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Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986
File 013
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Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986 - File 013. 1986-01-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3957/show/3948.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-01-10). Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986 - File 013. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3957/show/3948

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986 - File 013, 1986-01-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3957/show/3948.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 10, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript 12 MONTROSE VOICE/JANUARY 10, 1986 Wrapping Up Some '85 Films Films Robert Redford and Meryl Streep star in "Out in Africa" By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic In one amazing sweep, I'm going to try and wrap up the few remaining 1985 releases showing in this area. While there are still a few releases like Ron and Twice in a Lifetime that have only played in big cities, we'll count those for '86 and close out *85 with these. Out in Africa is the first offering. A beautifully photographed and gracefully executed film staring Meryl Streep and Robert Redford. The true story of Karen Blixen's attempt to build a coffee farm in Kenya should truly have some spot on the Best of the Year. Sci-fi fans will either be delighted or baffled by the bizzare Enemy Mine. Louis Gossett Jr. is quite an oddball as the reptile-like Droc who is disgusted to find himself on a deserted planet with an enemy fighter pilot (Dennis Quaid). Das Boat director Wolfgang Peterson creates a strong world where anything can happen. The remaining two films fall into the foreign or "art" category. Dim Sum is a touching look at a Chinese-American family. Dangerous Moves is a more complicated film about two men in a battle of wits during an international chess game. The later was named "Best Foreign Film" last year at the Academy Awards, but we're just seeing it. Better late than never, I guess. □ Out of Africa On the surface, it's easy to compare Out of Africa with similar grand productions like Ghandi or Passage to India. Lush scenery, powerful acting, and a long running time seem to be standard for this type of epic grandeur. Africa differs from both of those other films mainly because it has two superstars, namely Robert Redford and Meryl Streep. They happily hold ourattention as we plow through Karen Blixen's "Not always so exciting" life on an African coffee plantation. Blixen (who later wrote under the name Isak Dinesen) unfortunately did not live a life like Ghandi or I_awrence of Arabia, which is the stuff spectacles are made of. The makers of this film had a break when researchers discovered recently that Blixen had a secretive, intimate affair with a dashing British adventurer named Denys Fench Hatten. Their friendship/ romance has been hyped up into the centerpiece of the film, letting the rest of the "true" story serve as surrounding place settings. This gives the audience a sort of "love story" to spice up the long African stretcher. Actually Blixen is first married to a Baron Bror Blixen. a brother to her former lover that she married for conveniens. The Baron (superbly acted by Klaus Maria Brandauer) loves his wife, but also loves the ladies. He leaves her alone on the plantation for weeks, romps around the country on safaris, and is constantly promiscuous. When Blixen contracts syphillis from her husband, a chain of personal tragedies begin that brings her sorrow and finally bankruptcy. The main thing that keeps her sane during this period is her odd affair with Dennys Fench Hatten. Dennys pops up sparsely through the first half of the film, but becomes important as the romance blossums. Oddly enough, the love between these two never really blooms because they can't seem to understand what the other needs. Denys wants her to be there waiting when he returns from frequent safaris. Blixen wants a man who will be there when she needs him. But still give her room to grow. It's a typical problem that they never solve. Meryl Streep is more than stunning as Blixen, and could nab another Oscar. Her voice-over narration is soothingly perfect, and her accent (Danish) is marvelous. Streep does a lot less "modeling" and posing here than she did in films like Plenty and French Lieutenant's Woman, and it's very welcome. Robert Redford has the right weather- beaten look for Deny's part, but British he is not. I guess no attempt at an accent is better than a bad attempt. Still, he looks good with Meryl, and the two make a nice pair. Out of Africa is well worth seeing, but be ready for two hours and 40 minutes of solid film. There are some lax points, but Meryl manages to hold it together and keep us entranced. For Hollywood entertainment,, you can't really afford to miss "Meryl in Africa." d Enemy Mine This mega-buck epic from the director of The Never Ending Story and Das Boat is too weird to be a big box office draw, and it is probably the biggest holiday bomb. However, the movie shouldn't really be ignored, because it really has a lot of neat things to offer to the right filmgoer. First off, you have to accept Louis Gossett Jr. in this far out reptilion attire. Once you get over that and the