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Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986
File 005
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Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986 - File 005. 1986-01-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3957/show/3940.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-01-10). Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986 - File 005. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3957/show/3940

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986 - File 005, 1986-01-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3957/show/3940.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 10, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript 4 MONTROSE VOICE/JANUARY 10. 1986 GPC Presidential Candidates The City, the Challenge, Three candidates are currently entered in the race for the presidency of the Houston Gay Political Caucus. They are Ray Hill, Annise Parker and Sue Lovell. All three candidates responded to a MONTROSE VOICE questionnaire and expressed their reasons for seeking the top position in the Caucus. What is your experience with the GPC? Ray Hill, 45, trial assistant: One of seven co-founders of GPC; served seven years on the board, one as chair of the board; six years on Political Action Committee, three as chair; chaired committee to restructure screening process, and whatever odd jobs assigned by the previous or current presidents. Sue Lovell, 35: GPC board member; former GPC vice president, and current GPC president. Annise Parker, 29, oil company employee: member of GPC for five years; board member for three years; board chair for three years under three presidents; membership chair for one year, and interim treasurer for six months. Experienced in all areas of Caucus business: media spokesperson, speaker's bureau representative, political strategy, interacting with elected officials and gay leaders, chairing meetings, endorsements and screening, finances, mailouts, by-laws, voter registration. Specific Caucus activities include: GPC coordinator for the last "Night at the Alley Theater;" Ginny Apuzzo dinner committee; Re-established and served as assistant editor of the monthly newsletter; co-chair of the Speaker's Bureau; organizer of "An Evening for Women." What is your gay/ human rights activism experience (outside of the Caucus)? Hill: Active in civil rights struggles in the early 1960's; Texas director Student Mobilization Committee Against the War in Viet Nam; co-founder Pacifica Radio station KPFT (general manager 1980-81); creator/ host KPFT Prison Show; lobbyist for CURE (prison reform group) to restore voting rights to former inmates; challenged three city ordinances on constitutional grounds (won two, one pending); conceptualized, called and directed Houston Towne Meeting 1,1978; organized gay pride march downtown, 1976 and gay pride rally, 1977; joined Harvey Milk calling for a national march on Washington, 1978, and chaired executive and coordinating committees for National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, 1979. Lovell: KS/AIDS Foundation board member; board member a founder of Federation of AIDS Related Organizations—a lobbying organization to work for AIDS funding; committee member of Citizens for a United Houston; political campaigns for progressive candidates; member Mayor's Task Force on AIDS; working with THRF on the 21.06 case; assist Lesbian and Gay Rights Advocates in their effort to stop the state health board from adopting quarantine proposal; member National Organization for Women, Women's Lobby Alliance, and Women's Political Caucus, and spoken to a wide variety of groups in support of equal rights for gay men and lesbians. Parker: President (2 terms) Houston Women's Softball League (300 members); board member of Lesbian/ Gay Rights Advocates (the statewide lobby group); board member of Lesbian/ Gay Democrats of Texas; founding member of Rice Gay/ Lesbian Support Group; member of the National Gay Task Force; member of the National Organization for Women, member, of the Sierra Club. Ray Hill How do you view the current political atmosphere and outlook for gays in Houston? Hill: There is as much opportunity for us in the current political atmosphere as ever. Our enemies rallied around the referendum flag pole, but in November their lists proved less successful than they previously imagined. Only our own fears cloud the political atmosphere. With committment and hard work the outlook can be bright. Lovell: I think the political atmosphere is much better now than it was a year ago. This is due to the defeat of the Straight Slate in the past municipal election. However, we must face the reality that Houston is not as tolerant of diversity as we once thought it was. That many voters, religious leaders and business leders do not believe that gay men and lesbians deserve equal rights. I think our long range outlook is good if we as a caucus and a community are committed to continuing to work for equal rights. The short term outlook is optimistic. I think come endorsement time we will have candidates seeking our support. The past municipal elections showed that we are still effective at getting our votes to the polls. The most important thing that can happen to ensure a favorable atmosphere and outlook is to win the 21.06 case. Parker: The current political atmosphere is rather bleak, and there is still some sense of gays being political pariahs. The Straight Slate won't slither away— that hatred and paranoia will continue to seek a target. There are bright spots, however. All the Straight Slate candidates for city council were defeated, while our past supporters are back on the job. Gay men and lesbians will have to clean their own political house. We have to present a united front to fight increasing