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Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986
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Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986 - File 001. 1986-01-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3957/show/3936.

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(1986-01-10). Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3957/show/3936

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986 - File 001, 1986-01-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3957/show/3936.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 272, January 10, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 10, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ARE YOU A VIDEO ADDICT? TOO MUCH lV? Quiz, p. 10 - Wrapping Up Some '85 Films "The Newspaper of Montrose" Friday, Ja'.!uary 10. 1986 Issue 272 (713) 529-8490 Scott Cutsinger, p. I 2 Another Opening, Another Show: 1986's First 3 Months Bill O'Rourke, Montrose Live, inside Women's Center Plans Festival News, inside Gay Chorus Charges Choral Association Discrimi­nates News, inside New Shopping Centers Offer Unique Experience News, inside GPC Presidential Candidates The City, the Challenge, the Job Three candidates are currently entered in the race for the presidency of the Houston Gay Political Caucus. They are Ray Hill, Annise Parker and Sue Lovell. All three candidates responded to a MONTROSE VOICE questionnaire and expressed their reasons for seeking the top position in the Caucus. Feature, p.4 Braver New World of 1986 Biologists Have Re-Engineered Male and Female Roles By Walter Truett Anderson Biologists are emerging as the real revolution-makers of our time. They are changing the rules in many areas of human life, and the results are going to keep politicians and political activists busy for decades. Especially unsettling are the technologies of human productivity­artic1fial insemination, in vitro fertilization and embryo transplant. One hears a lot about the moral issues connected with these-like the question of when an embryo consisting of a few cells becomes a human being with civil rights. But there is something else going on that is even more politically explosive: These technologies are revising thE: social definitions of male and female roles. continued p.8 $900 Million in Montrose-Area Banks But Little Change Shown in Quarterly Report By Connie Woods The banking quarterly statements are out, and deposits in Montrose-area banks overall stayed about the same as they were one year ago. Texas Commerce-Chemical, River Oaks and Allied American gained slightly. South Main gained greatly. Liberty and BancTexas-Allen Parkway dropped. Story page 7 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 10. 1986 ~ EIGHT DAYS A WEEK Can Johnnie Ray Rousseau, a 22-year-old black gay aspiring nightclub singer, find happiness with Keith Keller, a six-foot-two blond bisexual football jock who works in a bank? Will Johnnie Ray's manager ever get him on the Merv Griffin show? Who was the lead singer of the Shangri-las? And what about Snookie? Somewhere among the answers to these and other silly ques­tions, Larry Duplechan has writ­ten the story of a couple as dif­ferent as - well, as black and white. And it's as funny, and sexy, and memorable, as any love story you'll ever read. + EIGBr DITS 1 WEEK EIGHT DAYS A WEEK by Larry Ouplechan $6.95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by rnail. Enclo~ed is $7 .SO (includes postage and handling) for one copy of Eight Days a Week, by Larry Duplechan. name _________ addre5s city---------state ____ zip ___ _ Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 The -..SPARTAN The Spartan A brisk·movmg novel of gay male love, valor, and Olympic hopes - set m dassical Greece, m an era when love between men was an accepted and valued part of life. Plense send me __ copies of The Spartan at $7.00 each postpaid. Endosed is $ _ _ name address ----- ___ _ Cit~·--------- state _zip ____ _ Don Harrism1 ALYSON Publications, Dept. p.5, ~----------'PO B< · ·s, &Non, ~1A 02208 WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAY NIGHT 50¢ Schnapps­All Day/ All Night 50¢ Miller Lite Longnecks 8pm-2am MALE STRIP NIGHT llpm, MC Victoria West $100 CASH PRIZE TUESDAY NIGHT Weekly Pool Tournament 8pm, $3 entry, WINNER TAKES ALL ' WEDNESDAY NIGHT DYNASTY NIGHT 8pm, No Cover THURSDAY NIGHT Dinner with the Colbys 8pm, followed by Brothers Never a cover charge FRIDAY NIGHT Houston's Longest Happy Hour till lOpm, with Hot Hors d'oeuvres V SATURDAY NIGHT 'I PARTY NIGHT Black Jack Tables Friday-Tuesday Never a cover at The Galleon SUNDAY ' '( $126 Frozen Margaritas All Day/ All Night Houston's Most Popular Steak Night, 7pm ~ 2303 Richmond 522-7616. JANUARY 10. 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 3 Gay Chorus Charges Choral Association Discriminates From a Press Release The Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles (GMCLAl has charged the American Choral Directors Association (ACDA) with discrimination because of ACDA's policies denying choruses with "gay" in their titles performance at ACDA conventions. In a blind audition, GMCLA was chosen out of 49 groups in the Western Division to be among 17 choruses to perform at the Western Division conference to be held in San Jose in Fehruary. Under guidelines re«t>ntly enactro by the ACDA's Board of Directors. groups with "controversial" titles are not allowed performance in ACDA conferences using names deemed "controversial" by ACDA. ACDA believes that the "controversial" nature of these titles (e.g., "gay") detractR from the mus1· cal pt•rformance. and that ACDA should not be a forum for political viewpoints. In its seven·year history, the GMCJ..A ha11 viewed itself as a musical organiza· ti on with "soft-sell" politics. "We are a pol­itical group on the basis of our name montrose VOICE MONTROSE. TEXAS Population 1es1 1985) 32.000 Cenaus trec;11 401 01. 401 02, 40201. 402 02 40S 02 "°3 and 404 01 Z.p eodn (roughly\ 77006. nout {porttoo). 77098 Bounded (roughJy) Shephet"d Or ,1wno. Allen P1rkway (north), Main St (east), US 59 (IOllth) ht1tude !Montrose 81vd at Wathe1mer Rd) 29•4'·13 N Longitude 95• 'l2'WW Altitude .CO' ELECTED OFFICIALS FOR MONTROSE Geor~ Grnn .. t , Houston C1ry Council (dist C> 901 Bagby f1'3J 22'2·~ El f ran<:o lM Haims CC>Ur'llV COl'T\tn&U10ner (fXI 1) 1001 Prtston 11un21-e111 WaHof Rankin. Constat>ie fpct 1) 301 Satt Jacinto, 111J) 221·6200 Debra Dtnburg, Tt••• HouM ol Rtp.-eMnt1t111n td1st 137) Hiii SW Fwy. 1113) '20-8068 Cr••Q Wuhington Tt•as Senate fd111 13) 2313 C•r011M. (713) B.%1-'343 M1c.:kfly Leland. US HouH of Repre&ente1t11• (dist 181 urn~ Smith •820. 1113) 139-7339 The Newspaper of Montrose Estabflshed 1980 OUR 272nd ISSUE, JAN 10. 1986 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston. TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 DISTRIBUTION 11.500 copies weekty in Houston ttirough 140 m•tor d1stnblihon pointa In the M.ontrou the Village the Hetghts estimated ~s.s-on rate l.ctor 2 B Nl•fMI«/ rHdflflhtp 32. 200 WHlfly 600 cop:ta wtell ly _.sewhere through 10 other d11tribuhon points ••t•m•t«I pu1-on r•I• factOI 2 5 Nt1m•ted rtacJ•rth1p r.200 wHlfly TOTAL OISTRIBUTION (GUARANTEED) 12,000 copies 1i1teeldy IOI•/ Hlim•l•d retd•rshtp 33.400 WHlfly Contents copyright 1986 Office hours. 10am-5:30pm Henry MCCiurg JUJbl1sh•r-«11tor Linda Wyche man~ing 11<Mo1 Connie Woods ''"°'"' Pete Diamond rePolf« Oa¥1d Roumfort proDrKtion d rect01 Scott Cutsinger, 8111 O'Rourke loc•I contflbuto,. Steve Werren n•t10n•I corr•spondent ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Houston (713) 529-8490 Elsewhere Texas (800) 222- 1537 ExT 995220 Elsewhere U S (800) 22!'>-0'227 EXT 995220 Jorry Mulholland «fvertiarng d1r«t0t Rick Hill account ••ecutiw• Founding Momb•rs Gruter MOflltose Busmen Guild. Gay and Lnb1an Pr*'s A.saociahon Nfiws S.1v1cH Ntwt-Ooe. Pac1l1C Ntw'S Service SyncJ1cattd Fe1ttu1• Serv1tH & Wr1ttrs Boan McNaughl. Uni· vernl Press Syndicate, N~w, America Syndicate POSTMASTER Se-no •ddreas correc1.an1 to 408 Avondale Houston T)( 77000.-3028 Su1Jacr1plt0n r1tt ,,, cJS m Haled env•lope $49 per year C52 tllUet} $29 per ah montht t26.sues). or $1 2~perwffk (Ian lhan 26 tllUH} Back tuun $2 00 NCh National MJ11.,1111ng represent1ttv• Joe 01$abato. R•venctell M.iirket1ng 600 8th Avenue Now York 10011 C212) 2•2-6863 Adv11r~1ng do•dl ne Wednesd•y S::Y>pm for -•ue refused Frid•y even1no Not1c• to Mh•lf urs local 1dvert1s ng rate schedule St'.Nen~A wmsetteet1v•Oct 12 1084 aod[ght Aw lbeeffectlv•Ja" 'l 1986 ~POns1bd1ty The Montrose Vote• does "°t u sume 1cspon· llbi ty tor •Overt 11ng aa ma RNdera ahould acNlse the newspaper 10 any dcctpt1vt ad...erttS no only," said Music Director Jerry Carlson. "We exist primarily as a musical group with purposes and goals aligned with those of ACDA. We see ourselves as a com­munity chorus with roots in the gay com­munity, just as the Mormon Tabernacle Choir is rooted in the Mormon commun­ity." After several attempts to negotiate and even compromise with ACDA, the GMCLA brought the issue to the American Civil Liberties Union in September. where they discussed the issue with Susan McGrievy McGriPvy thought there was sufficient legal i-rrounds to pursue ACLU"s involve­ment in the situation. The case haR been referred to the ACLU Northern California region, where it is currently being handled by Alan Schlosser in the San Francisco office. Kip Edwards, the cooperating attorney, was scheduled to file the complaint in Santa Clara County Superior Court on Dec. 31. Thr complaint is for preliminary and per­manent injunction based on the Unruh Civil Rights Act and violation of Common Law Right of Fair Procedure. The case has national ramifications and, in fact, a national history. In 1983, :;.;." \v· STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSM/7TED DISEASES ATDS!KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON FRI. 8.30AM·5 PM SAME DAY APPOINTMENT MON., WED , FRI. EVENINGS AND SATURDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY 2801 ELlA BLVD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX 77008 (713) 868--4535 IN T-iiE HEIGITTS --.,... the New York City Gay Men's Chorus (NYCGMC) was chosen by similar blind audition to perform at the 1984 ACDA Eastern Division conference in Baltimore. The national leadership of ACDA subse­quently took action (following a successful performance by NYCGMC) in the form of the current discriminatory guidelines Chicago's Windy City Gay Chorus has also been chosen to perform in the 1986 Central Division conference and is bear ing the pressure of ACDA to perform with­out "gay" in their name as well. The lawsuit is a crucial part of the stra­tegy being implemented in the issue with ACDA. Another integral part of this stra­tegy involve,; informing ACDA of the amount of support the Gay Men's Chorus has from gay and non-gay organizations, businesses, politicians, other choral groups and individuals. Anyone wishing to offer support to GMCLA in the form of a letter may address their correspondence to Hugh Sanders and the Executive Commit­tee, American Choral Directors Associa­tion, P.O. Box 5310, Lawton, Oklahoma 73504. The American Choral Directors Associ­ation is the professional organization in the United States which directors of cho­ruses belong. Most of its 12.000 members are directors of school and church choirs. Gay Health Advoca tes to Meet Sa turday The Houston Gay Health Advocates will hold their January meeting at the Mont­rose Couns .. ling Center, 900 Lovett, Suite 201, on Saturday, Jan. 11, at 7:30 p.m. The meeting will feature a panel presen­tation, followed by a discussion, of the problems (and possible solutions) arising from the pre..ent refuRal of nursing homes and extended care facilities to accept patients with AIDS. The panel, featuring representatives from the KS/ AIDS Foundation and the medical profession, will be presenting the facts at the meeting. Further information may be obtained by calling Steve Burton, HGHA president, at 790-9448. C>N I GU~ 10 )OJ?' 1 1"\~K~\QO.~ IS ~EFf.-· 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 10, 1986 GPC Presidential Candidates The City, the Challenge, Three candidate,; are currently entered in the race for the preaidency of the Houston Gay Political Caucus. They are Ray Hill, Annise Parker and Sue Lovell. All three candidates responded to a MONTROSE VOICE questionnaire and expressed their reasons for seeking the top position in the Caucus. What is your experience with the GPC? Ray Hill, 45, tnal assIStant: One of seven co-founders of GPC; served seven years on the board, one as chmr of the board; six years on Political Action Com· mittee, three as chair; chaired committee to restructure screening process, and wha· lever odd jobs as11igned by the previous or current presidents Sue Lovell, 35: GPC board member; former GPC vice president, and current GPC president. Annise Parker, 29, oil company employee: member of GPC for five years; board member for three years; board chair for three years under three presidents: membership chair for one year, and inte· rim treasurer for six months. Experienced in all areas of Caucus bu,;iness: media spo­kesperson, speaker's bureau repreRenta· tive, political strategy, interacting with elected officials and gay leaders, chairing meetings, endorsements and screening, finances, mailouts, by-laws, voter regis­tration. Specific Caucus activities include: GPC coordinator for the last "Night at the Alley Theater;" Ginny Apuzzo dinner committee; Re-established and served as assistant editor of the monthly newsletter; cc>ehair of the Speaker'R Bureau; organ· izer of "An Evening for Women." What i1 your gay/ human right1 acti­vi1m experience (out1ide of the Cau­cus)? Hill: Active in ciVJl rights struggles in the early 1960's; TexM director Student Mobilization Committee Against the War in Viet Nam; co-founder Pacifica Radio station KPPI' (general manager 1980-81); creator I host KPPr Prison Show; lobbyist for CURE (prison reform group) to restore voting nghts to former inmates; cha!