform to their whim&, at a poorly attended meeting on the eve of the hurri­cane, Ray Hill made a motion to censure me on trumped·up charges involving a minor infraction of a screening committee rule (! made the formidable error of writ­ing a question down for organizational purpooee before asking a candidate the queotion). I realize Hill is currently seek­ing the office of preaident of GPC, but I think he could find a more constructive platform to run on than his degenerate abilities in the field of character &88asma· tion. Once again we find mother wae right: masturbation i1, indeed, a difficult habit to break (especially for thoee who have been doing it for so long). Since GPC cannot take an open position againet the ordinance, a stand shared by politicians who depend on a placated gay community for funds and votes, they have instead attempted to discredit me, its author. Despite their attempt to "waffle­iron" this ordinance, I will continue to pursue my course, with or without their support. Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, ~ _ Happy to See Coverage From Sam Canzoneri I wu happy to see the recent coverage published by the MONTROSE VOICE con· =t!~!e~':i'l'!.!'n"!li~o:'J'1:~:h! very eoaence of what the gay political movement ia about. It should be oupported by every gay who has ever lo~t emp.loy­ment because of their sexual onentation. The ordinance is a positive agenda for the gay community to begin w~rking ~:C~~si.~m!~in~J:d h:::01::3t~~no:i~ Unlike previous efforts to establish our rights, the "Domestic Privacy in Employ­ment Ordinance" goes beyond efforts to eliminate laws which discriminate against us. The ordinance goes to the next step, that ie, to legally institute protec· tions for our community which are already extended to other groups. AUG. 26, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 To go one step further, the ordinance gives us an opportunity to reach out to other segments of our city, since in its coa­litional form, the ordinance also provides protection to single etraight adults who are discriminated against in employment and promotion because they choose not to be married, and also to married women, who are quite frequently paid less because they are viewed by employers as secon· dary income sources. I am disturbed by reports that some gay leaders are hesitant to pursue such an agenda. Their reasons range from concern that it might become an election issue, to an opinion that protection in employment can be instituted through more secretive and leas public political methods. To me, these objections demonstrate the fact that some of our leaderea need to stand apart from their friends at City Hall and become more assertive with the gay political agen­das of our community. NER~'POlJN GR~RGE GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 NOW THROUGH SEPTEMBER 11 "SCORES OF CHUCKLES AND A BUSHEL OF GUFFAWS.'' -After Dark Magazine "A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE IN THE THEATRE. HILARIOUS! SEE IT!" -Gay Scene ''THE AUDIENCE ALL BUT EXPLODED THE THEATRE WITH LAUGHTER!'' -New York Post .--------ORIGINAL CAST--------, DIRECT FROM 9 HIT MONTHS IN NEW YORK AND 6 SMASH WEEKS AT WASHINGTON'S KENNEDY CENTER. The comedy about Texas· third smallest town ... where the Lions Club is too liberal and Patsy Cline never dies. l>.AflLAWSON,a.tt_d8.fl' t'AJllllANTil:Y JOE SEARS JASTON WILLIAMS ~ Grffttr TUNA JASTON WILLIAMS JO"E SEARS ED HOWARD ED HOWARD CHARGE TICKETS BY PHONE: 526-1709 BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN Tues. Thurs 8 :00. Sun. 7:30: S16. 13. 10_ Fn 8 :00. Sat 1~00 & 10:00. Sun. 3 :00: S17. 14 11 Tickets avallabte at all T1cketmaster and T1cketron tocatoos Group Sales 529-2727 THE TOWER THEATRE 1201 Westheimer s.nu..IAvtangAvalla!U 14 MONTROSE VOICE I AUG. 26, 1983 Commentary A Few Words on Chemistry By Sharon McDonald Everyone'• always tallringaboutlove. We already know it's a rose, a many splen­dored thing, and better the second time around. What nobody talks about, and what is often much more to the point. is chemistry. A man I know once wistfully remarked that he'd give a lot for a lifetime with Mr. Right, but he'd give his right arm for just five minutes with Mr. Wrong. Now we're getting somewhere. For the benefit of anyone who's ever felt that inexplicable feeling that explains everything, I offer my attempt at defining that quicbilver angel, chemistry. What a oadly maligned thing ia chemis­try! More powerful than a 20 year mar­riage, for chemistry people have left families, jobs, religions and countries. Often referred to with the denigrating term "just sex," as in, "I don't know what ahe sees in her, it must be just sex," chem­istry is that blistering rush of 1()() proof happiness that defies such petty defini­tions. Chemistry is God's way of aaying, "Have a nice day." Chemiatry is everyone's reward for making it through puberty. And don't forget, chemistry ii the reason everyone of us came out. Chemistry ia what got you into the beotand the worstrelationshipo of your life, but that'• not chemistry's fault. Chemietry ia that whole volume of conver­• tion that goes on in a ailent instant, it's that decision made without a choice, it's 11c>metimea hard to find but it's even harder to hide. Chemistry ia being grown up and feel­ing two-and-a-half. Chemistry won't explain itulf, won't make sense, and won't listen to reason. Chemistry is not a mistake. Chemiotry will make the rught Oy, the day drag, and the air sing. Chemie-try will make your lover suspicious. Chem­istry is always faithful, it's your mind that betrays you. Chemistry is giggling in church, it's your soul on a rollercoaater, it's a surprise party for the peroonality. Chemiotry is what all those cells were made for. Chemistry is sunshine at mid­night, and you're the sun. Chemistry is feeling like you're hyperventilating when you've really stopped breathing. Chemis­try ia yes. Chemistry allows no substitu­tions. Chemistry doesn't think about security, plan for the future, or have a sav­ings account. Chemistry is involuntary, and it's every part of you volupteering. Chemistry is what you didn't know you wanted. Chemistry ia no questions asked. Chemistry is doing, not thinlring. Chemis­try is a volcano abruptly sprouting in a potato patch. Chemistry is against all odds. Chemistry is spontaneous combus· tion. Chemistry has no past. Chemistry is not a criteria to uee for deciding how to spend your lifetime. Chemistry is not something to write home about. McDonald, w/w live• in Loo AT111eks, ia co-winTll!r of IM 1983 Certificaw of Merit for Outatanding Work in FeatuTe WritinR from IM Gay Preu Aoaociation. Healthy as All Indoors A nationwide poll of outdoor enthusiasts has found that mixing with Mother Nature can be hazardous. 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Enclosed ts ___ . Make check payable to Andrewa and MCMeel, Inc. OChec:i. DMOMVOl'o.1 OvtSA D Mosl9t'ChofQelM<*et'COfd C~ -------- Stot•-ZIP--- Tuesday & Wednesday, Aug. 30 & 31 25' KEG BEER BUST on the patio EVERYDAY SPECIAL 1/2-price drinks to all arriving at Mary's on a Motorcycle ! LEATHER NIGHT Friday, Sept. 2, 8om-2am 75~ Can Beer to all in Leather ALL DAY WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY SPECIAL Happy Hour Prices to all In Mary's T-shirtz PARKING IN SIOE LOT SPM-llAM WEEKOAYS. ALL DAY WEEKENDS (TOW lllNAY ZONE OTHER TIMES) AFTER-HOURS NIGHTLY 1022 WESTHEIMER Home of Houston Motorcycle CJub & Texas Rtders 52&-a851 Music by Larry Fought We at TRAVEL CONSULTANTS are not new to the Montrose area-Only our name is. Collectively, our stall has over 50 years of travel consulting experience. This assures you that you will receive the experience and level of professionalism that you expect. 