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Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986
File 011
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Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986 - File 011. 1986-01-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3957/show/3946.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-01-10). Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986 - File 011. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3957/show/3946

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986 - File 011, 1986-01-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3957/show/3946.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 10, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript 10 MONTROSE VOICE/JANUARY 10, 1986 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz Are You a Video Addict? By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. News America Syndicate Special to the Montrose Voice In their current annual television report, the A.C. Nielsen survey company reveals that an average household views TV for more than seven hours each day. This is the highest frequency ever reported. Other surveys show that most viewers believe that TV lacks quality. The pushbutton joy box brings opinion, entertainment and news as well as nonsense to millions who, although they complain about it, continue to wearily watch the tube's offerings with somnolent indifference. Do you get turned off when your set is turned on? If so, you could be a TV addict. The quiz ahead may tell. It is based on case histories of persons with a compulsion to watch TV. Answer each item using the following scale: 1—Hardly ever; 2—Occasionally; 3— Very often. 1. After my favorite program is over, I remain unselectively watching TV for an hour or more. 2. When friends visit, we spend part of the time watching TV. 3. I watch TV at definite times during the day or evening regardless of the program being offered. 4. I watch TV past my bedtime. 5. About 75% of the programs I view in any one month are fictional. 6. I watch TV for long periods (two or three hours) without a break. 7. When I have spare time, I look at TV. 8. My conversations with friends revolve around TV programs we have seen. a Explanation Viewing TV unselectively is like eating anything placed before you without judging how good it is for your health. The beneficial reasons for watching TV are numerous. As a learning medium, educators tell us it is a proven powerful tool. But But no matter what your reason for Watching TV. there is a limit. Being a prisoner of any medium may narrow your perspective and deprive you of experiences necessary to keep you healthy in mind and body. an unwarranted assumption is that if some is good, more is better. Being exposed to long stretches of inferior programming could prove psychologically and intellectually damaging. Consider these dangers: 1. Overdependency—Our desire to initiate our own unique plans for creative constructive pursuits could be dampened, as we yield to easily digested planned activity by TV characters. 2. Social Withdrawal—Someof us might derive excessive vicarious experiences through the actions and beliefs of others. This indirect participation in life stultifies social adaptability and could weaken our desire to deal with others. 3. Shrinks critical judgement— Constant exposure to the attitudes and opinions of others, neatly packaged and delivered to us, could create a kind of intellectual laziness to read, study and dig out answers for ourselves. 4. Short-run expertise—Some programs, but not all, often serve up to us brief, succinct summary statements, which condition us to a kind of dilettante learning of a vast number of subjects. We become experts of superficiality with no in-depth understanding of a topic. A TV addict views TV not as a medium for gaining useful information and a grasp of the world, but more in terms of passive entertainment. □ Score Total up your points and find your view rating below: 8-13 points—low dependency 14-19 points—moderate dependency 20-24 points—high dependency (addiction) Who watches TV? Apparently it has "different strokes for different folks." One study, which took four years to complete and was conducted by sociologists R. Frank at of the Wharton Business School. Philadelphia, and M. Greenburg, with the consulting firm of Booz, Allen and Hamilton, discovered some surprising facts, such as: —Male blue-collar workers watch TV sports events less than most groups of women viewers. —Watching pro-social programs tends to defuse aggression in viewers. —The biggest audience for soaps is largely teenage girls. —Adolescent boys tend to favor TV which pokes fun at male authority figures. —The group which watches TV the least consists of very religious males. But no matter what your reason for watching TV, there is a limit. Being a prisoner of any medium may narrow your perspective and deprive you of experiences necessary to keep you healthy in mind and body. Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily mmm* _£ii;jy£j!j "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS: Albert G. Nemer. John J. Adams and Gordon A. Thayer Texas State Optical Dr. E. 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