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Montrose Voice, No. 279, February 28, 1986
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Montrose Voice, No. 279, February 28, 1986 - File 001. 1986-02-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3841/show/3816.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-02-28). Montrose Voice, No. 279, February 28, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3841/show/3816

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 279, February 28, 1986 - File 001, 1986-02-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3841/show/3816.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 279, February 28, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 28, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Lif long Re id n w ns de montrose VOICE INSIDE THE VOICE They Have High Hopes Candidates Will Show GPC Set to Begin Endorsements Screenings By Connie Woods 4Yrmtrose \ 'Oll'f-. Sta// Rl'porter 'Brazil' Very Off­Beat Movie Scott Cutsinger, inside The Houston Gay Political Caucus will begin its screening of political candidates in mid­March as the first step in its endorsement procedures for the May 3 primary election. According to Ray Hill, the sub-committee chairperson in charge of screening, there are approximately 40 contested races on the Harris County ballot. "We will probably screen in 28 to 30 races and make endorsements up to that amount," Hill said. 'Liberty Is in Our Grasp' Ga_y Pride Week Committee Selects Theme for 1986 By Connie Woods Montrosee Voicf' Staff Rl•portt•r Kicking off its plans for the 1986 Houston Gay Pride Week, committee members adopted "Liberty Is in Our Gras~" for this year's theme at the first public planning meeting held Sunday, Feb. 23, at the Dignity Center. Federal AIDS Funding Cuts Will Hit Houston By Pete Diamond Montrose \l1Jict• Staff R11portn When the Federal go~ern ment is faced with a large spending deficit, as it is now, it looks for ways to reduce ~pend!ng and th~s s?-ve money. Decidmgwhat programs will be cut and how to be r:nore .efficient without sacnficmg the needs of any government agency Often it's a no­wm situation This year, the Reagan Adminh;tration is facing a record deficit of $202 billion, which makes the program trimming process all the more difficult. One area that is particularly threatened is funding for AIDS research, testing and education. 2 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 28. 1986 A Welcoming Party and Autograph Signing with Evelyn Thomas Saturday, March 1 5:00pm at 2111 Richmond at Shepherd Hear Evelyn Live at NRG singing "Sorry Wrong Number" "High Energy" and more. Sunday, March 2, open at 8pm S~. Pa~rick's Day March 17 ~ And there's going to be Party in the Pages of the Montrose Voice Call now and reserve your space for St. Patrick's Day. And be a part of the party in the pages of the March 14th Montrose Voice FEBRUARY 28. 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 3 'Liberty Is in Our Grasp' Gay Pride Week Committee Selects Theme for 1986 By Connie Woods Montrosee Voict> Staff Reporter Kicking off its plans for the 1986 Houston Gay Pride Week, committee members adoptt•d "Liberty Is in Our Grasp" for this year's theme at the first public planning meeting held Sunday, Feb. 23, at the Dig­nity Center. The actual comment was made by Don Baker, the plan tiff in the Texas Penal Code 21.06 court case, at a recent fund­raiser held in Houston, Feb. 14. Although other themes were suggested as well as a proposal to hold a logo contest, the members expressed concern that the theme should be selected as soon as possi· hie. Co-('hair Stan Ford announced that gra­phic artis~ would be working on ideas for the logo and would be presenting those proposals when completed. Hom;ton Gay Pride Week begins with its kiC'k-off t•vent June 19 and <'ndH with tht• truditionul parade and Spotts Park Rnlly, ,Junf• 2H montrose VOICE ANO 'f w .. · 'AR MONTROSE TEXAS Pop .ll8lt0f1 (NI 1985) 32.000 ,.,..1 traets40101 40102 402-1 a" 12 40502 403a1-d4Q4C• Z p :>089 I• ,,gtwyl 7 7006 77019 po"1 Jn} r 096 Bo ~ roughtvl Shepherd Dr (wesO Allen arkw11y n:>rth Mfl•f'SI .. SI) US S toUhl Lal lude 1Mort1oae 81'1( a1 Westtuumet Rd 1 29' '4'4' J N Lon;tlude 9!!.•1750 W A lude 40 ELE TEO OFFICIALS FOR VONTRC"'.£ • e .... l"IOUSfonC.tyCou J( IC) lilOIB190y 1113 '22· El F anco ue Haffil Cour>ty Comm sioner 1pc I) X'1PrHI0111113)121·61 Wit!., A8nlun co,,.111~ (pet 11 JCH&-1Jk•nf0.111J/221-~ O.b11 D1t1burg Tt• .. Houte nl Aep1....,laT•wH t<ha1 131) T911 SW F*r 1113Jii»I008 Cr1 Washlng1on Te•uSen11ta(Cl•al ·) 1:J23C.roime t11J/6.59·<130 M• li.ey Lelilnd. US Hou• ol Rep•esen1al••t9 •d1$t 1 , l!H95"'•ht1820 •713) 739·1339 The NPwspaper of Montrose EstabliShed 1980 OUR 279lh ISSUE. FEB 28. 1986 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston. TX 7700&-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 DSTABU lN O•'XJ C'P es WMli.ty m Houllon ~h ouari 1'40 ma,OI' d•ll11butt0n ~ts In ltle Monlrote e V age 1'1e Heigl 11 • n1taa pas· on rete f•cttY 2 8 •hmetea ,. .. ,_sh1p 29 <100 weakly 175 :.pies wff~ly ellewhere NII fllJfad JMU·O/ ftJ/8 la1. •01 ~ Hf1m11r•a reat:Jersh ~ 440 w1,. .. ~1y TOTAL DI 181 'JN GlJARANTEEO) 10f\15c)presweekl')' -ot "sf naraa r-Hd8fsh p , '9 840 weell/y Contents copyright 1986 Office hours 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg u '~"-·•cfro L nda Wyche •M•g g aa110T '"'onn1e Woods news Pele Diamond lews Dav1,j Aoumfort odllC "' Bc..ittC..itsmger. B1llORourkertv-• Sieve Warren n•f on.1 rrHIX' ""' ADVERTISING SALES OE AAlMENT Houston (7131 529-8490 EISC'Where Texas (800) 222-1S37 xr 995220 E M•where US (800) 22$-'J227 XT r;J95220 Jerry MuJhOlland •dv.,t41rrg '11T«t<J1 Karen Myrow ercounl Hr'UI v• Founding ,.fomber1 eZer '°"' '!!rose Bus ,ess Gu .::i Gay and l l!Sbian P•eH Auoc1at1on News S.,.v~as Nl-'w ,..,... P•c1I N"ws $8fw1Ce Synd1c1tedfeaturwS.tv11 as & Wr1' s Br11tr1 M< Nat gl I. Un a.al P•ess )yn :l•Clllo NP"'I America Synd11:;are-p. "TMA' 'Hl St!fld add-ess ewe 1ois to 408 A11ond11Ja Houtton X 77006 3028 Ray Hill proposed that the starting time for the parade be delayed from 1:00 p.m. to later in the afternoon based on Houston's summer weather. Co-chair Cathy Lena­han pointed out that boardmember Debbie Holm<'s was trying to attract bands from other cities to participate in the parade. "To delay the parade would virtual1y discourage bands from San Francisco, Boston or other cities because of the diffi­culty to get return flights and be ready for work on Monday morning," Lenahan explained. Dale Beverly also supported changing the time of the parade. "If you want a suc· ce1:1sful Spotts Park Rally then have a later parade. If not, have a later parade any· way," he commented. When the time change came to a vote, a 5::JO p.m. starting time passed. During this difiCUM'tion, parade entrance fees were <·stnbli!o>hed at $150 for businer-;ses and $100 for non-profit organizationi-;. [n oth<•r husiness Carolvn Collins told the jlroup that sel<'ction of.the grand mar· Hhnl for the parndE' would be held at thP huitt puhlic mt•<•ting hl·fore Gav Pridt• Wt<•k. . T STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSM/1TED DISEASES AIDS;KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON -FRI. 8.·30AM 5 PM SAMf. flA Y APPOINTMENT MON • WED .. FRI. EVENINGS AND SATURDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY Twelve Oaks Tower 4126 Southwest Frwy #1000 Houston. TX nw_7 62I-n71 "To be eligible to vote, one must attend at least three public meetings inc1uding March 2.1, April 27 and June l," she explained to the members. All of the meet­ings will begin a 4:00 p.m. at the Dignity Center. In addition to the tentative schedule of events printed in the February newsletter, Lenahan asked the members if there were other events to be proposed. Phyllis Frye, president of the Greater Montrose Business Guild, said that her organization planned a business building workshop and trade fair tentatively sche­duled to be held at the Allen Park Inn. The workshop would be held Saturday. June 28 from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. with a choice of morning and afternoon work· shops. The cost of business workshops would be $10 for non-members of the guild. The trade fair. featuring area businesses difiplaying their wart's, would be free to tht' public. The cost to the participating husin<'sses would he $25 earh. She said the guild also planned to hold a lun<·heon in conjunction v.ith the work· shop und trade fair foaturing a kc~·note speaker from thf-' city j!ovemment The coi:;t would bf> .,.25 for membPrs and $:30 for non·members. The Montrose Art Alliance would offer an art exhibit on Monday, June 23 from 7:30 to 11:00 p.m. Joe Watts with the Group Theatre Work­shop proposed a live theater presentation for Tuesday, June 24. Annise Parker, president of the Houston Gay Political Caucus, announced plans for a community awards dinner to be held Friday, June '1:1. It was pointed out that the Gay and Lesbian Hispanics Unidoe had already scheduled an event for the same night. The Bering Memorial Methodist Church will host a pancake breakfast on Satur­day, June 28,from 1 l:OOa.m. to3:00p.m. A pet show will follow at400p.m.sponsored by Couples Other tentative events include com­memoration of the Raid of Mary's, Friday, June 20; Sportf; Day Dinner, Saturday, June 21; Walk for Unity and D.J. Spinoff, Sunday, June 22: Day of Remembrance, Thursday. June 26; Band Concert, Satur· day, June 28; and the parade and rally, Sunday, Junt' 29. 4 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 28. 1986 GPC Set to Begin Endorsements Screening By Connie Woods Montrose \lo1ce Staff Reporter The Houston Gay Political Caucus will begin its i:;creening of political candidate!'.' in mid·March as the firttt step in its endor­sement procedurei; for the May 3 primary election. According to Ray Hill, the sub­committee chairperson in charge of acreening, there are approximately 40 con­tested races on the Harris County baUot. "We will probably screen in 28 to 30 races and make endorsements up to that amount.." Hill said. He pointed out that the endorsements are the reason the caucus exists. ''It's about U>lling people who they can bettt invettl their votes in." he explained. Thiit year's elections include governor, state justicett, judgea; at the county level as well as precinct judgeb. All members of the caucus are invited to participate in the screening process, according to Hill. He said, "The best screen era are those with no previous politi­cal experience of any kind." To participate in the screening. inter­ested people must join the caucus now. Hill all'«~ pointed out that people who wish to vote in the April 2 general caucus endorise­ment. 8 must join the GPC by March 3. The current screening process has been used by the GPC for the past six years. Hill !!laid that three to five members screen each candidate in an hour-long meeting Dunng this meeting, candidates are askf'd questions about the GPC question· noire and then scored on their answers Additional follow·up questions are then allowed. Afterwards, tht> memberis make recommendations to the screening com· mitt..ee. The screenin~ committee then takes its recommendations to the full caucus as a final step in the endorsement process. "To re<-eive endorsements." Hill said. "it requires the general caucus vote.• In addition, no candidate is considered for GPC endorsement unless the candidate asks the caucus for endorsement consider­ation. H111 pointed out that the caucus adopted a new resolution this year concerning the election. The resolution states that in con­letited races in which no one screens, "do not vote in this race" will be printed on the card. The rationale of the resolution is to encourage candidates to seek the GPC endorsement. according to Hill. Based on the GPC's non-partisan policy, Hill explained that it is conceivable that the caucus could endorse a Republican and a Democrat for the same race during the primary election. However. in the November election he explained that the caucus will endorse one perl"on who could be of any political party. KS/ AIDS Foundation Acting President Dies By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Shock, 1orrow, a deep sense of loss. That was how many people throughout the community reacted foltowing the death of Jamee F Beecher, 36, on Monday, Feb. 24 . Memorial APTvlN>S for BeecherwPre held Gay and Lesbian Alcoholism Professionals Have a New Meeting Place From a PreBB Release The National Association of Lesbian and Gay Alcoholism Professionals (NALGAP), Texas chapter, recently announced that its regular monthly meetings will now be held at the Montrose Counseling Center. The meetings will be held the second Sat· urday of each month from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. and will be held in the MORE Pro­gram group room. Suite 201. NAI...GAP is a non-profit organization dedicated to forming a network of com. munication and support for gay and les~ bian alcoholism professionals; improving treatment for lesbian and gay alcoholic clients~ a88isting alcoholism agencies, and helping professionals to better serve their gay and lesbian clients. The March meeting will be held on Sat­urday, March 8. The featured speaker will be Robert H, Hodge, director of the MORE Program at the Montrose Counseling Cen­ter. The MORE Program is the only gay/ leebian alcoholism outpatient program in the state of Texas. For further mformation on NALGAP, contact Ron Covey in Houston or Galves­ton at (713) 921-3132 or (409) 761-4463; in Dallas. Holly Holloway at (214) 391·3236. The Montrose Counseling Center is located at 900 Lovett Blvd. yesterday (Thu.,,day) at St. Stephens Episcopal Church. According to Michael Wilson, immediate past president of the KS/AIDS Foundation of Houston, Beecher became ill about a month ago, apparently with the flu. Sources close to Beecher said he slipped into a coma due to cardiac arrest and never regained consciousness i·He was a health-conscious person," Wilson said, someone who watched his health and exercised regularly. "It's a total shock .•.. None of us knew or sus· pected he was ill." Beecher had been acting as president of the KS! AIDS Foundation since Sep­tember, when Wilson resigned from the position. Prior to this, Beecher had served as vice president for the Foundation and as a board member for two years. After graduating magna cum laude from Boston University with a bachelor of arts degree, Beecher helped co-found and manage the Boston Concert Opera. Fol­lowing a move to Houston, he served as director of marketing for the Houston Grand Opera from 1978 to 1982. In May 1984, Beecher received. a Mas­tera of Social Work degree from the Uni­versity of Houston. He became the first fu1l·time therapist at the Montrose Coun­seling Center, and remained. on staff until the time of his death. In addition to his work at the Counsel· ing Center, Beecher was a psychothera­pist in private practice at WilJiam A. Scott and Associates. "It's going to leave a big gap here," Bill Scott said. "He honestly was the best therapist we ever had here. Until the week he went in the hospital, he had never ever missed a day of work." Beecher served on the United Way allo­cation panel and was the state chair of the taak force on gay and lesbian issues for the National Aasociation of Social Workers. He also served as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Houston's School of Social Work. Beecher is survived by his parents and a brother. Contributions may be made to the Jamee Reeher Memorial Fund, P.O. Box 66973. Suite 1155, Houston. Texas 77006. Welcome to Houston-Yolo. Claudine and Gene from Boise. Idaho' Watch for a Big Surprise Coming for You! 608 WESTHEIMER 528-5953 Across from Jim's Gym Doors Open 6pm Mon -Fri. Mon.