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Come by or call to register for a FREE TRIP TO MEXICO Call Bruce Woolley at (713) 529-8464 or Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 2029 Southwest Freeway, Houston 16 MONTROSE VOICE I AUG. 26, 1983 Our five exclusive townhomes are ideally nestled on the corner of Greenbriar and Harold. Greenbrlar Park Town homes provide three innovative floor plans available in two and three bedrooms. They contain approximately 2200 square feet per home, with exceptionally luxunous amenities priced from the low 160's. * Large Master Suites * Security System * Oversize Tubs * Self-Cleaning Oven * Atrlums * Microwave Oven * Cathedral Ceilings *.Jenn-Aire * Skylights * Intercom * VVoodbuming Fireplaces * Brick Exterior * Landscaped Backyard * Automatic Garage Door * Balconies * TWo-Car Attached Garages 'at 774-4226 Greenbriar Park/2101-2109 Greenbriar PROPERTIES If you want to swing in New Orleans' French Quartez; call Linda Light for our $79 Weekend Special: ~o days' stay in a luxury French Quar­ter Inn, Dinner for two at the Imperial Regency Restaurant, Cruise tickets on a Mississippi River­boat, a bottle of champagne, and round trip air fare from Houston to New Orleans and return. Frenchmen Orleans Travel Club For reservations, call Linda collect at (504) 943-3100 between lOam and 5pm Blackmail By Henry Walter Weiss "A much younger woman has been living with me for some time," explained Jose­phine, the frightened voice on the other end of the telephone. "Our relationehip has come to an end; I want her out, but she threatens to expose me as a lesbian if I don't give her $10,000. Whatehould I do?" The ehawdow of blackmail loome leee large than it once did in our community. Still, it remains a real threat to anyone with a valid or imagined fear of exposure. For Josephine the fear was based on her sense that a professional career where she had traded on good looke and the ability to be seductive with men in power would be undercut or lost. The fear was real and valid. The lawyer whose client reports a black­mail threat must deal with two issues. He must advise on a substantive reponse to the threat and he must consider and advise on the criminal elements of the transaction. The proper substantive response to blackmail is simple, as a matter of logic, though often painful to appreciate as a matter of fact. The potential blackmailer believes he or she has an asset of value (i.e., information). The motive is usually greed. The blackmailer ie unlikely to reveal the information without being paid for it, since then there would no longer be anything to eell. On the other hand, as soon as the victim has made any payment at all, the black­mailer is all the more assured of the value of the information and the leee likely to relent in demands for future payments. In shOrt, the victims's choice is difficult but clear: to call the blackmailer'• bluff. The Law This risks exposure; but the blackmailer gains nothing by exposing the informa­tion and loses what it perceieved as a valu­able aeeet. Thue, the likelihood of actual exposure is minimal. To agree to the blackmailer'• demande buye nothing since the blackmailer etill has the information and will either expose it or else demand more. Blackmail and extortion are crimes. The lawyer must also advise the client-victim on reporting the matter to the authorities and gathering evidence under the supervi­sion of the proper authorities. Obviously a client such as Josephine would not relish the idea of taking the matter to the police. Still, a citizen who is aware of criminal activity has a responsibility to report it. Each case must be judged on its own. What the lay person perceives as black· mail may not rise Co the level of the crimi­nal. Frequently threats are veiled, expressed in innuendo or ambiguity. The client-victim need not treat every veiled threat as a police matter. However, if threats are on-going or unabiguous, they may well form a basis for police action. Surprieingly, policd are frequently eympa­thetic to these cases and will vigorously follow them. It ie often the client who wants to forget the whole thing. Being threatened by blackmail is a frightening experience, one where the vic­tim must call on all of his or her emotional resources to meet the threat. He or she needs all the help there is: lawyere and friends must be part of the support system. ' 1983 Henry Walter Weiss, a New York City attorney. His column appears here periodically and in other gay publicatiana. Letters and QlU!Btiana from readers are welcome. Write 4519 Lincoln Bldg., 60 E. 42nd St., New York, NY 10165. AUG. 26, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 DO YOUR FRIEND, AND YOURSELF, A FAVOR. INTRODUCE HIM TO Crabs are not the end of the= is 100% effectM! 1n removing world, but they.can certainly deed lica and. nrts. So the make rt unpleasant. AID next time you or your 1s a liquid treatment that fnend discover crabs, 1s available without pre- do yoursetves a favor scriptlOll. It's sale and 11 and get AID. It'• Nie. kills crabs in ten minutes. It'• •v•H• ble without Each paci<age includes a • prncriptlon at your patented line-tooth comb that locoll ptwmmcy. And • - · 18 MONTROSE VOICE/ AUG. 26, 1983 We feature ... • All Brands of Ice Cold KEG BEER • Delivery Service • Everyday Specials: Newport Kentucky Jamie '08 Vodka Tavern Scotch 1. 7S liter Bourbon 1. 75 liter $7.69 l:JS liter $11. 79 su.79 BRING IN OR MENTION THIS AD and receive a Bag of Ice for only zse WAUGH DRIVE UQUORS l402 Welch at Waaah Drive ~ Houston, TX 77006 I• 111.•I 'fHANKSGMNG IN THE CARIBBEAN NOVEMBER 19-26, 1983 Sail the magnificent adventure of Princess Cruises and explore the famous ports of the Caribbean: • San Juan • Barbados • Martinique • St. Maarten • St. Thomas From $1139, which includes airfare, cruise, meals and transfers DALLAS INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL 8150 North Central Expressway, suite MlOOl Dallas,Texas75206 (214)'369-7653 AUG. 26, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Commentary Dear John, Wherever You Are, This Column Is For You By Joe Baker He said his name was John. We met a few Friday nights back. I don't mean to make this sound like a Harlequin Romance pocket novel, but our eyes instantly met. It was mutual attrac­tion from the start. We played the usual "stand-and-stare­and- eee-who-will-smile--first" game. Then, of course, we played the "who-will-walk­towards- who-firet" game and "who-will­talk- first" game. Once all that was out of the way, we got a good conversation going. I liked every­thing abouthim. Hewasahotman,intelli­gent, fun and a great personality. Physically, he was exactly my type. "Wow," I thought. "I'm not going to let this guy get away." To my delight, he was feeling the same way. We left the bar, and headed back to my apartment. What followed was probably the most terrific 14 hours in the past few years. Heck, no probably about it! We didn't sleep much. In between the superb love-making, we talked and talked and talked. John kept saying he felt like he had known me for years. He said he couldn't believe how comfortable he was with me. He said all the right things-all the things I wanted to hear. My head was spinning by the time Sat­urday afternoon rolled around. This was certainly no "trick" affair. I don't usually get swept off my feet so easily, so I couldn't help thinking-and hoping-that maybe this was it. This was my "Mr. Right" I was waitina for. I did::i't want to rush him, but I wanted him to know exactly how I felt. I definitely wanted to see a lot more of him, but I was willing to take things one step at a time. John said he felt the same way. He said we had lots of time to really get to know each other. He said he was looking for­ward toit. "God, your wonderful," John whispered into my ear. 14You wouldn't believe how I feel right now. I really want to be with you." Over the hours, we talked, shared and made more love. We exchanged dreams, life stories and histories. He told