homophobia. We must overcome apathy, sexism, racism and ageism and other barriers that divide us. We must also continue to build on our much-improved relationship with the nongay media. Obviously there is a lot of work to do, but as Ginny Apuzzo says, "We have no choice; it's a war we must win." List what you feel are the major needs or problems facing Houston's gay community. Hill: Misinformation and resultant fears and depression about AIDS; closets; lack of confidence among ourselves and by politicians we have helped elect; job and housing discrimination; care of people with AIDS, and lack of courage and pride. Lovell: I think there are two major problems facing the gay community. One is the AIDS issue, which is very important and the second is to remember that there are other issues which are equally impor Sue Lovell tant and must not be forgotten. We need equality in employment, housing, the judicial syBtem, parenting and in health care to name a few. Parker: The major problem facing the gay community is AIDS. We must deal with funding, threats of quarantine, and all the forms of anti-gay discrimination that have been aggravated by this health crisis. The 21.06 case must be won. Its loss could produce a domino effect across the country. Of course, the money to deal with all of these issues must be raised. We must also restore pride and confidence in ourselves as a strong, vital community. List what you feel are the major needs or problems facing the GPC. Hill: Growth; the debt; new structure/ by-laws; involving more people; reform of the endorsement process; alliances with other minority groups, and better communication with elected officials. Lovell: (No response to this question) Parker: GPC is in a money crisis. We have a serious debt to pay off. We also need operating funds for the coming year. Without money, we can't do basic things like pay the rent and phone bill, much less accomplish goals. We are also faced with declining membership, participation and community respect. We must get people re-involved in the Caucus. Meeting the first two goals will lead into the final major problem—reclaiming our endorsements. We will have to prove ourselves again as a political force. How do you propose, as GPC president, addressing the needs of Houston's gay community (esp. 21.06, health crisis and accompanying homophobic hysteria, employment and housing bias)? Hill: More active participation with KS/AIDS Foundation and THRF in educating the community and the general public of our concerns in the areas where these organizations must reach the decisionmakers. GPC must go on the offensive to fight homophobia so it is generally perceived as just another form of bigotry. An aggressive campaign to inform the community of discriminators with whom they spend monev. Lovell: As GPC president, the most effective way to address the needs of the gay community is to continue and strengthen the Caucus' participation in electing progressive candidates to office, and to increase lobbying efforts of elected officials to be responsive to the needs of our community. The 21.06 case was reversed because of new appointments of judges by President Reagan. The ecunnmy may be better but Annise Parker we now face becoming criminals. Concerning the AIDS issue we have got to continue lobbying not only the city, but the county and the state that the need for education is crucial. That proposals such as health cards and quarantine are not viable solutions. We must convince government that their responsibility is to be resposive to the needs of all its citizens. Most importantly to educate our community that they must be vocal and insistent, as a community, that government respond. To gain equality in housing and employment we have to bo back to the first basic step and that is documentation. I helped initiate a documentation committee for that very reason. And we must continue to elect candidates to office that will vote in favor of equal employment and housing. Parker: The GPC president acts only at the direction of the Caucus, but I would certainly continue the Caucus' work with KS/AIDS, Lesbian / Gay Rights Advocates (the state lobby group) and the Texas Human Rights Foundation, which is leading the 21.06 fight. We are actively working with LGRA and AIDS organizations to increase funding for AIDS education and patient care and to preventdiscriminatory legislation in the next legislative session. Our city council should continue its rational approach to AIDS (i.e. the new council committee on health). But we are ready to work publicly, behind the scenes, with other groups—any way we can—if any petition drives or pressure campaigns are started. We are already in the process of documenting discrimination and responding to it, in part through our Economic Response Committee. In the coming year, we will devote more time to these vital projects. In general, our best weapon against discrimination and homophobia is a much stronger and broader-based Caucus that can solve problems and instill the kind of pride in being gay that we need. How do you propose addressing the needs of the Caucus (esp. membership, fundraising and debt retirement)? Hill: Expand the list by encouraging pride and self worth, and by inviting our non-gay supporters to join the list. Press the importance of membership in everything we do. Organize a fundraising committee of people not tied down with other Caucus responsibilities. Use the list for membership and fundraising. LovelLMembership. I want to increase membership through an effective public relations campaign of mailings and personal contact. We need to educate thecom- munity that there is a place for everyone in GPC, even non-political people. Fundraising and debt retirement. I would appoints fundraising chair in order for GPC to
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