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Montrose Voice, No. 158, November 4, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 158, November 4, 1983 - File 001. 1983-11-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3657/show/3628.

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(1983-11-04). Montrose Voice, No. 158, November 4, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3657/show/3628

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 158, November 4, 1983 - File 001, 1983-11-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3657/show/3628.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 158, November 4, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 4, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript How Are You at Dancing? Shy or Outrageous? Roz Ashley's Quiz, p.17 MONTROSE v a I c E The Newspaper of Montrose Nov. 4, 1963 Issue .. 158 Published Every Friday THE VOICE RECOMMENDS The Montrose Voice extensively reaearched the candidates and the issues in Tuesday's election and asks you to con­sider our recommendations in these races: Mayor: Kathy Whitmire (also acceptable: Dick Slemmer) Controller: Lance Lalor District C Council: George Greanias (District D Council: Rodney Ellio) (Diotrict H Council: Dale Gorczynak i) Council-at-Large Poo. 1: Anne Wheeler Council-at-Large Poo. 2· Eleanor Tinoley or Carolyn Day Hoboon Council-at-Large Poo. 3: Jim Greenwood Council-at-Large Poo. 4: Anthony Hall (aloo acceptable: Nikki Van Hightower and Marilu Rumfolo) Council-at-Large Poo. 5; Judson Robinson, Jr. Propooition A (Convention Center): For Propooition B (911 Emergency Number): For Constitutional Amendments: 4-Against. 6-For. 8-Againot. 9-For. 10-For. 11-For. Whitmire,'Montrose Candidate,'Addresses the Neighborhood By Robert Hyde In an interview Wednesday evening fol­lowing the last of the community meetings which have propelled her around the city over the laat few week.I, incumbent Mayor Kathy Whitmire paused for a moment to address certain issues facing Montrose and the gay community. M~~~ =t C ele }:o~ ~~b1!;8 ~( yeaTH," she said proudly. "I think it's a very special neighborhood-one that has a tr~mendous potential for being a good place to hve, and I want to Bee that poten· tial realized." Prior to a hurried late-nightretum to her office and then to face another event before eight in the morning, Whitmire waa relaxed and eager to express her apprecia­tion for the neighborhood. ao well as her concerns for moat of it.8 citizens. At first, ehe waa a bit nervous-not quite knowing what to expect and perhaps realizing that the gay community is sometimes capable of throwing a wrench into a well-greased political machine. Then ehe was quick to warm, emiled easily and then confidently expressed that she feele that her rapor with our community has been a good one. "I feel I've taken a strong position in favor of human rights on the basis of any form of discrimination based on sexual preference," she said. uAnd the encourag­ing thing io that the majority of our city council feels that way also." Over the past two years, the community hao oeen many accomplishments at City Hall. Whitmire is proudest of her appoint­ment of Police Chief Lee Brown and the subsequent lessening of police harass­ment of the community. In addition-and eomething that would probably never have taken place had her opponent in '81, Jack Heard, won the race-new recruits to the police department are being educated, aa well as a few of the old ones. "We provide in the trai~ing academy some education on diverse lifestyles-gay lifestyles-and we also have a task force from the gay community meeting wi~1th e police chief to help re•olve problems. Aleo in th<' past, Wh1.tm~re _has responded to nume-rous mv1tahon9 throughout the community to become cloaPr to its key isauea. Unforlunate~y, ~he admit& "I've received a lot more mvtta-tio;; tt~~~ \~a;uf~~fi~"mention that she appeared at the gay rights rally at the Summit last year, as well as at the one held the year before at Spotta Park. But is the mayor ready to ride down Wes­theimer in the Gay Pride Week Parade next year, an event that many members of the community would coneider an out. right, forceful endorsement. "Not especially," she says. "That's not coming up until next summer, and it'8 something I haven't given any thought to ~~~~.?'b~: r~n!~~W:o~r=v: commit to it at this point." But overall, she sees her record with the community as being a very positive one, unhampered by many of the plagues that have greeted San Francisco Mayor Diane Feinstein. "She's certainly had her problems with the gay community," 8he said reflectively. "Much more so than I have." However, Mayor Whitmire was sur­prised to learn that Houston's Gay Politi­cal Caucus had failed to target her mayoral race, although they did endorse it, which has come to the attention of some of her opponenta. "I didn't know that they had failed to target me," she said after a short laugh. "I'm dioappointed, But we've had a lot of people from GPC who've worked in the campaign thi• time, just hke they did last time. w.