me about a now-ending relationship of four years which had run ita course. He was looking forward to beginning a new life, a new job, meeting new people and moving to a new apartment. "I hope you will be a special person in my new life," John said to me. "I've never felt so relaxed and at ease with somebody so quickly and easily before." Around 4:00 p.m., John said he had to get going. Hie father was waiting for him, as they had made plans to go car shop­ping. He suggested dinner later the next week, which I quickly accepted. "Maybe I'm rushing things a bit," I said gathering all the courage I could muster, "but I don't have any plans for tonight. If you don't either, I'd love to see you. How about dinner?" John also quickly accepted. "Sounds great/' he said. u1 really would enjoy that." He said he would return to my place about 7:30 p.m. I gave him my phone number, and directions in case he had for­gotten from the night before. "If I'm running late, I'll call," John told me. We sid our goodbyes. I was on top of the world. Well, I probably don'thavetofini.sh this "script." If you are a gay man m an_y American city and have ever worn a pair of Levi 5018, you know what happened. John-my "Mr.Ri11ht"-nevershowed up. Not only did he never show up, he never even bothered to call. Not that night. Not the next day. Not the next week. Not even this past week. tel:bon~~=~:.~~tk~;.~:'.d:: of his ex-lover's house yet (that should have been a clue for me), I had no way of getting in contact with him. And still don't. All I knew was that he lived just out of town. But I reallly didn't think I had to worry about anything-after all, I'm a good judge of character and John was "Mr. Right." I knew I was going to be see­ing him again-a lot of him. I judged and guessed wrong. I've been stood up before, as most gay men have, but this time it hurt really bad. This time it was different. I felt like I had the guts ripped out of my stomach. Oh, I'm feeling better about the situa­tion now. But I'll never understand how John could do that to me. I'll never under­stand how anybody-male or female, gay or straight-can do that and be so incon­siderate. There is no excuse for not calling to break a date. Even a poor explanation­even days afterwards-is better than no explanation at all. How can people be so thoughtless and uncaring? Unfortunately, those are traits of a lot of gay people in our society today. They treat each other like pieces of meat, and have little respect for anybody else as human beings. The bottom line in my situation with John, however, is more than him standing me up. He obviously didn't mean the things he said during our 14 hours together. Or, he men! them-but only atthat time. Maybe it was just a game he was playing. Maybe a fantasy. Maybe he was just hav­ing a night out on the town without his lover. I guess I'll never know. And that is what really hurts. Because when people act like John did, it makes us a lot harder and colder. It scares us to open ourselves to others again in fear of getting hurt again. Damn it-I don't mind being just a trick or a one-night stand when I know I'm just a trick or a one-night stand. But don't feed me a load of bull when you know damn well you don't mean it. A little honesty can go a long way, and save a lot of hurt. I guess that's the message I want to give to John. It's a meesage a lot of other gay people should get, too. IUJS-- 527• 9866 20 MONTROSE VOICE I AUG. 26, 1983 f!l• GENERAL REPAIR• AUTO m (") -I :D 0 z 0 -I c z z t Sum Specials Q ~• * 00 Oil Change & Lube ~ ; ~9~ ~ 8 * Tune Up from $3995 ~ ~ * Air Conditioning ~ ::! 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The Far Side Book MontroeeVoice cl o Andrew• a llcMeel Inc. «00 Johnoon Drive Fairway, KS 66205 Please send me _ coplca of The Far Side at 63.95 per copy postage paid. Enclosed Is ---· Make check payable to Andrew9 11114 llclleel, Inc. OCM<:t OMoNv~ CW... 0Moet•ChOf99/ MalletCord C11y~------- SIGM-----DJ--- AUG. 26, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 Films :::::couPoN::::- Rod Serling Fans Must See 'Twilight Zone' DesT;~er's By Jack Sturdy Can you think of a film more surrounded by controversy than Steven Spielberg's Twilight Zone? · TV's "Entertainment Tonight" seems to focus a few minutes each evening on John Landis, director of the ill-fated episode in which actor Vic Morrow and two children were killed. The coincidence of the opening of the film and Landis' court appearance is hot news and may well add to what looks to be a hot box office picture. No, Landis does not show Morrow's death scene in any manner or form. In fact, producer Spielberg rearranged the episodes so that the Landis segment is eeen lint, as oppoaed to it.e original fourth and final position. Out of sight, out of mind. That prevent ghoulish viewers from leaving the theater apecu]ating on the actor's death. 0 Twilight Zone' is fashioned from ita tel­evision progenitor. There is a prolog, four episodes, and a quasi-epilog. Each episode is separate from the others, with different •tare and a different director. The prolog, directed by Landia, is a dandy that set.e the tone for the film. Albert Brooks and Dan Aykroyd are driver and passenger travelling down a dark, deserted road. They are revelling in their good time, ainging along to the aong "Midnight Special." That develops into a game of 0 Name That Tune," using TV theme Bongs. The final song theme, doo· doo-doo-doo, doo-doo-doo-doo, ia the setup for an 0 . Henry plot twiat that get.e your adrenalin going. Episode one is the Landis segment that featuree Vic Morrow as a self-pitying man passed over for promotion because of hie flagrant bigotry. Commiserating with friend• in a email local bar, Bill's (Mor­row's) vocalized hatred manages to offend anyone in hearing. In a snit, he walks out to find himself in World War II Germany, marked as a Jew. Time warps move him conatanlly for­ward to be conetanlly victimized by the indignities of hia own bigotry. The senea­tional original ending had Morrow (hav­ing Hbeen in their ahoee") saving the livea of two Vietnamese children; and the com~ promised present version isn't nearly aa powerful. The second aegmentie baoed on the 1962 TV episode "Kick the Can." Producer Spielberg direct.e thi1 one with all the atyle and grace that have made him one of the world'• moet oouaht-aft.er talenta. Scat­man Crothen ia Mr. Bloom, the newest re1ident in a rest home inhabited by di• couraged and forgotten men and women. He encouragea them to think young, ena­bling them to rediscover happine11 through a child'• curioaity. Bloom'• advice, 0 The day we stop playing is the day we start getting old," seeme to be Spielberg'• own philosophy. Thie ie the BEN'S 808 Lovett 528-9211 Sunday Brunch! I ~1 ~=-zt r Cbic/tq3.# Mu.broom & Cb~ '25 Lunch Special Ba~r & Beu$2.50 Kbl;is s .. c1ay lhm-2•• Mom . .S.t. 11:3eam-lpm A i-9pm best episode of the four, perfectly recreat­ing the nostalgia 80 prevalent in Rod Serling's television series. Episode three ie directed by Joe Dante. Even as the weakeet of the four, it's still worthy of good chills and a few laughs. Kathellen Quinlan, Kevin McCarthy and Patricia Barry star in this story of a boy who can fulfill any wish he desire•. Yet what he desires most-happiness-he cannot grant. Pay close attention to the set design in this one: house, windows and accessories are all parts of a child's Hdream house," that exist in spite of their obvioua reality/ logietics problem•. The final segment is based on my favor· ite TV episode, "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet." The TV version starred Willaim Shatner (in hie pre-Trekkie& days) a• a recently-released mental patient who sees a gremlin tearing at the wing of a commer· ical jet on which he's traveling. For the update, Auatralian director George I.Mad Mox, Road Wa"ior) Miller choosea to show the main character, V alentine(John Lithgow). as a successful author with a claustrophobicfear of flying. The new ver­sion is every bit as good as the original, with a few new, excruciatingly wonderful twists. 