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Montrose Voice, No. 31, May 29, 1981
File 007
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Montrose Voice, No. 31, May 29, 1981 - File 007. 1981-05-29. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3911/show/3900.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-05-29). Montrose Voice, No. 31, May 29, 1981 - File 007. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3911/show/3900

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 31, May 29, 1981 - File 007, 1981-05-29, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3911/show/3900.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 31, May 29, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 29, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript Page 6 / Montrose Voice / May 29,1981 Feature Tales of Gay Hollywood: An interview with Alan Cartnal By Armistead Maupin (Editor's note: The early reviews include, "The best chronicle of L.A. style" from the New York Alan Cartnal Daily News. "Advance proofs of the hardcover, non-fiction book are being smuggled around town and the word is out that it's a smash best-seller-to-be," said Beverly Hills People. PHOTO BY MICHAEL P. MA RON So San Francisco's Armis_ tead Maupin, author of Tales of the City and More Tales ofthe City, was asked to interview Alan Cartnal, the former L.A. Times reporter whom Women s Wear Daily calls "the Flash Gordon of California journalists," who has written California Crazy (Houghton Mifflin, $9.95 hardcover). It's touted as being a no-nonense peep into the glitz and glitter of Gay Hollywood- naming real names with their naughty doings. The two acknowledged kings of gay gossip—Maupin and Cartnal—visited at Armistead's new cottage in the hills above San Francisco's fabled Castro Street, where Armistead got the scoop on Alan, whose new book is striking terror in the hearts of the biggest stars and richest moguls of the movie industry.) Maupin: Where did we first meet? Cartnal: Do I have to go into that? Well, it wasn't in Gay Hollywood. And it's not in my book. It was at a big Hollywood party in 1979 at Marion Davie's old mansion in Santa Monica. It was on the beach. There were lots of pretty people there. Peter Allen was entertaining the flocks. It had a touch of Surfer magazine— all those blond beachboys. I think you liked it. But I was working and had to be a star- reporter so all I could think of was when will this be over so I can get to Studio One and pick up a trick. Do you mind being called a gay gossip? Sometimes. After all, I'm not just another dizzy queen who fell in love with Hollywood. Of course, I'm a gay writer. But it's not a big deal to me. I've been very public about being gay. I came out of the closet on television years ago—told my story to millions of viewers. Some people may read California Crazy and the section of the book about the gay world and get very threatened. To me, it's just one part of my life. Hemingway wrote about his world; Fitzgerald about his. This is the society I entered; I found fascinating. The time has come for a cultural reporter of gay times. What is Hollywood's attitude toward gays ? Horrible. Disaster time. ... There is no activiy you can engage in which will be disapproved in Hollywood, provided it makes money. Gays are a trend-setting aspect of the film-going audience, so film studios are catering to gay periodicals for advertising. But top stars like Robert Redford and Paul Newman won't protray contemporary gay men. Hollywood is primarily homophobic. The eleventh commandment is still no bars or baths. What do you think gays in Hollywood are looking for? That's easy! Can you make me a star? Can you help me with my career? Sexual climbing is in. Any single man at any Hollywood party is signaling that he is sexually available to the most beautiful or wealthy man or woman at the same party. That gpoes for even the top stars. What about the drug scene? If you've been told it's bad, it's worse. Everything that anyone could possibly do is being overdone in triplicate; over-drinking, over-sexing, over-drugging, over-spending and over-indulging in life as an endless pleasure. You name real names in your book. How did you first hear of gay movie mogul Allan Carr? Who didn't hear about Allan Carr! This man practically invented the word—publicity. I mean, Hollywood agents and movie producers just don't go to Chasen's and Ma Maison in Debbie Reynolds caftans and soiled tennis shoes with full length mink coats. Very few movie producers have blond boys with bulging biceps and sock-it-to-me smiles in their entourage. Carr is a phenomenon. I did a story on him for a magazine. My research lasted six months. He is a central portrait in my book—one of the first inside looks at the private world of a gay movie producer. How about the character called Blackie Norton? Where did he come from ? Blackie's the gay J.R. He and Allan Carr have something in common—they both know how to make fortunes off their fetishes. But Blackie is a pseudonym for a gay disco owner in Boys Town, the gay neighborhood in Hollywood. I wanted to explore a new type of man appearing on the scene—the exploiter of gays who sees them as dollar signs and a market. I wanted to write about a gay con man. I mean, there's a little bit ofthe hustler in all of us, isn't there? You describe show business gays as being very sordid? People in Hollywood are desperate; but gays in Hollywood will do anything for a part, a picture or for success. It's treacherous territory and failure is contagious so the most beautiful boys are reduced to products. To break into Hollywood's upper gay echelons requires that you are not only 100 percent physically perfect, but that you bave the constitution of Godzilla. Who has the real power in Gay Hollywood? Anyone who can make money at the box office. The reporting in California Crazy is all about the gay moguls. They control what are called The Twinkies—the blond and bountiful boys who come to Cinemaland looking for fame and fortune—through their power. The book is all about power. Are you writing more boohs? Absolutely! And also reporting more on Gay Hollywood. It will be interesting to see how many doors are shut in my face because I've (now) told the truth for the first time.
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