·.,. Ja.ct. .ooa •upperi.'' In addressing other i11ue8 important to the Montrose area, 8he focused on a couple of pet projects on which she's working. She pointed with particular pride to the rennovation of Cherryhurst Park and to the proposed branch library in the area-a Montrose first-for which the land has already b.en purchased. "Libraries were very important to me as I was growing up in this city,'' she said. "And I'm looking forward to the Montrose branch library at Richmond and Mandel." Tackling the isoue of pot-hole filled Richmond Avenue, a thorn in the side of anyone's whose driven the etreet, she jok­ingly said, "lt'o terrible. I recommend that you drive on Alabama, instead." But plans are underway to bring that bumpy stretch of Richmond up to the otandardo of the reot of the thoroughfare. "Richmond io one of tho worst streets in ~u~tftbecin?~yo~tv~~~y~i street in such bad condition?' "The plan is for the city to widen Rich­mond Avenue. Richmond has been widened on most of ita length, except for that little area right there between She­pherd and Yoakum where it needs to be widened.'' she oaid. "And the plans have been drawn up for sometime. and we have redoubled our efforts to get the land acquired so that we can go ahead with the continued page I 0 Wright Challenges the Mayor, Hopes to Defeat the Gay-Supported Candidate By Pamela Wolfe "Even though l didn 't get the GPC endor- 8ement, I feel like it'9 time that we concen­trate on tho8e things that unite us instead of those thing8 t~at divide u9," said may­oral candidate Bill Wright to the gay com­munity in a recent interview. Wright i8 a smooth politician who know• how to talk to people, as evidenced by his actions of only two years ago when he worked successfully as a fund.raiser in Kathy Whitmire'• mayoral campaign. But now he is Whitmire's major opponent. And to prove how close their political camps otill lie, both candidates ohare pol· itical 9upport from several financial backers, &8 well aa similar views. So as. a former fund raiser and ally of Mayor Whit· mire, Wright muot call to task his well­polished political okills to point out their poli tical difference8. Wright fai led to receive the politically· influential endorsement of the Gay Politt· cal Caucus. But according to Larry Bagnerio, president of the GPC, he p888ed ~for~!;'C screening test "with flying Bagnerio explained that while Wright ~le-arly undf'ratands and supports gay 1M&uea, "Kathy i8 the proven individual in the gay Community," Candidate Bill Wright In the 1981 mayoral campaign, theGPC considered Whitmire'& candidacy as top priority and targeted her race, concentrat­ing on rallying massive support in Mont· rose for the then city controller. But this year, the GPC targeted three other races, instead. Bagneris explained the GPC:• change in priority a8 "our way of saymg to the mayor 'wake up;' we expect more out of people we deliver to." The GPC leadership still encourages membera to participate m Whitnure's campaign, although it was not the priority race for them this year AB Mayor Whitmire'e former campaign fundraiser, Wright 'held a pooition that basically involved oelling her fine points as a publi~ administrator ~nd po~tician. Now he criticizes her polibcal pnorities, blunders and weakneues. When aoked to addreoo critico who may focua on his oharp political about-face, he replied, "I think in 1981, the thingo that I wae talking about in terme ofWhitnnre's promioeo, I believed-the need to restruc­ture government, to makeitmore efficient, to spend our tax dollan according to prior­ities, to have open and accessible govern· menL I still believe in theee. If you look at it, Whitmire'a the one who'a changed." Seemingly unperturbed by a hectic office and occasional interruptions from echedule-eonecious aides, Wright con· tinued pointing out hi8 major criticisms of Whitmire'a administration. The problem with city government, he say8, is that "it's being run like a buainesa where the clooed corporate board is mak· ing all the decioiono without asking the otockholders anything. That"o where the mayor'• gone wrong." continued JXll(e 8 2 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 4, 1983 WHY? COUNCILMAN ANTHONY HALL Council member ANTHONY HALL has been a human rights advocate throughout his twelve year political career. He is committed to the causes and issues which are important to the Gay Community and he has the knowledge, the contacts and the political skills to help us secure our rights. Whenever we've needed him, he's been there-In the Texas Legislature, In the City Council, In the Democratic Party. LEGISLATIVE EXPERIENCE In 1973, when Anthony Hall voted to repeal Texas Penal Code 21.06, he was booed from the Legislature floor. At the time, he didn't have a gay constituency-he opposed discrimination as a matter of principle. In 1974, Anthony Hall received the Susan 8. Anthony Award from the Harris County Women's Political Caucus for his legislative action on behalf of women's rights. DEMOCRATIC PARTY EXPERIENCE As a member of the State Democratic Executive Committee, Hall has championed gay participation and gay issues. As Chair of the Affirmative Action Committee and member of the Rules Committee, Hall secured