0 Twilight Zone" ia a well-directed, com­petently acted, and true to the televiaion series. A muat see for all Serling fana. Sturdy ia the film reviewer for "The Weekly New•," Miami. CJ983 Stonewall F•aturea Syndicau. Room s"\1\1S 50¢ WITH DRY CLEANING 224 Westheimer 522-7106 Hours 10am to 6pm _::::couPoN:::::_ 22 MONTROSE VOICE/ AUG 26, 1983 'Greater Tuna,' 'Virginia Woolf o Greater Tuna Revisited By Joseph Lee The population of the town hasn't changed since I last visited (Alley Theat­er'• version last summer) but the produc­tion has aged well (there's a lot of beef and bull in this Tuna). Direct from nine hit months in New York and a six-week sold-out run at the Kennedy Center in Washington comes Greater Tuna-a wacky and wonderful comedy about Texas' fictitious third smal- 1"8t town where the Lions Club is too lib­eral and Patsy Cline never dies (and our funny bones are all the better for it). Greater Tuna is never canned laughter; indeed it'a fresh and real, because it comes from very real, well dtawn characters. A cast of thousands (actually 20) created by the talents of three. Co-authored by Ed Howard, Joe Sears and Jaston Williams, with direction by Howard and starring Sears and Williams as 20 mad-cap, some­times bigoted and bizarre, yet human and sometimes poignant citizens of Tuna, Texas Built around radio station OKKK (yes, your assumption is corr«t, it does stand for that) we jump around from the broad­cast room to the home of Bertha Bumiller and her crazy kids, to a visit with Aunt Pearl Burras (who gets her kicks poison­ing dogs with her Strychnine-laced bis­cuits) or perhaps a commercial from Didi Snavely, owner of Didi's Used Weapons (And as Didi says, "If what we sell you doesn't kill, bring it back and we'll give ya something that does.") I have to go with Sear'• Bertha Bumiller (you've never seen an Earth Mother like this one) and his Aunt Pearl (whose scene in the funeral home singing over a dead Judge that she had an affair with years earlier is to die for). Drag acting at its most hilarious. The man surpaBBes camp and it simply is an actor's dream Williams shines brightly in many roles: outstanding as Didi Snavely and Vera Carp (the most "Junior League" of all Tuna's women, who runs the meetings at the Coweta Baptist Church) and haunting as Stanley Bumiller, Bertha's teen-age delinquent weirdo. Special mention must go to the neat set, country perfect for the feel of Tuna, and Aunt Pearl'• award winning, country blue ribbon, chenille bath robe. It should be listed as the 21st character in this laugh a breath, sheer delight show Catch this hot Tuna at the Tower Theater thru Sept. 11 o Stages War Games a Smash By Joseph Lee Michael (from "Boys in the Band") has a line referring to his parents that goes, " Killer whales, killer whales is what they are." If George and Martha from Who 's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, currently war­nng on the stage of Stage•, 709 Franklin through Sept. 11, had •ired Michael, we could eaaily believe his statement. Woolf is Edward Albee's Tony-winning 1962 Broadway drama about the sear­ingly squabbling George and Martha, the young couple they invite over for drinks and the painful revelations thatoccurdur· ing a darkly drunken evening. George and Martha are killer whales I've always thought a good argument was good for the soul. but they bite and tear at each other like a cancer destroying it's vic­tim. Yet, oddly enough, there is a strange support system underlying this destruc­tion that holds them up and together. Director Cynthia Potter has pulled together (to tear apart) a strong cast of brayers. as in actors. Braying is the art of the evening, and Albee's clasaic wit and way with the English language deserves praise and recognition as do the quartet of actors. Ms. Potter was truly able to "get to the meat" of the play; it's hard to fault 11uch strong direction Martha tells George, "If you existed, I'd divorce you." But Jean Proctor as Martha makes us feel that her ever leaving would be difficult, perhaps impossible. Charlie Trotter, as George, tells Nick in Act I that "Martha and I are merely exercising." One wonders after 20-plus years how much more exercising can they handle, or can we for that matter. Richard Hammer as Nick was a little too loud in some of his delievery but had some special moments, especially with Mr. Trot­ter Donna Whitmore as Honey (a dizzy broad, at best) maintained a delivery that was on target, and she had good staying power in her character. Her following Nick around the room, like an appendage, was both funny and sad. There was more humor in this produc­tion than I remembered from others, which was good for "cutting the slack" on the heavy weight of it all. Martha says in the opening of Act Ill that she and George put their tears in the ice trays and the ice cubes in their drinks and then they drink them. The emotions that are tapped in this play are not as easy to swallow as ice cubes, but Stages produc­tions has enough talent and depth to fill a sea full of ice trays. o Suburbia Presents 'Meller Drammer' Theatre Suburbia will be presenting their ''summer melter drammer" thorough Aug. Tl at 1410 W. 43. Reservations by calling 682-3525. l Director Paul Hager is once again the director for this fun time show. He is a Montrose Live regular member of the Montrose Sym· phonic Band •nd is a familiar face on stage as well as off. He currently resides in Heights. Mary Lang who is featured is also a Montrose resident and currently doing two shows back to bAck, Comming Attrac· tions at Carllion Corner and her appear· ance in the "meller drammer." o Manhattan Trans{ er: A Harmony Happening By Joseph Lee Question of the week: what flew on stage at the Arena Theater Saturday night, August 20, dressed like white doves and sang like blue angels? Sheryl Bentyne, Tim Hauser, Alan Paul and Janice Siegel, say who?, say the Man· hattan Transfer. The smallish stage at the Arena was filled with musicians and musical equip­ment and left little room for the Transfer to work, but work they did, into a "Bird­land" tail spin, playing the theater and the audience for an we were worth. After top hit "Birdland" came "On the Boulevard," a shinning, wonderful number. After opening the show, Janice (the short brunette) said that performing on the revolving stage at the Arena felt like being on the top of a birthday cake. If so, the rest of the evening turned out to be a fun and wonderful birthday party for all. On to "Route 66" from Sharkey's Machine, then "Java," hot and flashy, with Tim Hauser doing a Louis Arm­strong impersonation that was super. Then a "high and special" moment of the evening. Sherly Bentyne sang "Goodbye Love," a poignant, sad love song. She has a beautiful voice and performed it with great feeling. Opening the second half with "Twilight Zone" proved to be one of the best numbers of all. Then the melodious quartet sang a fine and dandy full scale version of "How High the Moon," after performing a snippet version with Ella Fitzgerald on the Grammy Awards. Next came Janice's turn with a solo of "Guess Who I Saw Today." Excellent. Mr. Cool, "Eldorado Caddie" (Tim Hauser), did a great comedy routine. One of his real funnies was: "he was gonna put Vasoline on your gasoline and give you Power Glide." OK, fine. The "Boys in the Band" (musicians) were all top notch and played extremely well. At times, it was difficult to hear all the lyrics, which should always be impor­tant, but alas. Manhattan Transfer closed with 110perator" -which drove the house crazzzzzzzzy. A cozy, fine night of muaic. o Market Square Art Show Slated for Sept. 18 The 19th Annual Old Market Square Art Tommy's Barber Shop has a new DRESS Newly remodeled and decorated for your convenience 2154 Portsmouth (Greenbriar Shopping Center) 528-8216 Show and Folk Festival will be held on Sunday, Sept. 18, from noon to 6:00 p.m., around Old Market Square Park at Pres­ton and Travis in downtown Houston. Houston's first sidewalk arts and crafts show, the original Old Market Square event was a salute to the building of Jones Hall as a cultural center in Houston, later joined by the Alley Theater. This year, the show will ealute the groundbreaking of the Wortham Theater Center at Preston and Smith and the completion of the Lyric Center Building on Prairie, highlighting the re-birth of Houston's old town area. Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 AUG. 26, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 THE DRYDEN CLINIC INCORPORATED for VD Problems or AIDS Screening. Oiagnosl\ and Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Diseases AIDSScreenmg c.omplete Physical Examinauon Laboratory Testing Referral and Counseling EachpatientseenbyLlcensedand Experienced Physician. M06C services reimbursable by insurmce Pattents seen by Private and Conlidcntial appointment onl~ Hepal1Us 'B' testing and \'aceine a\'ailable Mastercard and Visa Acttplcd Appoinunents Monday-Fricby; 795-0385 9-00AM5-00PM nn;: I?~Y!>~. 9·!1'?~ F09 Dryden. Suot< 1002 Th<Med.al 1l>w<n HOUSlon, Texas 77030 ("TJ3)'.'95-0385 Take off with Eastern and land on Broadway. Introducing Eastem's lively New -York City for less than I Love New York you can imagine. at Night Show Tours. Call your Travel Agent, or (lncludesAdvanceTheatreTicketPurchase) Eastern Airlines at 738-8615 in From the cozy off-Broadway Houston for complete details. theaters to the shining lights on Then take off for Broadway. the Great White Way, the stars come out every night on stage in New York City. And now you can experience all the excitement oflive theater and e . EASTERN America's famrite way to fly 24 MONTROSE VOICE/ AUG. 26, 1983 Sports Sally's Heads To Chicago By Chuck Meredith This has been a week of hard work and anticipation for the 18 members of Dirty Sally's-the M.S.A. Softball League Champions-as they prepare for next week's Gay World Series in Chicago. The team has been put through extensive drills by manager Jerry DeSale as they hope to erase memories of last year's perfor­mance, when Sally's finished with a dis­appointing 1-2 record and a tie for seventh place. Since it's best not to dwell on the past, here is a position by position look at Hous­ton's representative to Gay World Series VJ. PITCHING: Not considered a strength area for Sally's, DeSale upgraded it con­siderably by adding all-star Danny Webber of the Galleon to the roster. Webber is considered the best pitcher in the league and, by no coincidence, is the only pitcher to have beaten Sally's this year. Mike Odensky and Bill Schmidt are the Sally's regulara, but if they should fal­ter, Webber will be there to bail them out. CATCHING: Herb Muenchow and Harry Goldberg have added a scoring punch for Sally's at this position (.516 and .450 respectively) plus both field ade­quately. Muenchow will also be called upon to pinch-run since he is one of Sally's fastest runners. FIRST BASE: Although many of Sally's players can play first, Ken Gray and the Galleon's Dannis Harmaker will see most of the action there. While both men are able defensively, it is their hitting that should be helpful. Gray hit .400 and Hat­maker led the league in walks while bat­ting .356. SECOND: The rest of Sally's infield is loaded with experience and talent. Second baseman Jesse Young exemplifies this. Young's sure hands and strong bat should be a real advantage for the team. SHORTSTOP: Last year's Most Valua­ble Player, Mike Morrison, mans this posi­tion as well as anyone. Although he is coming off an "average .. year {compared. with last year), he is still an important part of this team. Should either Young or Morrison stumble afield or hit poorly, the Briar Patch's Bill Sansom will be there to fill the void. TIJIRD: Ken Bailey'a nickname 'fPearl" ii no misnomer since this accuratelydes­cribes his playing ability. Both afield and at the plate, Pearl i.o a real gem and should help Sally's performance considerably. Mike Linder adds good batting support, if needed. OUTFIELD: Littered with flashy statis­tics, good gloves, and strong arms, Sally's outfield holds the key to their series perfor­mance. Regulars Richard Mendey, Mario Marchena, Jimmy Cates and Jerry DeSale are joined by Mike Harwell and the Galleon's Barry Pirkey. Since all games are played on unfenced fields, outfield play is of particular importance because if balle get past the fielders there is nothing to stop them or the base runners. Overall, this is a team with considerable power, speed and strong defense. This has been true on past teams also, so it is up to the team to go to Chicago and play hard to represent Houston and simply play to the best of their capabilities. WORLD SERIES OPENING PAIR-INGS: Houston vs. Seattle Chicago vs. Pittsburgh Boston vs. Milwaukee Twin Cities vs. Southern New Eng-land Toronto vs. New York Birmingham vs. San Francisco AUanta vs. Kansas City L.A. vs. Long Beach o Volleyball's Final Week The M.S.A. Volleyball League ends its oixth aeuon this Tueaday with a "Friend-ship Tourney." This year has been a learn­ing experience for the entire league as organized league play was instituted for the first time and many new players were added. Most of these new players had never played under U.S.V.B.A. rules, and they are encouraged to return next year to continue their learning experience. Many of the league players will be play­ing in "straight'' U.S.V.B.A. tournaments this fall and the VOICE will keep tabs on their performances. The league extends a special thanks to The Barn and Dirty Sally's for their help with their tournament, and Ruby Lyons and H.LS.D. for their cooperation with the gym on Tuesday evenings. ./. -'Interviewing this Friday & Saturday for' Sales Positions in the Houston Area. Call Everett Woldridge at the Four Seasons Hotel 650-1300, room 1112 or appear in person with your resume After Sunday, mail resume to: GAY AREAS TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 413118th Street San Francisco, CA 94114 (415) 861-3905 A division of Gay Internation.JI, Inc. Stanford Square TOWNHOMES The twenty-four townhomes at Stanford Square afford the convenience of a near town location coupled with the serenity of a carefully-planned, secure environment. These one and two-bedroom traditional brick studio homes are within minutes of the downtown business and cultural district, Greenway Plaza, the medical center and the speciality shops, galleries and fine restaurants of the Montrose, museum and River Oaks areas. Careful attention has been given to security requirments. An automatic entry gate permits controlled access to the townhome community, while automatic garage doors and well-lighted parking areas extend security within the perimeter of the property. As an additional feature, each home has been pre-wired for its own security system. Stanford Square Townhomes offer a variety of amenities, including: • Woodburning fireplaces, • Private patios, • Kitchen appliances (refrigerator & microwave oven), • Washers & dryers, • Smoke detectors, • Pre-wiring for cable TV & Security Systems. SPECIAL BUILDERS BONUS• for purchasers acting prior to Sept. 30, 1983 1) A weekend for 2 in either of the sunny Carribean islands of Jamaica or Aruba (only air fare & hotel accomodations included). -OR- 2) A year's full membership for two at the popular Downtown YMCA. -OR- 3) A $1500 gift certificate at the furniture store or your choice to help you outfit your new home. •Sale must be closed prior to the awarding of any builders bonus. •Builders bonuses may be changed or withdrawn by builder at any time. OFFERED EXCLUSIVELY BY KITIRELL REALTY 529-5981 