· lenged three city ordinances on coni;titu· tional grounds (won two, one pendingl; conceptualized, called and directed HouR· ton Towne Meeting I, 1978; organized gay pride march downtown, 1976 and gay pride rally, 1977; joined Harvey Milk cal· ling for a national march on Washington, 1978, and chaired executive and coordi· nating committees for National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, 1979. Lovell: KS ' AIDS Foundation board member; board member a founder of Fed­eration of AIDS Related Organizations-a lobbying organiuition to work for AIDS funding; committee member of Citizens for a United Houston; political campaigns for progressive candidates; member May· or's Task Force on AIDS; working with THRF on the 21.06 case; as>1i11t Lesbian end Gey Rights Advocates in their effort to stop the state health board from adopt· ing quarantine proposal; member National Organization for Women, Women's Lobby Alliance, end Women's Political Caucus, end spoken to a wide variety of groups in support of equal rights for gay men end lesbians. Parker: President (:.! lt'rmsl Houston Women's Softball League (300 members); board member of Lesbian/ Gey Rights Advocates (the statewide lobby group)· board member of Lesbian/ Gey Demo'. crats of Texas; founding member of Rice Gay' Lesbian Support Group· member of the National Gey Task Force: member of the National Organization for Women incmbe.r. Q!1hc.S1l'l'l'aClub. ' Ray Hill How do you view the current politi­cal atmosphere and outlook for gays in Houston? Hill: There if' as much opportunity for us in the current political atmosphere as ever. Our enemies rallied around the refer· endum flag pole, but in November their lists proved less succei;sful than they pre­viously imagined. Only our own fears cloud the political atmoi>phere. With com­mittment end hard work the outlook can be bright. Lovell: I think the political atmosphere is much bettl'r now then it was a year ego. This is due to the defeat of the Streight Slate in the past municipal election. How· ever, we must face the reality that Hous· ton is not es tolerant of diversity es we once thought it was. That many voters, religious leaders and business leders do not believe that gay men and lesbians deserve equal rights. I think our Jong range outlook is good if we as a caucus and a community are com· mitted to continuing to work for equal nghts. The short term outlook is optimis· tic. I think come endorsement time we will have candidates seeking our support. The past municipal elections showed that we ere still effective et getting our votes to the polls. The most important thing that can happen to ensure a favorable atmo~phere end outlook is to win the 21.06 caRe. Parker: The current pohtical etmos· phere is rather bleak, end there is still some sense of gays being political pariahs. The Straight Slate won't slither away­that hatred and paranoia will continue to seek a target. There are bright spots, how· ever. All the Streight Slate candidates for city council were defeated, while our pest supporters ere back on the job. Gay men end lesbians will have to clean their own political house. We have to pres· ent a united front to fight increasing homophobia. We must overcome apathy, sexism, racism and ageism end other bar· riers that divide ui;. We must also continue to build on our much-improved relationship with the non gay media. Obviously there is a lot of work to do, but es Ginny Apuzzo says, "We have no choice; it's a war we must win." List what you feel are the major needs or problems facing Houston's gay community. Hill: Misinformation and resultant fears end depression about AIDS~ closets: leek of confidence among ourselves end by politicians we have helped elect; job end housing discrimination; care of peo· pie with AIDS, end leek of courage and pride. Lovell: J think there are two major problems facing the gay community One is the AIDS issue, which 1s very important and the second 1s to remember that there are other issues which are equally impor· Sue Lovell tant and must not be forgotten. We need equality in employment, housing, thejudi· cial system, parenting end in health care to name a few. Parker: The major problem facing the gay community is AIDS. We must deal with funding, threats of quarantine, and all the forms of anti-gay discrimination that have been aggravated by this health crisis. The 21.06 case must be won. Its loss could produce a domino effect ecro~s the country Of course, the money to deal with ell of these issues must be raised. We must also restore pride and confi· dence in ourMelves as a strong. vital com· munity. List what you feel are the major needs or problems facing the GPC. Hill: Growth; the debt; new structure/ by-laws; involving more people; reform of the endorsement process; alliancei; with other minority groups, and better com· munication with elected officiak Lovell: (No response to this question) Parker: GPC i~ in a money crisis. We have a serious debt to pay off. We also need operating funds for the coming year With· out money, we can't do basic things like pay the rent and phone bill, much less accomplish goals. We are also faced with declining mem· bership, participation and community respect. We must get people re-involved in the Caucus. Meeting the first two goals will lead into the final major problem-reclaiming our endorsements. We will have to prove our· selves again es a political force. How do you propose, as GPC presi­dent, addressing the needs of Hous­ton's gay community (esp. 21.06, health crisis and accompanying homophobic hysteria, employment and housing bias)? Hill: More active participation with KS rAIDS Foundation and THRF in edu· eating the community end the general public of our concerns in the areas where these organizations must reach the decisi· on makers. GPC must go on the offensive to fight homophobia so it is generally per· ceived as just another form of bigotry. An aggressive campaign to inform the com· munity of discriminators with whom they spend monev Lo~ell: As GPC president, the most t!ffechve way to address the needs of the gay community 1s to continue end streng· then the Ceut'us' participation in electing progressive candidates to office and to increase lobbying efforts of eledted offi· CJals to be responsive to the needs of our community. The 21.06 case was reversed because of new appointments of judges by Prnsidcnt Rl'al{en 1'!\e 'ifODSJI!l.l' ma · be ~tt~r b}!t Annise Parker we now face becoming criminals. Concerning the AIDS issue we have got to continue lobbying not only the city, but the county and the state that the need for education is crut'ial. That proposals such as health cards and quarantine are not viable solutions. We must convince government that their responsibility is to be resposive to the needs of all ito citizens. Most importantly to educate our commun· ity that they must be vocal and insistent, as a community, that government respond. To gain equality in housing and employ­ment we have to bo back to the first basic step and that is documentation. I helped initiate a documentation committee for that very reason . And we must continue to elect candidett-s to office that will vote in favor of equal employment and housing. Parker: The GPC president acts only at the direction of the Caucus, but I would certainly continue the Caucus' work with KS/ AIDS, Lesbian I Gay Rights Advo· cates (the state lobby group) and the Texas Human Rights Foundation, which is lead· ing the 21.06 fight. We are actively work ing with LGRA end AIDS organizations to increaHe funding for AIDS education and patient care end to prevent discriminatory legislation in the next legislative session. Our city council should continue its rational approach to AIDS (i.e. the new council committee on health). But we ere ready to work publicly, behind the scenes, with other groups-any way we can-if any petition drives or pressure campaigns are started. We are already in the process of docu· menting discrimination and responding to it, in part through our Economic Response Committee. In the coming year, we will devote more time to these vital projects. In general, our best weapon against dis­crimination and homophobia is a much stronger and broader-based Caucus that can solve problems end instill the kind of pride in being gay that we need. How do you propose addre1sing the needs of the Caucus (e1p. member­ship, fundraising and debt retire­ment)? Hill: Expand the list by encouraging pride and self worth, and by inviting our non-gay supporters to join the list. Press the importance of membership in every­thing we do. Organize a fundraising com· mittee of people not tied down with other Caucus responsibilities. Use the list for membership and fundreising. Lovell:Membership. I want to increase membership through an effective public relations campaign of mailings and per. sonal contact. We need to educate the com· munity that there is a place foreveryonein GPC, even non-political people. Fundrms. ing and debt retirement. I would appoint a fundreieing chair in order for Gl'C to the Job maintain and implement programs a nd retire the current debt we must become more effective at raising money. Parker : The Caucus' major problem is money. It is unconscionable that we are $12,000 in debt. I am part of a group that is working on a series of fundraisers, some of which can be annual events. The president and board members must begin speaking to as many gay organiza· tions and businei;ses as possible to deter· mine their needs and problems with GPC. This personal contact should be comple­mented by a written survey. In tum, we will explain GPC's goals and ask for their participation and financial support. This is the <>est way for GPC to become far more representative and responsive. Only then will GPC become the strong, undeniable voice of this diverse community and wield at large gay bloc vote. Then we can deal from strength with elected officials-and they will have to listen. Summarize by stating why y ou should be GPC preside n t. Hill: I feel the current lull is a product of our people and their supporters becoming depressed over the misinformation about AIDS and the inflated image of the Straight Slate Wizard of Oz. I'm not sure my opponents share this analysis. I've been in this movement since the national leadership could sit around one ta!!]<>. in 1966. Now everyone involved in lesbian / gay rights a nd community services in the U.S. could fill the Astrodome. These are our best times. I can help us realize it. Lovell: I have had the pleasure of serv· ing as G PC president for the past year and a half. My term has been through one of the most difficult periods the Caucus and community has faced. Many concerned people have asked me why I want to run for re-election. The answer is very simple. The experience I have gained fron. the past will benefit the Caucus in the future. I have proven myself to be a qualified leader, a good communicator. and, in a very diverse caucus and community, I have been open to the ideas a nd opinions of everyone. It is my highest priority to lead an organization that has for the past 10 years fought for the rights of gay men and lesbians. My only ambition is to con· tinue that fight. In a time in which govern· ment and society want to take away our rights, GPC must continue to be an organi· zation where we can have our hopes, express our dreams and accomplish our goals. Parker: The Caucus needs tough fin a n· cial management and a strong leader who can pull this community together again . Platitudes and rhetoric won't do thejob­hard work will. I am a candidate who can get the job done. ~n Jmlemoriam No Memorial Announcements or Obituaries Received This Week OUR POllCY The MunltOH V°'ce will comrnemc>Jate th• peu1ng ol MootroM residents lllld Houlton gay community members *1tn an announcement Fnendl or , ... , ...... of th4I dee.Nied may Pf~ide ue wtth lacll 1t>out tM per1CN1·1 hie. namet ol the doeelt IUl"9'Tv0tS, and b!Jrial 1rrang«nentl PrOM or WHM can be tncluded Pactur• 1r1 apprec111t.t end ... 111 be returned Name of th• cteceMed ahoutd be 1ttat:hed to the phOtO tnlormahon ahould be provided to the ti.4Qt'ltl'OS8 Voec• at the .. rtliest poaatble date and will be pubhlhed k'I the ne.:t ava table tdluon There • no charge tor lhil MtVJCe JANUARY 10. 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 ----10%ofi:---1 PARTS• lABOR l with this ad FOREIGN CAR SPECIALIST Semi-Trucks & American Cars WEST GRAY AUTO 238W. GRAY I I I I I I I 52tr2886 ,~ I • Electrical Work SI • C rt ~:~Al • H "<T onve ers 1--.cr•cNrAT.o ~I • MuUlers ,/.I • Tires ~ • AIC Repair \. j I 8am-5:30pm MON-SAT I L----------..J HSK CONTRACTING A Full Service General Contractor , Roofing Remodeling Water Proofing Room Additions Sheetrock/Painting Plumblng/Electrlcal -- - __ _ 520-9064 OR Emergency Digital Pager 891-4053 ~-----------, : s10°0 : l off ! I CUP THIS l\D and attach it to I I }QUr next order for S 10.00 off I 1 al""o/ of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing• Flyers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Emelopes • Amouncements • Imitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet Copying • I moices SPEEDY --:=--- PAINTING SERVICE ~ TEXAS Fast Reha!* Service. Excellent Quality. Low Cost 5400 BEUAIRE BLVD. c~ Souttwest L.ocaOOn I blo<• • .,, ot Ctwnnty O'OC• • ~ CALL 667-7417 PICK UP AND DELIVERY MEMB£R GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS GUW. GREATER llEUAJRf CHMASER Of COMMEllCE ~~. O<lt' '°'"""" ~ <ll>IO<TW'< ;rd/Of Otdtf. GYYlOI ~ comlltnl'<I With ~ dl5CQIT(S Of sptClal 0"'"'1 :.-.----------..J 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 10, 1986 Letters Jims's Gym Reopens Following Fire HouTex Tennis Club Responds From Jim Kitch Your article on the ''Tennis Split" was inaccurate in several respects: The HouTex Tenms Club name is "owned" by its member.ship. Rich Corder docs not "own" it. We have DBA papers to prove iL Do you Rich Corder? The membership decided at the N ovembcr mem~hip meeting to vote on the proposed constitution and by-laws at the Christmas party. Mr. Corder was never told that the changes would not be voted on at theChristma,. party. His state· ment to the contrary is not true. Rich Corder was a trusted newsletter issuer who had to obtain approval by its officers for any newsletter information. The newsletter that he recently sent to its membership to announce his dictatorial "takeover" was unauthorized and broke his trust of the officers and membership. Mr. Corder wao trusted by the member· ship to obtain the name '"Houston Tennis Club." He has taken it upon himself to think that this "ownership"' allows him to personally be able to disregard the wishes and mandates of the majority of the club's member.ship and to take over the club. He cannot "own" the club's member.ship as he feels he "owns" the name. Mr. Corder wa" once the club's presi dent. He was a..ked by the mandate of the member. hip not to run in 198.5. He recently ran for several offices and was not elected-again by majority vote. He fails to realize that our club is a democracy and is run by the wi8he.s of the majority. We will not allow an individual to dictator· ially strip iU. membership of its rights. Hope that you enjoy '"your"' club, Mr. Corder. I for 011e, want nothing to do with •·your"' club. (Editor's Note: It 1s always unfortunate when differences of opinion or interpreta· tion arise in our community organiza· tlons, for 1t hurts us all. As in all diRputes, tht>re are two sides to l'Uery story. Howcuer, there ls a difference bctu·pen the two sides to a stOT)' and •O·Callf•d "inac· curacies" reported in this neu·•paper. Only one of the aforementioned issue• wa• even addressed in the MO.VT ROSE \/OIC E article. That uas the tS•ue of the "dba" author1ty of the clubs. The other issues mentioned may or may not be valid concerns of the parties involved, but they reflect no inaccuracies in the reporting of the story.