rules prohibiting discrimination because of race, sex or sexual orientation. When, in 1980, the State Democratic Party called for the repeal of 21.06, as chair of the Convention Resolution Committee, Hall spoke from the podium in support of the repeal. In 1980, as a national delegate, Hall supported the inclusion of the Gay Rights Plank in the National Democratic Party Platform. CITY COUNCIL EXPERIENCE In 1980, Hall voted to repeal Houston's Cross Dressing Ordinance. Whenever as~ed by the GPC leadership, he has been willing to support us with legislation, resolution and action. As author of the City's Affirmative Action Resolution, Hall has agreed to sponsor an amendment to include sexual orientation as a protected category. As our friend, Councllmember Anthony Hall deserves our continued support VOTE FOR ANTHONY HALL at large Position 4 Anthony Hall was recommended .as the bes~ candidate_ in Position 4 by the GPC Political Action Screening Committee, but did not receive the GPC endorsement. Paid for by the Anthony Half'°' City Couocil Comm1tt ... 2713 M••n. Houston. Tex .. 770l'J'J. J.E. Middleton. Sr . Treasurer Mayor Whitmire with supporters previews site of Sunday's campaign event Strolling with the Mayor 11Stroll Down Institute Lane with the Mayor" during a political reception for Houston's gay community and Houston's Mayor Kathy Whitmire on Sunday, Nov. 6, from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. beginning at 5301 Institute, the home of Jim Hazen. The street will be closed to vehicular traffic for the open air event which will feature food, music, art and politicians. Among the musical contributors will be the Jazz En•emble from the High School for Performing and Visual Arts, a strol­ling barbershop quartet and strolling flu­tist, plus continuous piano at the Hazen open house. Other festive attractions will include early modes of Montrose transport-a horse and buggy and an antique car-and n 1964 Phantom Rolls R oyce. Hot dogs, pretzels, ice cream sand­wiches, wine, beer and soft drinks will be served at minimal cost. A $10 donation will be requested to attend the afternoon affair. Institute Lane is a short street that makes a "T" with Bissonnet at the 1400 block, about six blocks west of the Museum of Fine Arts. Sunday parking on Bissonnet is permitted. 'Gentlemen's Quarterly' Declines Gay Ad Gentlemen's Quarterly, the national fashion magazine probably found in more gay homes than non-gay, has declined an advertisement for Gay Housing LA '84, the only firm to win approval by the Cali­fornia Real Estate Department, reports the firm's news release. The firm, which recently embarked on a worldwide ad campaign, was flatly refused when they approach G.Q. "It was made perfecUy clear by G.Q. that the word 'gay' never appears on the pages of their magazine. They claimed that they had no idea (or intereet in know­ing) if any of their read ers were gay," BS id Philip Twichel, president of Amber-Gold Media in Los Angeles. "We wonder what would happen if everyone who subscribed let them know." Jean O'Leary, of National Gay Rights Advocates, said, "Unfortunately this kind of discrimination is still legal, as oppres­sive and outdated as it may seem to be." GPC Admits Push cards are Illegal By Pamela Wolfe Issuing a pre-election warning, Gay Politi­cal Caucus President Larry Bagneris announced at the GPC meeting Wednes­day evening that mass-produced voting pushcards are illegal. According to Bagneris, County Clerk Anita Rodeheaver, who is responsible for managing city elections, notified all pre­cinctjudges that bloc cards are now consi­dered illegal. Yet since the pushcard is extremely important in delivering the gay community's bloc vote to City Hall, Bag­neris advised pulling out the pushcard only while within the privacy of the voting booth-or writing down GPC-endorsed candidates on another sheet of paper. In another area of discussion, GPC acti· vist Ray Hill reminded members, in antici· pation of civil righta abuses, that it is a violation of an individual's constitutional rights to be searched. Later in the evening, past GPC Presi­dent Lee Harrington announced that Pres­ident Reagan signed a bill-with Coretta Scott King at his side-commemorating a national holiday for Martin Luther King. Harrington had previously made a motion for GPC members to endorse the bill, which overwhelmingly passed. He explained that it is most important that the GPC endorse the bill out of respect for human rights and in support of other minority groups' struggles against dis­crimination. Jn closing, Bagneris mentioned that the "Election Central" party will be held at Numbers, 300 Westheimer, Tuesday even· ing. GPC members were also invited to attend GPC-endorsed candidates' election celebrations. Paint Your Teeth Are you tired of your yellow teeth? There's no need to cap them, just paint them, says Dentist Harold Horn in American Health. It works just like dying your hair. First you strip the old color then apply the new tint. And if you think your teeth will look too good, the dentist can always brush in a few imperfections. The name of the new tooth paint: "Rem· brand!.'' Nov. 4, 1983 I M ONTROSE