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat AUG. AUG. 26 27 AUG. AUG. AUG. AUG. SEPT. 28 29 30 31 1 Selected Events through 7 Days -SUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays 9am-noon, MacGregor Park • SUNDAY: Lambda Bicycle Club meeta, then tours, from 12:30pm, unless raining, at 2212 Dunlavy, apt. 20 • IN 4 WEEKS: Houston Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers & Scientista meet 7pm Sept. 28 rutONDA Y: AIDS victim support group meeta 6:30pm, Montrose Counaeling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 llMONDA Y: MSA Summer Seaaon Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • TUESDAY: Gay World Series Softball Tournament opens in Chicago, laating to Sept. 2 • TUESDAY: Montroae Symphonic Band meeta at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm • WEDNESDAY: Montrose Chorale rehearsal at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30-!0pm • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPIT Radio, FM-90 • THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braeemain Selected Events in Future Weeks • IN 1 WEEK: Dallas Gay Alliance's Texas Freedom Festival Sept. 2-5, celebrating anniversary of repeal of section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code • IN 1 WEEK: Sixth Biennial International Convention of Dignity, Seattle, Sept. 2-5 • IN 1 WEEK: Tulsa gay aoftball league invitational tournament, Sept. 3-5 • IN 1 WEEK: Choice's Lesbian Mothers' Group meets 6:30pm, Sept. 3, 210 Fairview, apt. I • IN 1 WEEK: Lesbiana & Gay People in Medicine meet 7:30pm Sept. 3 U N 1 WEEK: Labor Day, Sept.5 • IN 1 WEEK: Greater Montrose Busine88 Guild meets 7:30pm, Sept. 6, Liberty Bank community room, 1001 Westheimer • IN 1 WEEK : Rosh ~~=Se~.' f-wiah New Year, UN 1 WEEK: Gay Political Caucus meeta 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm, Sept. 7 UN l WEEK: National Leabiana of Color conference opens Sept. 8, Loa Angelea, through Sept. 11 UN 1 WEEK: "Como Out and Sing Together," lat North American Gay Choral Featival, opena Sept. 8, lasting to Sept. 11, Lincoln Center, New York UN 2 WEEKS: Texas NOW Conference, ''We Can Do It NOW!," Corpua Chri1ti, Sept. 9-11, Emerald Beach Holiday Inn ·UN 2 WEEKS: Family & 'Friends of Gays garage & bake sale Sept. 10, l -6pm, Numbers, 300 Westheimer U N 2 WEEKS: Lutherans Concerned meets Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh, Sept. 13 IN 2 WEEK& Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) meeta Sept. 13 U N 2 WEEKS: Houston Data Profe88ionals meet 7:30pm Sept. 13, East Room, Holiday Inn Central, 4640 South Main U N 8 WEEKS: Yorn Kippur, Jewish day of Atonement, Sept. 16 3• IN 8 WEEKS: Montroae Tennis Club's 1983 Singles Championahips begin, MacGregor Park, 9am, Sept. 18 • IN 8 WEEKS: Choices meeta 12:30pm, Sept. 18, YWCA, 3615 Willia U N 8 WEEKS: Unitarian/ Universalist Gay Caucus meets Sept. 18, !st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin NOTICE BUSINESSOwNEAs r-h9 MOntroM ~111 lrM .. ch WMk in tr.. Montro.e Clau1f1ecl buai· neaa .. t•bUtt1mentaaeN1ngudiatnbuUon ~~~:~~.,~, lh• Vole• and community iindic.1 .. 1n1l1ts11n9 l••MontroHVok9 di.trt­butlonpolnt DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES MONTROSE APARTMENTS Efficiency $225. 1 bedroom $250- 375. 2 bedroom $400. 3 bedroom $550. All areas of Montrose. Adults only. 1 pet OK. 523-4403. DUPLEX FOR SALE Large 3-1 & 1-1, 4315 Roseland. Purser Realty, 526-9954, 434-2553. SUPER NICE BRICK In Eastwood. Large 2-1 -2 with big den & very nice garage apartment Mid 90s. Purser Realty, 526-9954, 434-2553. APARTMENT FOR RENT 3 large rooms, living room, bedroom & bath. Unfurnished (has stove & refng), air conditioned, water paid 1/2 block off Richmond (500 block) New paint, quiet and secure amid friendly neighbors. Call 524-9092. No kids please. UNIQUE DUPLEX-MONTROSE For lease. 2 bedroom, all appliances, central A/ C, heat, fireplace, enclosed deck. Nice place! $595 month. 529-5208. GRANO CENTRAL PIPELINE (A gay roommate service.) The best business deal you will make this year. 523-3223. SMALL QUIET COMPLEX One bedroom, pool, courtyard. No pets. All adults. $310 + electric. 521 · 0972 or 521-0212 MONTROSE/RICE/MEDICAL Near SW Fwy., 2-21h bath studio apartment, 1200 sq. feet, each bedroom- full bath, walk-in closets, picture windows, 16-tt. patio, ideal for roommates; quiet. beautlful com· plex. 523-5028, bills paid GESSNER AT BELLAIRE Beautiful 2-2 apt. , 20' ceilings, loft bedroom, fu ll baths, many walk·in closets, beautiful view, pool, quiet, excellent maintenance. Spacious 1 bedroom, 771-0249, bills paid. AUG. 26, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 25 Montrose Classified HOUSE FOR SALE Near SW Fwy. & St Thomas Univer­sity. 2 story. Mid 90s. Purser Realty, 526-9954, 434-2553. GOOD SURBURBAN LOCATION Willobend area. Convenient to Medi­cal Center & downtown. 3-2-2, den, has Mexican tile. Large updated kit­chen. CA/H WBFP. Purser Realty, 526-9954, 434-2553 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED PAINTERS A HELPERS Immediate openings Experience preferred. 529-9985. ACTORS/STUDENTS Alley Theatre seeks telephone per· sonal to promote '83-'64 season. Excellent pay. A great sense of humor a must! Call James Fowler, 228-9341 ext. 87, 10am-9pm. GAY BARS ::::=1 523LO¥ett 52)-339elrvee~ :e:f:'•-t02 Lovett 527-9888· dining. live e a.m-710 Pacilic-528-9427 country • Brazos R1....- Bottom-2-400 Bnu:a&-528- 9192· eovntry • Br..,. Pa1ch-22G4 w Holcombe--665-9871 :..~~1 OISC0--498.5 Mut1n Luther K!f19- e etuck9n Coop-535 W•"*"'*" 526-22.-0 ~-2$31 R9Chmond-52&-225lil ckaco wrth e O.rtyS.Uy'a 220 A~--5&7525 e Oouble RS.loon-5731 K•rby-521-14" • EIJ"a-1213 Richmond-527-9071 e Ex;1..,...1011 Betl-659-0ot53 country e G• lleon-2303AIChmond 522-7818 e Hole-109 Tu.m 528-9128 e Luy J-312 TU9m--528-113'3 e L01uo.pot-2327 Gl"•n1-521-8342 e Mary"a--1022 W•thetmer-528-851 :e~~ P9B: Mo .. 1 S.r-50 W•ugh Dr - • M•dnite Sun-53<4 Westheimer-526-7519 d•ICO,lhowl • M•u CNirlotte'a-911 W Orew-5~ ""''"' e Montroee Mining Co.-805 PKific 529-7488 •Numbers 2-300 W•IM!mer 526-e551 ""°" e Offie«a Club--2700 Att>,mny-523-4084 • On• on One-1016 w_ Gr•y-S28-a503 e Th• OuU•wa-1•19 Riehmond-528-8903 : :;:••-2702 Ktrby-52~2 d1n1ng. 1...,. e Ripc:ord-715 F..,.t9W-521-2792 e R1aky B 2700Albllny-52&-3&11 ~i~ ~-131 1 w.-.-.-521- • Tropte9"9 Swim C~21 1• P.cttwm e Twm-535 WMthetrMf-520-024<4 i.wn .._ e W..t ~nd-3012 Mi .. m--521-e911 e eiue Room 21• 23n:I 763-9031 • Fly 21 0 10~1&3-f!M2 e Roblrt'aLal1n ...... 213 Kernpner-765-6996 e Si......- P•I 22t•M«:hanie 7'53-9334 e TtMlll'IP9~ WW1ri19-76J..12•7 • P•ngM- 1501 Bra.d--(33-9389 ORGANIZATIONS Pi.cky?.1 Darling, he wouldn't go home with himself it he didn't have to. 26 MONTROSE VOICE / AUG. 26, 1983 The Far Side by Gary Larson " And you call yourself an Indian!" " Goad heavens, Charles! You're at it again! .. And with my fresh sponge cake, I see!" G~RoghtsNatJONllLobOy-PQBl892,Wathington DC20013-(202)546-1801 Human RighQ C~paign fund-POB 1398, W•h-lng'lon. OC 20013-(202) 5'&-2025 i..=~(r,~ o;:i:;132 W 43td. New Yo~. NY Med•• Fund !or Human Righi• (Gay Pr"• ~~Et-=~~33=:~·:::~: 151'5.SanFr..-.cllCO,CA.lMl15-{'15)1186-6383 NaltlonlllMlocllflOnofG1y&Le.b1anDemoc:rattc Cluti.-17<112 M- A.,,. SE. WHh1ngton. DC 20003-(202)5'7-310' NlllOIUll Gay Roght1 AdYoc.t•-540 Cutro, S.n N:i:::~Yr-aa1194F~~~~~t!.wvorti.NY 10011--(212)741-5800 NGTF't Ct•••l•M--1800) 221-7044 {outside New YOJkStlte) To• Gayl\.Hb .. n Tuk Force-PO& AK. Denton 7&201-f817)387-82HI ~~~;~~~~;;_ru•-(Mon:o~~c_::~-~ A Place In theSun--c/oGracllynn Books. 704 F11rview-522-7695 1ubgroup of /IH lnc concertl7pmTun ACLu-1236 w-or.v..:.52:.=s925-­AiDSH01-,-;- n;......·c10 Gay Sw•1choo.~1l Amer.uno.Y~1a-<t~ Atnenealil~t0c;8Jciubf-mee1s 11 D•f1et"ent Orum. 1732 W•UMtunM-528-8528 ~nightW_~ Aatro R••nbow Alhance-520-14~ 520-0552(TTYJ Bayou e·1U ... Montrose ChOl'"•le ~'lt::S~11i;d~~- ~!