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Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002
File 010
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Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002 - File 010. 2002-08-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3893/show/3877.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2002-08-02). Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3893/show/3877

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002 - File 010, 2002-08-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3893/show/3877.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date August 2, 2002
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com AUGUST 2, 2002 9 lOillt PAULA MARTINAC Now that it turns out women have been put at risk with hormone therapy, maybe the medical establishment will pay attention to us Trouble in -je#e HEiAe-tANp Maybe now they'll listen to lesbians WITH THE ALARMING REVELATION that hormone replacement therapy actually increases women's risk for heart disease, stroke and breast cancer, the country may fin.ally be waking up to something lesbian and feminist health activists first talked about 30 years ago — that menopause, like pregnancy isn't a disease to be "treated." The danger of HRT is as big a scandal as Enron or pedophile priests, representing a massive breach of public trust. Millions of women have taken synthetic estrogen to relieve the annoying indications of menopause, like hot flashes, loss of sex drive, mood swings, and insomnia, and also to guard against heart disease and osteoporosis. Doctors have even prescribed hormones to peri- menopausal women — those in their 40s, just prior to menopause — to deal with pesky problems like irregular periods. Without a doubt, straight women have been the primary market for this therapy, which amounts to yet another sexist ploy — like Botox or cosmetic surgery — to convince women that they must halt the aging process. Now many of the women who used HRT face life-threatening health issues that could make feeling sweaty, cranky, tired, .and not in the mood look pretty good by comparison. On the hopeful side, the HRT crisis may help bring the terrible era of overmedicat- ing women to a well-deserved close. In just a few weeks, there's been an explosion of media focus on alternative ways to navigate the trying time that my mother's generation referred to — in hushed voices, of course — as "The Change." And when Katie Couric starts weighing the merits of herbs like black cohosh and valerian for coping with menopause, a lot of women will be listening. WHAT'S NOT BEING SAID IN THE media, though, is that much of the information about alternative therapies isn't new. During the heyday of the women's health movement in the late 1960s and early '70s, feminists critical of the male-dominated medical establishment began learning about their bodies and sharing this knowledge with other women through clinics, workshops, and books like "Our Bodies, Ourselves." In particular, they sought out natural therapies and preventative medicines from Asian and Native American cultures. Not surprisingly, a lot of the healthcare activists who spearheaded this movement were lesbians. Among them was Joan Waitkevicz, an M.D. in New York who often had two choices of remedies to prescribe: a convention^ pharmaceutical one .and an herbal one. If you chose the herbs, there was a well- stocked, lesbian-run apothecary shop in the neighborhood. Many of these lesbian he.alth-care workers brought their valuable knowledge of self-help and natural remedies with them when they volunteered during the AIDS epidemic. Although it's not what it once was, the feminist health movement is still going strong in some areas, including cyberspace. The pioneering Feminist Women's Health Center in Washington state now has branch clinics as far away as New Hampshire and Georgia. Its Web site (wwwfwhc.org) correctly addresses menopause as a wellness issue, not an illness. THAT MAY BE BECAUSE OUR community, just like mainstream America, often glosses over the health concerns of women over 40, until they become manifested in a disease like breast cancer. When was the last time, for ex,ample, that you read about women's bone health in the lesbian and gay press? The concerns of younger lesbians, like pregnancy issues and safer sex, make better copy — that is, when they're dealt with at all. We've also virtually erased the enormous contributions lesbians made to managing our community's wellness. Nowadays it's more popular to diss '70s lesbians for going off the politically correct deep end than it is to praise their groundbreaking work in the area of self-help. What the HRT crisis clearly demonstrates is that health care for middle-aged women is in a sorry state. Ideally, our community would use this information to set up workshops specifically for 40- plus lesbians, implementing the lessons of the feminist health movement. That, of course, means acknowledging that maybe all those granola- and tofu-loving lesbians weren't so crazy after all. Paula Martinac is an author and il syndicated writer and can be reached at IJKoJumn@aol.com The Mostly Unfabulous Stclal Ufa of ETHAN GREEN ly Eric Oner sric_ornerOethangreen.com
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