VOICE 3 Montrose Mouth Vote Tuesday Yes, it's the election. Polls will be open 7am to 7pm. See you there. -D-A prominent artist will be visiting Texas Renegades beginning Friday of next week and through the weekend, when the works of prominent artist Robert Adragna will be on display from noon until 5pm each day. The New York artist. who has had national exposure for his western and science fiction works. will be on hand to display his creations Many VOICE readers may already be familiar with his advertisements for Texas Renegades, so plan to see this colorful art on canvas next weekend. -D-Aii you home beer makers can celebrate the legalization of home brewing this weekend and put your own brand up for a blue ribbon. Munchies Classic Cafe, 2349 81ssonnet 1n the Village, is hosting the competition. and the public is invited to get intoxicated by tasting the wide variety of home brews For more information, call 523-8154 Now someone recently asked how come the Mouth 1s always talking about the Uni­versity of St Thomas. That's because UST is the only university in Montrose and they're always sending us their press releases. of which we're only too happy to publicize. So here we go For all you lovers of Dixie-or curious Yankees-the university will present "Casino Night on the Mississippi Queen"' (the boat!) Sat. night at 8 in Crooker Cen­ter at 4001 Mt. Vernon. Then later in the week in Cullen Hall. the flute troupe will perform at 8 Mon., and there will be a guitar concert Wed. at 8 All you jazz lovers can make plans for next Friday's Fall Jazz Festival atthe High School for the Performing Arts at 4001 Stanford. Concert time 1s at 7:30 p.m. in Denney Theatre -D-Area "w1mm1n" can gather at the Houston Wimmins Mini-Festival this Sunday to celebrate women' arts, music and ideas. Should be a fun time with live music, films and artisans. -D-Feminist humorist Kate Clinton will be at Treebeard's at 315 Travis Saturday night, and for $12, you can see the show and munch out on Cajun cuisine. Rumor has 11 that Kate's hysterical, and women love her. Montrose restaurateur Tim O'Reilly is opening a downhome country and west­ern bar on Westheimer at the old Peyton Place location, serving beer, wine and mixed drinks Sam Bass 1s the manager Homeowners Fixing Their Own The "do-it-yourself' revolution is picking up speed. The majority of home repairs and remodeling is now done by homeowners rather than contractors, reports USA Today. Indusb"y analyst.a say the high cost of profeHSional work has sparked the self. help boom. Ten years ago, people doing their own home repairs accounted for one­third of all home improvement spending, while the prediction is that in the next decade, that'll go up to as much as two­thirds. 4 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 4 , 1983 us. Gay Political Caucus Citizens For Human Equality Greater Montrose Business Guild Mayor Kathryn}. Whitmire City Councilmember Eleanor Tinsley City Councilmember George Greanias State Representative Debra Danburg "We support a new downtown convention center because it's the best way to get Houston on the go again. A new convention center will create 9,900 permanent jobs and 1,200 construction jobs. And, by law; no Houstonian's tax dollars will be used to build or operate the center. Visitors will pay for it when they pay a tax on their hotel bills. A new downtown convention center is a common sense way to stimu­late Houston's economic recovery. We hope you'll support it." The New Downtown Convention Center. Houston Gets The Benefits. Visitors Pay The Bills. And That's A Fact. Vote For Proposition A. p 't~OllH[f)(Jl&"TIJ'lil'(P''-l' ( 'II \ 1-.. ITl 10t lll"I; HXA Nov. 4, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 The Montrose Voice Recommends ... Commentary By Hollis Hood On Nov. 8, Houstoniane must make signif­icant decisions about their city's future. Citizens will determine who their mayor will be, as well as who will represent them in City Council. They will determine how the hotel! motel tax will be spent-on a convention center or on projects to which it is pres­ently applied-and whether the state should adopt several constitutional amendments. Citizens will also decide if they want a catch-all emergency telephone number. So in the int.ere-st of keeping its readers informed, the VOICE addre•ses these races and issues in hopes of stimulating readers to closely examine the persons and issues before going to the polls. But above all-vote. It's your voice in govern· ment when no one else listens, but it can only speak when you use it. MAYOR: KATHY WHITMIRE Also AcceptabU!: Dick Slemmer Imbumbent Whitmire, 37, many think, will have stouter opposition than in her 1981 campaign when she carried 62 per­cent of the vote. Certainly, Kathy has shaken things up-it's hard to get a bright, petite lady to be a "gool ol' boy" at city hall. Apparently, she has antagon­ized enough of the good old boys that they have thrown some of their financial sup­port behind her most prominent opponent, Bill Wright. However, despite the running battles, she and her controller wage, and despite her critics' claims that she has headed the city toward bankruptcy, she stands her ground in pristine business suits, continu· ing to pursue what she must consider the most constructive way to improve life in Houston . • Montrose Voice The Newspaper ol Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529--6490 Mo-itroC,~CUu.