} Denying Services to True Americans From Loran E Doss Again the United States government is taking away from the American Indian (Montrose \-'oice, Jan. 3). With millions of dollars being sent to foreign countries to feed their starving people, we still ignore the plight of the American Indian . Since some American Indians are ll S taxpayers, it would seem that they could at least get health care service when it is needed. How strange it i' that the govern· ment would deny services to the only trut• Americans and then give millions tocoun· tnes that lean toward Communism Items in the "Letters" section represent s op inions of some of our readers and not necessarily the views of the MONTROSE VOICE. Readers are encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest to the community. Plea11e keep the letters brief and mail to "Letters to the Editor," !rtONTROSE \,'OICE, 408 A1•ondale, Houston, TX 77006. By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff RPporter Follov.ing an electrical fire which caused minor damage to Jim's Gym on Dec. 13, the Montrose health club recently reo· pened its doors to members. While damage resultin1t from the fire was being repaired, other improvemento were made, including the addition of some new equipment and a repainting of the club. Also, during the nearly three weeks ,Jim's Gym was closPd, plans were made for the club to be sold to Montrose real estate developer !'vlark Schmidt. Schmidt said the six-year-old club, which was to have moved to a new loca· tion several months ago, will remain at its present location of 607 Westheimer until terms of the purchase agreement are final· ized and the new location is ready for occu· pancy. While he was uncertain as to when the health club would move to ito new location at 2918 W. Dallao, Schmidt did say it will be renamed the Parkway Athletic Club. He added that the new, larger club would continue to offer the same facilities and classes as those offered at Jim's Gym 11 Vie for GPC Offices, Board Seats As of the Dec. 18 meeting, a total of 11 candidates have announced intentions of seeking either office.; or board of trustees seat. with the Houston Gay Political Cau· cus. A final call for candidates will be held during the election meeting, to be held Wednesday, Jan. 15, prior to balloting. Due to the expected high t urnout for the election, the meeting site has been changed to the Holiday Inn Central, 4640 Main Street. Seeking the presidency are incumbent Sue Lovell, former board member Annise Parker, and long-time activist Ray Hill David Fowler and Ernest Hall are vying for the vice president's position. There b no candidate for secretary, and Tony Bell 1s running unopposed for reelec­tion as treasurer. All five candidates for open board of trustees positions are currently running unopposed. They are Sam Cannon, po8i· tion l; Tom Tate, po!iition 3; Len Reber, position 4; Bob Meyer, position 6. and Joe Thornton, P'"ition 7. Those wishing to vote or run for GPC offices mu Rt be duei; paying members as of :IO days prior to the election. Credentialing for qualified voteri; will hegin at 7:00 p.m. and close at 8:30 p.m. The final call for C'andidates will be held before the election committee report which preceeds the can· didates' spceC'hes and the election itself. 'Taxi Zum Kio," "You Are Not Alone," "Male Couple," "Ernesto," "El Deputado" Order Your Copy Todayl • RENTAL GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE • SAME CAY DELIVERY FOR MOST SPECIAL ORDERS • All. TAPES GUARANTEED ,ftm 's Gym has rropened wtth a neu• ou·nt>r and neu• equipment (Connie Woods photo) r----------------------1 WESTHEIMER CAFE 1523 WESTHEIMER Now Under New Management' Open 24hrs. daily with Good Food & Cheap Prices Special: 1 Pancake, 1 Egg 8c 1 Strip of Bacon $150 Mon.-Fri. Complimentary Coffee wtth this Ad! Enjoy our oldies but goodies on the Juke box! Everyone Welcome! L----------------------~ TOM'S PRETTY FISH INC. Tom Graham Pres. - J Sugar-Sugar Gen. Mgr. .), J . ' I ALL KU1U~tc{~~~1PICAL FISH AND SUPPLIES FOR 'EM 2248 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON Ph. 520-6443 Tank, heater, gravel, filter, pump, tubing, hood, lights, dual gang valve, aquarium guide and thermometer All you add is plants, fish & L9va. JANUARY 10, 1986 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Neighborhood New Shopping Centers Offer Unique Experience By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter The Montrose business community con· tinues to grow with new structures as well as unique shopping opportunities. Two newly-completed shopping centers along Montrose Blvd. now offer local shoppers a variety of unique shops, bou· tiques, and restaurants. The newest development, The Chelsea Market, loca ted in the shadows of the Southwest Frl'eway at Montrose Blvd , offers an intriguing shopping atmos· pher!' Unique in its design, the Chelsea Market combines rose·colored brick with limestone borders accented by its blue can· vas awnings and solid copper roof. Hous,'Cl within its walls are the begin­nings of any shopper's journey. If this is indeed the year for the "Out of Africa" attire, Banana Republic can meet those fashionable needs for the shopper's journey through the lion country or even local jaunts. For those planning trips to the moun· ta ins or the cold country, Outfitters by Wil· derness Equipment offers attire for the rugged enthusiasts. For the shoppers who plan to stay at home to journey into home improvements or unique decor, the Chelsea Market has shops to accommodate. The organizer's Journey can beg1n at C. Packages which specializes in storage ideas for the home and office. The unique boutique, Arrangements , presents shoppers with decorative art, flower 8:rran~ements, and "one of a kind crea­tions. The journey into a new restaurant expe· rit•nct' begins at Anthony's, a European­styll' restaurant which offers fresh seafood, chops and pasta. Soon to open at the Chelsea Market will be a familiar Houston landmark. Butera's plans to open its cafeteria·style deli early this y!'ar. Two additional shops plan to open in 1986. Andr!'e's Cookies & Cream will offer gourmet cookies and homemade ice cream as well as a liqueur bar. Texas Greetings, a card and gift shop, is set to open in Febru· ary. Just north of the Chelsea Market on Montrose lies another opportunity for Merchants at 3939 Montrose provide shoppers with a unique experience. local shoppers. Highlighted by the large clock in the middle of the center at 3939 Montrose, the center offers shoppers a browsing experience along the storefront renter featuring art, ice cream, gifts and more. Classique Wine & Spirits offers a var­iety of wines and liquors. Next door shoppers will find Besselman Gallery & Fra mery where they can purchase prints of Montrose and Houston architectural landmarks. In addition, the shop provides c·ustom framing, creative mat designs and oth!'r artistic services. Mad F;Jegance combines cards for every occasion with unique gifts for the creative shopper. Mad Video, a video rental shop, offers a variety of movies to take home for entertainment. To 8atisfy the sweet tooth, shoppers can find ice cream, yogurt, with all the "mix· in 's" of candy and fruit. Montrose Blvd. offers local shoppers a variety of shopping experiences and res-taurants. Wherever the journey may take The Chelsea Market shoppers, it can indeed begin in the neigh-borhood. Overall, Montrose Banks Show Little Growth in a Year By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter The Harris County banks reported an overall increase of total deposits for the quarter ending Dec. 31, 1985, over the same period last year. However, the Mont· rose area banks' overall deposit total remained much the same as last year. Base(! on the quarterly call from the Office' of the Comptroller of the Currency, the county's 267 banks reported a $1 bil· lion increase from $38.87 billion for the last quarter of 1984 to $39.93 billion for Dec. 31 , 198fl. However, the overall 1985 total ofde.pos· its for six Montrose area banks remained much the same as the last quarter of 1984 at $900 million. Included in the six area banks are River Oaks Bank & Trust, Allied American Bank, South Main Bank, Texas Com· mem.• Chemical, Liberty Bank, and BancTexa~·Allen Parkway. River Onks Bank & Trust, listed No. 15 in the rounty, recorded an increase from $27fl,796,4['6 in deposits in December 1984 to $28.),379,92.'i at the quarter's end in Decemlwr 1985. Montrose Hams Dec. 31 Sept. 30 June 30 Mar 31 Dec. 31 rank Co. rank 1985 1985 1985 1985 1984 1 15 River Oaks Bank & Trust 283,379.925 282,042.268 266,360,066 261 ,049.814 275,796.456 2 19 Allied American Bank 228,246,698 206.061 ,566 235.060.524 213.726,915 223.019,702 3 25 South Main Bank 169,836.670 151,432,794 161 ,843,150 161 ,466,379 153.361,560 4 54 Texas Commerce Chemical 104,891 , 191 98.726.635 103.862.559 104,803,756 107,791 ,890 5 91 Liberty Bank 69, 198, 190 71 ,880.771 74,775.644 78.508.864 77,671,234 6 137 BancTexas-Allen Parkway 46,467,710 42.059,915 49.343.871 53,749.672 67,737,726 Ranked No. 19 in the county, Alhed American Bank recorded an increase of mort> than $5 million over last year's final quarter for the year. The Dec. 31, 198.'i. report Hhowed deposit.~ of $228,246.698. The large11t deposit increase of the six area banks was reported by South Main Bank with an approximate $16.5 million. List<-d No. 25, South Main Bank increased its deposits from $153,361,560 for Dec. 31, 1984, to $169,836.670 for the quarter end­ing Dec. 31 , 1985. Texas Commerce Chemical dropped from $107,791 ,890 in 1984 to $104,891,191 for the quarter ending in 1985. However, the bank did record an increaseofapproxi· mately $6 million from the quarter ending Sept. 30, 1985. The bank ranks No. 54 in the county Similarly, Liberty Bank, listed No. 91 , n'<'orded a decrease in deposits for the last quarter of 1985 to $69,191,190 from $77.671 ,234 for the quarter ending in 1984. BancTexas·Allen Parkway, No. 137 in the county, recorded the largest decrease o: the area ba~ks, appro.ximately $21 mil· lion. However, the last quarter of 1985 reported an increase of deposits from $42 million for Sept. 30, 1985 to more than $46 million for the last quarter of 1985. The total depoisits for the six area banks reported for the quarter ending Dec. 31, I 985 showed more than $9 million, a slight overall decrease from the quarter ending Dec. 31, 1984. Texas Commerce Bank-Houston. the city's large11t bank, reported deposits m ex~s of $7 billion recorded, an increase from the $6. 775 billion a year ago. 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 10. 1986 Braver New World of 1986 Biologists Have Re-Engineered Male and Female Roles By Walter Truett Anderson Biologists are emerging as the real revolution-makers of our time. They are changing the rules in many areas of human life, and the results are going to keep politicians and political activists busy for decades. Especially unsettling are the technologies of human productivity­articifial insemination, in vitro fertilization and embryo transplant. One hears a lot about the moral issues connected with these-like the question of when an embryo consisting of a few cells becomes a human being with civil rights. But there is something else going on that is even more politically explosive: These techr.. . ologies are revising the social definitions of male and female roles. Some feminist leaders have responded by taking a stand against the new biolo­gies, calling them another tool for domina­tion of women by men. Looking ahead, they see women reduced to the role of baby factories. Some men think the same methods could portend male obsolescense. If women can conceive through artificial insemination, don't men become little more than ;;eed factories? Clearly, human reproductivity is not what it used to be. Artificial insemination, a rarity only a few decade,; ago, is now routine. In vitro fertilization has pro­gressed steadily since the first "test-tube baby" wa .. born in 1978. Sperm and embryos can be frozen, preserved for years, shipped a round the world. Embryos can be transplanted, so that one woman conceives and a nother carries the child in her womb and gives birth. It is now theoretically possible for a child to have five parents- a female egg donor, a male sperm donor, the woman who carries the embryo and gives birth to it, and the couple who, prei;umably having set this whole team into motion becau;;e of their own infertility, take the child and raise it. These are big developmento for a society that already haB a feminist movement, a gay liberation movement, a general quei;­tioning of sexual roles, and a lot of doubt about whether the family is on its way in or out. Not surprisingly, interest-and controversy-ia especially high among feminists who divide into at least three different bodies of opinion: -Anti: An international feminist con­ference held in Germany last spring came up with a re11olution opposing new biotech­nologies as a com; piracy to seduce women into " industnal exploitation of their own bodie.. or body/ parts ... - "Right to motherhood:" Many femi­nists support the "right to biological moth­erhood," including that of single women and lesbians to conceive through artifical insemination. -Pro: Still other feminists see technol­ogy as the ultimate hope for liberation. Shulamith Firestone set this keynote over a decade ago with her proposal that child­ren be conceived and gestated in artifical wombs, thereby achieving "the freeing of women from the tyranny of their biology ..• and the diffussion of the childbearing and childbearing role to the society as a whole." It is not clear which position has the most supporters, but the current course of events, both technologically and politi­cally, clearly favors the "right to mother­hood" group. Artificial insemination (Al) is the most developed and widely practiced of the new biotechnologies. Nearly 20,000 children a year are conceived by this method in the United States alone, in comparison to about 1,000 children worldwide conceived through in vitro fertilization. AI is also the easiest to perform, and can be done by people with virtually no medical training. That makes it the hardest to outlaw or control. Some states at first refused to recognize its legality, holding that in cases where a couple had conceived through artificial insemination by donor, the baby was illeg­itimate, the father was not its legal father, and the mother was guilty of adultery. Some states still make artificial insemina­tion difficult for single women, lesbians and people in unconventional marriage arrangements, but such policies don't have much effect on anybody really deter­mined. The director of a feminist sperm bank in California recently told me that most of .In the heart of The City" her clients are single women, and over a third are lesbians. On the other hand, the day is not near when fetuses are grown in artificial wombs at society's expense; the technol· ogy does not yet exist for such an enter­prise, and neither do the political structures nor the cultural consensus to support one. Nevertheless, the world has already changed profoundly Women who want to-married or not, straight or not-can now become biological mothers without anything but the most distant and ano­nymous male assistance. "Conventional" couples who cannot conceive normally are able to have child­ren anyway. Men can make an insurance donation to a sperm bank, then get a vasectomy. And the development of amniocentesis-a test which can discover defects in fetuses-has played a large role in the striking increase in the number of mothers in their thirties and forties. Meanwhile, there is reason to believe that several new products in birth control technology are going to make it increas· mgly easy for people to decide not to have children. The effect of all thetie technological advances is not to dehumanize, but rather to widen the range of personal choices­even as they shake the ancient structure of values and beliefs about motherhood, fatherhood , parenthood. Amidst this flux , rigid political posi­tions quickly become dated. State govern­ments nil over the country are scrambling to produce laws and regulations that keep up with the changes. We debate abortion, fight for feminist and masculine agendas, and do not quite perceive that the ground continues to shift beneath us as we talk, that the human species is a different kind of biological organism from what it once wa11. Stein & Toklas D ET EC TIVES 1411 Taft 522-2190 * Cooling System check & flush $2795 * Transmission Service & • Check $2995 * Oil, Fiiter & Lube $2495 ASK FO~ CHIEF BUTTROCK Time to c!Y>ck your COOiing system• . . ~ i __..:.:-·· ··see the stars••· · .. New Year's Special Monday-Thursday Members only! 864 per movie plus deposit. adult hims not included MON.-THURS.: 10am-8pm FRl.-SAT.