-Tues .. Happy Hour Well Drinks s125 (No Cover) Wed .. 10¢ Drink Night ($3.00 Cover) Thurs.: Buddy Night (No Cover) Fri.: Dance until 2am (No Cover) Sat .. Beer Bust 3pm 'ti! 2am Dance until 2am ($2 Cover) 50¢ Draft Beer All The Time!! Sun.: Beer Bust 12 noon-10pm Show Starts 10pm. March 2nd S3 Cover with the Illusions of Kandi Love, Koffie, Jerry Harper, and Tina Rene Special Guest: Sabrina Delorean Jockey Strap Contest Coming Soon!! We wish good luck to Tino Renee in the Miss Gay Southwest Pageant 6 MONTROSE VOICE ' FEBRUARY 28. 1986 Federal AIDS Funding Cuts Will Hit Houston By Pete Diamond MonJro.e Voice Staff Reporter When the Federal government is faced with a large spending deficit, as it is now, it looks for ways to reduce spending and thus save money. Deciding what pro­grams will be cut and how to be more effi. cient without sacrificing the needs of any government agency. Often it's a no-win eituation This year, the Reagan Administration is facing a record deficit of $202 billion, which makes the program trimming pnr cese all the more difficult. One area that is part;cularly threatened i:; funding for AIDS research, testing and education. While President Reagan has said ··one of our highest public health priorities is going to continue to be finding a cure for AIDS," the 191\7 budget he has submitted to Congress proposes cutbacks 1n totaf AIDS.related funding of$.51 million for the current (19A6) fiscal year and $31 million for the 1987 fiscal year This year. the four AIDS programs that would be cut include: -$15 million for Demonstration Health ProJects •n New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Miami. These health care programs, for peuons with AIDS, are designed to determine ways of treating patients more efficiently and more cost effectively. -$14 million for ~ational Inst tutes of Health research. Included in this are "'drug evaluation units.'' which are set up in various locations around the countr~,. allowing persons with AIDS acceBB to experimental treatments. -$10 million to support alternative Bites for antibody blood testing. -$2 million for the r-;ational AIDS Hotline On top of these proposed cuts is an $11.7 biliion acros•the-board reduction in fed· erel spending, This amount. which repres­ents 4.3% of the total federal budget, is a resu t of the Gramm·Rudman-Hollings balanced-budget law. This law, scheduled to take effect today (March I), is designed to control the growing federal deficit Mike Richards, who is with the Dallas Gay Alliance ond the board of director!< for the W uhington-based AIDS Action Coun­cil <AAC), says, 0 We have not seen very muth funding in Texas to begin with <and) 1t IS likely we will continue not to see any funding In Texas." Nevertheless. Richards aaid any AIDS· related funding cuts would directly affect Texans and Houstonians. By reducing the money available to alternative testing eites. the burden of operating the 26 alter· nate eitea in Texas would fall on the state and the various cities in which they are located. With the exception of the privately run Montrose Clinic, Houston's alternative teeting 1ite, the 25 other alternate test pro-grams are either city or county-operated. Many of these sites may be forced to close down or begin charging rates some indi­viduals could not afford. If this occurs, Richards said more people will likely go to blood banks under the guise of donating blood to receive HTLV· III antibody testing. This increases the poesibility of a donor testing false nega· tive and AIDS-infected blood entering the nation's blood supply. Richards says this '"very dangerous .. situation would move those individuals who require blood or blood produc-ts into a high risk clasoifica· tion. The idea of alternate testing site~ was originally conceived as a way of keeping people who wanted to take the HTLV-lll test from going to a blood cent.er. says Tom Audette, director of the Montrose Clinic In addition to testing Houstonians, the clime also testa referrals from blood centers, the military and other cities. Becauseofthf'ir important role in testing individuals for AIDS antibodiefoi, a cut in funding for alter· nate testing sites would have a large impact on the Montrose Clinic. According to the AAC's February new· sletter, a $2 million cut directed to the National AIDS Hotline would dose the only government-supported hotline in the country. The hotline Is operated by the Department of Health and Human Servi­ces' Public Health Service If the hotline does close, Richards said people who live away from metropolitan areas wil1 lose a valuable resource. As a result. this will place a greater burden on local hotline resources. Although funding for the Demonstra· tion Health Program does not come to Texas, Richards said a reduction in fund· ing for the National InstituU>s of Health ,NIH 1 would primarily affect research facilities such as M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute. The AAC maintains thot with reduced 1'1H staffs and equip­ment. "It wiL d('lay the discovery of effec tive treatments at least lM to 24 months longer than if projects are funded now." If the proposed cuts for fiscal 19H6 are approved. overall AIDS funding would drop from the $244 million Congress appropriated last yearto$193million. The Reagan Administrnhon propoRes 213 mi11ion for 1987, an .. increase" of $20 mil­lion. But this "increase" has drawn a great deal of criticism from such individuals as Rep. Henry Waxman CD-Calif.), who says, .. They talk about it as an increase, but the increase (from fiscal 1986 to fiscal 1987) won't even meet the level of$244 million." "I can' t understand how the president can propose this kind of budget when he talks as if he believes that AIDS is a national emergency," Waxman says. He adds the funding cuts will retard research efforts that could lead to a vac­cine and cure for the d~ease. LaHt week. federal budget director James Miller further complicated the AIDS funding issue by stating, "We believe the treatment for AIDS and caring for AIDS victims is a local and state responsibility and the federal government should concentrate on searching for a cu re for AIDS." Richards contends this would be reaso­nable if Texas had previously been help­ing fund the AIDS programR slated for cutbacks. But the state doesn't provide funding, he says, and Texas ranks 47th nationwide in pro\Mding health care for its citizens. Nate Sebastian, executive director of 1h(' KS AIDS Foundnticm of Houston, says Miller's claim seems fair for states like California where suC"h programs currently exist. but not for Texas. ''Texas is not a soe1al SC'rvices state," he says, but one which is dependent on ff'deral support. Houston City Councilwoman Eleanor Tinsley, who also sits on the three member Council CommitU>e on Communicable, Infectious Disease Control, ~ays, ''If the federal government is pulling back (on its finanrial support for A IDSJ, it means state and local governments are going to have to put the money in." "Reality tells us the federal government will pull hack on some of the funding," she says. Therefore community efforts to ra1se­money for AIDS re-search and e-ducation will become more important. Tinsley cited the recent AIDS-Oirected contribution from the United Way to the Visiting Nurses AssOC"iation and the KS/AJDS Foundation as "a step in the right direc­tion." Nevertheless, representatives from the National Gay Tmik Force. the AAC and the Human Rights Campaign Fund ( HRCF) are working in Washington t-'J res­tore AIIJS funding cuts. Eric Rosenthal, assistant for proR'fams and development for the HRCF. says he is optimistic that program funding will he restored. But he cautions, "This does not mean we are home free. . The pressures 'for future funding) will be even greater It w-..:J be an ongoing fight." Rosenthal explains that with the number of AIDS cases doubling roughly every veer, the need for finding a cure be<-omes even greater But so does pres­sure from other departments and groups who are fighting for funds to main ta.in the existence of their programs. While political action committees such as the AAC and HRCF are pushing for restoration of AIDS funding, Rosenthal and Richards agree the effort is a "shared responsibility" that everyone must take part in. "Each individual hu the power to stop HAIR LOSS­NEWMEDICAL TREATMENT Male pattern baldness occurs when the hormone DHT acts on hair folli­cles. Proxidil 6 is an advanced combination of topical DHT-block­ing agents with the hair growth stimulator Minoxidil. It commonly arrests and reverses balding when Minoxidil alone does not. Call today for a consultation. Peter H. Proctor, MD,PhD MPB Clinic Suite ID, 5401 Da.ohwood, Bellaire 661-2321 the spread of AIDS," Richards stresses. "If legislators hear enough response from their constituents not to cut the budget, but increase it, we will indeed see the cuts come out of there. It is very important that gay men and lesbians today write their legislators protesting the cuts .... Letters work and they do have an impact." Human Rights Campaign Fund Urges Letter Writing Campaign on AIDS Cuts From a Pn·ss Releaxf• Jn an appeal to 1tH Hi,000 contributors and tht- lt·shian and gay community, the Human Rights('ampnign Fund has asked people to wrih· h•tters to their rrpresenta· tives urging rrstornton of the $fit million in AIDS proJrram C'uts propo!-lt'd by th(• Reagan Administration for the fisC"al yt•ar 19H6 budget "We an• juining with the rest of the organizt-d gay and IHihinn C"ommunity in doing evf'rythinJ.: possible to get thcappro- 11riations bm·k up where they belong,' said Vic Basile, E'Xt'CUtive director of the national Jeshian and fo?RY politcal uction committee The Campaign Fund, which n•ct•ntly rutsumed the lobbying duties which were once the responsiblity of the Gay Rights National Lohby 1<1RNL), plans to hire a full·time lobhyist within the m•xt frw wet·kN to ht·lp mnkt• the c·ommunity's cal-lt' on Capitol Hill. 'Pfhis was thP rationalt• for consolidut ing with <IRNI. in tht· first plan\" sajd Basile. "Lohhying 1s the natural follow •I-rough for the relationships wt· establish with candidates und inrumhC'nts through our PAC activit l'S. Tht• ght for AillS appropr1allons a perrf'Ct ex imp)pofwt..y his appronch s necessary " 'We run prevt·nt tht• Administration from making these ruts if wt· reach our reprf'Bentntives," said Rasile. "People in Washington must heur from thousands and thousands of peoplr across thf' nation that this is a mattn of life and death for us . BaHile urg(>d pt"<>ple tu write to their Senators at United States Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510 and their House Members at United States HouseofRepre­sentatives, Washington, D.C. 20515. All Members of Congress can be reached through the Capitol swtichboard, (202) 224-3121. NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE1 "T•xl Zum Kio," "You Are Not Alone." " Male Couple," " Ernesto," "El~" FREE MEMBERSHIP No Deposit for Membenr • RENTJ\l GIFT CERTIFICI\ TES AVAJL.Mlf • s.-.ME Ql\Y DELIVERY FOR MOST SPECIAi. ORDERS •All. TN'ES GUARMITEED BOB Lovett Boulevard Big Bang $1.99 Breakfast Monday-Friday 2 Eggs, Bacon or Sausage and 2 Pancakes BIACKBOARD SPECIAIS DAILY, EVER CHANGING, ALWAYS FRESH 521-1015 '111E BEST Ll'ffLE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATF.S PRIVAfE BATHS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 URSULINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 K.J.'s @ CLUB 11830 AIRLINE 2 blocks South of Aldlne-Bender 445-5849 HOURS: NOON-2AM HAPPY HOUR DAILY 12-7pm, Double Drinks, 75¢ Beer SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY Free BBQ 3pm Lip Sync Contest 10pm ALL NIGHT HAPPY PIZZA PARTY HOUR 7pm-2am Spm CASH PRIZES WEDNESDAY $1 Bar Drinks All Night THURSDAY POOL Tournament $4.00 entry Winner Takes All, Bpm ?'~ FRIDAY SATURDAY ,~ ~~"'- NO COVER! ~ PARTY!! PARTY!! PARTY!! 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IR£AICFAST (large single/double occupancy) • VALET SIRVICE • Special Weekly and Monthly.Rates Rdservahons required ;.>I..:. .:ise coi. Toi/ Free 800-253-5263 (Naf.ooal) 800-521 -4523 (Ca lif) (415)-olA1 -5141 (San Francisco) 1315 POLK sr .. SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 8 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 28. 1986 Westheimer Was Once Named Hathaway Lifelong Resident Recalls the 'Old' Montrose By Connie Woods Montrou Voice Staff Reporter Many changes have occurred in the Mont· ro8e area since Marie Crider was born on Helena Street in the early 1900s. The streetcars which once provided transportation to the neighborhood art gone. Many of the old hou~e; which onC'e lined the •treeto of Helena and Hyde Park (which was once Anita Street) have bet-n replaced by modE>rn townhomes, apart ment complexes and buFiines;.;eb "I was born nnd raised in the house next door to where I live now." she said as she pointed to the old wooden house with the traditional frontpon:h. "My father bou1tht the house in 1902 and later bought the one where I live now." One thing that has not changed i~ Ms Crider's interest and pride in her neigh­borhood. As a member of the Avondale Association. a neighborhood citizens roup, she joined other members Saturday morning, Feb. 22, to plant tree!' in the Avondale area. ~ow in her mid-seventies, she also enjoys her tnps to J-er other home in John­son City where she met her hu.!'band Tho­mu L.& 1126. The two weremarriedin 1932 and hved in Johnsor ( ity where he• hus­band farmed Isabel Bruner her nurse and compan ion, related Me. Crider'• memones of those ranch days. ''They married during the Deprt'881on, end his fathe.r l'li\o'Ded the ranch Marie eaid they almost starved to death, she explained. And so 1t was bai kt f.er old 1 et~"'~r· hood where she was born, attended school en lived th .. ough the pr ent c!1y She at I 1t ms f1 nr. memones of those /J. Plan.tmR trees m the yard of Marie Crider wPre members of the At ondale A.ssoc1atwn including (left to ri~ht) Stan Steele. charter member and treasurer, Isabel Rrumtr. resident. Ms. Crider, usidPnt, and Sharon Wemtrauh, president /Connie Woods photo) early yea: s when he .. neighbors raise<! ch1rkens hared nmmunity pririt" and rode the strf'etcar tG downtown for only five c nts. ••My father "orked at a sho(' store at 303 ~1ai ... "st-e Mm~ "l would catch the street car and go see him. ' Many of the busme.sses which served the smal. cvmmumty with: the c~tv have 'org sine(' d1sappeared. "ihe Heinke Pt-armacv was on thf' c:ornt.>r fT Jan a d Albany. There was also o. gmct·rv store of\g lhere but 1 d n'f re~ember the n mf> Anr' the old Faith flome11g 1talong there ts now n !oungf>, ' she said with a c.,uckle She a1so spoke of some oft 1e older rest dt>nces m '1f'r 11e1gh"Jorl:iood She sa1t the Au ry House across tht> street is the 01des ,n th(' neighbo hooC built m 18"7 Sh •e :ill~ the const .-uct or of thp Cor· tlandt area where several mansions were constructed. The area maintained its quiet neighborhood by building a permanent fence to prevent the street from being used for through traffic. "The place still looks the same ai;; it did then," 8he added. "We really didn't travel around the area much when I waR growing up. The streets wen• dirt roads and the main travel was by horse and huggy," Hhe recalled. "We cer­tainly didn't go all over the place like they do now." And "'all over tht• place" even meant short ridei; t() the street now called Montrose. or to Hathaway which iR now Westh~imer · Lik~ man}· couple.!' m the J9;JOs and 1940s. it was not unusual to live with par· ents. While both of them worked at Hujithes Tools, they Jiv('(f for a time with her part•ntH in the housl' wht•re ~he was born The lot whne her prNH.