~~~~n;ng eo M!.. _ Voke.11,0CIOCOpietweekly OallasQ1yNf!Wl.8.000cop1•"'""-IY tottlTe•••r" 11.000copinweell.ly Contents copyright •1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm HenryMcClurg publisher Ace+Cterk .,fdlT9CIOf Jett Brey graphlts s~;C:,,~~;is Robert Hyde m1negmg«:lttor H,:;~:~~ Chuck Meredith •1>«t1.01tor Jon Cheetwood Joel.Watts tnttrt1mm.ntwrit1r1 LytHarris adtrert.S•t1Qd•r.ctor M!!,?~!~o Jon Cheatwood cJ1n1/•lde<hllff1SlrJg ~C:::~'::,~'::' Gr•ter Mon1rose BUl•nesl Guild. Gay =~c:.,....JCN lnt9f'n1t•Of'lll Gly News Agency. P1e1hcNew1 Aus11nSurHu. C1pilOINew1Service ~=~~:~,~~~:~:~~=fi:~~~,~~:~~~:~~£-:.~~~~ McNeught.JoeS.ker =~~u!~!. ~~7=r911 correction• to 3317 MontroM Su~cr1p/KH1r1te1nUSln1N'-d.,,~iop. $4lilper)'ffr(52 luoet).S29~1111month1(2ellsues).orS125i-rweek( ... 1 thw!MiUUel) BiteklNUNS200HCh N1t10nel~tlalflQ,.prllettfef<YeJoe01Sablto.R1~0ell M1rh11ng.eeee1nA ... enue.NewYork.10011.(212)242-M63 Adv«l1smg deed111-.. Tuesdly. 5 lOpm, for !Al.II ,..,,led Frt· dey .... nlng Nol•t•toed>l«t11.n local1dvert1&1ng rlleacMduleS1x-A w11etlec1tveJuty 1.1"83 lkcPQN1b1My 'Monll'OH Va'te" doM not INUfT'll raeponai­t1< My lor 1ctv.rt1&1ng cll•ma. ReedefS lhould elef1 MQl'llrO .. VOICe~IO•"'(~l1\l'e•OYefttS11'g Whitmire is Voice's primary choice Whitmire has been installing several programs that win take time to prove whether, in the overall scheme of things, they are workable for Houston. People who look for immediate solutions to prob­lems and issues which have taken decades to develop should not be so naive as to look to government for quick responses Governments-municipal, county or national-are not noted for quick response time. The wheels of bureaucracy grind slowly, and the coffers of municipal money are even more recalcitrant. In all justice, Whitmire's feminine shoulders cannot bear the brunt of a national economic near-depre.r;sion finally hit Houston during her administration. City services are down because at no time in the city's history has demand for servi~ ces been at such a peek. Thousendsofpeo· pie have poured jnto Houston during the past two years-all of them looking for the same job that was filled three days before they arrived. Houston ••wonderful-and it does have it aJl-aa the visitor• and convention cen­ter advocates boast, but sometimes with the massive influx of people and recom· bining of shifting populations, it is neces­aary to stand inJine or wait in traffic until governmental mechanisms can take hold. Tootsie (oops, Kathy) did try to do some­thing about transportation via the Metro­politan Transit Authority's rail plan, which she and moet of the council endorsed. This newspaper, after doing much research, came out ardently against that project and still cannot reconcile that there was much wisdom in it, but it would have created jobs and would have stimu­lated the economy. A mayor has to think about putting people to work, making taxes and making the city run. Under Whitmire's administration, MTA has gre.8tly improved service, going from an on-time record of 47 percent to 90 per­cent. Transitways on the Gulf, Katy and North freeways will feature bus and van lanes, and these lanes are under construe· tion now. Whitmire did fulfill her campaign prom­ise of improving streets, and 512 miles of city throughfares have been resurfaced. The mayor's office established the Rede­velopment Task Force to expedite inner­city redevelopment and create jobs, and a new planning director was hired who has been investigating target areas for neigh· borhood revitalization. Whitmire also fulfilled another cam­paign promise of improving police protec· tion, has cracked down on D\\1 offenders, and under her leadership, HPD has insti­tuted the Directed Area Response Team in an effort to improve police community relations and law enforcement. Specifically for the gay community, Whitmire pushed for the $71,000 budget item for an AIDS monitoring system and approved the city grantrequestfor$9!,000 more from CDC. She has continually been responsive to the gay community when its concerns have come to her personal atten­tion. She, like all the candidates, is aware that Houston needs increased water treat­ment and sewnge treatment plants. She has pushed for the convention cen· ter in downtown because it will enhance Houston's economy and create jobs. Her administration's response after Hurricane Alicia was immediate. Whitmire constantly lobbys for Hous­ton, the giant-the almost unmanageable, sprawling metropolis that it is. This is no easy task, so if Whitmire seems curt, it's because she doesn't have time for bullshit. And that's the kind of person Houston needs to harneBS its energy1 channeling it to the bettRnnent of its citizens. On the other hand, alternative Dick Slemmer is untried in Houston politics, Slemmer also gets Voice approval but apparently is far from being politi­cally naive. He is the executive officer of