strange sounds that he makes, you can settle back and enjoy the plot. At least the first half of it. Ol* lizard face (actually a Droc from the planet Drocon) crashes on a deserted planet and finds that the only other person there is an enemy space pilot. Dennis Quaid is the bearded Davidge, a stubborn but resourceful man who attempts and succeeds in becoming friends with his enemy. The two are fascinating to watch as they exchange languages, ruHun ideas and become like brothers. Then something really strange happens. Well, Droc sort of gets pregnant and has a baby boy. Evidently, these guys have a body that's half man/ half woman and they just "have" children when it just happens to occur. The new little Droc looks just like Daddy (Mom?) and grows a lot faster than normal children. Unfortunately, at this point the film shifts into high adventure gear, totally abandoning the delicate bonding relationship built so carefully in the first half. Little Droc gets kidnapped by some renegade slave drivers, and Davidge spends the rest of the film doing Indiana Jones escapades to rescue him. Obviously, someone thought that the film couldn't stand on its own as a story of two enemies working together towards a goal. Gotta give the kids a little action or they'll get bored. That's why they stayed away from Iceman a few years back (the two films often complement each other). Personal drama is just not interesting anymore, because TV movies have covered all the angles. Still, it's difficult to recommend Enemy Mine because it's such an erratic film. Sometimes the special effects by the Industrial Light and Magic Company (George Lucas) are mystifying, and other times they are downright embarrassing. The screenplay by Edward Khmara is excellent the first half and very poor the second. The saving grace is Gossett, who gives the oddest performance of his career. I would recommend this movie to lovers of oddities like Silent Running or maybe Dune. It's too bad they spent so much money on a film that could have been a neat "little" film about two people coming to terms. □ Dim Sum—A Little Bit of Heart Last year, Chinese-American filmmaker Wayne Wong attracted attention with his hit Chan is Missing. Wong returns with an even better, more personal effort that concentrates on a girl and her aging mother. The Tom family consists of 62-year-old Mrs. Tom (Kim Chew), her daughter Ger- aldine (Laureen Chew), and Uncle Tom (Victor Wong) who supports the family with a bar. Conflicts occur because the mother wants Geraldine to marry because she thinks she's going to die. The daughter loves her mother and is afraid to leave her, but also must contemplate living her own life. The culture clash between old Chinese customs and the American way provides conflicts, anger, and even laughter. Mother's reaction to her daughter sleeping with her boyfriend, and the various American ized attitudes of many Chinese seem to show how tradition can mix with modernization. The push for young ladies to get married is still there, but now they have a little more choice in the matter. Like many Chinese films, Dim Sum is paced very slowly, with many quiet and personal moments. Sometimes Wong gets a little too arty and symbolic by lingering his camera much too long on a curtain blowing or some rippling water. It's not really necessary, because the actors do a fine job of being almost pure art themselves. Laureen Chew and Kim Chew are real- life mother and daughter, and their roles here are full-bodied and beautiful. Their conflicts are simple, but they have little affect on the love they have for each other. The mother really misses her daughter when she does leave, because she's happy for her but lonely herself. "Dim Sum is a good independent film that should be appreciated for its close examination of family cultures and their role in the eighties. Many will find it slow and distracting, but those who know cinema will see that this film has "a lot of heart." d Dangerous Moves This film won the Oscar for Best Foreign Film last year, and will be playing tonight and Saturday only at the River Oaks. All chess fans are alerted—all others can best spend time elsewhere. Dangerous Moves was a bit of a disappointment because I expected a much better film. »The plot is very simplistic, and overall it appeals to a very small group of people. An international chess match between an aging Russian master and a rebellious Soviet dissident tries to beabat- tle of wit and power, but it never seems to grab our attention. Thankfully, the political aspect is kept to a minimum, although both sides resort to dirty tricks to help their man win. A guru and a psychotherapist both try to "psych-out" the players. Even the players try to annoy each other by showing up late or getting up and down out of their chairs. Michel Piccoli is good as the dying patriarchal champion, but Alexander Abbott is a bit high strung as the violent, young opponent. Leslie Caron (as Piccoli's wife) and Liv Ullman have small but affecting roles that could affect the outcome of the game. Dangerous Moves is too full of chess maneuvers to make it interesting to those who know little of the game. At times, the characters rise above the game and become interesting. But for the most part they just seem to be like pieces on the board. Ijnirs Qosmrttl -ir flcfti and Dennis Quaid star in "Enemy Mine
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