·nt hou~e is locatt>d on<·(• bt·longed to hn father but he 'lost" it. The nrw ownNs built the house, hut she und her husband finally bought it and mov('(J next door ('rider dit•d in 1978 hut his widow remained in her homo. Sl•ve. ai months ago Bruner, a loni,rtimc n·s1dent of Hallas, t·ume to the house or H •ena Street to work as Ms Crider's n use and compan on "It has worked out very nicely" &he sui 'We can come and 1i:o a1 we w :it And wp ,i\le getting net•v ~byto keourtnptoJohnsonCityespe-­cmlly with •he weather bt•mg so nit"C'" Ms. Cr1d(•r main ta. s pr1dt•, 1 her her t tl.I(( nnd her nf'ighborhood. "It may 1-nve ooked luu· it wits m thceountry, hut1twas no farther from dowr wr Lhan 1t is J"ow, she sa1C.: with a sm•h· Obviously. · rne ms the 0 rt• "dt wnt· wn Thrift Shop Serves Multi-Purpose Functions By Connie Woods Jlonlro&e \. lf't' Staff Rl';r.rter !=ioc-n to celehrote its first anmversary the Houston Area W men's ('('nter Thrift Shop contmues to pnVlde funds, seno1ces and goods to women in Houston. According to Shop Manager Phyllis Senger, the Thrift Shopservessevf'ral pur­poses. In addition to providing funds for the P?Olll'ams of the Houston Area Women's Center, it i~ also a place for the clients of the center to !-ihop while in the programs or upon leaving the programs. 'While women are staying at the center (primarily for battered wives), they can come here without charge to shop for clo­thing items they may need for them!:ielve~ or their children," ahe explained. ""They have a choice here and it's llke 1hopp1ng and selecting their own things," she added. •·some women have never really had the opportunity w shop. They have said that either their husbands never would allow them to go shopping or the husband did all the shopping for the fam· ily •• she said Once the women have left the center they can select hou:-iehold items they may need to get started on their own. "They can come here to shop for glal'l-8es, dishes, even eome furniture like a baby's bed or other items neceRsary to start all over," she explained. She pointed out once again that although the womf'n do not have to pay for the items, the prices are on the goods in the shop for other people who purchase things from the Thnft Shop. "They still have the feeling of shopping and seeing the price tags on the items," she reinterated. The Thnft Shop receives all ofito goods from the community, according to Senger. "We have people bringing things all the time. Each week we fill aon~argaragein Phyllis Senger. manager, fills one of the bags to be used for the fin;t annual sprmg clearance of the Houston Area Women's Center Thrift Shop yard sale !Connie Wood. photo) in this building with donated items Voluntffl's help to separate and price the donated good," she explained She also related another facet of the Thrift Shop. She said that women will bring their children on Saturdays to help separate and price the items. "'It's good for the women and their children to work together on a project outside the home. They can feel like an equal here. ThHhild ren really seem to enjoy the project, espe­cially pncrng the toys," she continued Senger started as a volunteer for the Women's Center She also helped with the decision·making procet.s of whether or not the Thrift Center would be a feasible pro­Jt> Ct. Bringing ht·r retail background into the project. S('nger was hired on March I to put the proj('('t in motion. The shop opened on May IH. 198;') at ·U6 Mc-Gowen. As the shop growK so does its fundrais ing proje<·tR. The Thrift Shop will t;pon&or its fir~t spring dt'arancf' sale with a yard gale Sunday, March 9 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at thE" Women's Center parking lot at 4 Chelsea. Senger said that thl' spring clearance sale will be an annual fundraising project. (lot mg " I be 84 Id 1 l ur que w y • ~t'Ople c.m u':"Chase ne of thPS<" br wn bag for $1. The t ll"Y can i · i: with •hp clothing as tht>y please," shl' explJmed. The vurd snll' wlll offer nit styles und sizes of blue Jeans for ~I a pair :id coats fo!" I ea<·h. Ot hn itt·ms to lK• sold at the var<l salP includP toys nnd books. . Pro<·t'ffls from th4• vurd snlP will be ust'CI to furthf'r tht• pmgr~lmM of the Womt•n's C't·nter. In nddition to tht· Hheltcr for bat ten·d wom<'n and tht·ir childn·n, the Womf'n's Ct·nt('r ahm providt'S the8uppor­tivt• Outnnrh Snvices Program for womf•n nftt·r tht·y lt•nvt• tht• ~ht•lt~r Othn programs include thf' Family Vio­lenct• Outn•ach, the Rap<' Crisii; Program. and Community Edurat on. For more infonnation about thE' Thrift Shop or Y nrd ~ale. C'all 52~ 1062 or thP Womf'n's ('entn ut li28-679'-I. The Thrift Shop is located nt 416 McGnwt•n at Rngby and is opl·n Tuf'sday throuf{h Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to ;l;()(} p.m. Have a heart to heart with your doctor ... FEBRUARY 28. 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 9 COM[ DY lH WORKSHOP '2.105 SON HllPI (AT SlllPKlRD) LOVE ME o~ LEASE ME TUES. THRU SAT 8.30 PM Wl"H AN A1X:r1QNAl l,f rw RI 8 ')AT AT I 00 PM After Hours Nightly D.J. Lary Thompson 1022 Westheimer Home of Eagle Leathers 528-8851 9150 S. Main 666-3464 proudly presents SPOkl'S MONTH honoring the 1st year of our softball team and many years of our pool team and all M.S.A. and M .S.L. members during March Show your M.SA or M.S.L. ID and pay No Cover and get Happy Hour prices all the time during March! March Weekly Schedule of Events Sundays-Happy Hour All Day / All Night DAMM Hour 6-9pm $1 Well/ $1 Long Necks Tuesdays-Beer Bust 6pm 'til Closing with Country Western Dancing Wednesdays-Free Sphaghetti & Dynasty Night ThW'Sdays-10¢ Cocktails (with $5 cover) TGIF Fridays 8-lOpm $1 well I $1 long necks Saturday-Sunday Biggest Country Western Dance Bar Live D.J. Ram Rocha 10 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 28. 1986 Latino America Struggles to Find Single Political Voice The Hispanic Caucus By Kevin J. Kelley Pacific -.\'ru·,. Service Special to the Montrose Voice The U.S. Congress' Hispanic Caucus is not unlike its 17 million-strongconstituency­many cultures under one heading, with lots of potential political clout but not muC'h agreement on how to wield it. Latinos. who make up 8% of the popula· twn, speak with many political voicei-; rather than one. So do their congressmen. "The key thing about the caucus. as well as the larger commmunity, is its diver s1ty," says Rep. Mathew Martinez. a sub­urban Los Angelei:; Democrat who currently chairs the 14-member body "There are differences between younger and oldt>r members. urban and rural dis trict.-., liberals and conservatives, Puerto Rican" and Mexicans. Still, we do strive for umty." It is no easy task. Three of the caucus' participants-from Puerto Rico, Guam and the Virgin Islands-are not permitted to vote Cln the House floor. tThf>re are no Hispanic senators.) With the exception of Albuqut>rque Republican Manuel Lujan. the remainin~ lawmakers are all Demo· crate, though not all liberals A few members-like Tony Coelho, a Californian of Portuguese ori1irin; Ril1 Richardson, n half-Anglo, half-Mexican moderate from Santa Fe; and F. ··Kika" de la Garza, a conservative Texan who chairs the agricultural committt-e-have ac .. 1eved prominence on Capitol Hill. 0th· ers, however. are barely known outnide then <1wn di!-itricts. Such a mix does not always blend Take for example, the division within the caucus over onei~!;ueofspedal signifi· cance- to Latinm1-immigration reform The stickiest point in Congress' version is a plan to expand a .. guest worker" pro~ gram which now brings about20,000 Mex· icans a year across the border to work legally in the fields of the southwest. The Sfonate has already approved a substan· tial expansion of the program, which is favored by growers who say that suffi· cient numbers of U.S. residenta areunwi)J. ing to labor B.ti harvest hands Caucus member Henry Gonzales (0 Tex .) has branded the expanded program a •·rent a slave" scheme, and most caucu'° members will join with him in opposing it But three members may side with agribus ineRs on the matter. as they did in 1984, the last time it came up for a vote. That year. Latino legislators did man age to set aside their differecnes over spe­cific provisions to play a key role in killing the overall immigration package even though it had initially passed both tht> Hou~e and the Senate with the Reagan administration barking-an indication of Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily how potent the caucus can be when in synch Suprisingly to some, the caucus read ii)' agrees that tighter enforcement and an overhaul of the immigration laws are in fact needed. The presoure on som(· members comes from Latinos who resent competition posed by more recent arrivals The caucus is firmly united, too. in hark· ing bilingual education. and in rejectinj.'; proposals for making English the coun try's "'official language." Congressional Women's Caucus. with it.H widE· rangf' on most matters, than the Black Caucus, which often develops a um­ted front. As a result. the Hispsanic Cau­cus is judged by many Capitol Hill obs(•rvers to be much less influential than the larger black bloc. Even some aides to I.a.tino Congressmen acknowledge that the caucus seems at times to be a largely symbolic, ceremonial body, not an effec· tive force in the legislative process. Some Latino activists also charge that Even some aides to Latino Congressmen acknowledge that the caucus seems at times to be a largely symbolic, ceremonial body, not an effective force in the legislative process. But rifts on certain foreign policy QUE'S· tlons are so dttp that the caucus do<•s not attempt to develop a consensus on them. L.'lst ye:ir. for example. five mE>mbt-rs voted for u_s aid to the r\icaraJ{uan con tras while six voted against it. This yf'ar the balance could tip in the other dirf'Ction. Martinez, for one-, says he is "'lf'aning heavily" toward reversing his position against contra funding since .. right now I don ·t seP muc·h difference between tNicn raguan President Danit•h Ortega and (former dictartor Anastasio) Somoza." Tht'!it' Hchisms on key issues make the Latino grouping function more like the th(' caucui-; is unn.·sponsive to the E'C''O· nomi(' ne(.•d of its constituents. Th(•y p<>int to rt"<.·ent Census Bureau data showing that 25.2% of Latirn~American familit'S art· Jiving in povert~·. as compared to 11.6% of families nationwide. "'The cau(·us doesn't do nearly enough for poor and working-dass Hispanic:-:." says Ang(•lo Falcon, head of the ln8titute for Pu('rto Ri<·an Studies. Others contf'nd. however, that the ron tradi(·tory voting of the caucus b(•gins to make sem1e when "Hispanics" are rf'cog­nized as b('ing many constinu(•nciex in one Mexican Americans, by far the lnrg. Contracting ('OMrANt JNCORrOJlATED Serving the Community for Seven Years * A Full Service General Contractor * Remodeling Specialists * Commercial and Residential Work * Room Additions * Large and Small Jobs e8t single Latino group on the U.S. main­land. have a median income signifirantly higher than PuNto Ricans, for example. whil(· a million Cubans in the country have managed to attain a degree of rela· tive prm;p(•rity. Each group's history, even the way it speaks Spanish, is distim·tly diffr·rent. 'Hispanics in this country don't really have a (.'ommon culture," says Raul Yza· guirn· of the National Council ofla Raza. a Latino resean·h and advocacy organize. tion. "Thf're is no Hispanic ideolo~ pf'r se." adds Harry Pachon, sp<>kesman for the National Association of Elect<•d Latino Offirials Rep. Martinez is quick to concur with these assessments, noting that he him Helf did not know how to speak Spanish as a child Among all the diversity, however, one consistent trend doe:; emerge: Latino­Amt• rican!-1 are now participating in the political process as never before. In Texas alone, voter turnout among Chicanos douhh•d during the pai:.;t decade, making th<·m on(• of th<' most important compo. n(·nts of the state's electorate. At the i-;ame time. the Hispanic vote appears to b(• less monolithic than in the past, with dose to ·H>' of it having gone to Ronald Reagan in 1984 Tht' hiuic mcssaj.:'e. says Pac hon of the J.atinn offi<'ials group. is that "'people shouldn't make too many asi-;umptions about this community. It's growing. it's in flux and it's only bt:ginning to sense its powt-r That power may not translate into u (·oherent ng(•nda in Congress. howevf'r until m(·mbrrs of the Hispanic Cacus find firmf'r footing on common J..'T?und r----------- MEXICAN RESTAURANT Beer, Tacos, Tamales, Menudo, Enchiladas Breakfast Special $1.99 4am-10am Everyday 4701 N. Main Between 14th & Julian In the Heights 869-1706 2 for 1 Taco Dinners Not good with any other offer Expires 3/31/86 A TASTE OF MEXICO 24 HOURS DAILY CLOSED TUESDAY 10PM L .!~':.:.N_!'~~~A2'._1~':_ _J Officers Judged Guilty in '83 Montrose Shooting By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Two former Houston police officers, charged in the October 1983 shooting ofa Montrose Boulevard motorist, were recently convicted of civil rights viola· hons. Following testimony heard during the two-week trial, a federal court jury deliber­ated nearly eight hours before finding former offi<·er Kendall R Patter~on. 24, guilty of shooting the motorist without juHtifkation, and then attempting to rover up the inddent with the help of William BrashC'r, :l!°>. his sergeant at the time. The flhooting, which occurred on Oct. 14, l 98a, took place at the site of an unrclnt('d arrident at the intersection of MontroRe and Hyd(• Park. Testimony Rhowed that William HE>nry Pn~Rey, the motorist, may have gottRn into an argument with Patter­Hon whill" attempting to pass through thr intt'rsection. In the midst of this, Pressry wns shot in the forehead at near-point blank range. He remains permanently dis· abled today. Patterson maintained during the trial that he fired at Pressey because he thought the man was attempting to run BraAher over. He also denied that hE> and Brasher tried to rover up the shooting. Several witnesses, among them poliC'e accident investigatorN, claimed they did not see Brusher or anyone else in front of Preasey's vehicle before he was shot. ProM·rutE>r1:1 charged that Patterson "lo1d his temper" and then tried to cover up dt.·tails of the incid('nt with BraRher's help. The two officers, who were fired from the Houston Police Department, are srhe- Houstonians to be in Pro-Choice Capital March Representatives from several Houston organizations wiB join what organizers say will be 200,000 marchers in Washing· ton, D.C. on Sunday, March 9, for "The March on Washington for Reproductive Freedom." The march, sponsored by the National Organization for Women, is to commemo· rate the Roe vs. Wade Supreme Court deci· sion that made abortion a constitutional right. NOW believes that the present national administration is attempting to ••take away individual choice. This is evi­denced by decreased or denied funding for abortion clinics and facilities that dissf"m mate birth control." Thf't statement released by NOW con­tinuf'S, "'The March will serve as a warn­ing to the anti-abortion zealots that we will not buckle under to their 'Yenr of Fear' which they have named 1985-&i. We will not he daunted by their tactics ofharrase­ment and terrori!lm aimed at women. We cannot al1ow 19H6 to record anothc>r gain in their cnlloue campaign to out1aw forms of birth fontrol and to deny young people nccN1s t.o flex rducation." From Houston, representatives from the Coaliton of Labor Union Women, tht.