Consultech, a computer firm. He is. an engineer, lawyer, CPA and recognized expert in government administration and finance, b well as a retired Air Force colonel. He is aware, as are we all, of the stresses on Houston's economy, and his solutions are: reject additional taxes, quit borrow­ing, live within our means, promote effi. ciency, eliminate waste. He, if elected, would encourage civic association invol· vement for a grass roots knowledge of how government is affecting the people. He also encourages thedevelopmentof a comprehensive water plan. And the one aspect of Slemmer that makes him appeal to gays is that he has sons who are gay and has adopted five young gays as well. He is obviously sensi· tive to gay iBSues and concerns. and as seen from a special interest perspective, would be the only candidate in the race. CONTROLLER-LANCE LALOR Perhaps no candidate on the ballot is more deserving of the support of the gay community as a special interest group than is Lance Lalor, incumbent controller. He is one of the few who has put motion where his mouth is as an overt proponent of gay rights. He has not been afraid to speak his mind whenever he thought the authority of his office has been questioned or when the guardianship of the city's funds, which he apparently tends with jealous zeal, has been thwarted. As far back as 1979 as a past state repre­sentative, Lalor was active in removing a rider prohibiting gay groups from using university facilities. At that time, gay lob­byist Betty Naylor in Austin was quoted in Upfront as sa);ng, "Rep. La.Jar was marvelous. He carried this point of order for us without ever being asked to. The ga,y community owes Rep. Lalor our spe­cial thanks." He was named one of the IO best legiola· toni by Texas Monthly. He has never failed to be cooperative with constituent.& when on city council. And on one occasion. he was seen danc· ing at a chili cookoff at the Brazos River Rottc•m Lately. Lalor has been reclusive or per· haps has become gun-shy of public com­ments and has failed to respond to either the League of Women Voters' question­naire or the Houston Chronicle Voters' Guide. However. he did respond to the VOICE's query about what he considered his most outstanding accomplishment in office. "The succe88ful efforts we have made "'rith cash management and our aggres­sive investment policies are probably the most critical," Lalor said. "We have earned the city $103 million in the past year through sophisticated investment procedures, and that has done much to improve the budget that is struggling." When asked why he had not responded to other organization's questions. he said, continued next page 6 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov 4, 1983 The Voice's Choices-And Why continued from previous page "l haven't had time to do anytlung politi­cal. I've got everything in a file marked 'campaign.' but I'm literally campaigning on my record. I've been doing my job, and that got to be enough." AB the waU,hdog of city funds, Lalor has certainly taken his job seriously, repeat­edly challenging the present administra­tion with financially sound arguments against pr~poeed expenditures, such as the MTA r&Jl proposal, the downtown con­vention center and the city budget. These attitudes may place Lalor at time in an adversary position with other offi­cials, but Houston needs someone who won't back down to help keep financial ~xpenditures in prospective. He's protect­ing our money-that's his job. DISTRICT C COUNCILMAN-GEORGE GREANIAS Incumbent Greaniae, 35, is a city coun­cilperson and associate professor of admi­niatative science at Jones Graduate School, Rice University. Named as one of the OuU.tanding Men of Houston in 1983 and featured as one of84 outstanding per­sons in Houston by Houston City , Grea nias favors computerization to help promote government efficiency, stronger policies ensuring safe water, a workable water supply system and the neighbor· hood police DART concept. Greanias has been responsive to resi· dent.a onf the Montrose area and stands as an example of anti-discrimination in city GnarUa., Montro.•1.Meyui.nd co"""i""4n, tlourvn anotho urm hall hirins. Althoqh lhe VOICE and Grnniu have had clifferencea about how rapidly oomethins muat be done to all• viate a detoriora.lins !owe Wutheimer, lhe wheel• are now in motion for what he temuo u a oound aolution throqh lhe Su.­ually Oriented au.m- Ordinance. He ia alao attemptins to do eometlrlns about tran1portation in hi.a Transportation Reform Ordinance, permitting private sec­tor innovation• to increase taxi caba and vanpoola. Perhape the most outstanding attribute about Greania1 is that he isn't afraid to tackle an unpopular or sensitive issue or walk into a would-be hostile crowd. He is 1barp and innovative, and you have to run to keep up with him. That's the kind of energy Houston need1 on city council, and by h.i.o lack of significant opposition, moat of hie district thinks the same way. AT-LARGE POSITION 2 (equally recommended)-ELEANOR TINSLEY and CAROLYN DAY HOBSON Incumbent Tinoley hu been active initiating ordinances that affect the qual­ity of life in Houston, such as regulations