· 10am-10pm SUN· 1pm-6pm WE CARRY ADULT FILMS 2016 MONTROSE Houston, Texas 77006 529-5544 Are You Looking To Meet New MEN? Then the Cruise Connection Is Just For You. Not Just a Dating Service. This is an Innovative way to Cruise and to meet the men you are Cruising For Free Details, Send a Self­Addressed Stamped Envelope to· Houston Cruise Connection 2615 Waugh Dr. No. 196 Houston, Texas 77006 Happy Cruising! $44 00 · FRH AIRPORT SHIJTTLE ·COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE• WINE Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as • they sleuth through the French countryside. investigating the disappearance of the father • • COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL IREAJ<FAST (large single/double occupancy) • VALET SERVICE • Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Reservations required p tc- .ise c.oll Toll Free 800-253-5263 [No11()()Qi) 800-521 4523 (C..:o hf) (415 )-.l.a1 - 514 ~ (Son f ro".Crscol 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real­life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6.95 m bookstores. or use this coupon to order by mail Here is $7.50 for Murd;; is Murd;;. is Murd7 r, by Sa;-uel Stew;;:-d. name ___________ addr~ city state ip ______ _ _ Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 JANUARY 10, 1986 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Women's Center Plans Festival Women & Peace is the theme of the Houston Area Women's Center arts and music f es ti val ' From a Pr1•ss Relt'as" The Houston Area Womens C<'nter and the I..awndnle Arts and PcrformanC'e Cen· tt·r will C<>·sponsor a month-long arts and music festival called "Women and Peacl'" betwl'l:n Jan. 11 and Feb. 2. Indudt·d in the calendar of events are nrt exhihitA, 11 Hymposium, literature rend· ings, a film und video exposition, theatri­cal performances and live music by local and nationally n'Cognized artists, musi· cians and performers. The ,Jan. 26 Music Festival stars Queen Ida and the Hon Temps Zydeco Band, a Cajun music group based in San Fran· risc·o. Also scheduh•d to appear are Hous· ton singer Cy Brinson and Norma Zentl'n<>, a Monterrey, Mexico rock and roll and jazz musician. Money raised by the music festival will be used to benefit thl' Supportivl' Outreach Services (SOS) program of th<' Houston Area Women's CC'ntcr, which helps victims of domestic vwlencl' on an outclicnt hasis. Among th<' art exhibits schedul<'<l for the month is one dl'votcd to the conc·ept of pc1tce and involves hundreds of birds crcatLod hy Houston artists, children, and othC'r interested membC'rs of the commun· ity. A P<'UCl' fence composed of the birds will ht• displayed along Allen Parkway at Waugh Drive and at the Lawndale Center at f>600 Hillman St. Works by visual artists Nancy Spero, Sue Coe, Martha Beth Edelson and RINN'S SPEEDY PRINTING 1617 W. Abhan1a ~ ~ . e~ co~~ • 527-0027 500 Business Cards $11.99 •• •• • ( 13/ud\. Ink \\/hitc ~toc k C 1mh.' r(1 l\ i:uJ~:) PERSONALIZED SERVICE: Letterheads • Bits iness Forn1s Envelopes • Matches Brochures • Thcrn1ograph)1 Flyers • Business Cards lnt'itations • T )'Pesetting CALL OR COME IN FOR A QUOTE Christy Rupp will be on exhibit at Lawn· dale beginning Jan. 11 . The show's theme is that of domestic peace and freedom. and is entitled "Women: War and Peace-A Cultural ApproaC'h to Freedom." Houston artists Lisa Schayer will create a sculpture utilizing lights, a visual high tech display which was commissioned by Lawndall'. The sculpture installation involves eight.foot-long tubes which hang vertiC'alJy in a dark space and lends a sense of tranquility to the observer. Wnte or Call for Brochure 120 E. Atol St .. P 0 . Box 2326 South Padre Island, Texas 78597 512/943-3632 Winter Specials A short play by William Gibson, called Hand:r-Dandy will be presented Jan. 17 and 18. The two-person show, features a nun and a judge discussing the issue of peace. A day· long symposium, "Women: Power for Peace," has been schedulf'd for Jan. 18. Three panel discussions are planned. The first one, entitled "The State of Women in Contemporary Society" will be moderated by state Rep. Debra Danburg. The afternoon session "'Peace Work" features speeches by Betty Flanagan Bumpers, the 198!5 Woman of Conscience Award winner; Margaret Brenman· Gibson and the Dromenon Women, a group of five marriage and family thera· pists. Also planned ii; a film and video night (Jan. 24) and three evenings of readings and performance~ of fiction by women (.Jan. 19, 26 and Feb. 2). The writer and performer Jo Harvey Allen will perform her comedy, drama and poetry revue callro "As It is In Texas," on Feb. 1. For further information, contact Helen Bernstein at the Houi;ton Area Women'" Center at 52/l-6798 or Mary Evelyn Sorrel at the Lawndale Art and Performance Center at 921-41!55. (mcludmg a1r fare. transfers. accomodat1ons. and breakfasts) 3 day (Fn.-Mon ), or 4 day (Mon.-Fn) ........ • . $189.00 Fly/drive option . • • •.... $199 00 7 day (weekend amval) . •.. $219 00 Flyfdnve option .. ....... $259.00 Tired of looking for an apartment in all the wrong places? Ifs time you visited 1920 West Alabama. Enter our gates and you'll realize you've finally discovered the finest In gracious apartment living. We've combined privacy and elegance at this professional adult community located In the Montrose area near River Oaks with easy access to Downtown and the Medical Center. Why hunt? We have It all! One bedroom from $305, two bedrooms from $415. 1920 WEST ALABAMA 529-6798 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 10, 1986 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz Are You a Video Addict? By Salva tore V. Didato , Ph.D. Neus America Syndicate Special to the Montrose Voice In their current annual television report. the A.C. !llielsen survey company reveals that an average household views TV for more than .. even hours each day. This is the highest frequency ever reported Other surveys show that most viewers believe that TV lacks quality. The push· button JOY box brings opinion, entertain· ment nnd news n• well as nonsense to millions who, although they complain about it, continue to wearily watch the tube's offerings with somnolent indiffer­ence. Do you get turned off when your set i~ turned on? If so, you could be a TV addict. The quiz ahead may tell. It L based on case histories of persons with a compul· s1on to watch TV Answer each item using the following scale: I-Hardly ever; 2-0ccasionally; 3- Very often. 1 After my favorite program 1s over, I remain unselcctJvely watching TV for an hour or more. 2. When friends visit, we spend part of the time watching TV 3. I watch TV at definite times during the day or evening regardlesA of the pro­gram bemg offered. 4. I watch TV past my bedtime 5. About 75% of the programs I view in any one month are fictional. 6. I watch TV for long periods (two or three hours) without n break 7. Y..'hcn I have spare time, I look nt TV. 8. My conversations with friends revolve around TV programs we have seen o Explanation Viewing TV unselectively is like eating a nything placed before you without judg· ing how good it is for your health. The beneficial reasons for watching TV are numerous. As a learning medium, educa· tors tell u.s it is a proven pow~ful tool. But But no matter what your reason for watching TV there IS a limit. BcmR a prisoner of any medium may narrou• your per~pectwe and deprwe you of experiences neces· sary to keep you healthy in mind and body an unwarranted ai;sumption 1s that it some is good, more is better. Being exposed to long stretches of inferior pro· gramming could prove psychologically and intellectually damaging. Consider the. e danger,;: 1 Overdependency-Our desire to imt1ate our own unique plans for creative constructive pursuits could be dampened, as we yield to easily digested planned activity by TV character.;. 2. Social Withdrawal-Some of us might denve excessive vicarious experiences through the actions and beliefs of others. This ind1red participation in life stultifies sodnl adaptability and could weaken our £}ff.. Pl~~' , F fDD:;J.'PI "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS: Albert G. Nemer, John J. Adams and Gordon A. Thayer desire to deal with others. 3. Shrinks critical Judgement­Constant exposure to the attitudes and opinions of others, neatly packaged and delivered to us, could create a kind of in tel· lectual laziness to rend, study and dig out answers for ourselves. 4. Short-run expertise-Some programs, but not all, often serve up to us brief, sue· cinct !!ummary statements, which condi· ti on us to a kind of dilettante learning of a vast number of subjects. We become expert.• of superficiality with no in-depth understanding of a topic. A TV addict views TV not as a medium for gaining useful information and a grasp of the world, but more in terms of passive entertainment. o Score Total up your points and find your view rating below· 8-13 pointR-low dependency 14·19 points-moderate dependency 20-24 points-high dPpendency (addic-tion) Who watches TV? Apparently it ha. "differl'nt strokes for different folks." One study, which took four years to complete and was conducted by sociologists R. Frnnk at of the Wharton Business School, Philadelphia , and M. Greenburg, with the consulting firm of Booz, Allen and Hamil· ton, discovered some surprising facts, such as: -Male blue-collar workers watch TV •ports event" less than most groups of women vi!'wers. - Watching pro-social programs tends to defuse aggression in viewers. -The biggest audience for soaps is Jar· gely teenage girls. -Adolescent boys tend to favor TV which poke!! fun at male authority figures. -The group which watches TV the least consists of very religious males. But no matter what your reason for watching TV, there is a limit. Being a pri· soner of any medium may narrow your perspective and deprive you of experiences necessary to k('('p you healthy in mind and body. Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily TEXAS STATE OPTICAL zi. Dr. E. Burt Denton & Associates OPTOMETRISTS TSO-Village 2515 { "niversity 528-1589 TSO-South Main 1t J.I Main 52:J-5109 MERIDIEN LEASING INC. '86 BMW '86 MERCEDES BENZ '86 HONDA 325 52S. nsi 309/mo 395/mo 569/mo _ '86 CADILLAC ~illr 329/mo __ .86 MAZDA RX·7 626 -IL 20'1/mo 178/mo 190E 300E 5&0Sl :wi:mo 4'18/mo 725mio ~VORSCHE_ 944 944 Turbo 398/mo 4'18/mo '86 TOYOTA 172/mo 185'mo CALL LEE BORBA (713) 975-1986 Accord Pn!lud~ X16 159/mo 17'Jlmo 569/mo _ _ '8!! BUICK 17'J/mo 27'Jimo t.0 IX)WN PA\\IE'<I • LO\'\,(~ '-10'<1tn1 PAYMENT • LASH fOR YOUR TRADl JANUARY 10, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 Another Opening, Another Show: Montrose Live 1986's First 3 Months By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Critic "Everthing great in the world comes from neurotics." -Marcel Proust. This is a calendar showing some high­lights of what you can expect from our area theaters in the next three months. Of course, it isn't complete. Two of our major theaters are having money problems. The Ensemble hopes to open a show in January, but at my dead­line three weeks ago (I'm on vacation, remember?), they weren't sure when it would be. Chocolate Bayou Theater Com· pany will be touring its sesquicentennial show, Gone to Texa~. to Foley's stores throughout the state. JANUARY 10-Mo~tellaria or The Haunted House (Theater Suburbia)-Rousing comedy by Plautus. 10-Pastie.~ (Theater Southwest)-An original comedy/ murder mystery set in a school for burlesque performers. 10-A Woman of Independent Means (Houston Community College)-Barbara Rush in a one-woman adaptation of the novel. 11 - Bamajol (Jewi~h Community Cen ter's Kaplan)-First performance of Dance Month at the Kaplan. An l8raeli folk dance company from Mexico. 16-Thc Miss Firecracker Contest (Alley)-After it closes in Houston, this Beth (Crtmes of the Heart) Henley play will tour the state. 17-Don Giovanni (Houston Grand Opera)-The life of the !(Teat playboy. 17-The Great Sebastions (Country Playhouse)-Originally a star tum for Lunt and Fontane. 17-Risky Business opens its new revue. 18-ChoreogTaphers • 6 (Kaplan)­works by outstanding Houston choreo· graphers. 22-Houston Ballet opens its run at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. 24-Battletap U.S.A. (Tower)­Sponsored by the Society for the Perform· inK Arts. 25-Misha Dichter (Jones)-Famed pianist plays with Houston Symphony Orchestra. 26-Fredericka von Stade (Jones). 26-The Odyssey (Main Street Theater for Children)-Will the wiley hero ever make it home from the Trojan War? 28-Dreamgirls (Music Hall)-The tour-ing company of the show about a female singing trio. 30-Artists in Residence (Rice)-Five actors from the Royal Shakespeare Com­pany will do three public performances durinl{ the week they are teaching at the university. :JO-Marat/ Sade (Main Street Theater)-What's the good of a revolution without .. . ? :II-From Us to You u·ith Love (AD Players)-Valentine's offering-a one act play with a musical revue. Jo'EBRUARY 6-Balm in Gilead (Alley Arena)-The largest cast ever assembled in the down· stairs theater wil pre8ent Lanford Wil· son's first major success. 6-Fear of Ducks {Radio Music Theater)-! hear these zanies will be expandinl{ their cast. 6-Grand Tour and The Magic Man· darin (Houston Ballet)-MM is the city premiere of a work by Ben Stevenson. 7-All That ,Jazz! (HSO Pops). !!-Ballroom Dance Night (Kaplan)­Featurinl{ national and international bal· !room champions. 8-Winners (Pasadena Philharmonic)-The winner of the PP con· certo competition and the winning piece from the "Art of Texas" composition con· test. 9-Joan Karffs New Dance Group and Several Dancers Core (Kaplan). 10-Buried Child (Rice)-Sam She· pherd's Pulitzer Prize-winning vision of the disintegration of the American dream. 14-Jessye Norman {Jones)-Famed soprano sings with the HSO. 19-Guys and Dolls (Music Hall)­TUTS brings Damon Runyon's fabled New York to the musical stage. 20-Isn 't It Romantic?-Don't ask me. 22-And Miss Reardon Drinks a Little (Theater Suburbia). 23-City Ballet of Houston {Tower)­The Pas de Trois from Swan Lake and "It's Not Tchaikovsky" by Victoria Vil· tum. Also the premiere of A Movable Feast by Karen Bell·Kaner. 27-Pack of Lies (Alley)-The govern· ment thinks the Krogers are spying for the Russians. Which side should their best friends, the Jacksons, take? 28-Breakfast in Bed (Theater SouthweRt)-A family comedy, who'll get late Uncle's fortune? MARCH 6-In the Night and The Two Pigeons (Houston Ballet)-lt is a company pre­miere of a work by Jerome Robbins. 7-Fiedler Favorites (HSO Pops). 13-Ei•erything in the Garden (Main Street)-Riting satire by Edward Albee. 14-The Academy of Saint Martin in the Fields (Jones)-SPA sponsors the well· known orchestra. 14-To Be Announced (Country Playhouse)-The winner of the CP playw· righting competition. 