• Houston Coalition to End Clinic Violt>nre, the ACLU of Greater Houston, the Women's Group, Womynspace, and the Texas Abortion Rights Action League will partiC'ipate in the march which begins at 10:00 a.m. on the Mall. A rally will be held at 12:00 noon at the Lincoln Memorial. Rrprest>ntatives of the march can be reached in Houston at 522-6673. duled to be sentenced March 21. Patterson faces up to 11 years in prison and fines totaling $11,000. Brasher, now on proba­tion for a state perjury conviction in con­nection with the shooting, could receive ]Ql,tiyears in prison and more than $10,000 in fines. Patterson had earlier been acquitted of attempted murder by a state court jury. The Presfley incident was the third time Patterson had shot someone in the line of duty durin~ his two year~ as a Houston police officer. However, he was not charged in the two previous shootings. Officer Lounge Being Added to Police Center By Pete Diamond MontrosP Voice Staff Reporter Jt's only been about three months since the Lower Westheimer Police Community Center opened, but already the center is expanding. With the help of Montrotse business d('veloper J .R. McConnell, a new officer lounge is in the process of being built behind the Community Center Houston Police Sgt. Don WiJJiams said the lounge will include a work area for officers stationed at the center as well as a small kil<'hen, weight room area and ~eparate showers and lockers for male and female officers. The lounge will serve a number of pur­pases, Williams said. For example, officers who work late night shifts and must appear in court the next morning will have a nearby place "to clean up and relax before they have to go to court." Construction of the officer lounge is being contracted by Montrose-based HSK ContractorR. Owner H.S. Khalsa says he is hoping to complete the building, which will measure approximately 27'•31 ', by mid to late March. Khalsa says he sees his work on the new building as a kind of community service project, "We're really into Montrose, the area and the community spirit. . So we're trying to participate in the commun ity to make it as prosperous and shining as we can." AmNTION NIGHTCWB ENTERTAINERS Singers, Piano Acts, Impersonators Please make sure the Montrose V0tce has o good quality (preferably in black and wMe) publicity photo ol you in our files fa use when our adv er t1sers ore engaging your services. t wouldn't even hurt ferns to have savor ral photos of your smiling face 'har>k you The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAltR Of MONTROSE 408 AVONDAlf - 529-8490 FEBRUARY 28. 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 11 LOs Jorges Houston's Only Latin cay Bar . ·.Y. .•. . . •' .. ·, The only gay Latino Club in Houston where Latin lovers are found! · ....... . •.· · .. .. ~. ::_.··.: .•. ;.v;;.;·~ ~·: !"::~:· • "· • . •.-y· .. • . • ./P·' Friday­" Latin Reserve" Special Guests- Nancy Taylor, MOnlque JOhnson, LOia Flame & Regular cast coming soon- Jeray Harper After Show NOn-stop Music 'tll 4am. $3 cover. .•.. .. · ..•. •.·· .... .......... ·. ·:• ..· ·. ·. . . "' •...... · .~· ... · .. ·. :e ·" . .... saturday- "special Reserve Show" Emcee- cookies Cantu open 3pm-4am Showtlme 'tll 12 midnight . •.1.•. . .• !.'~. • . ... ........ ,... . .... :. .~··· . · .. _..,,,. ~- .. . •·· ·. SUnday- < •• • •••• : .•.. ,. FaJita cookout, No cover FREEi 3-6pm Hot Dogs and Hamburgers 6-9pm Tacos de fajitas, rice and beans 5605 washlngton Ave. 869-5599 12 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 28 1986 By Connie Woods M.:Jntrv e i·otC't' ."taff Reporter A (:re swept through the patio and att C" of Bacchus, a nightclub located at 523 Lovett. early Monday morning causinJ{ extt>nsivl" damage to the dttk, storeroom and roof. The fire is believed to have started in the alll'Y immediately behind the club about 3:00 a.m. Monday. According to club manager Shirley Neely, a neighbor saw flames rising from the back patio area and called the Houston Fire Department. Ht> then called her ''The fire-men had just arrived when I got here," she said. "They had triE'd to enter the front door by breaking the plexi glass window_ I unlocked the door, but the flames and smoke from the patio door forced them to enter through the out.side fence in front of the club," s~e explained Although the fire caused extensive dam· age to the attic and rear patio, the club itself received only smoke damage. How ever, the second floor of the building suf· fered smoke as well as some water damage The second floor houses the club's offi ces, liquor storeroom and a beer cooler. After city inspectors completed their reports Tuesday, Neely began contractor A workman surr·eys the- damage whlle furnishml(S are removed from Bacchus follou·1n}! a fin~ that damaged the patio, attic and roof ff'onnw Woods photo) Early Morning Blaze Damages Area Nightclub bids to begin reconstrudion of the dam agPd areas. :'\t>el'.\· stud that she hoped the club could be ready for rt'Opening within a Wl"E'k to two weeks ... What we wnnt to do is get back as soon as pos1'ible. As long as we're down. thE> club ilj making no money," she explainf'd How much damage was done wa~ not immediately determined. However, Neely said she felt that the neces1:1ary could be done well enough to get the doors open again. "We may just rope off the back portion of the patio until we decide what we want to do with it. We may not replace the deck but put gravel or something in that part of the patio," she explained. "We were really lucky that the fire did not rl"ach the clubiti-elf. It could have been worse," Neely said. She did point out that neither the club's 8tereo equipment nor furnishings were damaged except for smoke and soot. The front portion of the patio had no evidence of damage by smoke, fire or water. She also pointed out that there was minimal damage to the electrical and plumbing systems in the club. Neely said the fire department inspec· tors thought the fire was started in the alley by a small open flame. "There are people' ar u d hen· who hang around m that ulley dnd might t·ven build af'ire back there" sh<" explaint·d She also said that people dump all sorts of trash and garbage in the alley as well as a chopped tree dumped there recently. She also pointed out that a building on the opposite side of the alley caught fire ear· lier this month. It appeari; that damage to the attic and roofresultf'd from the intense heat and not the actual flames "I really believe that the outside brick wall kept the fire from going through the downstairs part of the club," Neely explained. Sh• said that with the help of her employee~ all valuable items was removed from the club Monday. After notifying the Texas Alcohol and BeverageCommii-sion. the club'K staff removed the beer and liquor to 11tore it in a safe place. ThE> club manager applauded the fire­men for the fast reHponse and the care they took to cause as little water and other dam age as possible while fighting to extin guish the blaze. Neely has been club manager for more than two years. The club has actually been there for about four years. Previous to becoming a club, the building housed sev· eral different restaurants. Montrose Kroger Plans Expansion By Pete Diamond Mrmtro " Voic.Y ."itaff Rt>porter At a t1mewhen much ofMontro:;esE"ems to be buzzing with construd1on. the Kroger grocery store at ~Montrose Blvd has joined the building activities. Construction has begun on a lfi.{)()( square-foot addition, which has tents tively been schedulrd for completion Aug 14, according to Kroger store manager Marty Payne. When finished, the 40,000 square-foot store ~m. Kroger officials sny, be a prototype for future Kroger stores. The larger. totally remodeled 11tort', which will feature a number of"'specialty ehops," is deshmed to offer customtrs a grf'ater variety of products and ~ervicE"8 under one roof, Pa)·ne says. In addition to a 40-seat restaurant, there will be a butcher shop, seafood shop, nutrition an~ health food dopartm•nl,en expanded bak ery section and a fulJ.Jine flora shop. The frozen foods iUNl will be expanded and the produ<'.e department w.11 ht> doublt'd in size to offer a 1irn•ater variety of fruits and vegetables, Payne says. The store will also hffome more <Ii versified In the non·food produ<·ts that are carrit'd, hy expandm~ th<." automotive and hardwarl" S('('tlons und ndding n •·Jobby shop" when· <·ust• mt-rs can rent SU('h items as video cnst·t l.(> rt•rordns and video tapel'O. Payne said Kroger oflical~ hav(• met with fit•veral area husines:-; groups and rivic organizations ('Oncf>rning land!4ntpe and desi1w plans so the 11tore and the nf'w addition will blend in with future devt>lop­ment plans for Montrose Boulevard. The addition. which is being built onto the south side of the existing building, extl'nds about 70 feE"t south and as far west toward Yoakum Strt't't 88 the main bu !d· 1-.g The varant ht..usC' located on tl.e torn er of Yoakum and Hawthorne strf'<·ts will n•main standmj.!. howevt>r Hf'('ause most nf tht• construction work 1s being dc:1ne at night Payne smd he expects tht•rt• "ill he ittle in<·onvt'nwnct• to t1hnppers. In Montrose, Neady Everyone Reads the Voice Aid for AIDS Reports on Finances Aid for AIPS reCl'ntly reported its fin 1 crnl rs1tu n or the sevt•n·"'l'lonth le od from June 1 ~~ to.Januarv 1980. •~xpens~ were divided to four mnJor categ1 rtes .,.-.>4 medu :sl expenses r ntsubsii t•sa 1d spe. ding mon('y Du:i7'g the re;: rt d period, rc>venJes were hste-1 at . I": lbl ~l:J. ht<Iined nost.J ,.. om pr vate donatiors and a fundrnlser Expenses were 1 sted at $2745.56. Aid for All>S poucy IS that over 90C.' of al: (unds raist'CI go directly to people with AIDS or ARC' tnht•lpthem met't the cos ts of day·to-day living Outsidt- of finan('ial assi.stance. Aid for AIDS servt's to disseminate information on numerous 'altt·rnative" therapies that can b(' uHM in conjunction with conven· tional medical treatment. Information on vitamin therapy, vi!oiualization tech· niques, manohiotic dit·ts and holintic techniques can he obtained by calling the Aid for AIDS office. c Aid for AIDS The group said it net-ds more monf'y to help t·onlinut> the work. Donations may be mailPd lo Aid for AIDS Inc .. P.O. Box fl6953-257, HouHton. TX 77006. ThE> office phone number is 526·6077. Period Ending January 1986 Rrvf'nUf's: Danny Villa Fund Cash Contributions Interest Income Total Expense• !PWA Related): Medical .. Food and Vitamins Therapy Rent Subs1d1es . Living Expenses Video Presentation Flowers Expenses (Administrative): Telephone Postal Box Bank Charges Total Balance Available: as of Jan 31. 1985 $ 288.37 4826.59 3637 $5151.33 . .. $ 501.00 569.26 175.00 500.00 450.00 136.24 15.00 214 90 117 00 6516 $2743.56 $2407 77 KS/AIDS Foundation Moves Offices By Pete Diamo nd Montro~e Vmce Sta(( Reporter The KS· AlDS foundation of Houston has a new home. With the help of volunteers from the KS1 AIDS Helper program and other indi­viduals. the foundation moved their offi t'l'B to :J.t()O Montrose Blvd. on Saturday, Ft•b 22, a('cording to executive director N alt· S"hastinn. The move wui; prompted hy a need for largt•r offit•(• SJHlCt', Sf'hastian Nnid. Sinre thf> KS AIDS Foundation of Houston, Inc , was rounded four yenrs Of.CO, it has (•xpe­rwnced tl trem(•ndous amount of growth for exumph·, tht• amount of mom•y the foundahon has d1•,nlt with innensed from oppniximuh•ly $17,000 m 19~4 to morp thun $200,000 this yt•llr llo~'(·Vf'r, for lht• past y1•nr nnd n half, lht• orgnnizntion wnM Hharmg part of a Montrost• houst• which had n confidential addrt'88. This prt·vented individuals from vu"iting to ask questionl'l or pil'k up AIDS n•lutffi (-durntionnl hterutul'<'. Tht• nt'W offiC't•, loratt>d in Huite 700, will lw opt•n from ~;(HJ n.m. to5:00 p.m. Monday throuli(h Friday The KS AIDS hotlinft numher will n·mnin tht· same (524-AJI>St and will continue to np<'rnh• Monda'.\· through Friday from 900 a.m. to 9:00 p.m FEBRUARY 28. 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE ' 13 Softball League Readies to Host Lone Star Classic Hy Pett' Diamond Westheimer \11 n•rrse \.mer Staff Reporter Softball pl iyers 11nr" their ams hnve nly ne Wel'k (''\ t , rl'i:!'l • fo1 part1C1pat or l- t •£· MonLros(• & ft" Leagu s '..onC" ~. r l I. SSH' RC't F. r ~ "Ch k- 1( The ouhle c• mi:1 1ti1 n toum 1mf•nt will bl' lim1tc to~ ams. As of Feb. 18, t'ight teams had t>I hCJ enten·d or made verhul comm1ttm<'nts tc play in the Eru-h•r week t>nd cvt•nt. including the "Los Angt•lt'8 Ont>," tht• "Nl'w York Rowdies" and tht> 'Atlanta Hays" l('ams. Action Prevails at All Levels in HoutexPlay The HoutE'x Tennis Club continueR to report aC'tivity on all levels of the chal l<·nge Judders. On Sunday, Feb. 2:1. Eugene Brown con tinuecl his winning ways over Steve Beurd1·n 6-4, ;l-6. 6-2. Donny Kelley dt·fended his position over David Gnrza 6-4. 6-2. Thomas ( 'ortez makes his first appear· anc" on the Top Ten with a win over F.ddit• Chavez 3-6, 7-6, 6-0. Randy Miller moved up again this week by defeating Bill San taiti 7-.'i, fi-4. Mr. Bill defended against Ri1·k Knapp 7-5. 6-4. Gabe Herpin main· tained his pm1ition over Rick Martinez6·3, 6·2. Henry Erkhardt needed three setR to defend his position over Daiwid Hendrirk· son 6-3. 5-7. 6-3. Beginning March 5, Houtex will return to Wednesday night doubles play at McGregor Park's Homer Ford Tennis Cen­ter from 7:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. In conJu ctmn W1th the \lasstr hous· ( 1:-g will bl' 1Jrov1dl'd c! the V1srount Hotel, ~-8 Soul We8t Freew w f r special tou n :-nf' •" fr msporta· IC.n onr' from bo1 llt.bty e d n c-:: ;ittnen' llr)")Orts w o provided. Ace rding t ... U'l'fl, mc..,,• c ::c1 tis. t r h u.stor. l ark anc: kecr 'ltlO~ )C'pnrt mt•nt has SSued the C1 lSSt... 1 pet mil for Ml'mona1 playm.., fields numh<•r fou ond fivt•. Gamt"-s are schMuled to bcgm ubout noon n Frida~·. ~1nrch 28, nnd continut• through Saturday afternoon Murch 29. when tht• championship gamf>~ will hf> playPrl. Sunday morning is heing re.served ns a makt>up day in case of rain Fut1ht>r information about the touma· ment C'an he- ohtained by contarting the Montrot't' Softball League office at 524 :3144 The Barn, Four 611 Still Lead in MSA Pool Th(' Barn and Four 6 cont nm.• ~ lead tht•ir rt•spedive division~ after the twelfth week of play in MSA Billiards League aC'tion. The Barn. Division R leader, downc•d Thf' 611 to stay in the top spot, whil(•Thf'Gallron dt•feated.611 III to move into St't'Ond place in Divif!ion B. LipstiC'k moved up to third behind The Barn and The Galleon. In Division A, Four 611 remained on top by dc>feating the Streetcats, while BacchuR I moved into second place with a win over Mary's Naturally. The Ranch Hands, dropping a match to giant-killers BRB Shooters, fell to third place in Division A Specials 3pm· 7pm Monday-Friday $1.99 Monday: Queens Day (2) Foot-longs (All the Way) and Fritos Tuesday: Fiesta Day (3) Tacos & Refrieds w/ Avocado Wednesday: Chefs Day Salad-The Chefs Way Thursday: Captain's Day Stuffed Tomatos w/ Chicken & Tuna Salad Friday: Goulash Splash 2nds Free "Thank You All" & Welcome Coming March ''Scuzz lz Az Scuzz Duzz'' ... naturally D.J. Lary Thompson 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 at Mary's Only Scuzz like you could make up all those Lies, Lies, Lies. Ripcord D.J David Oleson 715 Fairview 521-2792 14 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 28. 