on food vending machines and making it against the law to leave unattended child­ren in a vehicle. She was an ardent propo­nent of the MT A rail proposition and is solidly behind the downtown convention center. She told gay business and civil leaders at a recent reception, "We on city council have researched this as well as we reserach anything and believe it to be sound." Regarding city finances, Tinsely favors "a small tax increase" and user fees to maintain services, facilities and equip­menl She supports a comprehensive people-mover plan in which buses are the principal mode. She favors conversion from well·water to surface·water in the future because of subsidence problems in Houston. Carolyn Day Hobson, 38, a lawyer and native Houstonian. has not served in Houston politics before, and perhaps the time is right for her. She favors an expanded bus system and use of existing rails for transit. She believes the solution to the budget problem is in attracting new business and industry to the city which would solve the job problems and there­fore the tax woes. Hobson is the current treasurer of the Houston Lawyers' Association and is a member of the Houston Commission on Education. She has campaigned vigor­ously for the gay vote and should be given a chance to exercise her options for city government. AT LARGE POSITION 4-ANTHONY HALL Also Acceptable: Nikki Van Hightower and Marilu Rumfolo Han. who resigned a secure seat on council to run in the open race, said he believes he can more effectively represent all of Houston in an at.large position. The 39-year-old attorney has served in the House of Representatives and was a U .S Army captain in Viet Nam. He suppom the Regional Mobility Plan for easing Houston's transit problem. Thia plan includes several grade separations which have not been completed and a greatly expanded bus fleet. He favors the DART and HOW police interaction programs and does not favor tax increases. He says the next 20 years will be critical for Houston's water supply and use and that planning must be done now. Van Hightower, director of the Women'• Center, ii a former professor and radio political commentator. She favors a larger, better-trained police force, emphu­izea community participation in fighting crime, aupporta e:i.panding MTA'e bus fleet and developing a tran•portation plan from citizen input, and advocates the development of a water quality and treat­ment plan to phaseout groundwater use to preYBnt aubeidence and floodins. Rumfolo, 30, a native Hou.atonian, ii di?ector of sovornmenial affairs for Time Eneru Syotema, lnc. She-lhe biueat problema the city muat tackle an lack of plannins. criU manas...,....t. wuteflll opendins. avorlappiq city oevicoe, util­ity rate control, mua tranait, crime and floodin1. Rumfolo favon cuttins overlappins oer­vioee and lhe wute out of lhe city budset ("eirht houro work for eisbt houra pay'') and votin.a down the "unneceuary" con· vention center project. Bayou beautifica· lion ia a biggy with Rumfolo, u are all &1pecta of water-analyzing-ia it 1&fe and will there be enough of it? She opposes utility rate increases and propo8e8 a city inventory ,including streets and street repair. Hall, Van Hightower and Rumfola all are outapoken and all give the impression of being able to get things done if elected. Nobody here ia afraid of a fight, and nobody here i1 afraid of gay righUI within the bound• of logical expectations, but Hall outrank.a the ladies in experience in Houaton politica. Eleanor Tinaley geta dual endorsement with •.. . .. Carolyn Hobbo for at-large council nat 2 Jim Groenwood endoroed for at-large council aeat 3 Other Races, Propositions and Amendments ... In other races, the VOICE endorses: Dl1tr1ct D-Rodney Elll1 Dl1tr1ct H-0111 Gorczyn1kl At-Lorge Po1ltlon 1-Anne Wheeler At-Lorge Po1ltlon 3-Jlm Greenwood At-large Po1ltlon S-Jud1on Robln1on, Jr. These persons have distinguished them­selves and some of them have campaigned ardently in the gay community. PROPOSITION A-CONVENTION CEN­TER The VOICE endorses the downtown con­vention center project, if proponents of the center can do what they say they can. The convention center would certainly stimulate the economy, pumping vital life into a declining construction industry and providing jobs principally in entertain­ment and service& for many people. Convention center advocates and Texas Eastern Corporation have courted the gay community for some months on this issue, convinced that Montrose especially would benefit moet from the center's downtown location. 