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Montrose Voice, No. 320-A, December 9, 1986
File 006
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Montrose Voice, No. 320-A, December 9, 1986 - File 006. 1986-12-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3993/show/3985.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-12-09). Montrose Voice, No. 320-A, December 9, 1986 - File 006. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3993/show/3985

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 320-A, December 9, 1986 - File 006, 1986-12-09, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3993/show/3985.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 320-A, December 9, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 9, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript Progress in Research is Coming AIDS, the Worldwide Threat By Jan Ziegler UPI Science Writer WASHINGTON—The AIDS virus could cause 500,000 to 3 million cases of the deadly disease worldwide over the next five year's, invading South America and Asia unless preventive measures are taken, a World Health Organization official said last Thursday, Dec. 4. AIDS has been detected in 78 countries, with cases concentrated in the United States and Africa, said Dr. Jonathan Mann, director of WHO's AIDS program. The disease is just beginning to take hold in Asia and South America. "Brazil has the potential to have an African-style epidemic of AIDS," Mann said at a news briefing. In a separate development, researchers at the National Cancer Institute and others reported for the first time they had demonstrated that only a fragment of a protein in the AIDS virus may be needed to produce an anti- A1DS vaccine. The researchers, reporting in the journal Science, said animals tested in the study produced antibodies that neutralized the AIDS virus in test tubes. The scientists, are beginning tests in chimpanzees. At least half a dozen other vaccine candidates are being investigated but these tend to rely on whole protein fragments. The new protein section can be cheaply mass-produced. It is uncertain which candidate will be effective in humans. However, Mann said that even if a vaccine is developed, AIDS will remain a problem because two generations- adults and some children—already have been infected with the virus. WHO is convening a meeting Dec. 1 5- 16 of four officials each from the United States, Africa and Europe to discuss how to set up human field trials of potential vaccines should any reach that stage, he said. Mann said the pattern of transmission in Brazil is the same as in the United States—that is, the disease is appearing mostly in homosexual and bisexual men and among drug abusers. However, in that country as in the rest of South America, the government still mistakenly believes "this is not a big problem," he said. In Asia and particularly Bangkok, Thailand, where AIDS virus is "knocking on the door," a major problem is patronage of prostitutes and sexual tourism—travelers visiting the country for a particular sexual experience, Mann said. Sexual tourism also is a problem in Australia, where AIDS is just beginning in the drug addict population, and New Zealand, Mann said. Those two countries have not yet begun to examine how much of a problem AIDS is and will be for them, Mann said. Mann said no country can consider itself immune to AIDS, even if it has reported no cases so far, and should have a national program or commission to deal with the disease. He said 5 million to 10 million people around the world are infected with the acquired immune deficiency virus. With a 10 percent to 30 percent case rate, 500,000 to 3 million of those infected wil 1 develop AIDS in the next five years. The figures do not include people who become infected with the virus in the future. In Africa, an estimated 2 million people have been infected. About 1,819 cases of AIDS have been reported, but the actual total is believed to be much higher. Worldwide, 36,210 cases have been reported to WHO. Of those, 28,246 have been U.S. cases, with 15,853resultingin death. The AIDS virus is spread through intimate sexual contact, contaminated blood products or needles and from mother to fetus or newborn. The disease is incurable at this time. Education, with emphasis on condom use and avoidance of needle sharing, is the only way to keep people from transmitting the virus. Mann made his remarks at a briefing sponsored by the Panos Institute, a policy study and information organization. Husband accuses nun of alienating affection BROWNSVILLE (UPI)-A South Texas man has filed a lawsuit charging that a Roman Catholic nun engaged in a sexual relationship with his wife. The nun, Sister Mary Kregar, denied all the allegations in an answer filed to the lawsuit. The $500,000 "alienation of affects" suit, filed without benefit of an attorney, names the Catholic Diocese of Brownsville, the Archdiocese of Texas and Kregar as defendants. Steve Woolverton, of nearby Port Isabel, contends in the suit filed in 197th District Court that the nun used her "position of trust" to seduce his wife. Mary Woolverton, when she sought consolation during a period of "emotional dependency" after the death of her father. DECEMBER 9, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 Mexican Officals Still Debating AIDS Issue By Glenn Whitney MEXICO CITY (UPI)-Health Ministry officials said last Thursday, Dec. 4, that the number of AIDS cases was doubling each year in Mexico but has not yet reached epidemic proportion. Health Minister Guillermo Soberon said in a news conference that 249 cases of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome cases have been officially reported in the country of 80 million people. He also agreed with an estimate ofthe Atlanta Center for Disease Control that for every confirmed AIDS case, there are another 50 to 100 people infected with the disease. "That is why we have begun to closely monitor the problem," he said. The ministry issued an order Dec. 3 requiring all doctors, for the first time, to report AIDS cases to the government. Jaime Sepulveda, national director of epidemiology, the branch ofthe Health Ministry in charge of monitoring the disease, told the same news conference that AIDS cases have been "doubling each year" for the past three years. Sepulveda said the first reported case of AIDS in Mexico was a Hatian immigrant in the first part of 1981. The first Mexican AIDS case was reported a year later, he said. Sepulveda said, similar to the situation in the United States, 90 percent of all AIDS cases in Mexico are gay men and bisexuals. The other 10 percent are made up of hemophiliacs, intravenous drug users and heterosexuals, he said. The director ofthe national system of Private Hospitals and Clinics charged two weeks ago that the country's blood banks are a dangerous source of the disease. Several newspapers reported that as much as six percent of the plasma in private hospital blood banks is contaminated with the AIDS virus. Sepulveda said this figure was probably incorrect. However, he said the government recently approved a 500 million peso ($575,000) program to revise the nation's blood banks and test would-be blood donors. Sepulveda admitted, if left unchecked, AIDS contaminated blood "could become a very serious problem in Mexico." According to Sepulveda, AIDS is now a nation-wide problem given that 85 percent of Mexican states have reported cases. The majority of cases, however, have been reported in Mexico City and Jalisco state, Sepulveda said. The epidemiology director said half of the reported AIDS patients in Mexico have died. Soberon said sensationalism could easily exaggerate the problem and called on the Mexican media to educate people rather than frighten them. "We're still far away from the situation in other countries," he said. WWAV.
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