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Montrose Voice, No. 31, May 29, 1981
File 008
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Montrose Voice, No. 31, May 29, 1981 - File 008. 1981-05-29. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3911/show/3901.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-05-29). Montrose Voice, No. 31, May 29, 1981 - File 008. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3911/show/3901

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 31, May 29, 1981 - File 008, 1981-05-29, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3911/show/3901.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 31, May 29, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 29, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript May 29,1981 / Montrose Voice / Page 7 Books 'California Crazy' by Alan Cartnal CALIFORNIA CRAZY by Alan Cartnal. Houghton Mifflin, publisher, 2 Park Street, Boston, MA 02107. Hardcover $9.95. Reviewed by Joe DiSabato California Crazy by Alan Cartnal could be called a trashy Hollywood novel if it weren't for the fact that it's all true. It is categorized as "non- fiction" by its publisher, Houghton Mifflin, and Cartnal swears that he is merely the chronicler of real life in Los Angeles. As Cartnal puts it, "Of course I'm a trashy writer, but consider the territory. If you've heard California is bad; it's worse. Everything that anyone can possibly do is being overdone in triplicate: over-drinking, over-sexing, over-drugging, over-spending, over-eating and overindulging in life as an endless pleasure. Reading California Crazy is like eating popcorn: once you start you can't stop. The book is a series of profiles ofthe people who typify various social circles in L.A. There's "the shopper"—Nancy Czar, who has refined the act of shopping to an art (and you haven't shopped until you've done it on Rodeo Drive). There's "the dope dealer"— Ricco, who sells grade-A cocaine out of his Mark Cross briefcase an chauffeur-driven limousine to the wealthy of Beverly Hills. There's Carole, the married Brentwood nymphomaniac who makes it with every hot deli very man, construction worker and waiter in sight. There's Stewart, the real-life model for the Richard Gere character in American Gigolo, who is paid a minimum of $100 per hour ("You must realize, this will be exactly one hour," he tells the woman he picks yp at the pool of a Beverly Hills hotel). And, of course, there's the strata of L.A, society around which all of the rest seem to revolve—gays. As Cartnal once put it, "The Valley ofthe Dolls has turned gay." Not your ordinary, everyday, run- of-the-mill gays, mind you, but Hollywood Gays, what Cartnal has referred to as the "A- Gays." Beautiful boys from all voer the country who descend upon L.A. to find fame and fortune, but who usually end up hustling either at society parties or on Santa Monica Boulevard. It's the gays of Boystown (as West Hollywood is now universally referred to), both rich and poor, like Paradise, the face of the 80s, the most successful model of his generation, who is sure of everything but his sexuality; Liberty, one of the most famous black athletes of his era, who can't afford to be identified as gay but who can't stay away from the pleasures of Boys- town; and Blackie Norton, the gay Godfather, the handsome owner of Ciro's West—the infamous disco/nightclub that serves as the dance hall campus for all the clean-cut, blond California boys that seem to populate every beach movie and Coke commercial. And last but certainly not least, rich Hollywood moguls like Alan Carr (producer of Grease and Can't Stop the Music), whose Hollywood Party to end all parties begins each day at 10:00 a.m., and whose estate is referred to as Mount Olympus. Just sample part of Cartnal's description: There are two things you never discuss in Hollywood. One is drugs. The other is homosexuality. That might explain the presence of straight stars, socialites and business types in Carr's place at night. By day the crowd was gay. The rule of order in the town was that anyone stepping foot in Carr's place fell into one of three categories: brains, money or ass. Even now gorgeous boys—tanned, bronzed, fine-toned, golden. Wasp, blond, blue-eyed, straight- teethed—were descending the magnificantly carpeted stairways from the netherwold of Carr's upstairs bedrooms and floating majestically toward the pool. From his bedroom, Carr would watch them in popsicle- colored Speedo swinsuits marching in unison toward the chaise lounges by the pool, draped in terry-cloth towels. Carr had given