20-As Is {Stages)-A play about AIDS. 20-China Oimitrova (Jones)­Bulgarian soprano sings Italian dramatic arias. Sponsored by HGO. 21-Count Cry {Jones)-HGO's madcap farce about a countess who swears off men and the young rake determined to seduce her. 22-Durufle Requiem (Pasadena Phil­harmonic). Mid-March-Big River (Pace Theatrical)-This musical version ofHuc· kleberry Finn won last year's Tony for Best Musical. It is coming, but the exact opening date hasn't been set. 28-Parenthesis (A.D. Players)-Last presented three or four seasons back, this was one of their most popular shows. A traveling carpenter visits a Louisiana boarding house after a tropical storm. APRIL 1-(Jones)-The S.P.A. will celebrate April Fool's Day with a concert by Peter Schikele, better known as P.D.Q. Bach. o Notes Celebrate! The major b'day this week is Martin Luther Kini{ Jr.'s on the 15th. Others: 10- female imper11onator Craig Rus;;ell and actor Sal Mineo; I I-Alexander Hamil· ton; 12-Andre deShields, best known for the title role in The Wiz's original Broad· way cast; 13-Edmund White, Horatio Alger and Charles Nelson Reilly; 14- Yukio Mishima (he of the controversial film biography) and costume designer/ photo~apher Cecil Beaton; 15-Me; 16- playwnght George Kelly. Enjoy. In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voin~ Barbara Rush is "A Woman Of Independent Means" which begins a limited engagement at the Eru·in Heinen Theatre today A scene from the Broadway production of Michael Bennett's dazzling Tony Award, Grammy Award winning musical "Dreamgirls," opening Jan. 28 at the Music Hall "Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" 1s ~cheduled to pla:> in Horuton this season 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 10, 1986 Wrapping Up Some '85 Films Robert Redford and Meryl Streep star m "Out m Africa" By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Vo1CI' Film Critic In one amazing sweep, I'm gomg to try and wrap up the few remaining 1985 releases showing in this area. While there are still a few releases like Ron and Twice in a Lifetime that have only played in big c1t1es, v.e'll count those for '86 and close out '85 "';th thest'. Out m Afm:a is the first offering. A beautifully photographed and gracefully executed film staring Meryl Streep and Robert Redford. The true story of Karen Blixen's attempt to build a coffee farm m Kenya should truly have some spot on the Best of the Year Sci-fi fans will either be delighted or baffled by the bizzare Enemy Mine. Louis Gossett Jr is quite an oddball as the repttlc-hke Droc who is disgusted to find himself on a deserted planet with an enemy fighter pilot (Dennis Quaid). Das Boat drrector Wolfgang Peterson creates a strong v.orld where anything can happen. The remaining two films fall into the foreign or "art" category Dim Sum is a touching look at a Chine:<c-American fam­ily Dangerous Moues 1~ a more compli­cated film about two men ma battle of wits during an mtemational che11s game. The later was named "Best Foreign Film" last year at the Academy Awards. but we're just seeing it. Better late than never, I guess o Out of Africa On the surface, it's easy to compare Out of Africa with similar grand productions like Ghand1 or Passage to India. Lush scenery, powerful acting, and a long running time seem to be standard for this type of epic grandeur. Afm:a differs from both of those other films mamly because it has two super· stars, namely Robert Redford and Meryl Streep. They happily hold our attention as we plow through Karen Blixen's "~at always so exciting~ life on an African cof­fee plnntatlon. Blixen (who later wrote under the nnme Isak Dinesen) unfortu· nately did not hve a life like Ghandi or Lawrence of Arabia, which i~ the stuff spectacles are made of. The makers of this film had a break when researchers discovered recentlv that Blixen had a secretive, intimate affair with a dashing British adventurer named Denys Fench Hatten. Their friendship f romnnce has been hyped up into the cen­terpiece of the film, letting the rest of the "true" story serve as surrounding place settings. This gives the audience a sort of "love story" to spice up the Jong African stretcher Actually Blixen is first roamed to a Baron Brar Blixen, a brother to her former 'Jd<>er ilia he mamed f6'r c6nveiiience The Huron (superbly acted by Klaus Maria Brandauer) loves his wife, but also loves the ladies. He leaves her alone on the plan tat1on for weeks, romps around the coun· try on safaris, and is constantly promiscuous. When Bhxen contracts syphillis from her husband, a chain of per.son al tragedies begin that bring" her sorrow and finally bankruptcy. The main thing that keeps her sane during this period is her odd affair with Dennvs Fench Hatten. Dennys pops ~P spari;ely through the first half of the film, but becomes impor· tent as the romance blossums. Oddly enough, the love between these two never really blooms because they can't seem to understand what the other needs. Denys wants her to be there waiting when he returns from frequent safaris. Blixen wants a man who v.;11 be there when she needs him, 6ut still give her room to grow. It's a typical problem that they never solve. Meryl StreE'p JS more than stunning as Blixen, and could nab another Oscar. Her voice-over narration is soothingly perfect, and her accent (Danish) is marvelous. Streep does a lot less "modeling" and pos· ing here than she did in films like Plenty and Frenr:h Lieutenant'~ Woman, and it's very welcome. Robert Redford has the right weather· bea!Rn look for Deny's part, but British he is not. I guess no attempt at an accent is better than a bad attempt. Still, he looks good with Meryl, and the two make a nice pair. Out of Afrzca is well worth seeing, but be ready for two hours and 40 minutes of solid film. There are some lax point , hut Meryl manages to hold it together and keep us entranced. For Hollywood enter· tainml'nt, you can't really afford to miss "Meryl m Africa." o Enemy Mine This mega-buck epic from the director of The Ncuer Endllll! Story and Da~ &Jal is too weird to be a h1g box officeJraw, and it is probably the biggest holiday bomb. However, the movie shouldn't really be ignored, because it really has a lot of neat things to offer to the right filmgoer. First off, you have to accept Louis Gos· sett Jr. in this far out reptilion attire. Once you get over that and the strange sound;; that he makes, you can settle back and enioy the plot. At least the first half of it. 01' lizard face (actually a Droc from the planet Drocon) crashes on a desertl'd planet and finds that the only other per· son there is nn enemy space pilot. Dennis Quaid is the bearded Da~;dge, a stubborn hut resourceful man who attempts and succeeds in becoming friends with his enem~'. The two are fascinating to watch as they excliange1angungi!S','clilllirtl, hn!I ideas and become like brothers. Then something really strange happens. Well, Droc sort of gets pregnant and has a baby boy. Evidently, these guys have a body that's half man/ half woman and they just "have" children when it just happens to occur. The new little Drue looks just like Daddy !Mom?) and grows a lot faster than normal children. Unfortunately, at this point the film shifts into high adventure gear, totally abandoning the delicate bonding relation ship built so carefully in the first half. Lit­tle Droc gets kidnapped by some renegade slave drivers, and Davidge spends the rest of the film doing Indiana .Jone escapades to rescue him. Obviously, someone thought that the film couldn't stand on its own as a story of two enemies working together towards a goal. Gotta give the kids 11 little action or they'll get bored. That's why they stayed away from Iceman a few years back (the two films often complement each other). Personal drama is just not interesting anymore, because TV movies have covered all the angles. Still, it's difficult to recommend f:nem) Mine because it's such an erratic film. Sometimes the special effecL~ by the Industrial Light and Magic Company (George Lucas) are mystifying, and other times they are downright embarrassing. The screenplny by Edward Khmara is excellent the first half and very poor the second. The snving grace is Gossett, who gives the oddest performance of his cnreer I would recommend this movie to lovers of oddities like Silent Running or maybe Dune. It'. too bad they spent .o much money on a film that could have been a neat "little" film about two people coming to term!' o Dim Sum-A Little Bit of Heart I.a t year, Chinese-American filmmaker Wayne Wong ttttracted attention with his hit Chan 1s Missmg. Wong return~ with an even better, more personal effort that con­centrates on a girl and her aging mother. The Tom family consisL< of 62-year-old Mrs. Tom (Kim Chew), her daughter Ger­aldine ~Laureen Chew), and Uncle Tom (Victor Wong) who supports the family with a bar. Conflicts occur because the mother wants Geraldine to marry because she thinks she's going to die. The daughter loves her mother and is afraid to leave her, but also must contemplate living her own life. The culture clash between old Chinese customs and the American way provides conflicts, anger, and even laughter. Moth· er's reaction to her daughter sleeping with her boyfriend, and thl' various American- Films ized attitudes of many Chinese i;ecm to show how tradition can mix with moderni­zation. The push for young ladies to get married is still there, but now they have a little more choice in the matter. Like many Chinese films, Dim Sum is paced very slowly, with many quiet and personal moment;;. Sometimes Wong gets a little too arty and symbolic by lingering his camera much too long on a curtain blowing or t1ome rippling water. It'11 not really necessary, because the actors do a fine job of being almost pure art them· selves. Laureen Chew and Kim Chew are real­life mother and daughter, and their roles here are full .bodied and beautiful. Their conflicts are simple, hut they have little affect on the love they have for each other. The mother really misses her daughter when she do<•s leave, bcrnuseshe's huppy for her hut lonely herself. "Dim Sum is 11 good independent film that should be appreciated for its close examination of family cultures and their role in the eightie,;. Many will find it slow and distracting. but those who know cinema will sel' that this film has "a lot of heart." o Dangerous Moves This film v.on tht• Oscar for Best Foreign Film last year, and will be playing tonight and SRturday onl~· at the Hiver Oaks. All chess fnns an• alerted-all others can best spend time elsewhere. Dan1:erous Moves wa~ a bit of a disap­pointment because I expected a much bet· ter film . .:rhl' plot is very simplistic, and overall it appeals to a very small group of people. An international cheRs match between an aging Russian master and a rebellious Soviet dissident tries to bea bat­tle of wit and power, but it never seems to grab our attention. Thankfully, th!' political aspect is kept to a minimum, although both sides resort to dirty tricks to help their man win. A guru and a psychotherapist both try to "psych·out" the players. Even the players try to annoy each other by "howing up late or getting up and down out of their chairs. Michel Piccoli is good as the dying pat· riarchal champion, but Alexander Abbott is a hit high strung as the violent, young opponent. Leslie Caron (as Piccoli's wife) and Liv Ullman have small but affecting roles that could affect the outcome of the game. Dan1«·rous Moves is too full of chess maneuvers to make it interesting to those who know little of the game. At times, the characl!ors rise above the game and bt·come intereAting. Hut for the most part they just seem to be like piecei< on the hoard. JANUARY 10, 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 13 Women's Softball SportsV oice to Hold Annual Meeting Sports Voice Calendar & Standings MSA Pool League Team Standings. Winter League. Week 5 The 1986 Annual Meeting of the Houston Women's Softball League will be held on Sunday, Jan. 19, at 4:00 p.m., at Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin. TEAM Recent Week, Total Matches. Total games The league encourages all members to attend this meeting. The spring session will begin in late March and games will be played on Sun­days ei ther in Montrose or the Heights. The '86 World Series will be played in New Haven, Conn., over Labor Day wee­kend. Newcomers are welcome to attend the Jan. 19 meeting and are reminded that this is a slow-pitch league. For more information about the league, call Carolyn at 86~256. Garza Successfully Defends, Chavez Moves Up in Houtex Tennis DIVISION A 1Four611 2 Mary's Naturally 3 Bacchus II 4 Bacchus I 5 Ranch Hands 6 BRB Shooters 7 Manon & Lynn's 8 Outlaws 9 Too 611 10 Slreet Cats 11 The Hole 13-2 5-0 bye 4-0 10-5 4-1 7-8 3-1 0-15 3-2 8-7 3-2 8-7 3-2 15-0 2-2 2-13 2-3 7-8 1-4 5-10 1-4 DIVISION B 1 The Barn 2 611111 3 The611 4 Kindred Spirits 11 5 The Galleon 6 L1pst1ck 7 JR'S 8 Kindred Spmts I 9 Lone Stars 10 Hooters II 11 Hooters I 13-2 5-0 8-7 3-2 8-7 3-2 ~ 2-2 ..... 2-2 7-8 2-3 6-9 2-3 13-2 1-3 7-8 1-4 2-13 0-5 2-13 0-5 Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladd.er matches through Jan 7 TOP TEN LADDER 6 David He1land 7 Sabe Velez 52-23 39-21 43-32 37-23 39-36 38-37 37-38 41-19 37-38 34-41 27-42 51-24 41-34 34-41 31-29 3Q-30 39-36 35-40 3Q-30 26-49 17-52 16-59 Last Sunday, Jan. 5, 26 players partici­pated in Houtex Tennis Club play. Several matches were played along with some "after the holidays" practice. 1 Rick Hadnot 2 JC Barrera 3 Armo Albanza 4 Ron Bell 8 Oscar Martinez 9 Edward de Leon 5 Roch Corder 10 Ron McCauley BLADDER 1 Ronn Rodd 2 Eugene Brown 3Mr Bill 4 Billy Green 5 Randy Moller 6 Steve Bryant 7 Roy Mendiola 8 John Murphy 9 Da1w1d Hendrtckson 10 Oscar Ysas:sr Lou Garza defended his position on the Bladder by defeating Joe I... 6-4, 7-5. Eddie Chavez moved up to the B ladder with a win against Larry Jarvis 6-4, 3-6, 7-5. Rick Martinez regained a position on the D ladder by defeating Henry E. 6·3, 7-6(7-1). C LADDER 1 Rudy Garcia 2 JV Klinger 3 Howard Brown The club will be having a general meet­4 Steve Chesney ing1 party on Sat., Jan. 18, at President Donny Kelley's home. For more informa­tion call 789·2110. DOUBLES LADDER 1 David Heoland & Rich Corder 2 Billy Green & Paul Brown HGBQ 'IOUR PARTV HEADQUARTERS 25 ~ DRAFT BEER Sat. & Sun. afternoons on the ~afio 3 HAPPY HOURS AFTER DAILY HOURS Mon.-Frl. NIGHTLY 1022 WESTHEIMER 528-8851 HouTex Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Jan 5 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 2 Randall Dickerson 3 Donny Kelley 4 J. C Barrera 5 Arm1 Albanza 1 Oscar Martinez 2 Edward de Leon 3 Ron McCauley 4 Lou Garza 5 David Garza 1 Thomas Cortez 2 Larry Jarvis 3 Mark Deardorff 4 Mr Bill 5 Rick Knapp 6 Ron Bell 7 David Heoland 8 Steve Bearden 9 Tony Tim 10 Sabe Velez BLADDER 6 Joe L. 7 Ronn Rodd 8 Eugene Brown 9 Ron Mauss 10 Eddie Chavez CLADDER 6 Gabe Herpon 7 Rock Massey 8 Billy Green 9 Randy Miller 10 Steve Bryant DLADDER 1 Roy Mendiola 2 John Murphy 3 Da1w1d Hendrickson 4 Oscar Ysass1 5 Boll Santa1t1 6 Rick Martinez 7 Henry Eckhardt 8 Rudy Garcia 9JoeD 10 JV Klinger E LADDER 1 David Moskowitz 2 Howard Brown 3 Randy Joerscheck 4 Steve Chesney DOUBLES LADDER 1 Jom Kotch & Dock Cotten 2 Armo Alabanza & David Garza 3 Steve Bearden & Boll Santa1t1 4 Ronn Rodd & Richard Pregeant 5 Billy Green & Paul Brown 6 Eddie Chavez & Henry Eckhardt Regular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Ten­nis Center Tennis Club 10:30am-1:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center Women's Bowling League Spm, Stadium Bowl W.W B. Bowling League 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: MSA Men·s Bowling 9pm. Stadium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Center MSA "Fun Volleyball League." 7pm WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League plays Bpm, various locations THURSDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center Whatever Happened to Baby Jane' MSA Mixed Bowling League 8 45pm, Stadium Bowl Special E vents Feb. 14-16 IGBO-affohated Bluegrass Clas­sic, Louosvolle Feb. 28-Mar. 2 IGBO-affoliated Sprong Break lnv1tat1onal, Ft. Lauderdale Mar 27-30 IGBO-atfohated Doxie lnvotatoonal, Atlanta Mar. 29-37 · IGBO-affohated MAK l.T. Kansas Coty June.· Oak Lawn Tennis Assoc. hosts Texas Cup Challenge. Dallas. competing with Hous­ton Tennis Club July 25-Aug 3. 1986 U S Olympic Festival, Houston Frontrunners in Tenneco Race Five Houston Frontrunners will be com­peting in the Houston-Tenneco Marathon on Sunday, Jan. 19. Two of the club members will be running in the marathon for the first time. During the marathon, other members of the local jogging club will be manning sta­tions along the route providing support and water for the five runners. The three stations will be in front of the Venture-Non Main; at Weslayan and Bis­sonnet; and Dulavy and Allen Parkway. Those interested may call 520-8019 for specific times when runners will pass the water stations. 808 Lovett ~\--~~ 521-1015 .___ _.. ...... ~CA~~~---....... -lllS4 Boulevard Big Bang $1. 