~~h&:.~~1_•5~;J~thet (BWMT)-c/oGay Choice..-:.clc>G8Y Switchboud or Carol at ~~~~!, ':'L=:;~·,::~;~1t1a, 12 30pm 3rd Chrlauanctlurch-Otlha GOOd Shepherd-1707 Montroaa aervlcea tpm Sun Bible sludy 730pmThurs t~:-~~~l~h,~~~h~~-::;-7~ Church 0t C~-17 F.:;"Niew- 529-8005aerv1cn1045limSun&115pmWe<1 ~:-:~':!Y~J:Tues &Sun ch01rprac11ce C""tWrch ol P;n1eco11al-llnoiY-850-728tl 520-5899 S.rvices730pmFn.11amSun C111zena 1orHUm.n eQu.1~1y( CHE)=aoi F.; •1301-236-86&6 botlrdmeet1ng2ndTueacMya ~~\~S-J,!~~S2~1t:iat Bruos RIWtr =;;ty-QO~ter=1foo Monlr0M­C0ri9 AYiz -c~.:m-.. 1. -;.·-ccF. m Fa11V1ew-fl8&.8997 aerv1ce&10C1•18pm2nct & 41hFnd•yt COnrot1ArML•mbd•Socl9tY-J•n•t7M-0354 OfRay•t75&-4097 Cri11aHothn;....:22&-1505 --­~~~- 1~ly-Ath.,.t-457~ -;;;;.,IClln ~ Oisn• FoUnd.:t:Oii'.:VOOMasOn-S24~ ~~~.7:-~:~~~'~fr~Y~~~,~~;· ~~~ S.turdayt Filn1hei &-Fri9nd10IG•y1-464-66&3 meets ~:~~:r:. ~~~~,.~,p~:::r.i,~~~ch~~~~~ ~:~~::-E:~2:21~ Fannin~526-1571 ~-z,:,,·~~~r;t.g -EXpefience (GASE>·.: ~&Lnbi4inA1ch1ve.ofTuas•llth•teofJ/H Gar A•1•n au-t>-:ze15 Weugn •12•nooe­Gay H;,p;n.cC.uCua-=21~i1•12- 521-0037 rMtta3'd Thurld•y• G9yltal1an Group~52&.M« - 08). Nlirws A-il1iince..=880-9'8~6 - ~:~2t;~&_l=if~~~lr;~~;= 1a1&3rdWednead•vs ____ _ ~~~~~:::ko;8JoJ'!';~~~~f.~:~ Gay Sw11chboud POB 3112c-52e-3211- ~l~:hon. counaellng,relerrals.TTY,AIDS GrHt•r Montrose Bualneu Gu1ld-contac1 ~=nfu:;°:r!,'!~n1~o;:mml~ ~~·,:~ ~~=mvFM19SO ArH f;,..A-;;y"Fiie""";;j;: ~le l:t:rfa1lh- A:1·-nCe--~ Manof--r ~!~~~.1~'~52~~~3~8Le~:~uE"¥~":"ct~ Wedneadaya HOUiton COmm-;,;;1yCi~~13,-,­HOu11on -ol18ProiM,;on.1.:m;;u-·1n-E.ii Room. Holld•y Inn Centr•l. 4640 S M••n- 523-1922. mMttng 730pm 2nd TUffd•ys ~Mo1orcvc..-CIUtifaoc----;elC1~ Mary·a. 1022 WM!heom.,-528-8851 ~~~~:n;1-~~~~~-,;2:~-r~~o-e 3840 ifHlilC-=POB 18041.- 11222....:.8ic--:tt32 ~~:~~~~n ~~/,i~e: i'0~,~~. a:: ::•'si~: Montrose Art Alllance. Gay & Lesbian Archrves ol THU, Gey Switchboard, Montrose Symphonic Bartd. MontrOM Cloggers. board meeting 7.30pm 111 Thursdays (vu!ed loc•Uona); educational lorum 7·30pm 3rd Thuradaya ~~nj£=~ ~1:?1..,;~~= =~=i:.=· 6265 M•Wl~lh Tue.deya •1 ~=~~.,a:n~~~J~~:,~~yH!nC -POB iKPff A~~FM=to=.419~LovetlBl...d - 52tr4000 ""'Wilde ·n Stein~ gay r•dlO lhoW Thurad•ys.73C>-900pm ~::~~~FO;;n~1001W~i3~: ~~~IC)'QleCtu.;:o--.,7~- Cal'QI fo~:~m~.~;~"~'"'·n0n.:.12, .. ~~So?aoo~.:u~~ve;;i~~ ~~:1~~~!'d=ic1~1488; l•bl•n Mothers; aubgroupol ChOic•; meets 11tand3f'd.S.t,&:30pm,210Feuview.•pt1 Luther•n• Concern•d-m•el1 et Gr1c1 luther•n Church, 2515 Weugh-521--08153 ~11'3tnMt1nt12nd&•thTue1 . ...-.ntngs eM1tropolll1n Community Church or ttl• Ruurrectlon (MCCR)-1911 D1c1tur- 861·i1'i pot.luck dinner 730pm 111 s.t ~y~~'.::£.~~~~:.Hr:,·~&:! MontrOH A,, Allience 521·24&1: 1NIU1te l/H lnc.;m"tt2ndThuradl.y1 Montroae ChOrai. and a.you B'lu-Robert Moon, dlr., 521-2006 rettearul 7.30-10pm Wtld atBel'lngCl'lurch,1440Harokl MonlroM CIY!c Club ... NNrtown Auociaflon • Montl'OM CUnlc t(M W•tMimet-528-5531 open WMkdays t0em-5pm (except Wtld.) and WMkday ...... e 30-1'30pm; women'• emphull PfDgram t·SpmSun MonlroH Countaling C.ntar-IOO Lovett t:zo:J-5~7 AIOS 'licllm suP90rt group meeta&30pmMondaya MonttOM Slngers-C.rl Lawrence n4-3591 ~:O~o~Monevea.BenngCl'lurcti. Montroee Tenn II C/u~Rlch at 524-2151 • playt Sunda)'I. lltom, MacGregorParti, 1913 Singles Champlonal'l1pebegln9am,Sepi.1& ~~1r=~~~:,~:~~=m a~:r":.:~~~,,,~:i~=u;~=~~r- MSA/Gruter Houston(~ 523-8802daya,S23-0413.,.. 'M'SAiWQNrl'1 Softball Lugue-72•9371 MSA/Volleyb1U-880-2930- gamH 730pm Tues,G,..gory-Llncolnacl'lool,1101Tatt ~:~ "¥1;o~~,~~21= ·~=1~~ 730pmTuet.;afhUatellH/nc MontrOM Watcl'I: ayt>group NMrtown Auoc Mu1tangafaoc1alcJub)-meetaa1theBam.7tO Pat11ic-52&-9427.clubnlgl'ltTl'lura NMiiOWn Auocla11on (Mofl!IOM CMc Club) mffll al Btr1ng Cl'lurch, 1440 Harokt- 522·1000 tnffMQ 7pm 411'1 TUMdays New Frffclom Cl'li11t;MchUrC:h-912 w 111h- 591·1342· HrVicM tOlm Sun. 7:30pm WtlCI fi~C:~i:;:-~4 Neartown Community ~1L1Mr•c•on-P08&00063. 77260 AecrN1~m;n;;:_Mu1t•fl9 Clubproj,::;Kl'-o----~-­~~ 7~~1" Gay/L .. blan Support Group ;=;u;-a•v ..,,.. Gaye-332-3737: l'l'lfftlng Thu!'lev.nlng T.iiHB•Y-.t.rUO.yYOiTt~332-3737': meetJt1;1 bt-'Qtkty ~?•YILHblanT11kForce-1&9-7231, ~n~~'!lrhn~~~4 Foundatlon-1915 ~~iderl+-c/O M•ry'I. 1022 W•lhcHmer 8~::~.~~uc~=.11152~0Y ,,[:~~~91~;~ S26-5M2tnMtmg3rdSun attemoons w;1;y.n Feli0wlh1p-MW999 ~ Colc>nY ... -rt.-.-.-.-,,. -.- ,00=1 W•tMimer '117 F•ll"lal. 100-1100 bk>cks W•lhelmet.Ocl 15-1& women:Sl0bt)y-Ai1ianc.-<1 ChellN-521-0439 ~~~ly~IR~~~;. 21ec. Longv1lla. LA-;;:;;; PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS OVER 30? GREAT! So am I. Professional GWM, 31, 5'11'', 175, bl/bl, seeks other discreet sincere men 35-SO's tor personal involvement & general good times. I'm serious about career, health & friendship. Hobbies include home improvement & writing. (I'm a pub­llshed author!) If you're brave enough to write, I promise to respond. Let's get together! Write T.J., Ad 148-A, c/o Montrose Voice. OPERA SEASON TICKET 11th row center. $250 or AX charge. Robert Gilbreath, daytime, 524- 7800. RELATIONSHIP WANTED GWM, 41, 135, 5'11", GR/FR/A/P, sincere, seeks GWM lover/compan­ion. Contact John Towle, 617 Harold, apt. 3, Houston. TX 77006. PROFESSIONAL MAN 56-yr. masc. straight-appearing, looking for right person. Must be straight-appearing 4().55. Write ad 148-8, c/o Montrose Voice. ARE YOU SPECIAL 1 GWM, 30. Warm, Intelligent, stable, tall, slender, attractive & masculine. Well-educated & a successful pro­fessional. Enjoy the outdoors, ten­nis, quiet evenings at home, good conversation & occasional weekend trips A healthy attitude about my sexuality but not Into casual encounters. Find bar scene shallow & boring. Having mixed feelings about placing ad, but believe there are many others out there with sim­ilar characteristics & interests. If you think you're a little bit special & are Interested In possible relationship or just making a new friend, I'd like to hear from you.. Ad 147-A, c/o Mont­rose Voice --:rEN5i0N EASING MASSAGE Relax tension & stress, relax & enjoy full body massage. Call for appoint­ment. In or out. Tom, 524-7163 RELATIONSHIP, FRIENDsHiP GWM, 51, 5'7", 1!>0, mescullne & straight appearing. Looking for last­ing relellonshlp. Write ad 146-A, c/o Montrose Voice. BODY MASSAGE In or out, Bruce, 521-2009 TRAVEL KEY WEST Free brochure and map included Accomodations, restaurants, shops, bars. Write Key West Business Guild, POB 1208-M, Key West, FL 33040. (305) 296-7535 MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED RATES Advertising rate: o $2 for up to three bold capital words and o 30¢ for each remaining regular type word. Total minimum charge per ad $3. There are no other rates._ Advertisers _who wish something different should consider running a display advertisement. a Deadline for all advertising is 5:30pm Tuesday for newspaper released mid-day Friday. o Blind box numbers can be assigned for $3 each week the ad is run and all responses will be forwarded to you by mall or picked up at our office. a Deduct 151Mt if you run the same ad 4 weeks or more and pay for the full run In advance. a Bring or mall your Montrose Voice Classified to 3317 Montrose #204, Houston, TX 77006 Use this form or blank sheet of paper Numberolwffk•MllllOrun ___ Amoun!Meloaed -- __ 0 Cn.tk 0 MOM; Ord« 0 Cuh (flOI by lflallJ 0 VISA charge 0 4'HtetCard cfltrpe cted1ICMd# GAY WOMEN Write/meet with dignity through "The Wishing Well" Magazine Pro­gram. Integrity since 1974. Confi­dential, supportive, prompt. Tender, loving, alternative. Introductory copy $5, postpaid (mailed discreetly 1st class). Information: Box 117, Navato, CA 94948. 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment CONTACT, FANTASY, FUN Wrestling & more. 500 members nationwide. lnfopek $3. NYWC, 59 w. 10th, New York, NY 10011 HAPPINESS IS ••. Being with a handsome, healthy, warm, fun-loving escort, model or masseur from TexEscort, noted for discretion & integrity. 