1966 Montrose Live A Month Devoted to the Photograph Picture This! By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Critic Tomorrow is the beginning of the Houston Foto Fest. Some 65 exhibitions and Tl Jec­tures and slide shows are slated for this month-long festival. Ko other American city has a month devoted to the photograph. Inspiration for this effort came from Paris. There, the Maia de la Photo has been going strong once every two years ... ince 1980. It is esti mated that 400.000 visitors attended the 191'<4 edition Because of its location, central to many of the museums and galleries, the War­wick Hotel is serving as unofficial head­quartenii for the Houston festivities. Aspiring photographers can make appointments there within the next two weeks to have their portfolios reivewed by the professonals There are only two galleries in town that speciaJize in photography. Several others represent photographers along with other artists. But for many of the rest. this will be the first time they ever featured photo­graphy In fact. the city is so gung-ho over this that the following lbt is limited to those museums and galleries in the Montrose area. The Firehouse Ga.Iery '1413 Westheimer>-Annie Ltebovitz. Ruth Mor· gan, Wendy Watnee, Susan Meiselae. Houston Center for Photography (1441 W Alabama)-works from HouHton resi­dents. Moody Gallery 12815 Colquitt)­William Christenberry, Ray Fridge, Dou­glas Kent Hall, Barbara Kaeten, Manual, Ray K. Metzker Nancy O'Connor Al Souza. Jack Meir Gallery 12310 Bis,onnet)­Meridel Rubenstein (opens 318). Phillips / Cowan Gallery (1720 Bissonnet)-Tomiyasu Shiraiwa, Katinka Mann (318). Duboee-Rein Galleries (1700 Bissonnet) Robert Capa (3/8). Toni Jones Gallery (! 131 Berthea)­Ru ... 11 Lee. Museum of Fine Art (1001 Bissonnet)­Robert Frank Contemporary Arts Museum (5216 Montrose}-Rauschenberg Glaasell School of Art(5101 Montrose)­Poot- 1945 Americans. Plaza Gallery (5020 Montrose)­Valentin Gertsman. The Drawing Room (3209 Montrose)­Bach, Blandeau. Haber, Farber Art League of Houston (1953 ~ontrose}-statewide photographic com­petition juried by George Kraui;ie. Midtown Art Center (1419 Holman at LaBranch)-Eight national artists who have painted on photographs. (3, 7). Houston Public Library (500 .McKinneyl-They have made prints of aome 275 pictu?t'S in a rare book (one of only twc copies they know of) which show small towns in Texas (which included Houston back then)weatheringthewinter of 19 f>96. Diverse Works (214 Travi&)-L.A. and Houston photographer~. If you want a map. call Metro. The Foto Feot office, 522-8228, will also have more mformation. While you"reout, grab a copy of Art HapfHnmga magazine. a very help­ful freebie which d0et1n't limit itself to the fest. All events are free and open to the pub­lic o Notes Keep an eye on the Montrose Voice. While we've never been one to take a back seat to anyone, we're really on the march now. For instance, be one of the first 40 to buy a Personal ad in the classified section next week and receive a free ticket for two to the Comedy Workshop! (Tickets are good for Sunday through Thursday.) Lyn Launer-now appearing at Rascal.IJ And. the Montrose Voice will be co­sponsoring a revival of Stages' megahit, Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All For You. Thia time the run is open-ended! No closing date h88 been set. They'll keep run· ning the play as long as you keep buying thooe tickets. It opens March 21. , . When Lenora Nemetz understudied Liza Minnelli in The Rink, just before Liza went into the hospital, the audiences usu· ally saw Lenora. Now you can see her shine in TUTS' Guys and Dolls (closing this weekend) . .. These are the last two nights to see Lynn Lavner at Rascals. The Chicago Sun· Times called her ''a leather-clad. lesbian Tom Lehrer.'" The Gay Engagement Calendar called her. "Up-beat, uproarious and u~fronL" Thl& i.s her very first trip to Texas. Let's make her feel like coming back, often! This weekend the Heritage Society's Gallery of Texas History opens. It's tn Sam Houston Park next to the Long Row. Auditions: Theater Suburbia for But She Won't Lie DoU'n (comedy thriller), March 2. et 2 and 3, at 7;10. Need five men (2f>fi0) and two women (21>45); 682· J52.~ .. • o Celebrate! "I have gathered a posie of other men·~ flowers, and nothing but the thread that binds them ia mine own." That is the only quotation from Michel de Montaigne (born 2 128) in my Bartlett's. and it faces the title page, making it the quotation clos­est to the binding. Other b'days: 28, film director, husband and father VinCf'nte MineJli. 4. the only female film direct.or of thf> thirties, Dorothy Azner. 5, Pier Paolo Pasolini, who turned naked young street-toughs into cinematic art. 6, Michelangelo Buone­roti, who turned naked young street· toughs into fine art good enough for the Pope. "From thy fair face I learn, 0 my loved lord/ That which no mortal tongue can rightly say; t The soul, imprisoned in her house of clay,/ Holpen by thee to God hath often soared."-Michelangelo was also a poet. (Translation by J.A. Symonds). Enjoy' o Openings And Mis,. Reardon Drinks a Littli' (Theater Suburbia, 26)-the dark comedy that was a hit for this theater 1:mme lO years ago with the !'!&me director, Jim Sie­dow, and several of the same cast members. Breakfast in Bed (Theater SouthweRt)­English comedy about relatives grabbing for a rirh uncle's inheritance. Chrysalis Reportory Dance Company (Heinen, 28)-with their guests, the Sharir Dance Company from Austin. Doctor Who Festival and Exhibit Tour (Shamrock Hilton. 28, 5 p.m.-2 a.m.)­Freebie, ONO! h• & sh• (Stages, 28)-revival starring Ruth Hastings, Craig Jessup and Doug Trantham. Montrose Art Alliance (Missouri Street Gallery, 28)-Larry Johnson (inks) and Claud Pollard (oils). Pigeons and Tattered Dreams (Com· munity Music Center 2R)-two one-acts produced by IMPACT Peter Frankl, pianist (Jones, 1).-.. Lawrence Foster conducts the HSO in Mozart and Prokofiev Shake•peare, the Globe and the World (Doherty Library, University of St. Tho­mas, 1 )-art, rare books, folios and a scale model of the Globe. Sweet Saturday Night (Galveston's Grand, 1)-American black street and social dance from the last 300 years. Delia Stewart Dance Comany (Heinen, 2, 3 p.m.) Romeo and Juliet (U. of St. Thomas Jones, 3900 Yoakum, 6). Candanc' Compton a11 Janie Blumber11. Harry Breu·er as Simon Blum burg and .\lark Mitchell as \i'/adlmir ln the Stages produC"tion of "lsn ., It Rumantlc" FEBRUARY 28. 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz If You're a Procrastinator, Don't Delay Taking This Test By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. News America Syndicate 8pi•c1al to the Montroe Voice Jf you've ever had the urge to drop what you're doing and takea holiday, you're not alone. There's a little bit of the procrash nator in each of us. Dr. Jane B. Burka of the Counseling Center at the University of California (Bl'rkeley), an authority on the subject, ~mys that procrastination is a way of expressing internal conflict about doing something and, at the same time, protect­ing a vulnerable sense of self-esteem. Studies on procrastinators show that they have certain traits in common, which the quiz ahead reveals. To find out how much of a procrastinator you might be, .:-heck each item true or false, then read on for answers. I I tend to work harder than my friends do. 2. I tend to be a perfectionist (e.g., I have a nc>c>d to go over things I do to iron out any naws). a. When given a deadline by someone, I 11ometimes feel a surge of resistan<·c> within me. 4 I have sometimes become a bit awrd hy tht.• prospt.>("t of holding down a job (or gt-tling involved in a projfft) which is a challt•ngr. fi. I often oven·stimate the time it would takt• mP to C"omplete a job. 6. I ofh•n gE'l into troublf" because I forgt.•t to do thing-s which I sould do. 7. I have had moment.8 of doubt about my <·omp<·tencf" in my job skills. 8. To do something badly would bother me a great deal. Other examples of a leading task are rolling a piece of paper into your typewri­ter to lead you to writing that letter, or buying a paint brush to lead you to sign­ing up for that art course. A leading task is often just enough momf."ntum for overromingresistance and sustaining your motivation to complete a job which has been kept too Jong on the shelf. o Answers Although there is surprisingly littlr rt•st·arch on procrastinatoTR. most scho­lar~ dispute the notion that procrastina· tors nre lazy (item 1). "It's just the oppoHite," says Dr. Lenora Yuen. a colla· borator with Burka on a new hook on the subje<'i. "They get a lot done. If you 1:1cratch a procrastinator, you'll find a workaholic." Many procrastinators are perfectionists who set overly high aspirations for themselves. They have strong fears about fa ilure and receiving disapproval from others. Many procrastinators are perfectionists who set overly high aspirations for them­selves. They have strong fears about fail­ure and receiving disapproval from others (items 2 and 8). Procrastination is sometimes seen as resistance to control by others. Often such types have an authority problem in which they don't express their opposition directly but they show it by getting things done late and beyond the deadline (item 3). Some procrastinators feel apprehensive about success and consequently avoid jobs which could lead to it. They are too threat('ned by the idea of bearing heavy responsibility with no one to tum to if the 1.wing geti- rough (items 4 and 7J. It's ea:;y to put off a task if we judgf." it to he more complex than it reallv is onfwe judge the time rE'Quired to do.it to he far longer than we can afford. This is a trap procrai..tinators often fall into item 1). 8ome procrastinators often havefconve­nicnt) memorv blocks which blot out the things they should be doing <item 6). o Score For procrastinators. all answers are true. The itemR rorrelate highly with the ten· dency to procrastinate. Give yourself one point for each true answer. If you scored between 3 and 5, you're about average in the art of putting things off until tcimorrow. Scores above5 indicate a stronger tendency to procrastinate. Tip: Ont technique which may help con­quer procraRtination is called chaining. Suppose you've delayed washing the car Get the process going with a "leading task." This is a very simple step toward the goal and it should be done quickly and easily. It might mean simply taking the car out of the garage, or connecting the hose, or fetching the soap and bucket. 0 0 o THE o 0 LISTKEEPERS 0 0 522-2268 ° O LET US KEEP YOUR LISTS: O o=== = =====o 0 0 0 •Business *Invitations 0 *Family *Christmas 0 •Friends •Direct Mail 0 O *Wine *Cassettes o o •Albums *Video Tapes o 0 0 0 ADDRESS LABELS OUR 0 0 SPECIAL TY! 0 lr>tial entry 10 earh 0 Pnnted on μresst.re sensltrve .abeh 0 O 04 eacl> 0 HSK CONTRACTING •Roofing (All Types) •Remodeling •Sheetrock/Painting •Plumbing/Electrical •Foundations Repaired •Tree & Trash Removal •Insulation •Water Proofing A Full Service Contractor •Tile/Masonry •Carpet •Cabinets •Decks/Hot Tubs • Room Additions •Concrete •Fully Insured •References Available No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 OR Emergency Digital Peger 891-4053 ----~· 16 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 28. 1986 ROCK "N" HORSE Newest Women's Bar (Men Welcome Also) Dancing Soon DRAFI'BEER 75¢ Happy Hour $100 Regular Well Drinks $1 25 Happy Hour Happy Hour 4-7pm Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 4pm-2am Fri.-Sun. lpm-2am Narene Kee-owner 5731 Kirby 520-9910 Certified {J/J~ ~· • Fast, Fa ir, Friendly -: • Your Neighborhood Plumber Remington Place Apartments **Special ** 1 Month Free Rent 1 Bedrooms $265 & up $100 Deposit 2 Bedrooms $290 & up $150 Deposit 4 Pools, Hardwood Floors, Distinctive Floor Plans, Convenient Location Call Teresa or Pam 965-0589 2210 Mid Lane (Inside 610 Loop. near Galleria) Stein & Toklas DETECTIVES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real­life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6. 95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail. Here is $7.so for Murd;; is Murd;;. is Murd-;r, by Sa~el Stew;;;:d. name _________ address ________ _ city state ip ------ Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 MERIDIEN LEASING INC. '86 BMW '86 MERCEDES BENZ 'B6 HONDA J25 5211< 73Si 309/mo 190£ 395/mo 300£ 569/mo 560Sl 349/mo Accord 498/mo Prelude 725/mo 159/mo 179/mo '86 CADILLAC '86 PORSCHE '86 JAGUAR 398/mo XJ6 569/mo 4'8/rno '86 MAZDA '86 BUICK RX-7 209/mo 626 17Bfmo '86 TOYOTA Slcybrt. 11'!/mo C.mry 172/mo Electr.1 219/mo Celie a 18Slmo CALL LEE BORBA L - -. h_ (713) 975-1986 NO DOWN PAY Ml NT • LOWER MONTH I Y PAYMlN J • (A~I l FOR YOUR TRADE The ffiontrose Uoice announces a new Public Affairs Column 'f\sk CillJ Hall'' Bq Houston Citq Councilman qeorqe qreanias Ever had a problem with CillJ Hal\? Ami citq service? Perhaps qou're just curious about some aspect of our cttq government or the services it is required to perform for its citizens (streets, police, garbage, health. uti\itq regulalton, or even the zoo) Councilman qreamas will answer qour questions. address qour concerns. or help qou get around Citq Hall 'red tape ... Write "Ask Cilq Hall," c/ o tnonlTose Uoice, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 7'2006 ('Qour question will be answered in lhe tnonlrose Uoice. Confidentialitq can be maintained if de sired. On personal i ssues, Councilman (ireanias will provide a personal answer.) Startinq in ffiarch in the newspaper of ffiontrose FEBRUARY 28, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 17 Editorial Something to Be Proud Of By Linda Wyche Montrose Voice Managing Editor Last Sunday, Feb. 23, the first public plan­ning meeting for the 1986 Gay Pride Week was held at the Dignity Center. Individu­als and representatives from several organizations met to chart the course for Houston's annual celebration of pride and unity in the gay community. Unfortunately, during the process of planning the week to 10 days of activities, we often forget just what it is we're trying to celebrate. During the next three months our "lead­ers'' will tear each other's hair out, scratch each other's eyes out. slander, maim and defame each other, all in the name of ''pride." By the time June 29 rolls around, they'll be so "proud and unified" they won't be speaking to each other. At that time, the community in general will join in th!' fray. The parade was too short. The parade was too long. There were too mnny speeches at the rally. There wnrn't{'nough speeches at the rally. Even poor Moth{'r Nature will ht' blamed ifthe weather is any less than perfect. Everyone will he mad as hell, but whether you like it or not, you will celebrate .. pride" and "unity" in HouHton. c3ln 3altenwriam James F. Beecher Ac .. ng KS/AIDS Foundation President James F Beecher 36, 11ed Monday, Feb 24, 1986 Memorial services were held Feb. 27 at St Stephens Episcopal Church. (See story elsP.where thts issue ) Beecher had been actmg as president of the KS/AIDS Foundation since September Pr or to tt-1s he had served as vice president tor tl"e Fol ndat1on and as a oard member 'c..r two year After graduating rnagna cun dWJe 'rom nc ston University with a bac elor of arts degree Beecher helped co·foundand man· age tte n, stim Cc nc rt Opera Follow1ng a move to Houston, he served as director of marketmg for the Houston Grand Opera from 1978 to 1982 In May 1984. Beecher