99 Breakfast Monday-Friday 2 Eggs, Bacon or Sausage ,------a-n-d 2- P-an-ca-k-es. -..-. I Bring your SWeethealf In for a 1 1 Valentine's Dinner 1 Mon.·Thurs. wHh coupon I I Buy One Blackboard Special at the I I regular prlc. and get one tree 1 _ --_ _5.Ev~!_~ ~n~ - - - _ J Hours 7om-11pm Mon-Thurs 8am-MIClnoght Saturday 8am-11pm Sunday ·n1E BEST LimE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVAfE BATI-IS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-II 77 1118 URSULINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 10, 1986 The Far Side by Gary Larson •t~.JNVE .,,. ... •, .... ,._-: "And the nex1 thing I knew, the whole ship just sunk right out from under me. So whafs the deal with you? ... You been here long or what?" =- Belly button slipknots ' ~ ~ ~ ' ,~ Jo~ $~ ~ When migration routes encounter the window of vulnerability Thwarting the vampcow ,:{,..._ "For heaven's sake, Lee. That spoiled rhino Is going to either bellow or charge the door all night till we let him in." Still in its early stages, the Olduvai Pothole claims its first victim. Fortunes Romance for Scorpio By Mark Orion For Fflday. Jan 10. 1986. through Thursday. Jan 16. 1986 ARIES-Do you think you could get out of bed long enough to join someone for breakfast? There's a potential prob­lem this weekend in damaging old rela­tionships by paying attention only to new ones. We know you can give enough for both 1f you want to. TAURUS-Romantic vibes abound. They're more apt to be frivolous flirtation than heavy hearthrobs. so take 'em in a light vein. Then, someone's problem calls for logic instead of a shoulder and days end with glee GEMINI Your current walk in the win­ter sunshine isn't over yet. Your charming personality will continue to make you new friends and enhance your relation­ship with old friends and co-workers. CANCER-You have been sticking closely to your New Year's budget resolu­tions. You've gained a grasp on money matters. So now is the time to splurge a little and treat yourself-and someone else-to something special. LEO-Others view you differently than you see yourself. Ease up. Give yourself a break. You're far more attractive and pop­ular than you think, even if you've been putting off making an important decision. Now is the time to trust your instincts and go for 1t. VIRGO- This will be one of your busi­est weekends of the year. Your ability to organize yourself and things around you will be very important Stay on top of things. A rest is coming soon. You can seen it over the horizon LIBRA-Your ability to serve as a diplo­mat will be in demand this week. There are those who disagree and you're the elected referee. Just remember not to take sides when trying to settle disputes among friends. SCORPIO-Your romantic side con­tinues to run deep. Your normally strong sense of good judgement is being over­come by some deep feelings for some­one. For the time being, listen to your heart and not your head SAGITTARIUS-You may think you're tough but deep inside you're as soft as a kitten. This will be a week to let that someone special know it. It is not a good time to practice minding your own busi­ness The personal affairs of a not-so­close friend are of concern to you. CAPRICORN - That antsy feeling just won't seem to go away, will it? Use it constructively on new projects. Give some thought to starting a new fitness program. AQUARIUS-Certain mutual attrac­tion can prove quite exciting. Do be care­ful that one of you isn't looking through rose-colored glasses. (Reality is very pleasant in its own right.) Snappy wee­kend will come to sparkling fini. PISCES-Your meticulous nature may prove to be your downfall this weekend. So try to avoid nitpicking, especially when it comes to close friends Remember, nobody's perfect. •1936 Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose Voice. a general c1rculat1on newspaper having published con11nu­ously for 1 year or longer, 1s quahhed lo accept legal notices affecting the news­paper's circulation area of Montrose CARS & BIKES MERIOIEN LEASING Lee Borba, 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ASCOT LEASING:°LTo~ 1303 Upland, 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN JACINTO MOTOR LEASING 10700 Richmond #100, 781·8566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE GWF-Need responsible roommate to share expenses of apartment or house in Houston area Call Liz at 713-337·2939 to discuss details Burlington Apartmen ts GREAT LOCATION Close to Downtown in Montrose Area. Small community, Adults only, Nice pool, Larg_e closets, Bi(l windows, Free mou1e channel, Well maintained I and 2 Bedrm. Effective rent from $249 3502 BURLINGTON 523-0249 JOIN IVY LEAGUE One bedroom. hardwood floor deck, fenced in yard, beautifully landscaped, hot tub ldeel for home pro1ects Near downtown and BAB $250 mo No dep­osit, no lease Roger 630-0530 - MONTROSE OASIS Ouiel adult-only building deep in the heart of Montros~ Free gas heat for win· ler. swimming pool for summer Central A/C, GE appliances. m1n1 blinds and more. 1BR at $315. 2BR al $375 plus security deposit & electric. 308 Stratford at Tilt By Appolntm..,t, Plea.. 52)-8109 Smart, upper, 1 ·1, lots of light. Clath'.dis­hwasher. Ice maker, etc , security gates 3402 Garrott. $395/mo 1 year lease 529· 1111 MONTROSE AREA APARTMENTS Effll bdr J2 bdr From $225 thru $350. Call 527-8305 Small qu1e1 M-o-n-tr_os_e_co_m_plex New paint, new double door ice boxes $100 deposit 1 bdrm $285 plus elec Also avail­able 2 bdrm 529-8178 BEHOLD. SALL'<· 5 MINUTES FROM UH Gay couple renting 1 bedroom 1n 3 bed­room house. $250/mo plus 113 u1il111es Off street parking Deposit required Fur­nished or unfurnished Call 921·8002 Male to share large house conveniently localed near Memorial Park $285 plus 'h ut1ht1es 880-0538 ---- Non-smoking roommate. 30 s or 40's. sta-ble, 10 share Studewood and 14th St area home. no drugs. private, large fenced yard. $230/mo plus 'h u11ht1es. 863-1510 Non-smoking mature man seeks consid­erate friend to share house or apartment Many interests, sense or humor. accept­ing of self and others. Travel• oflen. Box Holder. Box 66263. Houston 77266. Heights garageapartment. 1 bedroom, wood floors. appliances, $25().lmo Water paid 956-8671 , ~r.i:mindod person to share house in 1960 area with 2 males 89()- 4676 FOR LEASE Studio duplex, unique interior must see, 1947 Richmond, m1n1bhnds, hardwoods. separate living and dining. screened porch. s1t11ng room off second bedroom ~er/ dryer 5~~- Luxury Condominiums Now Leasing with option to purchase. Great location Large beautiful swimming pool & Jacuzzi. Controlled entry security Remote controlled garage entry High efficiency AC & heating Free cable TV One bedrooms from $375 ($150 deposit) Two bedrooms from $650 ($250 deposit). 2507 Montrose Boulevard Call for appointment 524-0830 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED PERFORMING ARTS Ticket office personnel sought full/ part time. Excellent verb~I skills required Base plus comm1s11on Call Ms Knipp after 11am 52&-5323 LO'Oking for part-time admin1strat1ve assistant with excellent typing skills Tre· mendous growth potential lor right 1nd1- v1dual 524-4062 Ask for Darren Wanted quaiol1ed mechanic Must be experienced Taft Automotive 522·2190 ~daor Chuck SALON DANIEL Hair stylist with some following be pro­fessional, creative. current We provide everylhing for you In a fun. modern atmosphere Commission/benefits Call or come by 2431 B1ssonne1 5W-9327 Dependable nurse seeking day or night work Own transportation. 529-9046 Work trOr;;homel No Hperl..,ce neCft:' Hryl P1rt/lull time. Male/female. Mlrlce­ters needed for Dental plan/Vlaa plan. $15.00 Commlaalon each plan aold. (713) 520-9029. (24 hours.) VOICE AD-V~E-R--T'-I_Sl_N_G_WORis­Rent that house or apartment through a Montrose Voice Class1f1ed Call 52!Hl490 ~~:e~=i::~:b'.t ~,r~~::c~~.c~~;.~~c"::ci or Visa I HAVE C:Rf.f\TI:D I\ DEVICE IW\o\ltH crow; 1NV1s1s1u1'{ ! JANUARY 10, 1986 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 To place an AD in the Mont1~ose Voice Just phone us ! 529-8490 li(la, 5 : 30pm l>?ekdays Ads can be charged over the phone to a maior credit card OR we can bill you later (MISC.) FOR SALE SHELBY FINE ARTS Specializing in l1m1ted ed1tt0n pnnts by oationally and 1nternat1onaHy known artists. Salvador Dali, Bill Marlow Bea­trice Bulleau and others We offer art mvestment semmars. spec,al arttsts exhibits. free home and office consufta .. t1on5. For more information call or 'Write Mark Roden, 3846 S Gessner, Houston, 77063 (713) 784-4467 FOR YARDSALES- - -­Seo ads under · Yard Sales" at the end of the Montrose Classified MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS BODY MASSAGE Full body massage Hot oil-in or out Bruce 622--0370. ---Z-MAGIC TOUCH BY David of ET '713)622-4530 PERSONALS Gay wreutlmg• Uncensored 1nfop1xpax $3.00 NYWC. 59 West 10th, NYC 10011 GffllM. very attract;8,'c1ean cut. intelli­gent, sensitive, 30. seeks same for poss1· ble relat1onsh1p-fnendsh1p Sincere only Lark 933-7288 GWM. 39. 5·_ handsome. very muscular. proless1onal , affectionate. non· promiscuous Greek versattle Seeking masculine man. 32-40. handsome, mus­cutar extremely hung Greek toP for good tomes and possible relationship (713) 524-8390 Recently moved to Te;;;. Attractive GWM 27, 5 6", sohd 140 lbs Alter 5 yeera of self-search1ng and pos1t1ve change mentally. phys1ca ly and emotionally I feel ready for a lasting relationship Important quahtles desired Physically Three requests that you be masculine. that you not be thin and that YOU like lhe way you IOok Emotionally someone " 'th Inner strength who 1s mature. honest car­ing, stable and tndependent. Not look Ing for perfection, 1ust for the right FEEL, and If the chem1s1ry ls right as lovers, maybe we'll have found a new friend Bo·~ requneabeg111nlng. Th1s ls1t Reply Blind Box 272-B Clo Vorce G 'W M seek1"g close encounters ol the sale sexual to perm k •nd Am 34 slender 5'9", beard. non-smoker/doper Contact for mutually agreed exchanges Jay, Box 56412, Houston 77256 NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTION? GWM, 34 6', 170. Brn1brn. I! resolved to finding GWM with compatible stats Well- 1d1usted. profess1ona1 non-smoker, humored. outdoorsman, c1nemaph1le xenophtle Act on your resoutt1on and write me so ¥ve can rendezvous Reply Blind Box 271·L C:.l.o:._V..o:_ic;_:e_ ____ WICKEDLY WITTY T-SHIRTS Over 200 designs $1.50 gets lull cata­logue. Pubhc Image. 495 Elhs St , Suite 204 San Francisco. CA 94102 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat floor JAN JAN WI'UESDAY: Houston Data 1 0 11 Professionals meets 7:30pm Jan. 14 JAN JAN JAN JAN JAN 12 13 14 15 16 Cnteria tor 1nct. ·Day C.~ar anc::I Mon1rose Retourc:. 1 E-went or group musupectficaUy J)«te1n to neigh~.~ .Jf Montrose or Houston· a gay community tinteM mtiJO' city. state Of national holtday or maJOr net~al gay ...-ent 2 Strk:tly commerc11:1 event• not 1nciuoed 3 Bu1i.nesa, civic and IOC'81 groups arws their events are generelly qu1hf~ed 4 Political events where only one "~ of a tut>,ect, canchdate or party 11 dominant not quahfied For ackhtionar l.l"lfOfmation or phone numbers. look tor the sponsoring or;1ni1111on under •·RMOUrcee " Typestyles indicate events' location: Events in Houston, Events of Local Interest Elsewhere. Events of Area Interest SELECTED EVENTS • MONDAY: Integrity meets THROUGH 7 DAYS ~~~a~~'" 13, Autry House, • FRIDAY "Breakthrough" • MONDAY: Montrose Art lesbian-feminist program, KPFJ', Alliance meets Jan. 13 FM-90, 8 :l5-1lam • MONDAY: Gay & Lesbian • FRIDAY: Montrose Country Hispanics Unidos meet 7pm Cloggers meet 7pm, MCCR, 1919 Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, Decatur Jan.13 llSATURDAY: KS/AIDS Foundation meets 3400 Montrose, • MONDAY: KS! AIDS Foundation & Montrose no. 501, llam Counseling Center AIDS Risk • SATURDAY: Houston North Reduction (Safe Sex) Workshops, Professionals meets 7:30pm, 8pm Jan. 13 Jan.11 • MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm • SUNDAY; Houston Tennis Club at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain plays 10:30am-L30pm, Homer llTUESDAY: Frontrunners run Ford Tennis Center from Memorial Park Tennis • SUNDAY: Frontrunners run Center from Memorial Park Tennis WI'UESDAY: MSA "Fun Center Volleyball League" plays, 7pm • SUNDAY: Women's bowling WI'UESDAY: Montrose league plays, 3pm, Stadium Bowl Symphonic Band meets Dignity • SUNDAY: Gay Asians & Center, 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm Friends meet 3pm Jan. 12 mTUESDAY: Lutherans • SUNDAY: W.W.B. Bowling Concerned meets Jan.14, Grace League, 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanes Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh llSUNDAY: Overeaters WI'UESDAY: Citizens for Human Anonymous meet 8pm Montrose Equality meets 7:30pm Jan. 14, Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Houston House, 1617 Fannin, 9th • WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Caucus meets 32! 7 Fannin, 7:30pm Jan. 15 • WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League competition • WEDNESDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold WI'HURSDAY; Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center mTHURSDAY; "Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFJ' Radio, FM-90 WI'HURSDAY: Mixed Bowling League, 8:45pm. Stadium Bowl, 8200 Brae11main SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS • 1N 1 WEEK Bayiown Lambda irea•s 7·~m Jan.17 • IN I WEEK: Cho1ca mef'ta lpm Jan.19, Maateraon YWCA. 3615 Willia • IN l WEEK: Parttiu FLAG meet. 2pm. Jan. 19, Preebytft'tan Center, 41 Oakdale • IN I WEEK: Greater Monin­BU5ln- Guild moeta 7pm Jan. 22, Bl'filnan'1 Restaurant. 3300 Smith • IN I WEEK: Cloia. Lesbian Mother1 Group, open meeting Jan. 23, Dignity Ctr. • IN 2 WEEKS. Howiton Area Gay & Lesbian Engineera & Scientist. mttt 7pm Jan.28 • IN 2 WEEKS. Monlrotie Civic Club !Neartown~ mef'ta 7pm Jan.28, 1413 Weothoimer • IS 3 WEEKS. Howil<>n Ga" Health Advocateo mttt 7·30pm Feb.-! • IS 4 WEEKS HoURton Bar Ownera Aaan. mttt8 2pm Feb.12 • IN 4 WEEKS !l."eartown Business Alliance mef'ta 7pm Feb. 12, Uberty Bank. 1001 w ... theuner • II\ 4 WEEKS. Cleia, Lesbian Mothera Group, cl~ mttting Feb.13 • IN 4 WEEKS Avondale A88ociauon mttt8 7:30pm Feb. 13, Chnatian Wom~n·a Cali«, 310 Pacific • IN 5 WEEICS IGllO-olllllaled llUMgrau ClaulC. Lou~. Feb 1~16 • IN 6 WEEKS Houston Uveotoclt Show & Rodto operui, A.trodome complex, Feb. ll>Mar. 2 mlN 7 WEEKS IGIO-allllloted Spring llr- lnvlollanol, R. Lauderdale. Feb »-Mor. 2 lllN I WEEKS Nollonof le&bion onct Goy Heolfll Foundollon pr- 7111 Notlanol/le&bion Goy Heollh Conference and ""' Nollonol AIDS Forum. "Moving lelblon and Goy Heollh Core lnlo lt>e Mainstream,· Mor 1)-16, George WCllhlnglon Un......ny WCllhlnglon, D .C • IN 1~11 WEBCS IGIOdlllloled Dixie lnvllollonof. Allonlo. Mor 27-30 16 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 10, 1986 Couple. 31 (Latin) and 47 (Anglo}, seek unique person w/o hangups for mutual grat1ftcat1on Marraed or divorced grven preference Habttual sare sex a must• No dopers. barf lies or prostrtutes Short letter ~~:~rM~lsc1~~~ply Reply to -~CALLI NG ALL CUDDLE~ Are you seeking a unique t0d1v1dual. quiet, sincere, en1oys candlehght. rom­ance, love included in sex Saturday mati­nees, cuddhng and dating? Do you enioy occas!Onal cocktatls or herb. card games plants, fantasies. art<sts astrology, cats and hating fun at home? It most of the above appeals to you, you may ha•e made a new fnend II the following descnpt1on appeals to you as well, we could ha•e a potential relationship as lovers I am GJW·M. tall and slender, mid-twenties beard. mustache. blue-green eyes. long brown hair and •ersat1le You should be 25-35. medium to well built. s·e· or taller. bluish eyes "1!rsatileor Greel<-act...,e. and pcssess mos1 of the quahtaes or interests listed above Only senous need respond Please no lats. femmes users. or quick sex addicts Reply Blind Box 272-S c/o Voice GIW M 24, 5'10", 1601b$ ,-ti(();.";;""ria­r/ eyes moustache. attractJV8 Like music, handicrafts coolung, 1ogg1ng. irre.erent humor Would hke to meet stable, tntelb­gent. non-smokmgldruggmgG/W M. 27- 40 with similar stats and fikes '86 has got to be better than '851 Wnte John, Blind Bo• 272-C cto Voice GWM 35. 