such wonders of the world a name: Twinkies. Later, when everyone in tout Hollywood picked up on the term for the golden ones who came to Cinema City searching for fame and fortune, Carr changed the name to Triscuts. Whatever you called them, the town regarded such goings-on as equal to the end of western Civilization. Roman, they called it. Like some emperor in a Bibical epic, they said. And Hollywood loved every minute of it. They had come from Florida, Nebraska, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin, for this. The overstatement. The extravagance. The unequaled decadence. There was nothing like it. Not anywhere. Europe had fallen under the Black Plague of Socialism. Upper-class Europeans no longer had entree to flaunt their opulent lifestyles. London was a mess. New York too provincial and conservative. Only Hollywood could produce a modern wonder like Carr. The last of the Grands Seigneurs. A man who bubbled like champagne and was now sitting in his Sheik Cich Arabian cabana—stocked with overstuffed caramel- colored Valentino pillows—watching every fantasy imaginable appear before his eyes. A living testament that piz- zaz had not vanished from the face of Hollywood. And pizzazz is what California Crazy is all about, written from the viewpoint of an insider. It's a cultural chronicle of life in "El Lay"—both gay and straight. Cartnal, a former staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, editor at New West magazine, a current contributor to Esquire, an editor at Los Angeles Magazine, and a regular guest on ABC's A.M. Los Angeles with Regis Phil- bin and Cindy Garvey, knowing hereof he speaks. "Of course, I'm a gay wri ter," says Cartnal, "but it's not a big deal to me. I've been very public about being gay. I came out of the closet on television—told my whole story to millions of viewers. I wrote California Crazy and the sections of the book about the gay world in El Lay from the viewpoint of 'so what.'" "Some people may read about Boystown and get very threatened. That's where they are about gayness. To me, it's just one part of my life. I think Hemmingway wrote about his world, Fitzgerald about his. This is the society I entered, I found fascinating, that I want to reveal to my readers. The time has come for a cultural reporter about gay times." Reviewer DiSabato is a marketing executive in New York specializing in the gay media. Montrose Art Art This Week in Montrose (Saturday, May 30. through Friday, June 5) Art League of Houston—1953 Montrose-523-9530 All Media Open Show noon-4pm Saturday, l0am-4pm Monday through Friday. Boulevard Gallery-1526 Heights Blvd.-869-H733 Helen Orman collages, Elizabeth Hedley paintings, Tina Escudero weaving* and Gary Huntoon pottery l0am-5pm Saturday and llam-opm Sunday. Contemporary Arts Museum— 5216 Montrose Blvd.-526- 3129 The Americans: The Landscape photography exhibition in the Upstairs Gallery (Saturday and Sunday only); Sylvia Mangold: Nocturnal Paintings in the Downstairs Gallery; 10am-5pm Saturday, noon-6pm Sunday, and 10am-5pm Tuesday through Friday. Fine Arts & Collectors Gallery—1776 Montrose — 527-8367 Ira Horvitz and Ron Ratliff oils and Andreas Hadjialexiou pastels 10am-5pm Saturday. Harris Gallery—1100 Bissonnet—522-9116 Larry Samuels paintings and prints 10am-6pm Saturday and l-6pm Sunday. Hooks-F.pstein Gallery-1200 Bissonnet—522-0718 Polychrome wood sculpture and watercolors by Jacqueline Fogel daily except Sunday and Monday. James-Atkinson Gallery— 2015 W. Gray-527-8061 French and American Impressionists 10:30am-4pm Saturday. L'Atelier-1513 W. Alabama— 522-7988 Works by Dan Allison, Gary Huntoon and Marie Letermie llam-6pm Saturday and Sunday. Museum of Fine Arts—1001 Bissonnet—526-1361 Herbert Ferber: Sculpture, Painting Drawing 1945-1980: Upper Brown Gallery;New Accessions in Photography: Lower Brown Corridor; Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Selections from the Beck Collection: Jones and Masterson Galleries; 10am-5pm Saturday, noon-6pm Sunday, and 10am-5pm Tuesday through Friday. Rothko Chapel —1409 Sul Ross Mark Rothko abstract expressionist paintings and Barnett Newman's Broken Obelisk sculpture. St. Thomas University Art Dept. Gallery—3900 Yoakum—522-7911 ext. 292 Graduating Seniors Art Show 10am-4:30pm Saturday, 12-6pm Sunday and 10am-4:30 Monday through Friday. Speedby's Old Print Gallery— 2015-F W. Gray-521-9652 Will Bradley art nouveau prints 10am-5pm daily except Sunday and Monday. Texas Gallery-2012 Peden- 524-1593 Bruce Nauman sculpture 11am- 6pm daily except Sunday and Monday.
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