received a Masters of Social Work degree from the Uni\fers1ty of Houston He became the first full·time therapist at the Montrose Counseling Cen· ter and remained on staff until the time of his death In addition to his work at the Counseling Center, Beecher was a psychotherapist in private practice. Beecher served on the United Way alloca~ t1on panel end was the state chair of the task force on gay and lesbian issues for the National Association of Social Workers He also served as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Houston's School of Social Work Beecher 1s survived by hrs parents and a brother Contributions may be made to the James Beeher Memonal Fund. KS/AIDS Founda· hon. 3400 Montrose. suite P.O Box 66973. Suite 700. Houston. TX 77006 OUR POtlCY Tf'le "'4ootrOM Voke .,., comm.moral• lh• PN&it'Q ol "'4Qfltl'OM rnidlfita and Housion OIY f"Ommun1ty tnllfl'lb9rs with lr"I •flnOUnce,,...,-ot Friends Of rNt1vea Ol lh• d.C.:sed ml)" prov•d• us wolh fitc:ta ll>Out lfl• pel"IOr"l'I tole n-a ol lh• closet! IUN•vD!'1. and bur,.11rr1~ements ProM or verse can be lnducltld Poe turn are eppreciated and w.11 bl rlttlrnld N11me ol the deceaMCI should be attached to the ptlo•o lnlc>rmlt•on 1hould be provided to the "'4ontrOM Votee 11 the Hrt1e1t poa11b1e date and w II be pubhahed on the neNt 1v11l1t11t1 ecM•on There 11 no charge for th•I Mf'V'408 In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Vof'e Then aft.er we celebrate our "pride" and "unity," let's make a $500 donation to a worthwhile charity-something like the Houston lOOClub. Wearesoproudthatwe can give money to an organization that has long been known as racist and homo· phobic. Anyone who has lived in Houston more than five minutes knows that the 100 Club is the closei;t thing to a bribe next to handing a police officer your wallet when he asks for your driver's license. Maybe following the parade when the post· celebration PI patrol hits the streets, we can tell them that we are members of the 100 Club and should be spared the trip downtown. Qu e ~: t i on'.::: About Heal t h I'm certain Bruce Felger, the parade chair, feels that such a gesture serves as a symbol to Houston's general population. It's time we stop dealing with symbol8 and start dealing with substance. Such a move on the part of the Gay Pride Week Commit­tet! is a flagrant misappropriation of funds generated by members of the gay com· munity and should serve as cause for each nnd everyone of us to become involved in the planning proce~A for future Gay Pride Weeks. I would hate to "'ee a$;>()() donation made to the Ku Klux Klan as a };ymbol of"pr de and unitv." Beglnr ing April -l. the Medicine :t"est d<>t:",ts ir the Moru~_e Vo1c:e. H ser ice f the Mo1 •r e C'lln1:. tht. MedlC"'lne 8t-1e<;.f"' ill an 1er rea::te ' ,uo t.1. r- ~bout he~lt~~ healt~ care and 3~ ~enance. F<nonqn10U$ quest101" ;:'!ln be n1al.ed t J: Th~rt> 'are three remainin~ planning mec·tinjlM before Gay Pride Wf'ek. That's three more meetings for our "leaders" to show som(• pride and unity instead of ego and stubborness. 1'hat's three more mttL· in gs for those who .. just can't wait for the lit»Y pnde parade" to get involved.. That's thrt.'(' more meetings for each and every memh<'r of the llouston gay communit'!-' to bccomt• a part of something w{' can hon· estly say we are "proud" of. Hie "edicine Chest c. o Tt">e "ll n•rci e Voice o.108 1-1\.Jcmidlo He • Te a · ~00c rnroco110r -C A· f · E-AND CA5AQET Kim Yvette, Richard Askins, Mahli McGee and Liz Mendez Driscoll St. Happy Hour All Drinks 4-Spm Experience a Hand Reading with Susanna Fri., Sat., & Sun. Brunch Starting a Montrose Tradition with Our Sunday Brunch 1834 Westheimer 522-7020 ~------ 18 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 28. 1986 'Brazil' Looks at the Future Through the Past By Scott Cul8inger Montro1e Voice Film Critic This week we have one highly original film and two rip-offs of other movies. The big surprise is Brazil, the futuristic satire by Monty Python alumni Terry Gilliam. Featuring a thought-provoking script and stunning sets (both nominated for Oscars this year), this is an unusual effort that deserves praise and a big audience. The Hitcher is a scarey movie, but it's too much of a road movie with a mad kiHer on the loose. This film and House stea1 ~hameleAsly from other thrillers and hor­ror films. and you'll recognize them imme­diately. o Brazil If the future scares you. the new film Brazil will assure you that you have every right to be. The film takes us into a world similar to Orwell's 1984. a bleak existence where people no longer have control over their own livei-;. No one appears to be in charge, but everyone is being watched by someone. confusing and disorienting feeling des­cribed by some as "retro-future"-1ooking at the future through the pasl Everything seems to be twisted around until it makes little sense. The government is now in charge of fixing things like heat· ing and appliances-but they don't know what they are doing. Private contractors are considered scabs and arrested, even though they know what they are doing. Isn't that always the way it is? I could go on and on about the very impressive and talented cast (including Robert DeNiro, Katherine Helmond, Ian Holm, Bob Hoskins, and Michael Palin), but it would take forever. The most stun· ning aspect of Brazil is the production design (an Oscar nominee). the marvelous models, and the special effects. The bleak world of this film is a bri1liantlyconceived image that will stay in your mind for a long time. I'm cautious about highly recommend· ing Brazil because it will bore some and be over the heads of others. The film is really a work of art. but the entertainment value irs. Lowry (Katherine Helmond) and her son Sam (Jonathan Pryce) arriue at a re1taurant for lunch in "Brazil" What saves Brazil from depression is the genius of director Terry Gilliam of Monty Python fame. Thia iB far from Python movies 1ike Holy Grail or Meaning of Life, but much in the grove with Gilli­am's hit Time Bandit1. This is a serious "black comedy" where we laugh and then realize that we really shouldn't. Right off, one ohould realize that Gil· liam is lampooning the future with per­verse, nightmarish ideas. Everything from terrorist bombings to stupid, time­saving kitchen devices are looked upon non-chalantly. People are wisked out of their homes for questioning, tied up in heavy bags, and interrogated until they die. Yet people still manage to hope and have their dreams. One dreamer is Sam Lowry (Jonathon Pryce), a clerk in the Ministry of Inform&· tion records department. In his elaborate dreams. he is a courageous knight saving hie fair·haired maiden in distress. In real life. he is having difficulties because a computer blunder caused Mr. Suttle to be interrogated instead of Mr. Tuttle. This blunder by information retrieval manages to engulf Sam in an escapiBt adventure from which he may never return (but he may otill get the girl). Thia is the basic premise of Brazil. a film that is about as hard to categorize as it will be for some to understand. This vision of the future threatens our very ideas about reality and hope, and it's often hard to swallow. Everything we see is vaguely familiar (clothes are thirties and forties, architecture is modern eighties, and mte­nors are sixties and seventies), but it'11 a will differ for everyone. I loved this film because iU visuals and visions are super­bly unusual and different, but many wi11 find the future too forboding and gloomy for their taste. o The Hitcher This is one of those films that excites you while you watch it, but later you hate your· self for liking it. It sort of reminded me of Blood Simple last year with its slick look and sick storyline. The Hitcher tries to be flashy like that film was, but underneath it's really a slasher movie taken "on the road." C. Thomas Howell (Grandview . USA! is a tired driver who picks up a hitchhiker in the rain. The newspaper ads say "Never pick up a stranger." and this guy is cer· tainly stranger than most. When our driver sees how weird this guy is, he triee to get him to leave. But it's too late. There's already a knife at his throat. .Som~how , our boy manages to get the hitchhiker out of the car by pushing him out. That, of course, is not nearly the end of that guy. We find out that he likes to get rides with people and then ki11 them hru· tally. And he does it repeatedly during the film-although we, thankfully are not subjected to any actual killings. So, like Fruiay the 13th our man keeps terrorizing people and killing them. But like Steven Spielburg's first film. Duel, the main conflict occurs between thf' young driver and the hitchhiker out un the open road. It's a cat-and·mouse game wherf' this hitchhiker aeems to pop up ~very· John Ryder (Rutger Hauer), a psychotic h1tchh1ker, plays a deadly cat and mouse game with Jim Halsey (C. Thomas Howell}, an innocent young man u·ho picks him up on a Texas highu .. ay m "The Hltcher" where to frighten (or kill) the boy. I must admit that Rutger Hauer(Blade· runner) is scarey as hell as the evil hitch· hiker. Whether he's leaving a chopped finger in some french fries or threatening to throw a match in some gasoline where the boy is lying, we know this man is some­one we don't want to know. He is evil incarnate, and when he ties a girl between two aemis and threatens to pull her apart. we know he i8 too sick to be real. The problem with The Hitcher is believ· ability. Too many things happen just to provide excitement, and they really don't make any sense. Thia man could not pm1si­bly be everywhere that he turns up, and soon we turn off common sense and expect him any time. Just like Halloween, we almost await that moment when he pops up. Robert Harman directs the daylights out of this film, and at all times, there are moments of pure terror and originality. Still, the film seems lifted from too many other movies, and this keeps it from stand ing on its own merits. The Hitcher is a good matinee film and really very scarey, but it just isn't plausible enough to be memorable. o House I caught the new horror film Houae at a sneak preview, and the crowd was unanimous-this is a very stupid movie. Throwing in everything from Poltergeist monsters to bits from every haunted house movie ever made, this film is an embar· raseing rip-off. This is one of those movies where some­one rents an old house just to "get away from everything-" William Katt plays a To better sen'e your needs ... young man trying to write some memoirs about Viet Nam. Of course, he doesn'tget much writing done. Katt (of "Greatest American Hero" fame) spends most of the film chasing after the monsters that lurk in the house. A direct Poltergelst steal comes from a monster who hides in-you guessed it­the closet! Katt sets up elaborate camera equipment (how original) but has trouble "capturing the moment." GMrge Wendt ("Cheers") provides a nice comic touch as a nosey neighbor. His attempt.fl to help Katt capture the monster are the highlight of the movie. Kay Lenz is also on hand briefly as the ex-wife, but she gets killed off rather fast. The film begins with a halfway feasible story, but towards the halfway point it starts to get rather murky and delirious. Katt seems mentally disturbed about his Viet Nam experiences and a1so the loss of a daughter who just vanished at this very house years ago. We get dream sequences that slide in and out of reality so much, we really aren't sure what exactly is going on. The whole thing turns out to be a bunch of malarky, and we feel foolish for sitting through this silliness. I have to admit, there are several jumpy, scarey scenes that had me half on the edge of my chair. Unfortunately, the rest of the film is so dumb that it's not worth it just for the cheap thrills. I was really ready for a good horror film in the mode oflast year's Fright Night, but no such luck. House writer Ethan Wiley obviously feels fine about stealing ideas from other movies, but we don't have to sit through this rehash. Stay at home and avoid this House. TEXAS STATE OPTICAL announces new hours at these locations TSO-Village 2515 L'niversity 528-1589 Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Closed !\fonday Fff--ec. .t.i.n · Feb. TSO-South Main 4414 S. Main 523-5109 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Clo•ed Saturday I, 1986 Films 'frrry Oi/liam, the director of "Brazil" Monty Python Animator Proud of New Film By Scott Cutsinger Montro~w Voic1• Film Critic T{'rry Gilliam is probably heRt known as the odd animator for the zany Monty Python bunch. ViRiting Houston on a pu}).. licity tour, Gilliam says that he's become bored with animation and the Python bunch. His new film Brazil is definitely something in a new vein. He describes this effort as something a little different-"a rut-out animation movie with live actors." "l think that moviemakers under~ N•tlmatc> the public," says Gilliam. "They nttd suhstinancE>-not just entertainment without thinking." He added, "Movies like Commando are juHt A to B to C with no c·hurac·U·r dt·vt•lopment or intelligenCf>. ' The idt>a of making a futuri~tic film intrigued Gilliam because he had such a backlog of odd idens and thoughts that he was able to bring to life on the screen. "I wanted lo makt•art that includes evervone in the process and leaves !'\herds in ihe1r braina," he cummented. ''Movies todav just don't do that." - In fact, the new film was almo~t too strange for its distributor, Universal Pie~ tures. They wanted to trim the movie and re-edit the downbeat ending. Gilliam fought hard for a year, cut his own 10 min· utes, and then decided to show the movie to critics himself when Universal ignored it. Los Angeles critics fell all over them­selves in praise (they gave it Best Film of the Year) and Universal decided to release his prinL The praise was a surprise to Gil­liam, who said that he "never expected anything like the reception Brazil received-nothing was better than that moment." Success is not new to Gilliam with hits like Jabberwol'ky and Time Bandits to his name, both which he directed. He worked on all of the Monty Python films, and was tiecond unit director on the recent Mean­ing of Life. H<> comm('nted that he doetm 't RN' the group getting together anytime soon, but any future Python films wi1l have to include all of the members. His futur(• projects include a film called Thr Adt1t•nturt•s of Baron .Yunl'hhauser Jt deals with storiE>S told by an 18th Cen­tury lawyer who is a notorious liar. Gilli­am's success with Time Bandits and hopefully Rrazil makes him a "golden goose" right now. nnd he has the oppor· tunity to film many ofhiR strange concoc· tions. ··It's a very simple system in Hollywood until you flop," he noted. When asked about the title of Brazil and what connection it has to thi~ film, Gil· liam says that, -·It's the answer to every· thing. That thirties tune is an et1capist answer to our naive dreams, and it con­jures up images of romance and relief." Gilliam's film is truly relief for serious filmgoers, and we eagerly await the new projects that he might be thinking up­even if they are still caught up in his prec-­ariously unbalanced mind. ~~CJ TAFT A UTOMOTIVE} 1411 'f'AF'f', 522-2190 FEBRUARY SPECIAi$ * Oil Change $1995 * A/C Check Br Charge $1995 * Check Cooling System $2795 'r11.2.- ~- ~"-.!-8£-0.-.!-!.-S~.- !°.-!.!-.~-u~ -~..-!.-a~ DON'T NEGLECT BP~TSY! GENERAL REPAIR AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION ELECTRONIC TUNEUP AJR CONDITIONING FEBRUARY 28. 