6'1", iss. brownl~e People tell me I'm goad looking I work out three tunes weekly Architect with stable life. into k1ss1ng, cuddling and lots of healthy, safe sex Seeking like minded guy 2(}-40 for sharing and possible relat1onsh1p. My photo for yours Wr te and tell me about ~~~~x l~}_~c1:'::~1~ppens Reply OVER-SEXED, OVER-SIZED? Handsome. well·hung. Greek versatile GWM desires outrageously well­endowed. 1nsat1able, n1cely-bullt, tap man (or Greek versatile) Only serious callS from o.er-n1roers. please! (713) 526- 3979 AN ORDINARY GUY Well educated G/W M 38. sincere. hon­est discreet Seeks same R"lltv Blind Box 271-S c/o Voice ------- Get Yiu. M•ter<Mdl No Cl9dll Necet1- Nry. Colletenl depoet required. Atao 32 119netura loen •nd IO lrff grant loce · tlonol (713) 520-9029. (See Emptoymenl) Mature gayeoupte seeking other gay per­sons In the Splendora/ Porter area for rnend"11p and socializing Call Larry ~ Tom at 1 ~9-1507 GWM, 32, 6' blo;;delblue, nice build masculine. stable, honest Wants to start 86 with mascuhroe stable, honest. GWM. 211-40 Not into heary bar scene with health aecual appetite but not promiscu­ous Into real goad times and possible rerat1onsh1p Oescnpt1ve 1etter with phone number appreciated Reply Blind Box 271).T, Clo Voice Protw M 3' -5-·e-·.-1-7_5._s-toc-ky.- _11a_1_ry Lo.e to CIW dance. g"'e massa995. share quiet times Seelt ng hairy W/M 35-50 non-smoker with same likes Lee 713- 468-1563 5--dtocounted dental plan! s..em to 3141 No waftl"9 period! Only $11 month. Frff x-rar-: Frff cleaning. (713) 520-9029. (See Emptoymenl) PtiONE SEX Our ser.1ce connects Homy Guy• 24 hrs a day Do It now for less than $3 50 an hour (415) 34&-6747 OUR POLICY on Se>tually·E.phc1t Ad;8; tis1ng The Montrose Voice does not belie•e that humans engaging 1n consent­ing seJtual acts with one another 1s immoral Our readers are encouraged to advertl$8 here to seek relationships, encounters ac!Ventures etc All ac!Vert1s- 1ng should. however not contain lan­l!::," J; that wquld oflend an unsuspecting ACLAsiiFJED AFFAIR? Jonn Preston and Fr-rick Brandt can show you how to have ac!Ne fun or play pass"e games w~h the personal ads In !hell new bOOk, • Clasa1tied Afla11s they11 tell you how to wrlla an ad that really stands out, what to expect when you place or respond to an ad. and 8\len what all those tunny lrtlle 1bbr811iat1ons mean Send S8 to"Clasa1fiedAfla1rs " Aly­son Pub Dept P-5. 40 Plympton, St Boston.MA 02t t8 (Also1ncluded wdlbea coupon for SS on on your next Personals 1n your choice of 25 gay publications Including the Montrose Voice ) - - PLAY SAFE Sale sex IS fun, erotic Play safe. for your sake, for your partner's sake YARD& GARAGE SALES HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce It here then stand back for the crowd Call 52&-&190 or.,.,, the Voice 81 408 Avondale to place your yard sale announcement Reading the Monlrose Voice Ev Fri That's because no other publication in the world covers the news of your neighborhood-Montrose-as thoroughly as the Montrose Voice. In tact, no other publication in the world has even a SINGLE journalist assigned fulltime to Montrose. Not the Post, not the Chronicle, not lWf, not the Forum, not lnnerVi6'N, not Town. Each of those other publications have their own attributes. But Montrose news is not one of them. Montrose n6\Ns is what we do better than anyone, with THREE fulltime journalists (Linda Wyche, Connie Woods and Pete Diamond) who report only on the news of Montrose. And partly because of our extensive news coverage, the Montrose Voice leads all other publications in Montrose circulation-by thousands and thousands. The Voice now distributes 12,000 copies each Friday in Montrose-reaching an estimated 33,000 readers. That's thousands more any of the other local community publications. Ifs even more circulation-per issue-in Montrose than the Post or Chronicle. When it comes to Montrose N6\Ns, the Voice is the Choice. The Montrose Voice In Montrose, Nearly Everybody Reads the Voice! Montrose Voice Classified Advertising ::,: c ,,.°'A' -oro:.r~~~:,'~~"!rl"~h;J.S,::~':'en~~~!r,7::6 ,., Fa1 ,.,. 1rd1stM ty9dYttrl•s1np THE HEADLINES: Headline words in bold type, centered, are $1 each word (minimum $3 per line). (Centerell bold headlines can also appear within the text or at the end of the ad. and are also $1 per word, with a minimum of $3 per line.) THE TEXT: Each word in regular type is 40¢. (Additional regular words in "ALL CAPS" or Bold Words not in all caps are 55¢ each. Additional BOLD WORDS in all caps are 70¢ each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each add1t1onal word like this 40¢ THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each add1t1ona1 word like this 40¢ THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLD, $9.00 Then each add1toonal word like this Is 40¢ ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WORDS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE 55e EACH Addltlon1I bold wordl Ilk• this In text 1r1 55C 11ch. ADDITIONAL BOLD, ALL CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer, make no copy changes during the run. pay for the full run in advance. and deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same conditions and deduct 25% BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number. We'll conf1dent1ally forward all responses to your ad to you by mail or you can pick them up at our office Rate is $3 for each week the ad runs (Responses will be forwarded indefinitely, however, for as long as they come in.) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mall your ad in or phone 11 in. You can pay by check. money order, Mastercard, Visa, American Express. Diner's Club or Carte Blanche. Or we'll bill you . DEADLINE: Classified ads received by 3pm Wednesday will be placed in that week's newspaper. Ads received later will be placed in the following week·s newspaper. ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number clo Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006-3028 It will be for­warded, unopened, to the advertiser. Enclose no money. ADDITIONAL NOTES: A •·word" is considered anything separated by "spa· ces." except hyphenated words are considered 2 words when each segment 1s a recognized word 1f 11 stood on its own. A complete phone number, including area code. is 1 word. City, state and zip is 3 words. bold line----­bold line----~ text words: bold line Use addll1onal paper 11 necessary CATEGORIES D Announcements 0 Accomodallons (lodging for Houston v1s1tors) O Cars & Bikes 0 Commercial Space 0 Dwellings & Roommates O Employment & Jobs Wanted 0 Items For Sale 0 Models, Escorts, Masseurs 0 Personals D Pets o Rides o Travel 0 Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AD UNDER IN THE "GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY" OPPOSITE PAGE ' ___ bold headline words at $1 each (minimum $3 per line). regular words in text at 40¢ each: - ALL CAPS regular words in text at 55¢ each: Bold words In text at 55¢ each BOLD ALL CAPS in text at 70¢ each; Blind ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad in 11 mailed to me. $1.25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Times __ wffks: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) O Also. I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week I have enclosed (or will be billed or charged, as indicated below) an additional 0 $29 for 6 months or 0 $49 for 1 year. TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged METHOD OF PAYMENT 0 Check enclosed 0 Money order enclosed O Cash O VISA charge 0 MasterCard charge 0 Diners Club charge O Carte Blanche charge 0 Amercian Express charge 0 Bill me If charging. card expiration date Credit card number Signature Name Address_ Phone(s) for verification of ad, 1f necessary MAIL OR BRING TO Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 10am-5·30pm JANUARY 10, 1986 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 MON TROSE RESOU RCES SELECT£D STATE. NAT ORGANIZATIONS Bar Owners AMI\ ot Tx (BOAT)-720 Brazot lfl01 Aultin--(512) .. n-3333 A1g,sg~:'~:,r;~d~pe~:,1~s ~~~ WW\tngton OC 20003. (212) 547·3101 Gay & La.btan ~ Aan-POBA. OktChe .... Sta New York NV 10011-(212) 9MH822 G•y R.ghta Nat Lobby-POB 1892, WHl'Ungton, 0C 2CX>13-f202> S4&-1fl01 Human Rights C.mp•ign Fund- POB 1396, Wuh­ong! on. OC 20013-(2021 046-2025 Lambda Leg•• Oefe111&- 132 W 4Jrd New York. NV 10039-(212) 9'44-IMM lesb..,,,..Grt Rightt Advoc.ates-POB 121. Austin 78787 Mech• Fund for Human Rights POB A. Old CheflN $11_ Nrtw Yori!. NV 10011 -(2,2} ~ Nat A.an of Bustness Councill-Box 15145, San FrMCllCO. CA 94115-!•tS) 88$-6363 Niii Aun of Gay & lesbian Demo Clubl-1742 Ma• Av SE. Wuhongton. 0C 20003- (2021 r,47-3104 ,.... Gay ..._Ith Educ foundaUon- POB 784 New Yoo NY 10036- ~212) S&l-6313 °' Or GrMnberg (713, 523--5204 ~ Gav Righb Advocates-6-IO cuiro S.n Fra,,_ OSCO CA 94114--(415) ~4 Mitt Gay TaP Force fNGTF) -80 5rh A¥ New VOfti. NY 10011-i212'J 14~ NOTFt C<>tlsli.,.. (llOC) 22'1·7044 (-New VOttt State} Rur1r Cmfitton CIO W•H•· Zangh6, Box 611. Blum. TX 7££i27 T• Gay/lesben Task Force-POD At(, Denton 76201-(111' '87-82tlll US Tranave.t le Tr.·1stn~ Conttct SvC-1017"8 E Ptlte. SNttie ~122 1206) $24-12f.16 ~NTION ORGANIZATlo;;;s­Check your listing. We list hara each week name of organ1Zat1on, address, phone. regular meeting dates and times. and ~n~~~r~~t~~:~o~~:~t1:nf~r~a~rd~':~n~~! Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006 THE MONTROSE VOICE­INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY AidiorAIDs-~14_77266-S~ An A cape11a Chorus, ChUrch of Christ-POB !!673' 772!!6 A Place 1n the SUn-52~_c2_:·7_::69;c5::_ ____ _ ACLU-1236 ViGray~4-5925 AIDS Hotl1ne~529-3211 (Gay & Le.Olan Sw1lch­boardl ~y Atne.t1--P08 ee111. 77266- Altro Rainbow SOciety for the Deaf '""'52<Mi732 (TTYI AvOl"lda18 AHn-POe 860$4. 77266 meets 7 30pm 2nd Thurs, Women's Chnstlan Ctr, 310 Pac1hc ~c;;f1"·· M-ouine----6130 SW fwy ~~~r:2_~-Roben Moon. d•r 209 Bering Memonal Unned MethOd•st Church- 1440 HarokJ-5~1017' 1 ... c 10 50am SlJn Chok:81 Unhmited-POB 70996. 77270· 529- 3211 (Gay & U1btan Sw1tchboarcO meett lpm 3td SI.In. Masterson YWCA. 3615 W101a. •·Social ~~ ~~lwnate f nday1, Sunday brunch Chi.&t.an ChUrch orthe Good Shephe1d-1707 ~~rose· 1vc 1pm. Sun, Bible study 7 30pm Church olChO.tlan Faith- 1&40 W~ 529-8005 aves 10 458m Sun, Bible study 7 30pm Wed Rev Chris A Rice. PHtor ert;zef,,-tOr Human Equality (CHE)-P08 3045, 77253-680-3346. 937-3516 meet 2nd Tun. Hou HouM, 1817 Fannin, 9th ftoor act1v1ty room Cl••. Lelbtarl Mo:ihers Group-Sarra "7J.3709 meets 2nd a. 4th Thuc1. Otgntry Ct.~r,_,- -­Clippers- 3"2-6502 Cott ..s·a-meets et Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Bruos-52tr9192 Committee for Public Hellth Awareness-PO& 3045. 77253-~. 522·50&4 Shanng Group tor the Wowed W11r rriieet Frl. 7~8pm, MontroM Cout'sellng C_tr ______ federatlOn or en.noes Ul'l1ted tor Social Servt-t: t!f.~~!~~u':'~t.8' a~~~~:~ MontroM Chmc. Montroae COunaefing Ctr 111 Un1tanan Chureh-52t0 Fa"nin-526-1571 l'IC 11151m Sun Frontrunnera-Joe 520--8019 or S.t...ador 529- 1280 runs Sun, Tues I. Thi.Ira Memorial Perk Tenn11 Ctr GaYi"'Ahve shanng Experter1ee ~GASE) 528~ 1311. 526-0891 Gay & Lesbian Arctw"" of Tx aff;i1ate of IJH Inc Gay· &~Mormons· 1713 W•thelmer #6040. 77098--568-,.13 Gay & L•btln Student Assn at UOtH-Box 314 4800 Celhoun-529-3211 (Gay & LHb1an Sw11chboard) Gay & L•btan Sw1tchbolr0::-POB eiSet, 77286-529-3211 tnf0tmat10n, counleiing. ref4 errala, TTY. AIDS Hotline Gay As .. ns & Friendl-2615 Waugl'\ Or •289- ~7(!8. 7~ ,_,. 3pm 2nd & lat! Sun Gay Fatl\era-3217 Fanrdn-528-0111 Gay & L•bi..n Hispantali ftidOI PC>e~ 77'2e0-882-1•78 ,,_,. 2nd Mon. Dogn<ty Ct• ~.41hanc~ Oay People in Chnsban Science-Bo• 613. Bel· .. 1,. n .-01-us-2'6.&2 GOy Pol'11esl c;;e.. (GPCI POB ~ 772e6-52'1· 1000: meets 3217 Fannin 11t & 3td Wed (Hou) Gey Pride Week Committee-PCB 66821. n2M-Stan F0td 523-7644 or Cathy L.nahlrt 1168-8258 GrMter Montroee Bus•nell GuUd-M1ke NMIOn &30-0309 or Bruce Wooliey 529-8464 meets 7pm, -'th Wed, Brennant R•t, 3300 Smith The Grc>Yp theater Vrt"ork1hop-Joe Watts 522- 2204 meets 7pm Thurs Oignrty Ctr. 3217 Fannin Hazelwitch Product1on1-2815 Waygt\ Or 1266, nooe lesbian concerts. tree mailing Uat Homopt\lle jnterfa•iri Alliance-729 Manor- 52~6969 Hou Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers A Scientaats-POB 66631. n006-439-1878· meets 7pm 4th Tues Hou 81r Owners Assn (HOBOl-clo Brazos River Botiom 2.tOO Brazos-528-8192 meets 2pm 2nd Wed Hou Commun ty Clowns-e62-831• Hou Coundl of Clu bs-526-e()S( Hou Olto Prot-oonals-523-6922 ~59 meets 7:30pm 2na Tues Hou Gay Heath AdWcates ~ Melita 7 3(Jpm 1st Sat Hou Gay Students Asln-747-3098 tiOu lnter·Faith A1 aance contact through lnte­gnty/ Hou Hou Motorcycle Club- -clo Mary's 1022 Wes1· hetmer-~1 Hou North Profeas1on111-P08 3840. HumbJe n3"7-81n 11 821-7126 meet 7 30pm 2nd Sit Hou OutdoOf Group (HOG)-521·364' or Jim 68()-31 .. ~H 1nc-POB 16041, 77222~9'· 1732. 52&-701• 1fhh1ted groups are Interact. B'zzarr10·1 A Piece 1n the Sun. Montrose Art Alh1nce. G1y & L•b11n Arch•v• of Tx. Gay & LMb•an SwitchbOard, Montrote Symphonic Band, bOard meet 7 30pm 11t Thurs (varied locations) edueation11 lon.im 7 30pm 3rd Thul"I Ingersoll Speakera· Bureau-POB 381. a.Ilaire 77401~ tnt90rity1Hou (Ep11copahen)-POB 66008, 77268-524~1'89 meets 73lpm 2nd & ·tth Mon, Autry Houle 6265 Main ~nteract-POS 16041. 77222-529--7014 KPH RoO.O. FM-ll0-.,9 Lovett Blv0-526- 4-00Ct ""tltMililthrOugh" ie.bia,,..feminlst pgm Fn I 1~11am. "W'llde 'n Stein- gey pgm Thurs 7 30- 9()()pm In Montrose, Neady Everyone Reads the Vot'e KSIAIDSFoundatton-3317 MontrOM Box 1i55, 77006-62 .. ·2437 AIDS RrD Reduction (Safi Se•) Workshops 8pm 2nd & 4th Mon in conjunc­tlOQ. wtlh Montrose CotmH ng C.nter Jerry Kiiuffman cancer fu.nd-778--4106 Krewe ot Hydra-811 G~acetand -8111 Mercier 726-1032 ~•mbda Ctr Gay AJcohohC1 &Aii,..On-12\4 Jo Annie-521·9772 ~~,~~C'~~~~nd ·Pfotect ot Hou Tho Little Churcn-212 rarv0-522·7~ ...,. 2:3Cll>a1Sun Living Waler Church-271-6-472 (S-10pm) aves epn, sun. Holklay Inn "'"'" ' Bloclgett. ROY Jeanne Leggett Lone Staf Ni'-ud=ost,..G"'•-:o-u-..--=PO=e-=1-:-.o:;=12~.~n~2"'1,.,.., ~the~( Police Sub-Statton-t02 W•theimer-529--3100 Lutherln1 Concemed-meeta at Grace luthe-- 1an Church, 2515 Waugh-521--0883, 453--1143 meet 2nd & 4th T1.1ee lt\'en1ngs McAdOf)' Hous.-c./o KS.AIDS Foundabon. 3317 Montrose Box 1155-524-2437 Men Against Oec:eption CourtNY Clut>-POB ;~~;h1~;d~S4,,;!r:t,!~~~ay & Letb1an =~~Cnc~~~r~~~11~~ .. ~~; luc• dtnner 7 30pm tat Sat rnonthty. aves 10 •Sam & 7 15pm Sun & 7 15'>m Wod, member· .lhtp inquirer. elm 7 30pm Mon educatlOft c.la.1• Tu• & Wed evw tHou,. M«;Opoi~11;.;an;:;W,=.;;1t1::dc.,E"',_..--,,,._--529---96-1~ Moo!S St S1aphent Epscopal ChU<Ch. 7~ Wod Montrose Art All•anee-es+ 1732, eu.&31" 869-- 5332 affiliate L H inc, meets 2nd Mon Montrose B1Atne91 Guild see G,...t• Montrose 8u1Guilcl MonttOH Church ot Chllst-1700 MontroM- 777.o286 ave 11am Sun M'ontroMClvtCC!ub'-:--:-:-N;:-:•=nc-own--=A-11_n_ Montrose C11n1c-803 Haiwthome 5~ open Mo". Tue, Th~ 6-9pm Montr0te Country Clogoers-456-8881 mffl 1 10pm frt MCCR Church. 1919 Oec1tur Montrose Counaehng Ctr 900 Lo....n •203- 529-0037 AIDS victim support group 8 30pm Mon. women·a Suppcrt Group 7pm Tues. AIDS Risk ReduCtlOn (Safe Sex) Workshops &pm 2nd .. 