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Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002
File 005
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Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002 - File 005. 2002-08-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3893/show/3872.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2002-08-02). Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002 - File 005. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3893/show/3872

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002 - File 005, 2002-08-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3893/show/3872.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date August 2, 2002
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript AUGUST 2, 2002 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE IICIIIVIICII IICKW9 Gay group pushes for ratification of women's rights treaty BY RHONDA SMITH Leaders at the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force urged the organization's members last week to lobby for a 22-year-old international treaty created to promote equality for women. "Basic equality for women should be a no-brainer," said Lorri L. Jean, executive director of NGLTF. "yet the anti-gay right wing in America has blocked this treaty for nearly a quarter century." Sean Cahill, director of NGLTF's Policy Institute, said the gay political organization is lobbying for U.S. Senate ratification of the treaty, known as the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), because of its direct impact on women, including lesbians. "Half of gay people are women so it will have a direct impact on lesbians," he said. "But also, it's about equality As a gay man, I should be concerned about this passing as well" The Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted 12-7 on Tuesday, July 30, in favor of ratifying the treaty, which urges nations to remove barriers to equality for women in education, employment, marriage and divorce, health care, and other areas. Under pressure from conservative opponents to the treaty, the Bush administration recently asked the Senate to postpone a vote on it until the U.S. Department of Justice reviews it. Democrats rejected the request. Bush officials and Republicans have said the treaty's text is vague and that they are troubled by related UN. panel reports. They cited one report calling on China to decriminalize prostitution and another chiding Belarus for using Mother's Day to encourage women's traditional roles. Secretary of State Colin Powell said in a letter to Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del., who chairs the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, that while the Bush administration supports the treaty's goals, it wants time to examine the treaty and the "basis, practical effect and any possible implications of the reports." "It's not a long or complicated treaty," Cahill said. "For the Bush administration to say the Justice Department needs to review it is disingenuous. If he's opposed to it, he should come out and say that." Scott McClellan, a spokesperson for the White House, told the New York Times that the administration "strongly supports the goals" of the treaty but has concerns about whether it might infringe on U.S. laws. The ranking Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations committee's. Sen. Jesse Helms of North Carolina, said in a letter that the U.N. panel's findings "are simply out of step with generally held values of democratic nations." Helms is recovering from heart surgery and voted by proxy against the treaty He also has expressed opposition to the treaty and accused supporters of it of having a "radical abortion agenda." Two Republican senators, Gordon THE LOVETT INN Distinctive Lodging and Catering Accommodations Call us for your next out-of-town guest! Historic Accommodations • Corporate Meeting Rooms Banquet Facilities • Jacuzzi Suites • Pool/Hot Tub Near Downtown, Museums and Medical Center We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lovett Blvd. Houston, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 • (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • lovettinn.com YOU'LL LOVE IT! Smith of Oregon and Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, joined the Senate Foreign Relations Committee's 10 Democrats in voting in favor of the treaty Republicans predict uphill battle Before the president can consider the treaty for ratification, two-thirds of the Senate, or 67 members, would have to vote in favor of granting advice and consent for ratification. Lester Munson, a spokesperson for the Senate committee's Republicans, predicted the recent vote would only increase objections to the treaty. "I think we're going to see a lot of people raise their voice with objections and concerns and actual passage on the floor is going to face a stiff challenge," he said. The treaty's supporters hope to schedule a floor vote on it in the full Senate in September, before the midterm elections. The hope is that pressure from women who support the treaty would push moderate Republicans to vote for it. Congress is scheduled to adjourn for summer recess from Aug. 5 to Sept. 3. "The reality is that the right-wing fears that these treaties will undermine their own rigid concepts of the family and religion," she said. "The right wing has used this same anti-woman, anti-gay rhetoric to oppose reproductive freedom and equality for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people, both here in the US. and abroad." Lynne Weil, press secretary for the Foreign Relations Committee, said the full Senate could possibly vote on the treaty in September, if Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) places it on the executive calendar for consideration by the full Senate. Weil also said, however, that placing the treaty on the calendar does not guarantee a full vote will take place. The Foreign Relations Committee approved the treaty for a vote in 1994 but there were "anonymous holds" placed on it by unidentified senators who did not want a floor vote on it. The treaty has garnered little attention since 1980 because Presidents Reagan and George H.W Bush gave it a low priority. The Clinton administration pushed to have the committee consider it in 1994. When Biden became chair of the Foreign Relations Committee last year, Weil said the supporters of the treaty began examining the option of considering it again. "To our mild surprise and pleasure," Weil said, "the State Department under the current Bush administration gave this treaty a more favorable ranking than had been expected." As many as 170 countries have ratified the treaty, which President Carter signed as he was leaving office in 1980. The U.S. is the only industrialized nation, among 21 countries, that has not ratified the treaty Other countries that have not ratified it include Iran, Sudan, Syria, Somalia, Monaco, and the United Arab Emirates. The Associated Press contributed to this report g@[f^D(g@ Sundays at 9am & 11 am Wednesdays at 7pm Noche Espiritual (Spanish service) Saturdays at 6pm 2025 W. 11th St, @ T.C.Jester • 713-861-9149 www.resurrectionmcc.org V. w i ■■ # '."
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