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 19 9n loving memory of ~ames '3. Beecher KSIA9DS 'Joundation President As our friend and co-worker, you and tfie contri6utions tfut you made will always 6e remem6ered 6y your community and tfie many others tfut you served 9n lieu of nowers, tfie family requests tfut contri6utions 6e made to tfie ~ames '3. Beecher Memorial 'Jund in care of tfie KS'A9DS 'Joundation of Houston 31100 Montrose Suite 700 Houston, oX 77006 20 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 28. 1986 T., ..h e Far Side by Gary Larson ,. ~ I / Testing the carnlVOr~ool vest. In the days before soap. Cattle hustler. "You're gonna be OK. mister. but I can1 say the same tor your little buddy over there. _ The way I hear ii, he's the one that mouthed on lo them gunfighters 1n the first place." A Star is Born, It's a Libra By Mark Orion Fortunes For Friday. Feb 28. 1986. through Thursday. March 7, 1986 ARIES-March comes in like a lion and you're prepared for the blow Things become hectic on all fronts but you remain calm and organized. Don't be afraid to delegate tasks to others TAURUS-With the beginning of the new month, spring is nght around the corner A mild case of early spring fever makes concentration difficult. Relax and enjoy some limited daydreaming. It will aid in future creative endeavors GEMINI-Your usual calm nature will help settle a dispute. Use you level head to prevent someone close to you from making a mistake Your rational approach to the situation wins you new friends and respect. CANCER You are struggling to get out of a late winter rut. Limited finances have you believing you're just stuck. Not true. Try changing your routine a little Begin a new home improvement project. You want to be ready for a great spring season LEO - A fantasy involving a new acquaintance is beginning to nag at you Try ignoring your stong mental side and let your feelings have a fllng. It could turn out to be a wonderful first time, but not a last time VIRGO-You've been so good at watching your pennies and taking care of your health. Now's the time for a treat How about a wardrobe addition? Or, a night out? Grab a partner and have a ball You owe it to yourself. LIBRA A star is born. Look in the mir­ror You've been a wallflower fart6o long Don't let shyness force you to miss the boat. Your talents are in demand and you are more popular than ever, both at home and at work SCORPIO You have been a little con­cerned over a major purchase. Relax and enioy the luxury. Friends gladly help you enioy the treat. You wtll find ti's worth every penny SAGITTARIUS-It's a give-and-take world. And now·s your time to take. Gifts of all kinds are coming your way. Be wil­ling to graciously accept because it's time you were repaid for past acts of generosity CAPRICORN-A chance meeting has blossomed into an unexpected relat1on­sh1p. Right now ti's all fireworks and star­ftlled nights. Enjoy. Don't let a previous affair cloud your present happiness AQUARIUS "Stop blaming yourself for something that was bound not to work You did your best but fate iust wouldn't cooperate. Don't change a thing Next time (and it won't be long) things will work out PISCES You avoided a possible dis­aster by stopping to think about the con­sequences Let out a sigh of relief but don't let one close call make you overly cautious. You love to take chances and most of the time you come out on top PLAY SAFE Sale ae• la fun. erotic Play sale. lor your sake. for yOllr partner"s sake Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS EX·2306 MEMBERS Cati 529-8091 LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose Voice. a general c1rculallon newspaper having published continu· ~~!'P:~~~aren~t~~0~Pt:611~gq~~!if~e:1w~~ paper's c1rculat1on area of Montrose CARS & BIKES ·82 Yamaha Maxim 15o. 4.500- m;les. exceHenl condition S 1700. lee 975-1872 ·01 Continental MarkVllC811L1nd8522- 2190 ·Ss. BMW 325. Red. $318 per month lee 975-1985 "86 Honda Accoard Xll. $228 per month Lee 975-1985 '83 Volvo 240. $8295 Lee-975-1985 ·84 01ds -cuuaas. 20K- miiGs. $1895~-Lee 975-1985 b4 Chrysler Lazer. 18K-miles, $7250 Lee 975-1985 MERIOIEN lEAsiNG Lee Borba, 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE RENTERS ADVANTAGE! One bedroom plus den $20CVmo. 3 bed­room. 1 bath. $30Ql'mo (2 blocks from TSU) Secure with hardwood lloors 9374 1889 Mo~ose Duplex. large. -2br. C -h/a. washertdryer connections. fireplace. m1n1 blinds. hardwoods Must see. 510W Saulm1er, $49~mo 46+-6197 - -- HEART OF MONTROSE large lwo bedroom duplex $500 523-- 5125 MONTROSE DUPLEX 2·1. hvmg. dining. breakfast. central a/h, ceiling lans. hardwood, available March 1 664-4211 Roommate to share 2-2 on Timmons Lane. S1Cl0 deposit. $22~month No pets or amokers Senous calls only 850-0769 Evenings Creatrv8 pr0f'Ms1onaf to Share nice 3br home in NW. close to 610. $250fmo plus ut1llt1• and $100 depoS1t 686-6388 DWELLINGS ANO ROOMMATES ~::i:r:,~~'.n:riv~:~ $~~5. sh~~~1t1:1~ 1510 EXCELLENT LOCATION $18G"mo. lor efficiency apartment. Mont­rose, lower Weethe1mer area 523--4483 GwM seeks roommate. large. 1 bdr. Sum­mit area 713--622-0370 Male to Share large home with w-d. cable. den. flreptace, etc. $285 plus ~ ut1ht181 8'!0-0538 Roommate !or 2P1Ui28partmen1 · H1gh- ~~Yud~ 8s111~~~~:~j~· ut~~!:e~~,Z~~ female 561-5665 East Woods across 1-45 tr'Om U of H Completely remodeled 2-1. downstairs in triplex lots ol windows. new appliances. carpet. quiet neighborhood Frve minutes to downtown or U ol H $350tmo. plus ~~f~~::~~~~~;::a~~~~t!n ~~10~~,jt If interested call 523-7261 after 8pm Mon.·Fri or on weekend! '1W MIGHf P6 \..ELL 1'1¥1 US NOW. \J\1£N l,J( Ftll'.:oll PR£SEN'{INC, OW. EVIOCf\i:E, THE COURT Will Gl\1£ US TRIP\.E [:¥\t'lA\,ES I Luxury Condominiums Now Leasmg with option to purchase. Great location Large beautiful swimming pool & Jacuzzi Controlled entry security. Remote controlled garage entry High efficiency AC & heating. Free cable TV One bedrooms from $375 ($ 150 deposit) Two bedrooms from $650 ($250 deposit) 2507 Montrose Boulevard Call for appomtment 524-0830 Hardship sale Will negotiate · eegin $69.000. lease purchase considered 1800 square feet. 4 bedroom. 2 bath. double ~~~~: ~~~: e:~~no;p~~~r~:';~~~~: Southwest Houston 723-8368 Montrose1He1ghts. Several apts. availa· ble. 1 & 2 bedroom. covered parking $250-$425. Midtown Property Service 868-1129 MONTROSE APT J POOL ~~~~r~:1~r~~'~!u~:~Po~nw~~~:.es~~~ ming pool tor summe< Central A/C. GE appUances, mm1·bllnds and more. 1BR at $315. 2BR at $375plussecuntydepos1t & electric 309 Stnillord at Taft Dl1count on 1yr.La.. 523-1109. 1920 WEST ALABAMA APTS.- - 1920 W Alabama. 529-6798 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE --GREENWAY PLACE APTS. 3333 Cummins Lane. 623-2034 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Sfnall quiet MontrOse - complex New paint, new double door Ice boxes. $100 deposit 1 bdrm $285 pluselec. Also avail­able 2 bdrm. 529-8178 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Health care proleas1onal gay man seeks hOme health care position. Live tn Reply Blmd Box 279-W c/o Voice CAREER POSITION DESIRED ~9:nt .. 1.0~,~co~r~t~n 1BF~an~~:~1!~~:~ non-smoker. reliable. ~all accountant or assistnat conlroller position d•tred Call Tom 784-0985 Wanted person to sew on part time basis for small manufacturing company 1n Montroae 522·3443 or 523--2489 BARTENDERS, WAITPERSONS Need part time at Risky Business Cabaret 528-7126 between 1 Oem-1 pm tor appt Muscular mal8 mod811 areneed9ci-1rTlme­dtately for the country's leading male ~~:~~~n bt~r~~~~~f:~ ~~~~g~~rvh~ search ol Texas tal.,t Call lor interview ~d-ap~inlment 523--4340 SA.LONDA.NIEL Rent a Chair 1n Houston·s best salon Be your own boss Call or come by 2431 Blssonnet 5~9327 FEBRUARY 28. 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 21 EARN 100s working spare time at home RUSH self·slamped. addressed en\lelope 2870 N Towne #136 Pomona. CA 91767 Oept-J3 Cotr99e educated. with 13- years refa1I expenence. l111e years 1n management Excellenl verbal skills. expenence 1n pol· ~~cna~1~~a~~;nfi:~d ~~~c ~~~f'"ti9o~ phobic environment. Please call leonard De Palma at 869-8685 during business hours Baiber. stylist with fOllow1ng lor-He;Qhts Blvd shop 868-4784 -- PERFORMING ARTS - ~;:;=et ~;~i~~ef:r!~~~:ir !~Pshtr~~,~~t Base plus commission Call Ms Knipp alter 11am. 526-5323 (MISC.) FOR SALE TA.LL TEXAS COWBOY GWM 23. 6'2". 195. Brown hair and moustache. Seeks a special friend for dat­ing and more Prefer someone who en1oys C& w dancing. quiet bmes at home and has his act together Prefer someone 22-35. d•k hatr. 57" pit.is I am reta11on· ship ot1ented and not interested 1n one night stands. Reply with letter. photo and phorie No reply w1thout photo. Reply Bhnd Box 279-0 Clo Voice BIG DA.ODY looking for bad httle boys fordominat10n and ltght punishment Write. PO. Bo .. 701041 Houston. Texas 77270 RfPCOrdtJune" GPW.'150i~J Doe ~? GHM. 5'7", 140. Are you young? Mature? Responsible? Maybe you'd like to spend an evening with me. Send me any picture of yourself. your name and address and I will return same I am discreet. and I don't play games. Response PO Box 27354 Houston. Texas 7702.7 ONE FOURTH PRICE HfALTH CARE PROFEiStOHAL 0 GAY Anhque grand piano. ornate. beautiful. Man seeks phySlcian. especially with perfect keys. $9600appra1sal. S2000sale AIDS patients. Reply Blind Box 279-N Clo Queen sized soft sided water bed Paid Voice $800. Sell lor $200 Bed looks like a regu- GWM STABLE, 36 tar bed Trad1t1onal sheets lit Fast. easy A slim and ho~y bOltom seeks non- ~i/~n~1i~t~~7-~~maran Paid $5050 ' :~gk~~~n~~c!.h~e:~·san~h~~~ 1~7~~~g h~~~ See ads u~'!.R··~:r~~:J'e!:E:i the end of ~ply ~~b::ox1~~t~erc7o ~6:~onship the Montrose c1as11!1ed GWM. ·2i 5·1 r. 150. Br'br. attri'ct1~. clean cut. looking !or someone 22-30. re1a11onsh1p and goal onented to share MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS ''RubdOWl_'t, you place. $20. $25. C8-UV.n. 558-8912 LEGITIMATE SWEDISH MASSAGE 24 Hours' lrvoutt Pnces start at s101 Wil· ham M O"Rourke. MST 869-2298 -- RUBDOWNS Ronnl..,_5•3147 TOP TO BOTTOM Relaxing and soothing deep muscle mas· sage by bodybuilder 568-25"'4 THE CADILLAC OF TOUCH 08~~ ~0(~1~)~1~2~~ BODY MASSAGE Full body massage. Hot 011-in or out Bruce 622-0370 PERSONALS GWM, 31, 6' 155. brown/ hazel, moustache. honest. tun loving. romantic and 1dventurous En1oys the outdoors. entenaintng, space m0111es and champagne in front of• fire ~~~~~~~dr~~~nsG~:'tfu~r ~~~~~:= tenmal romance.or possible relationship Reply to Dan. Bhnd Box 279-E c/o Voice what life has to offer I know what I want and I'm going for 11. Are you? Tell me about yourself and I'll reply Reply Bhnd Box 279-P GBF would hketo meet a fish. Quiet. hon· est. sincere. 35-40. Reply Blind Box279-L c/o Voice ~.~LA~C~K-M-AN-WANTED Looking for super hung. black man for heavy hot ses11ons. 30-50. I am GHM 5'9", 1-'S tbs into fantasies. Greek pas­sive. French versaflle Reply to Blind Box 279-G Clo Voice :~-:~~~~~:,1!a~~e:~~::!r~~ ces Lots to off•. Hourfy or hve-in. Call Mr Willa.ams 526-8859 between 9am and 9pm GwM~ 35. s; 1··~155.· br1hz1. p;o1estt0na1. sincere YES1 Air. food and water exist outside the loop• Anyone else live 1n West Houston and want to meet others 1n Me~ onal area EnJOY cooking. movies. theater. talklnq and laughing For fun, trohc. fnendsh1p and a safe romp 1n the hay, reply Blind Box 278-S Clo Voice MALE MODELS Do you ha\le ·1hat k>ok""? TEXAS MEN. a quarterly magazine. may make you a star if you're handsome or cute. (Let's be hon· est now Some of us just are not mOdel material Th&"I again. some of us are and don't know 1t) lfwe choose you forpubli­cahon. you will be paid To inquire. call 520-0206 (adult gay mal• only) PLAY SAFE Sale sex is fun. erotic. Play sale. for your sake. for your panner"s sake GWM. 21. 5·10··. 150. brown hair and eyes EntoY most sports and music Tell me about yourself No drugs or smoker Seeking 19 to 27 I guarantee a reply Write Blind Box 278-T Clo Voice NUTRIOL-MEDICAL MIRACLE Nutriol---Europe·s fastest selling. proven h•r growth product now 8\'&•lable Also Nu S.:ln skin c•e products. Distributor~ ships available s21..geo1 anytime. HOT Gay. white male. 29. 6' 165 lbs brn. hzl wilh beerd seeks similar for dating and possible relattonship. Only real men need apply Reply Bhnd Box 277-S do Voice PtiYoUt-ilfiY--tlWlta$y. hiish~-des1re that turns you on with handsome. uninh1b11ed ~= ~;: ~~~ 2L7e;~~g~~~i::soon Leather m.ste~~36~ se~S-masoCh1sl-25- 40. •flfO safe and sane S&M Send photo and tetter descr1b1ng fantasies and hm1ts Novices constct81"ed Repty Blind Box 277-A eio Voice. LESl51AN AND GA.Y-CciiJPLES Voh.mteer1 needed for Master's 1hes1s study on deost0n making in lesbian and gay coupl• 1-1"' hours of your time completely conf1denta.al interview by Jes· b1an student (512) 690-1693 evenings or weekends GWM. 19.s·4·· 133:-bro';;eyes.harrand moustache Looking forGWM. 28-40fora daddy Reply Blind Box 276-R c/o Voice PHONE SEX - Our service connects Horney Guys 24 hrs. a day Do 1t now for less than $3.SOan hour (415) 3'46-8747 QUA POLICY on Sexually-Explicit Adver· t1smg The Montrose Voice does not believe that humans engaging m consent­ing sexual acts with one another ts immoral. Our readers are encouraged to ad"9rt1se here to seek relationships encounters. adventures. etc. All advertis­ing should h0we11er. not contam Ian· guage that would ottend an unsuspecting reader A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Fredenck Brandt can show you how to have active fun or play passive games w•th the personal ads In ther book. 'Classiflecl Atta1rs.w they11 lell you how to write an ad that really stands out. whlll: to ew:ped when you place or respond to an ad. and even what all those funny lllUe abbr8\11at1ons mean Send $8 to ··c1ass1hed AftA1rs Alyson Pub., Dept P·5. 40 Plympton. St. Boston. MA 02118(Also tnctudedwrll bea coupon for SS off on your nextPersonais 1n yourcho- ~~n~~:! i'6i~r11cat1ons. 1nclud1ng the YARD & GARAGE SALES Garage sale by four couples. ""i12.20uval Anhques. cha.rs. pc1tures. books. house­hold 1tems. lheworks Saturday and Sun­day March ~ and 2 - - FRIENDS OF MIKE MIESCH S.lurd.y Ylfd s• 1103 Callfomla 10-S 521-7014 QUICK REFERENCE (Tear Out lo Post by Phone) AiOSi-· ·~ 529-3211 AM-BuuNc~•'•"'• ~ ,:.,o------ c;..,. Hal 222-3011 Doct~...-ad9"~52t-~3~2"" ____ _ FIRE , 91 1~--- - ~>eal Caucuc-•°"52"'""10=-00---­G. y & l•b .. ., S,..•tchboan:!. $3-3211 KSIAIOS foundatiOI\. 524-2437 l .... .,.., ..... dl0f'52t-3211 Library 235-1313 ~oM•oaa C1m1c, 528-5$31 MOril:•OM Coursetlng Cir s2i-0007 MONTROSE VOtCE S2fM.490 POLICE; 111- ~~~=~~ Sta_5 29-_3}001-_ r.m.~iemp,,...att,~ -- Vol~ '99tttrauon. 22._191:;;9-c•"'•3"1'~0 -- 22 MON G reaTRtOeSEr V OMICE I FEBR UARY 28. 1986 ·o ""'"'""" •n 'h5 ~~~-· calo ntrose Serv1·ce 529-84\lO °'-'' and Shop · ping Directory ING LES LEASIN 5211 .. Buffal~ASMILY MOTORS SEE OUR Olr;Pedway 667.fi804 IN THE MONTRLAOS YEA VOO ICE lee aorn::~~l~N LEASING SEEOURO s IN THE MO~S?LAY AD Also see C TROSE VOICE Caassi· ed' p~~e & B•kes on Montrose PAIR Montrose Auto Repair All ~ee Estimates ork Guaranteed Ma1or, Minor Repairs Gas or Diesel Electrical Repair 526-3723 2716 Taft ing business hours 1411 Talt.Tti'i/UTOMOTIYE SEE OU 190 IN THE :.:tlSPLAY AD - NTROSE VOICE 1901 Tait, ~:4~:6T0OWN KARZ SEE OU 1 IN THE :.:t~f'LAY AD AUTO REP ROSE VOICE 2001 Harold. sJ.~~:s.B 5O2D6-Y1 9S4H0 OP Di ~perHead no s Barber Sho 302W 11th t p (~eights) 96;.;";~6 Comp~teH~~'.cut-$7 r Style· ·Sll EPING See also 'Tax Preoarat1on etegory ~:1·s~~se Levering & fou ...,......a tlOn Co M~Togoo;1r 520-9064 HSK CONTRACTING SINE ET HOEU MRg 1sPLA r AD NTROSE VOICE ING c{amoly. Individual & 'g'tvPsychotherapy C~O JONES, All f W, ACP ees negotiated 529-6741 ERV ICE RonalDd .oMs 8utler U::, Westheimer Monda=°:h:: 77006 Hours by A Saturday (713) s2':""~"1 SSES 252 TEXAS STAT 441~ 5 Unrversity 'Vi!