4ff"I Mon ln COflJUnctJOn wtth KS:AIDSFounaa­llOn ~~trou Singers, gay men·a cnoru1-M ke"'i26: MontroteSoltbo!l LNgue-POe 27272, 77227- 524"3144 Monift>H $pons Aun MSA) see specmc Sub­group ~,. N•ghi (Mixed League) Bowtmg­M ae Weikert at 973-1358 play 9pm Stadium Lann. 8200 BrH'Ml\&ln ~~ ~~~~ \:~~rs;OebboeScon 97~ MSA.VolleybllK-"'•"' 522-1<169 games 7pm Tt.1•. Gregory·lmcotn school, 1101 Taf'I: Montrou Wltci'I subgroup NM.rtown Assn M~mMti81theearn.71C Pacmc 52&- 9'27 dub ntght Thurs NltiOn.i Gay Heatth Education FoundatlOn- 523-6204 =~~~~:~~~~=~om;..·- ..... r10w, Assn ("4onlrose CM<: ciUb).:.1'13 We1thl'imer: mee1 7pm 4th Tuea Neat10wn Business All~7010: meets 7pm 2nd Wed ltberty Bank 1001 Westhesmer New Freedom Ctv'iStian Church- '829 Yale 963-8377 sves !Olm 5un Oweru1en Anonymous-c/o Montrose Coun· ~~ :';::"~,:~:..-= 8ering Church. '"° - Parents & friends ot LestKans & Gays (Parents FLAG~ ._,. 21"" 3td SUn. Presby· tertan Ctr 41 ()akdale Park People-c o NHrtawn Commuruty FtrehOuS&-7 .. 1-2524 Po. 11 uberlCion-POe 6000e3. 112e0-862- 1416 Presby1enens foe L•b1an1Gay Concerrw­Prt9byter1en Ctr "1 Oakdll&-526-2584 rneera 730pm 2n<1 r- Recreational Land Fund Committee-Mustang Club projOCI Rice Unrv Gay 'lesbi1n Support Group-5~ 3211 (Gov & Lesboan Switchboard! Rothko Ch--'"°" Sut RO.s--=52•-9839 ~ ~Jmg tor ht•threaten1ng iures .. -622·50&4 ~::.:. c~~~S::ds ~0:0 eou• Society tor the Promotion ot Amazon Sadc>­MaochlllTI (SPASM1-POB 70996. 77270-Goy a. Lesbian SwltchbO&l'd 529-3211 Sunc.nce Canle Co aoc111 club-clc> The Bam 710 Pocffoc-52&-9427 Tx Gay Rooeo Alan-Drawer 1194 POB 86973. 77006-526-SOOI ~~~~~ounOatlon 1815 fx Rllders-c:to Ripcord. r~ .. ""FaiN.;;::521-2192 wwe &w1ong-M1n 723-1'55 "°"" 1;30pm Sun. Post Oii< Bow•ng L..- Westoyan re1to...,,ip-1164-ll899 ----­= t=~~J Arts Assn-1001 W•thet-wn8t Ever "Happened to Baby Jane Mixed ::~1 .. ~~!~~tad~~L!!°243 eve1 Women 1 Bo• ng LNgue--Oebbie 973-1358' &pm Sun Stadium Lann, 8200 Braeamarn Women's LObby Ama~ Chelsea-52t-OC39 wom;n;-SottbaU -L•gue-6431 -P.nnn.dt> 77008- Ca!l!y or Coralyn~~ __ BAVTOWN-Baytown Lamb<1a Group-427-1378 meets 730pm 000 Fn CONROE-Conroe A•ea Lambda c;.,, M-1-1 3"-6470 Conroe Aru LOll>oans· Ka!l!y at ("°917~ meet 8Pm 2nd & «h Fn GALVESTON-Lambcla A-.Olies Anonymouo-7~1401 Metropol tan Community Church ot Gatveaton lslancl-1~4 8t~w1y 765--7626 QUICK REFERENCE (Tear Out & Post by Phone) AIDS Hothne-!t2'9--3211 AMBULANCE-222-3434 CttYHall-222-3011 Doctor-Me adrl 0t ~3211 FIRE-227-2323 Goy & L-n Swhchboard-529-3211 Lawyet-.- ads or 529-3211 Utnry-224-5"' Montrooe Counoelmg Center-~7 "'ONTROSE V0tCE-521H1490 POLICE-222-3131 ~;'::" WestNimer Polee Sut>-StatJon-529- Toxl~"°40 or 236-1111 lime, lemp. WNther-$U·7171 ADS BY THE INCH In add1t1on to our regular classified rates of paying "by the word," you can purchase space here ··by the inch ... When buying by the inch, you can include special art, logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3" $49 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3• $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3" $39 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 10, 1986 Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory To advertise 1n this page. coll 529-8490 dunng business hours ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep ii listed here on the Montrose Voice where l1teratty thousands turn each ~eek VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS - Advertise your professional service through a Vooce Classified Call 5~8490 Pay by check or charge ot on your American Express. Diner's Club, MasterCard. Vosa or Carte Blanche AUTO SALES LEASING MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba. 97!>-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ASCOT LEASINGTTD-. -- 1303 Upland. 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN JACINTO MOTOR LEASING 10100 Richmond •100. 781-8566 SEE OUR DJSPLA Y AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Also see ·ears & B-;k'es· on "Montrose Classofoed" page AUTO REPAIR ALL PAINT & BODY SHOP 1510 Leeland. 659-3131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ~--- WEST GRAY AUTO (TEX STATE INSPECTION) 238 W Gray 528-2886 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Ma1or/Minor Repairs Gas or Diesel Electrical Repair 526-3723 2716 Taft Road Service TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1~11 Taft. 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE NEARTOWN KARZ - 1901 Taft, 524·8601 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE AUTO REPAIR & BODY SHOP 2001 Harold. 522-5255 528-1940 BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS TOmm) B ber Shop. Haor cuts $9.00. House calls St 5 00 & up. For onto 528· 8216 BOOKKEEPING s;;;;-lso "Tax P7eparatoon·• calegory COUNSELING Dan Kuchars-Counselong 5~9004 DANIEL J. KUCHARS __ _ 5~9004 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DENTISTS Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westheomer Houston. TX 77006 Monday thru Saturday Hours by Appoontmertt (713) 524--0538 EYEGLASSES TEXAS STATE OPTICAL 2525 Unoversoty (Village). 528-1589. & 4414 South Main, 52~5109 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Eyeglas!I fra,;;;s;;p;;ed New frames for your old ~nses changed while you wa•t Eyeglass prescr1pt1ons foiled Many. many frames 10 choose from. Come see us al Smith Optocoans. 4313 Auston. Austin & Wheeler Mon Sal 7 30am-6 30pm. 524- 8884 FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch 528-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GIFTS. PARTY GOODS TIS THE SEASON 1966 W Gray (Roover Oaks!. 520-5700 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GOURMET SHOPS SAY CHEESE 3626 Wes1he1mer (Highland Village). 621 · 1825 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GYMS - OLYMPIA FITNESS & RACKETBALL CLUB 8313 SW Fwy. 988-8787 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPB CLINIC 5401 Dashwood #10, 661 -2321 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HOME AIR CONDITIONING TIME FOR A/C REPAIR? $25 plua parta. CALL 643-<>391. JANITORIAL SERVICE PLUS 528-6245 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Cleaning al ots best for less• 522-6967 JEWELRY KENESCO LTD. 1101 Post Oak Blvd, "9-558, 680-8286 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MEDICAL CARE ----sTEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D 2801 Ella Blvd , suole G, 868-4535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MOVING MOVEMASTERS Boxes too' Visa. MC. AMEX welcome 1925 Westheomer 630-6555 PRINTING SPEEDY PRINTING 5400 Bella ire Blvd 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE REPAIRS COnStrL __ Jn Repairs, Brocks. paints. fireplaces. extenor lumber. shingles. shMlrnckong. 987· 1410 Charles Young­bl1 >d SHOPS. RESALE TAX PREPARATION TAX RETURNS Professionally prepared Foryourspecoal needs lnd1v1dual and business Computerized 468-6199 anytime TIRES ... ·~" 529-1414 ~ TMI 11-~ ""'Cl ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview 3 Blks Wesl of Montro•e TRAVEL TRAVEL CONSULTANTS Complete travel arrangments. All services FREE. Open Monday through Friday 9am-5:30pm 2029 Soulhwest Fwy Houston. TX 77098 (713) 5~8464 VACATION IDEAS? See "Vacations· following •·on lhe Town" on the previous page VARIETY WHOLE EARTH PROVISION CO. Alabama al Shepherd. 528-5226 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE VENDING VIDEO YIDEOSCOPE 2016 Montrose. 529-5544 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE YIDEOTREND 1~1 Cal1forn1a. 527--0656 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Also see '"Adult Video ' category HAYING A YARD SALE? Announce ol here then sland back for lhe crowd Call 5~8490 or vosit lhe Voice al 408 Avondale 10 place your yard sele announcement To p l ace an AD i n the Montrose Vo i ce ... just phone us ! 529-8490 10am-S: 30pm Wee~ da·~s Ads can be charged over the phone to a major credit card OR we can bill you later. Keep your working parts in order. American Heart Association \o\'t:'RE FIGHTING Fa< '!OJR LIFE In Mont-ros~, Nea-rly Eve-ryone Reads the Voi'e ~~Pla.y ~safe! Montrose Soap Come on in Baby, It's Cold Out There By the staff of the Montrose Voice When winter roared into Montrose this past week, the conversation turned to talk about keeping warm. One sure fire way to stay warm (next to having another warm body) is to go out. You ask, "go out in this weather?" Sure. The nightspots and businesses provide heat anyway. So why stay home and run up your bill. Who knows? That other warm body may be out there thinking the same thing. -a- The Mary'1-naturally Travel Agency reports that Ken Claude is in Nashvegas. He's going to kidnap Tammy Wynette and force her to cut a hit record -o- The 611 welcomes former Mr. Texas David Pre1ean to the staff -o- There's No Accounting for Taste Dept.: If that gallopping gambler known to frequent Dirty Sally's brings back one more diamond from Las Vegas, management will be forced to start issuing sunglasses to the customers. -a- Heard some where in the vicinity of Main Street that Steve Shimer of 611fame1s buy­ing half of The Venture-N from David Jim is keeping his half. -a- Everyone seems to be buzzing about Gene Howle not Cop(a)-mg anymore. -a- The Galleon is expanding its schedule of festive specials Added to the popular Mon­day schnapps and longneck special is something for every night of the week including Black Jack Fridays through Tuesdays. On Saturday, Jan. 26, all contibutions at the Galleon's Casino Night will go to the THRF 21.06 Supreme Court Appeal Fund. What is this about an all-city bartenders drag show on Feb. 2 at the Galleon. Now that should be a hoot. -o- Stop by Kindred Spirit• this month and say goodbye to manager Kat Chnsope, who 1s leaving. 0 Do all good things have to come to an end? So tong to the Chicken Coop. o- Just heard about The Crul1e Connection. Sounds like 11 might be very interesting. -o- Also of interest are the new faces seen using the new facilities at the Maeterson YWCA on Willa. They have programs that fit any need 'or personality. -o- Members of the Hou1ton Organization of Bar Owners (HOBO) are making some wonderful plans for the winter months -o- Let Us Entertain You Weekend is slated for Feb. 14-16. A George Washington's Birth­day Celebration will be held Feb. 20: and Mardi Gras Madness will take place Tues­day, Feb. 11. ~o- Thinking about getting tanked? Tom'• Pretty Fl1h at 2248 Westhe1mer 1s having a 10-gallon special. JANUARY 10. 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 19 Thl'. C h1rk<'n Coop u·ill rlosl' th1.~ Sundav nillht !Connie Woods photo) -o- Getting back to the Galleon, their popular Monday nights include (as we all know) male strip night, MC'd by Victoria West, and 50¢ Lite tongnecks from Miller. But now also on Mondays. the Galleon has . soe schnapps. This all means you can hve 11 up for literally pennies-with a feast for your thirst and a least for your eyes -o- Saturday and Sunday afternoons at Mary's on the patio. it's 25¢ draft-usually served by someone infamous. Bring your quarters and party at your ''Off1c1al 1986 Party Headquarters." -a-lt isn't Valentine's yet, but the Boulevard Cale has jumped the starting gun w.1th .a nightly (Monday-Thursday) Valentines Dinner Bring your sweetheart and buy 1 blackboard special at regular price, get the second free. -o- Sylvia Reyes continues to provide first class entertainment nightly at the New Driscoll Street Cafe and Cabaret In add1t1on. artists Rock Smith and Sharon Connely have some of their paintings and sculptures on display -o- In Monti:ose, Neady Evei:yone Beads the Voiu~ 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 10. 1986 Gay and lesbian reading =======from====== A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS HOT LIVl:'liG: Erotic stories about afc sex, edited by John Preston, $8.00 The AIDS cns1s has closed off some forms of sexual activity for health-conscious gay men, but 11 has al•o encouraged many men to look for new forms of sexual ex· press1on Herc, over a dozen of today's mos1 popular gay wnter' present new short stones that 1magmatively erottcize safe sex Conmbutors include Toby Johnson, Frank Mosca, Marty Rubin, Sam Steward, George Whitmore and T R. W1tom•ki SOCRATES, PLATO AND GUYS LIKE ME: Confessions of a gay schoolteacher by Eric Rofe:., $7.00 When En<.: Role~ began teachmg sixth grade at a conser­vative pnvate school, he soon felt the strain of a spin identity Here he describes his two years of teachmg from wtthm the closet, his difficult dcc1s1on to come out a1 work, and 1he conse­quences of that dec151on ~sEconn CHflnCf S a novel bv Florine De Veer SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7.00. ls it always harder to accept what 1s offered freely! Jeremy, young and st11l n:uve about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet he chooses to pursue the hand­some and unpredictable Mark. ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and le•bian youth edttcd by Ann Heron, $3 95 Twenty-eight young peo­ple from all over the US and Canada, mostly m high school, share theu commg-out expenences. STOLEN M0.1"ENTS, by John Pre:.ton, $5 00 Who says heroes can't be gay? In the fourth of the "M1ss10n of Alex Kane" senes, Kane and h1' partner Danny Fortclh head for Houston There, they take on a media baron who is mtent on usmg homophobta to build his tabloid's circulation. Also available Sweet Drea81s, Golden Year and Deadly Lies; each star­ring Alex and Danny; $5 00 each EXTRA CREDIT, by Jeff Black, $6.00. Harper King has a boring teaching job, stagnant relationships, and a tank full of fob named after ex-lovers dymg in the same order their namesakes were se­duced. Can you blame him for wanting a fresh start! Enter Mick, a lover from the past talking about their future; Garrick, a ftr,t·year teacher looking for coniunc tions, and not necessarily m the class­room, and young Dean, an oversexed Dennis the Menace making all A's in ome very advanced biology. IRIS, by Janine Veto, $7.00. The retelling of an ancient Creek myth of love, devo­t10n and vengeance - this time with a lesbian theme REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, $4.95. The moving auto· biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na· tional news when he took a gay date to hi~ high 'chool prom MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M. Steward, $7.00. This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas sleuthing through the French countryside attempting to solve the mystenous d1 appearance of a man who is their neighbor and the father of thcu handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stones THE LAVENDER COUCH: A con· sumers' guide to therapy for lesbians and gay men, by Marny Hall, $8 00. Therapy can be tremendously helpful for lesbians and gay men. Yet how many of us really know how to go about choosing a therapist, and how to be sure we can get the most out of therapy! Marny Hall, her•elf a lesbian therapist, has wmten the first book ever to address this sub· ject. THE PEARL BASTARD, by Lillian Halegua, $4 00. Frankie is fifteen when she leaves her large, suffocating Catholic family in the inner city for Montauk, work, and the sea She tells her story with a combmation of painful mnocence and acute vision, beginning with the man in the fine green car who does not mourn the violent death of a seagull agamst his windshield. The simplicity of Halegua's style is reminiscent of The, Color Purple: tt 1s a powerful story of a girl's sudden entry into a harsh maturity MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioli, $13.00 Through some 46 photos, ltaltan photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the begmning
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