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Montrose Voice, No. 323, December 30, 1986
File 008
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Montrose Voice, No. 323, December 30, 1986 - File 008. 1986-12-30. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3979/show/3965.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-12-30). Montrose Voice, No. 323, December 30, 1986 - File 008. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3979/show/3965

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 323, December 30, 1986 - File 008, 1986-12-30, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3979/show/3965.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 323, December 30, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 30, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript DECEMBER 30. 1986/MONTROSE VOICE 7 Actress Elsa Lanchester Defended Husband's Sexuality By Linda Rapatonni United Press International LOS ANGELES—Elsa Lanchester, the red-haired pixie who specialized in playing eccentric spinsters and witty dowagers during a 60-year career that included the film classic The Bride of Frankenstein, died this past week at 84. Lanchester, the widow of Academy Award-winning actor Charles Laughton, died of bronchopneumonia Friday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital, where she was admitted Dec. 17, spokeswoman Jean Ferris said. The London-born actress had been comatose for several years following several strokes. She left no family or relatives and requested that there be no memorial services. Lanchester twice was nominated for Oscars, for Come to the Stable in 1949 and Witness for the Prosecution in 1958. During her prolific career, the actress delighted audiences with bawdy cabaret songs and horrified moviegoers in the titleroleof the 1935 film The Bride of Frankenstein. Lanchester made her first Hollywood film appearance in David Copperfield earlier that year, and her co-starring role with Laughton in The Beachcomber in 1988 won her recognition as a major actress. Born Elizabeth Sullivan in Oct. 28, 1902, Lanchester hoped to become a dancer, but began playing music halls and small night clubs, and helped organize the Children's Theater in London at age 16. She belonged to a group called Cave of Harmony productions that staged, after midnight, one-act plays by Anton Chekhov, Luigi Pirandello and A.E. Houseman. Lanchester claimed that while at the cabaret she originated the costume of top hat, ballet tights and high heels, later used by Marlene Dietrich. She met Laughton in her first big London stage hit Riverside Nights. When the play closed, they were married. Friends said she had no idea her husband had homosexual predilections. I_ater, Lanchester was asked why she allowed author Charles Higham to write about her husband's homosexual life in Charles Laughton: An Intimate Biography. " "Because times have changed, and such things can be discussed more openly than they were before," she said. "And because it might help people who are faced with the same kind of problem and must deal with the terrible guilt that Charles felt most of his life." lanchester played her first screen role in the silent version of The Constant Nymph in 1927. The Laughtons came to the United States to perform Payment Deferred. one of their hit shows in London, on Broadway. I_anchester played Laugh- ton's daughter. The couple returned to Ixmdon in 1933 to make their first talking movie, Henry VIII, in which she played one of the monarch's wives, Ann of Cleves. The movie was a success and they repeated it as as stage show at the Old Vic. That performance led to several companion roles for the laughtons, including Ariel and Prospero in The 'Tempest by Shakespeare; and Peter Pan with she in the title role and he plaving Captain Hook. Laughton began building a reputation as an actor, and Hollywood lured him in 1934 for such films as Buggies of Red Gap, Mutiny on the Bounty and The Hunchback of Notre Dame. The Laughtons shuttled hack and forth from London to New York for a hit, then settled in Los Angeles. After the filming of The Bride of Frankenstein with Boris Karloff, Lanchester complained of the three hours it took to make up her face for the female monster. "My hair stiffened into a Topsy-like mop and was to stick out backward on a little cage," she wrote in her autobiography, Charles Laughton and /."I was then bound in yards and yards of bandage, all most carefully done by a nurse." Lanchester's more than 50 credits also included The Ghost Goes West, 1936; Rembrandt, 1937; The Spiral Staircase, 1935; The Inspector General. 1949; Androcles and the Lion, 1953; Bell. Book and Candle. 1958; Mary Pop- pins, 1964; Willard, 1971; Murder by Death. 1976. She also appeared on television in •Omnibus," 1953-57; "The John For- stytheShow," 1965-67; and "Nanny and the Professor," 1971. After I^aughton's death in 1962 in Los Angeles, Lanchester remained in Hollywood and performed for several years at the Turnabout Theater. She also sang in night clubs and many of her tunes were recorded in an album. Songs for a Smoke-Filled Room. One Entree' Free per Party w/Coupon at Cafe Edi Serving Italian omlettes, chicken dishes and | salad platters MONARCH CLEANERS 522-5101 Sign the Petition at Bookstop against "Colorization" ot black and white films! GENERAL REPAIRS AUTOMOTIVE Happy New Year from the ever-constant gang at Taft May old friends never be forgotten 1411 Tafl fc? 2?) 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS BETTER LAUmS & QARDERS Total laum maintenance Commercial—Residential • Landscape • Trash Remoual • Chimney Su?eep • Tree Seruice • Stumps Remoued • Complete Sprinkler Systems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN CHUTES 1732 Westheimer 523-2213 HAPPV NEW VEAR" FREE CHAMPAGNE FREE PARTY FAVORS FREE BLACKEYED PEAS F«EE CORN BREAD
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