~ OPTICAL SEE ;uth Matn. 523-~:Js 528-1589 & IN THEu:.:g~TsRPOLASYE AVDO ICE L DIRECTORS ~S~O:WUeTlHcWh.E S5T2 8F- ~:s~RAL DIRECTORS IN T:ku:.:g1sPLAY AD NTROSE VOICE RE RESTO ONS For the REST FUTONS 1()()111, conon 50~~ 1 • ·PARTY GOOO your partnet's .~:afe tor your FOODS Your mo1he ~~aa~~molher ~s~sihdemthem Your produr1s Watkms Spices Since 1868 Rack. 3 14 /~!ie r,c a7t1a3lo-8g6. 1-H1:S2~l . hS op1mcee SHOPS 3626Westhe1~AY CHEESE ~a;: OU er (Highland Village). 621 IN THE :JtlSNTPRLOASYE A VDO ICE OLYMPIA FITNESS & 8313 SW F CLUB RACKETBALL SEE OU wy. 988-8787 IN THE:.: DISPLAY AD ONTROSE VOICE SERVICE 5401 Dashw• ':t~, CLINIC SEE OUR DIS D. 661·2~t IN THE MONt,LOASYE AVDO ICE AIR CONDITIONING R ··oELl~IOUORS WAUGH ERY SERVICE 1402 WE~~~E LIQUORS DORIS 529-9~WAUGH •nd o~"..~:;-oRIGINAl M/V!AMEX L CARE GetUsted! And Get NEW CUSTOMERS! cAll 529-8490 Each week. the Montrose Voice is read bY an estimated 27 ,OCIJ Houston people. And those 27 ,OCIJ are a>ma;s 1001<\ng tor various seNices-trom attornevs to yard seNice from dentists to auto repair. frorn travel agencies to hOme movers OUR RAlES ARE LOW Jus' ca\\ us l odav\ Your ad will appear here next weeK. And then you will nave NEW cus10MERS! PROCTOLOGY CLINIC OF SOUTH TEXAS DR. CE FONTAN I ER Diseases of the Colon & Rectum * Colonoscopy * Hemorrhoids * Constipation * Rectal Bleeding Medical & Surgical management 872-7676 Answered 24 ho 210 urs H West Greens Rd ouston, TX 77067. NTROL RESULTS PEST C 123-4000 SANITATlg~TROL & SINE ET HOEU MROD~ ~PLAY AD ROSE VOICE NISHING WE o6 !~OUR QUALITY PH enlargeme:ill• Printing end ~TO paper 2615 ~l~g";,"°o pnnts. f,:,e1~pod1ng. r 52~1 010_ ak ING NG 1817.:l:r:: SPEEDY PAINTING SEE OUR ..-. •. 527-0027 IN THE Mt~STPRLOASYE AVDO ICE 6.at) Bella~=~~?dy 6P6RINTING SEE o · 7-7417 IN rnl:.JtlSNPTRLOASYE AVDO ICE REPARATION ., . ....... ..... 529-1414 TNl 111'f !'UICI ALL BRANDS , a1~0X!~\~iew ontrMA 2016 Montro!ID5~~!COPE SEE OUR . ~,544 IN THE Mt~~~LOASYE AVDO ICE 401 Cehtorn~!D~2~TREND SEE r.1u -0656 IN THE :.:t~~~OLASYE AVuO ICE v Jr gay~: DELIVER VIDEOS 5:..?·448 eoservice. 1420Westh111mer Also see Adult VKleo cat egory Montrose Voice Classified Advertising ,-,;: r1r 1,;'iJ~y .r~~::;,~;,t;;;/la'i::"~S,:~~~'1;;,..7;~ .,_, F reg~ •d• yac>-1nrsmg THE HEADLINES: Headline words in bold type. centered. are $1 each word (mm1mum $3 per line). (Centered bold headlines can. also apl?E!arwithin the text or at the end of the ad. and are also $1 per word. with a minimum of $3 per line.) THE TEXT: Each word in regular type is 40C (Additional regular words i· "ALL CAPS" or Bold Word• not in atl caps are 55¢ each. Add1t1onal BO' WORDS in all caps are 70¢ each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each add1t1ona1.word hke this 40C THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each additional word hke this 40¢ - THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLD, $9.00 Then each add1t1onal word liketh1s 114()¢ ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WORDS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE SSC EACH AddltJon•I botd words like this In IHI .,. SSC Heh. ADDITIONAL BOLO, ALL CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH. I ONG TERM ADVERTISING: Aun the same ad 4 weeks or longer, make no copy changes durmg the run, pay for the full run in advance. and deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same conditions and deduct 25%. BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number We'll ~;~~~n!~8~~/6ffica:.dR~1:~rss$~~~re:~g~~~~=~~~ ~g~ubri's~~i~~~b~~ecsa~i~i~ forwarded indefinitely. however, for as long as they come in.) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail_ your ad in or phone it in. You can pay by check. money order. Mastercard. Visa. Amencan Express, Omer's Club or Carte Blanche. Or we'll bill you DEADLINE: Classified ads received by 3pm Wednesday will be placed in that week's newspaper. Ads received later will be placed 1n the following week"s newspaper ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number, c/o Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006-3028. It will be for­warded. unopened. to the advertiser. Enclose no money ADDITIONAL NOTES: A •·word"' is considered anything separated by "spa­ces. ·· except_ hyphenated words are co.nsidered 2 words when each segment 1s a recognized word 1f 1t stood _on its own. A co.mplete phone number. including area code. is l word. City, state and zip ts 3 words bold llne bold line text words·---- ---------- bold lino--------- Use additional paper 1f necessary CATEGORIES• 0 Announcements D Accomodalions (lod~ing for Houston visitors) 0 Cars & Bikes 'Ei ~~~~~~:~, f~~~~ ~~~~nBs1~~~~~;ns~r: 0 Models. Escorts, Masseurs O Personals 0 Pets 0 Rides O Travel 0 Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AD UNDER IN THE "GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY." OPPOSITE PAGE bold headline words at $1 each (minimum $3 per line) . - regular words in text at 40¢ each ALL CAPS regular words in text at 55¢ each Bold words In text at 55¢ each BOLD ALL CAPS in text at 70¢ each Blind ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad m 1t mailed to me, $1 25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Tlmn weeks: Less 15,_ dtscount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25.,., discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S): __ _ o Also, I wish . to receive The Voice home delivered each week I have bn$~~r ~o~~~~lh~o~~$!9°~0~~a~~:~· as Indicated below) an additional TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged _ ~ METHOD OF PAYMENT: D Check enclosed O Money order enclosed o Cash O VISA charge D MasterCard charge o Diners Club charge o Carte Blanche charge D Amerc1an Express charge o Bill me If charging, card expiration date -~~ Credit card number _. Signature Name __ Address Phone(s) for verification of ad, 1f necessary __ __ MAIL OR BRING TO Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 52!H1490 weekdays 10am-5 30pm FEBRUARY 28. 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 23 MONTROSE RES01-~RCES sELeCTED :.rATE. NA1 OFIGANIZAT1 )"'S 8-f Owners AUl'I ol T• IBOAT• 720 8r&101 _. "'*in.(512)472-3333 AIDS AC1oon COundHtlOeraion of AIDS ~i.ted Orga"1.Ut'(lfla 11 lS'lll lndt:J)etodenoa A¥ SE Wa.turigton.OC20003.(212)5"7-3101 Gay & Leib.,, Pfas AMn. P08 A. Old ChetMI Sta Nww Ytwll. NY 10011. i2t2) ~ Gay Right• N•l lobby. POe 1892. w .. h..,gtQrl. DC 20013. 12021 s.c&-1801 Hum•" Fl•ghts Campaogn Futod. POB 1396. w .. n­tngtQrl. OC 20013. (202)S4e-2025 Intl Gay"""· AFSL. Box 350. S·1012S Slodlholm sweoan. pho,. •46-88480 !iO L9rnbda L9r Oefente. 132 W 43td. Ne• YM. NY 10039.(212)944"*'88 l..ti.antGay Aognll Advoc;at ... POB 822. Authn 1~81 Nat A9ln ol Bt111NN Counds. Box 15145. Sen Franoaco. CA IM115.14151 ~ Nat Aunol Gay I ltllboall OemoClub9.1142M .. A¥ SE. Washington. DC 20003. (202) S47-31CM Nat Gay HMltl'I Eouc FOUMahon. POB 784. ,..._. YM.NV10036,(2'121563-43t3orOrG~berg (7t3JS23-S2CM ,.., Gay Flighll Aotwocal.-. ~ C.tro. San Fral'l­csaoo. CA IM114. l•USI 8193-311524 Nat Gay Tmlo: Fore- iNGTFJ 80 5ltl A¥ N-Yon. NY 10011. t212l 741·SIOO NGTF'1 Cr-*'ne. (900} 221-7044 jout~ ,.._ Yorll SUia) Rurs1 Coal•ton. ~o w .. ..,.zangn.. Boll 611. Blum. T1(7fll27 Tx Gay-\.esb•n T_.. Foru. POB AK. 0-.ton 78201.1811))67..f.218 US Tr .... ....-11.-Tr-•u.11 Conlacl S..c.1011·8 E Ptt<a.SN111a.98122.120&Je:24..v&& Hairy men/.H81rl8nS adhst Info. $2 oO Hair. 59 West 10th. NYC 10011 ATTENTION ORGANIZATIONS Check your listing. We list here each week name of organ1zati0n, address. phone. ~~!8~1 ~::~~f ~:~! i,"~~,r~~~·1n ani~ incorrect, mall correct information to fhe Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006 THE MONTROSE VOICE-INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY Aid fOr AIDS, POB6i414-7i266. ~77 MA-C4Pena ctiorut. Chui 11Chn11.-POB 66734. 77266 A Place 1n 1ne Suft:-522:7695 ACLU. 1236 W Gr.Y,-:-524~25 Aios Hothne. 529-3211-(GIL Swotl.tlbollrdJ :~·CatiG ay A1he•ia: POe 6()1ii. i72iA:iil- ASttO R•·~.. .- s;: .•Y Tofiii';-oe;.-520-o132 {TTY) ~·A.~ -POe~ •. -,72'6e-m;;t. 7 30prn 2nd Thurs. women·1 Ctinst••n Ctr. 3W =Parc•ohcm y.n·. M1gaz1il., ei30SW Fwy 1335 Bayou B"1u Sing••. Rab«t Moon. dlf, 209Strat· lord. 868-30&4 Bemlg Memorial t.k1"rled Me1ho(filtCtiUrCh-:-1•40 ~=dp.~~:!.:~.:~15;'!":.3!:,,nJu~~Q= Pride Wee« pet ahow 4pm Jun 28 Ch°"=• UnhrM•cl. 52D-3211 (G&LSw1t~ Christian Ch!Jrch of th• Good Sti•ph«d, 1707 ~'!,;OM: SYC lpm Sun. Bible stuctv 7 30pm ChUl'ch of Chrllt•an F••th. l&<Kl wnth9~mer 529-3005 Iva 10 •Sim sun. 81bl•l1udY 7 30p,n Wed: Rtw Chr• A Rice. putor Cl\urchollNI Rock. 51()-8.4519YC15un1030M'l Citll. ..... few HulNln Eq1.111hly (CHE). Poe 3045. 77253. 6'Kr3346. 937·351fl mMC 2ndTuea. 2414 Gram«cy Cleis, L..o.n Mothers Group. Sarra 473-3708 n'IMC• 2od & 4th Thurs. O.gnt=tyc.;C1"''--­Clipi »r1. J.4U502 Col 45"1. O.rrsU Bull« Pf•. mW• at Brazos R,.,,. Bottom. 2400 Brazos. 521-9192 Comm'-tff tor Publt<: Health. Aw..-•n.•. POB 3045. 7n.53. 52&-6333. 522-50&4 ""Sharing Group lor the Worn•d Weir mffl Fri. 749m. Monlrme Courwe11~""'-C'--"--- ~)YQa' ;;;,~~C:~2Ac;~mmlftff (C- ~~'S~~l~~nS:~:~h~~rme. 52·1: ~7~-:a!~~~~-.y~~:.7y"~f~~ & Blodgelt ~~:!;~~:ndew&ekp9t at;0;4~ ~22~1505'" ------ oemocomm~~l834--­~- aroup. "08 A...ondai9. -52._955.i' o.- Found111on, 2700 M•on. si4-5791- g~~1i~~az!:'~!:!., 3?;f;t:."tf52&­~ Prd;M;;i'r"s0e.a10ub:""ii1= Fecs.ra1•on of Cti•r~7..~ -,o, Soc.a1~1- ~=.1~~~kJ."A~~;~~;ti~~mMg~1?!; Clime:, ,,.ontrON Cou"98tltig Ctr ~•an Church, 5210 firii\:n5~t571 l.,c t1151m Sun FrontrUnners, Jo• S3HI019. (;g;j.,idO5, 5:. 1288 runs Sun. Tu• & Ttiu111 Memor111 Park ~.:iiu~2J Gay Pride WMk 1pcwt1 dl'f !!Wit•· a;; a A.1~...-sn~ri;;;c;{GASE):"'521--: 1311. 529-0891 ~Atet1;;...01fi-tl1111;;;Q11/Htn"C GIY & LHbi., -MOrmorw.:--17i3 -w.;,r;;m., ll&040. 77098. 58&-1413 ~~ ~=~ ;~c;-111 ~~~·~~~~~t!:~?1 • Gay & L•b•n S.,•tchboard. POB 66591. 772'6i. S29--J211 uitormahon. coun1e11ng relerr•I• TTY. AIDS Hot11M Gay Aa•artl a Frterodl. 7~3633 or G&L SW'ltchbollrd Gay Fath••· 3217 Finnin. 521-<1111 GIL H~n•CI Unidol. POBIOOi21. 77260. 521· 3&11 meetl 7pm 2nd Mon. Dignity Ctr. Gay Pride WMk .....,,1 Jun 27 G.,. f>Oirt,e11ICl.ucus iGPCl.Poe ..-.. ·nit .>21·1000 mNb 3217 Fant1111111 & 3rd Wed can· di0a1a ac:reet11ng m<d-M•rch. rl'•efftbentup deld­• M Mar 3 few general caucus enoj()~ll Apr 2: P"mrr etec:t•on May 3. Gay Pride w.-: com4 ml.Slit)' -•rd• d1rinef Jun 27; Gey Pride Week Spotts Park Rally Jun 28 ('Ho---;;)Gay Pnde Week Cornmlftff. POe 66821 n2M Stan Ford 523-7644 or Cathy Lenahlon ::~~~blc;~;'fr:r~. ~.~ ~-t~~: oommemora11on ol r••d on Mary·• (tentative) Jun 20. Sports O.y1 Dinn• (tentative) Jun 21. Walk for Unity (tenlatrYe) Jun 22: OJ Sp1noft (tenta· ll\le) Jun 22. MontrOM Art Alh•nc• exhibit 7 30- 11 pm Jun 23. '"The Group·· hve theate1 preaentahon Jun 24. Day of Remember•l\Ctl (IWll•h¥e) Jun 26: Gey & Lnb11n Hi1psn1C1 Un~ dol twenl Jun 27: GPC community awards d•nrwtrJun 27: Ber1ngChurc:tipanc•ebrUklul 11•m·3pm and pet sho.w -'pm Jun 28. Grea1er Montroee Busrnen Gu•ld bu .. neu bu11d1ng wotkstiop & 1rade lair {tenlat1ve) 9 30am--3 30pm .\li.r"I P•lil lnn Jun 28. Montrcme Symphof'lt<: Band concert (lentattve) Jun 28. Lo.,er W•th•mer-Waigh Or. ~•de 5 30pm Jun 29 GPC Spott1 Parll; Rally Jun 29 GrMter MonlroMB;j;n;uGu~11frye ~: .~~ tc~~;!1 h.fe~~ ~;: pherd. bo¥d mee11ng 2nd or 3rd Thur.. busrn ... bu•ldll'l'g woruhop & trade lair (UtnUll•\19) 9 309m·3 3Qpm Allen P•Or. Inn Jun 28 ·n.e G,;ou:p .. tne.ter wOfkshop. Joe waii1 522· 2204 meets 7pm Thu111. OtQnlfY Cir. 3217 Fan­nin. Gay Pride Week preMntallon Jun 24 Haz8lw1tch Productions. 2615 Waugh Or •26i 77006 l•b••n concerts. tree 1N11llng 1111 ,H,o.fl." lophUe ln191"tarth .'\lh•"Ce. 729 Mana<. 523- HoU-....rea G&L Engoneera & Scienl;t11. POB 66631. 77006. 439-1879 mee11 7pm 4lh Tu• Hou B•r o;.ners Assn tHCiBOl. c/o Bill°'~., Bottom. 2400 Brazos. 52&-9192 l!'leell 2pm 2nd Wed Ho~C0mmunlfy Cl°""'"*· 862--831i-­Hou ~~.5~ Hou Data Profe1S1onats. 523-6922. W-6459 meets 7:30pm 2nd Tu. HOu "Fl.O.i or; Corps, D•"'d Walker~-:-;s2= 2776elter6pm HOU Gay He1ttn AOYocal•. SiM'e BUl10n. 7gcj: a.u8 mee!s 7 30pm 111 Sal ~i= s:~b~·i~~~~~ ~y (MUTUAL TENNIS.vents 8th annual .. US. Gay Open .. National Tenn• Tournam9fll May 24-28. San Francmoo: Gay Pride w.- sports day (len­UlllYll) Jun 21) l/H rnc. POe 16041. n222. liM--1132, 5S.7014 affll1ated groups are lntwact. B"zarno·1 A Place Mi the Sun. MontroaeAr1 Allila~ G&L Arch...,.. of T•. G&l. Swlfchboatd. MontrON Symphonic Band. bollrd mNt 7 30pm 111 Thurs (¥Wltldloc• t1c>n1). educatlOMI I011M1'1 7:30pm 3rd Thurs lnger9()11 Speakers· Bu~. POB 39t a.1 ... rs 77401. 6fl8--'0M KSIAIDS FounclatiOn. 3317 MonlrOM Boll 1155 HOOS, 524-2437 J«ry Kauffman Cancer Fund, 77&-4106 KreweolHydra, 811 Grsceiand. B•U Me;C • .,726. 1032 liinbm Ctr Gay Alc:otloltCI & Atanon, 1214 Jo Annte. 521-9772 L91biarv'Gay Resource S¥C. Un1w9ra.ty ol Hou 4800 Calhoun. boll 309. 770CM. 74 .. 1253 ~• 2 30pm alternate Tuel. Spmdletop Room. 2nc1 11oor.un .... er111yCtr L•t U1 Entertam You Weekllnd. pro,«:t of Hou Council ot Clubl. S26-ll054 The Llftle Church. 212 Fargo. 522-7et5 ll'CI 230pmSun Lone si... Nudist Group. Poe 740572. 77274 Lower W•theimer Police Sub-SUlh01\ I02iiiiii· lheimer. 529-3100 Lu1~•n1 Concernm. me.ti st Gracelulh.,.n .C.h..u.r.c.h.... 251S Waugh. il'l-0&48 mM1 3rd Tue1 McAdCitY~AJ~i);;'.3317 Momroee Box 1155. 524-2437 tf.1~~1;;i. ~~~1 ~91lw~c~~~ meets b•·weelltty =!~~c~~~~~,~~ :,_1~~=·~· luck d1nn.- 7 .30pm 111 Sat morrthly. l\'CI 10 •sam a 7 tSpm Sun & 7 1Spm Wed. member- ~.!. .'" l~91 ~=. J.30pm Mon. educat•on Melropol1tan Pentecost•I Church. 686-02'0~ :~~ors:· a.ring ACb¥•l1• Bldg Mulberry !~~~pdf~L;~r=~~n:~·:~~g~~ TAN PENTECOSTAL CHURCH on the comer ol Hewthome •nd Mut*ry streets (Bering Memon•I Act1v111• Bldg ) We ue a born ag .. n. spmH1Qed ehurch wh•e you cen wor.h1p the Lord H the sp1nt leeda Our MrV1oe it: Sundays at 2:00pm under the l..::lentup of th• Holy Ghost F0t more inform.tt0n cao 5.0280 ,. •ul i..i" r W• d fisemb1e. ~10 M< IUStS fpis....>pelCtiurch. 7'30W111d ~Ar1Ai.1-c:e. _...1132. ess-9314"86~ 5332. affiliate llH Inc. meet• 2nd Mon. Gey Prt~ WMll exM11t 7»11pm Jun 23 ~UW-.Gu11d iffGrWerMon1rOM Bua Guild • MonhoMChi.irc~-MOtitr<ie. 111- 9:286. ,.,.;: 1111'1'\ Sun MO";'""ro.~-,....,,~r;Au,, MonlrOM cu nu:, 803 H•~~horroe 52&-SS31 open MO!\ Tue. Ttiu111 &-9pm ~";;lry C1oQgerl.•56-aa&1 rriMt7- 10pm Fri MCCR Church. 1919 Decatur: ·w•t· -rdHo 5e'7"'730pmFeb23BAB.7pmMar2 Kindred Spmts "Clogging at 1r1 e.r· 104.spm Feb 28. 9 30pn'I Ji.lar 1 &pm Mai 5, The Barn M~~O¥eft•203..529-- 0037 AIDS vu:t•m auppor1 group 6 30pm Mon Womefl"• Support Group 7pm Tues Momrc.e $1.ngers. gay me111 cnor.Js Moke 526-- 3010 MorwroM Sotl~I League. POB 22272 77227 S24-3144 GayPrldeW..sponsday!t&ntll•we) Jun21 Monll'OM Sports Aun •MSA°) '"specifc IUb­L°' f; Gay Prw:te Wffk qiorta dl'f ttentstr.oeJ ... ontro&e &ympMnec: B.and. POB 66613. 77296 527-~S..C meet 7 30pm Tuea. 0.gMy Ctr. 3217 Ferinin; aff1tiate l. H Inc:: Gay Pnde Week eorcert ~~~:~~~E·-. ,-,.._~-,-,---- ..,,.,_ 1r.-.1 treatment pgm pro,ect MontroaeCourwel· 1ngC1r MSAtMorl"Nlgn1 Bowhng. play Stadoum Lanea 8200 Bra•tna1n, St8"'e 892·4597 G.ty Pnde Week lportS day (tentat•¥9) Jun 21 ~~.!i~~·9~r,~•M;~~~U9~1=1~t::.~ 8200 Br ... l'Nlln, Gay Pride Week 1pon9 day ~'!~ :;:."1~1~:,..'c 1 "°I lcc,cc,.c-.,.o-. "0o"'•"..,,-,Sco1=1
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