524-9511 Major credit cards. AMWAY PROOUCTS MEAN quality & personal service. Try us & see. Kent Naasz 5~6541. Gene 859-0!18. Henk 529-7525 or 864- 7229. Trish & Phyllis 723-8368. PRIVATE GAY CLUBS • Club Houston B11t11 2205 Fannin-651-4998 :;;:ouari.rTheatw 3201 Lou111&na e MidlowneSpl-3100Fannin-522·2379 e 230e Dub-2308 G~521M235 RESTAURANTS e Ba)a'a-«12Lcwtt 527-1988 e ett~13Rlc:hmond-522-2385 ~:;,ankie'1 MonlrOff at We1thelmer s:.- :!~m!!!.'"~dwlcl'I Sl'lop 153& e HouN Of Pies-3112 Klrby-626-3818 :s~ .. of Sh•lh K•bob-2°'42 Mal'lhlln-521· e g.,-.1303 WeatM!mer-528-8823 ::i~~d Houalon Diner 914 W Alabama 524- e Pltrtty's Riel'lmondatKlrby-524-0075 e Racall-2702 KirtJy--S24-e272 e Spud-LH.111---"16W•!Mlmef 520-05S4 e StarPU:za 211tNorfc'k-Q3-0800 • Steak 'n' Egg-t231 Monltoae-52&-8135 ~i;:..m·a eon .. Shop-t525 WMtMimef-62t- • Tropieana Sw.m Club-2114 Peckham SERVICES, ETC. MALE MOOELS, ESCORTS Handsome. cordial & discreet. Call G.E.M.S., (713) 52G-6337 RUBOOWN, $20 In the privacy or your home. Van, 493-4850 evenings & weekends ---UCENSED MASSAGE THERAPIST Therapeutic/relaxation masssage Randolph Alan, 526-3147 VW REPAIRS At your home or office. Factory trained, good prices. Beetle through Sirocco. Call Ted Miller, 52G-5778 PIANO/ SINGING INSTRUCTION Private Instruction by professional teacher. 723-3254 CHEAP AIR FARES A free service for gay travelers. We guarantee to locate the cheapest fare between any 2 cities. Travel planned for holidays needs to_ be booked ASAP. Gay tours, cruises and hotel packages available. Grand Central Pipeline, 523-3223 MOVEMASTERS Hauling, packing, supplies, too 1925 Westheiner, 521-3155 PATRICIA ANNE O'KANE Attorney at law, 526-7911 TRAVEL CONSULTANTS complete travel arrangements All services are free. 2029 Southwest Fwy. 529-8464 ----s24-"9511-TEX-ESCORT New telephone number. Same great service\ Have fun with the right guy for you! Major credit ca_rds honored Monthly medical cert1f1cate AUG. 26, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 ~~~~~~~~ RELAX a ENJOY the Bodyworks massge. Evenings and weekends. Call Bill, 526-2470. Gift certificates available. HUSBAND FOR HIRE Plumbing, electrical, etc. I can do just about anything. 24-hr. service 27Hl403. LICENSEO MASTER MASSEUR Full body massage. In oroul Chase. 527--0876. =""' Excl'lange-3307 Ricl'lmond-524· ~crsco·a Hair O.lgn 901 Richmond ~~9~~1 Houae kKtg1ng 106 A'lon· :~9~ BeautySchool-327W•IMirMr- Want to talk? Call the Gay Switchboard, 52~3211 ~1'-?nds Hair Des.grt-906 WMtheimer~7- e UOMt Htur o.&lgn-3220 Yo.kum-526-4494 ~ontroM Ha.r O.!!iJn-tOCM C.Jifomia-622- ~;ce ~-3317 Montn:>M e NMnown Garag9-1901 Tatt-623-2794 ::'::n.';~~efN mail box•-1713 :2~"'7t' Bartlef $tiop-21St Ponlmouth­e Tr..,.el Consuttants-2029 SW Fwy-629-1'&4 eTnvel lnnoouona 1506 W Alabema :~::~Club 523-3051. commercial ByTycho SHOPS & STORES ~'-StarAdullNeWI 1407Riehmon6-S21- eAntiqueCo"'91' 111CZ1W•the•mer 522-8087 •As)'lumAdultBookstC11"9-1201 Rlci'ltnond ea.n P.t Adult Boobt 1830 w Alebanul ~bweb liquor9 2038 WestheorMr 52&- eCul Fiow.t's 5015 Mont ~'*'•·Mutt News 2AOWnthetmer 528- eOoubrllYa-Jonn. the Manhole clothing 1983 WGr11y-524HOll ~but Recorda 2117 Riel'lmond 523- eOrWT1ahka g1tt1-3224 Yo.kum 52&-5'57 eGoogies-1004 Cahlomia 524-5555 eGrllCietyMBooks-TIMFaiN..,. 522-7&95 eGrettinga Plus-1411 Westhelmer-830-0188 eKltby NewMand-3115 Kirtly-520-02-ie eOft BoY' LMther Goodll 912 W•lheirMr 524-7851 :t':t Eng!M Fumrt1.1rw-t138 W Gray-521· ==rdR«* -310ISSl'lepherd S24- e StudrAduttNew9 tt32W Alabama • TlC-e02 w Aiabama-524-seeCI e TsftAutornotrve-1'4tTaft 522-2190 e TileTlreP'tece-1307F*'M9W 53-1414 =lon.JKkdoChtn; 1212W91ttte+mer-S2&­e Up One WHttrn/Lulhu BAB, 2400 Brazoe~4-5737 • W•tl'letrMr flM Manuat 1733 Westheimer e WHll'le•mer lnlerlol'I 1727 W9lthe1mer 520-1357 e Wllde a. Stein book 1t~WestheirMr 529-7014 Fortunes For Frld•r evening. Auguat 26, 1883. through Frid•r .wning, S•ptMnber 2. 1983: ARIES-The Moon is in Aries as the weekend opens, will leave Sunday morning. Don't be greedy. Good things have been coming your way aplenty, but you've treated them like a snowball in August. They all melt away because you're too active to stop and see them. If you slow down, renewed recognition of your work may bring a different kind of reward. TAURUS-The Moon passes through Taurus from Sunday mornmg to Tuesday afternoon. Some good news and some not-so-good news: Relations with fathers and brothers will be strained and difficult, while relations with mothers and sisters will be better than ever.A reunion is in the picture; what you have inherited is a big concern. GEMINI- The Moon 1s in your sign neKt week, from Tuesday after­noon, the 30th, to Thursday morning, Sept. 1st. Your private self and your public self are a bit at odds with each other. This looks like a point of coming out of the closet that you thought you'd passed, or maybe one that you're not ready for. Don't take two steps back for every one forward; open that door! CANCER-The Moon enters Cancer next Thursday morning, Sept. 1 So you went and fell in love--as lovers do--w1thout thinking of the consequences. Now the responsibility that comes later has come sooner, and you're not at all sure how to handle it. How about "do unto others, .. and "honesty is its own reward?" LEO-In your sign this week: Mars (all week) and Venus (entering Saturday morning). A bit more lightness and frivolity before the summer ends; and wouldn't you have thought you'd be played out by now? There is that nagging sense of things that need to be done, but not until you've had all the fun you can find Ain't nobody gonna stop you! VIRGO-In your sign this week: Venus (until Saturday morning). Mercury (until Monday morning), and the Sun (111 week). You've taken last week's strange insight and realized that something has been miss­ing in your life. Probably it was romance. lfso, you won't lose much time In bringing it back. The surprise will be in Its object: not your usual "type." LIBRA-In your sign this week: Pluto (11/ week) and Mercury (enters Monday morning). The new position you're being offered demands more responsibility than you imagined. Rather than being bogged down by this, you find it extremel)'..Stimulatmg, and an impetus to do more. In helping others, you help yourself to a lrttle bit of what's around you SCORPIO-In your sign this week.· Saturn. Learning your limitations and working with them rather than ignoring them makes you both more sensible and more understanding of others You're doing this now, truly aware of the needs of your friends. You're growing up, no matter how old you are SAGITTARIUS-In your sign this week.· Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune Don't let work pressures get you down. They're real, and there's a lot to be done, so you're going to have to tap your reserve energy to do it. Be more thoughtful and methodical. In turn, during your off-hours. be slightly bizarre. CAPRICORN-The action you've been thriving on 1s allowing you to find a very creative part of yourself, This week that creativity should take a definite form. Whatever shape It assumes, go with it and results will be beautiful. AQUARIUS-Midweek will find you indulging in some fantasy time A Sagittarian or an Aries would be a perfect partner for your fun. You'H need to take the initiative on this one; be in charge and get a charge out of your make-believe PISCES-The picture clears, and you realize it's time for building and making preparations, rather than trying to achieve everything at once Diligence, deliberation, a kind of one-day-at-a-time approach makes more sense. Examine the child in the adult. •11113 STONEWALL FEATURES SYNDtCATE 28 MONTROSE VOICE / AUG. 26, 1983 A SPECIAL SERVICE FOR SPECIAL PEOPLE OPENING IN SEPTEMBER HOUSTON INFORMATION LINE (713) 952-0337
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