911 EMERGENCY NUMBER ProPonents of the 911 emergency tele· phone number say that it is the fastest means of summoning help in a crisis. This proposition would create the Emergency Network for Greater Harris County and authorize a user fee (talk has been of 20¢) per month for the service. When a distressed person dials the number, a computer would a utomatically route the call to the cloaeat appropriate agency in that area. The ballot ia only to decide if the propG8i· ti.on should be initiated in the metro area. Opponent& view it aa a potential for a com­puterized invBBion of privacy on a grand scale. Anthony Hall is the ~oice's first choice for at·large city C"ouncil seat 4 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS Voters will be called upGn to change the Texas constitution through Amendments on Nov. 8. The foJlowing is a synopsis of the proposed amendments and pro and con statements on each. No. I. Authorize fewer justices of the peace and constables in counties of fewer than 30,000, providing for continuous .ser­vices of these officials when the precinct boundaries are changed. FOR: Many counties don't need four JP's and four constable&, and the require­ment creates a burden. AGAINST: Reducing the number of elected officials sets a precedent for cut­ting representation, specifically minority representation. No. 2. Placing limitation on urban homeatead from $10,000 value to one acre. FOR: Space allocation, not value, is more equitable because of changing econ­omy. AGAINST: One acre is too generous; one-half for urban purposes would be ample. No. 3. Provide for advancement of food and fiber production and marketing through research, education and promo­tion financed by producers of agricultural products. (Applies to farmers.) FOR: Uniform collection procedures would allow additional revenue to pro­mote marketing and research. AGAINST: Increased paperwork would discourage producers from applying for refunds . A similar amendment was rejected in 1977. No. 4. Statutory provision& for succes­sion of public office during disasters caused by enemy attack and suspension of constitution protocol during the attack. FOR: Proper civil defense could save lives, and the state government needs power to respond to enemy attack. AGAINST: In the event of enemy attack (nuclear), the federal government would assume control, making this amendment mute. No. 5. Use permanent school board funds to guarantee bonds issued by school districts. School boards can use "trust" funds to guarantee loans. FOR: A bond-guarantee program would improve interest rates, making bonds cheaper for schools. AGAINST: If bonds are guaranteed, contingency must be made for default Bhould they fail. No. 6. Court ordered garnishment of wages for back child suppGrt. FOR: Thia is one offew ways to guaran­tee payment to minor children. AGAINST: The administrative burden would fall on employers, and this is the first step in allowing garnishment for other purposes No. 7. Provide financial assistance to veterans and to authorize the issuance of $800 million in bonds of the state to finance Veterans' ·Land Program and Veterans' Housing Assistance Program. FOR: Long-term, low interest mortgage loans would enable Texas veterans to finance homes they could not otherwise afford. AGAINST: A dispropGrtionate amount of the state's credit is already used for vete­rans, and similar assistance is available through the federal government. No. 8. Exempt veterans and fraternal organizations from property taxes. FOR: Many organizations would not be able to survive without the tax breaks they receive. AGAINST: Exemptions would shift tax burden to already pressed taxpayers. No. 9. Probate judges allowed to substi­tute in statutory county court, probate jur­sidiction or constitutional county court. I<'OR: Probate cases are complicated. Some judges may not be lawyers and may ~~n1:f; 1,~:;.i~i!° !:~rd~ ~':bt0:u~l1;! persons to hear the case. AGAINST: Judges might not be availa· ble in their home areas. No. 10. Permit city to expend public funds and levy a88essment for relocation ofsewerlines. FOR: This would facilitate needed replacement of lines. AGAINST: The five-year repayment plan for levy on home& is too short. No. 11. Change the Board of Pardons and Paroles from a constitutional agency and give the board power to revoke paroles. FOR: Thia would expedite the parole process and eave money. ApAINST: The present governor con­trol of veto """' patoles is a safeguard to release system. Nov. 4, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Mention this ad for 10% Discount on All Service FOR ALL YOUR REPAIR NEEDS Foreign end Domestic • Guaranteed Mechanical Work • Total Transmission Service • Air Conditioning Specials-Free Check • Body Work & Paint ShOf> • Free Customer Tow Service • Fleet Pnces on all Service SPORTS CAR SPECIALTIES ENGLISH AUTO RW,¢~R (FULL SERVICE) RAY DORSEY 200 PIERCE (713) 650-0591 Owners Tony Pegg, Lance Harrington, David Disher :·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:· 8 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 4, 1983 Wright Challenges Whitmire contin!l«l from page 1 Wright believes her administration failed in remaining open and accessible to citizens and community groups as a result of the mayor's incapability of taking criti­cism that goes with public life. To prove Whitmire'• shortcomings, he claimed that the last four chain of the mayor's Hispanic Advisory Board are now on Wright's campaign committee. The GPC ia another example, he says, to prove Whitmire has alienated her main supportero. He maintained, "Even though the GPC has endorsed her candidacy, they haven't targeted her race." But Bagnerieo, on the other hand, coun­tered Wright's assertion: "We've got proven acceu to government throuah Kathy Whitmire." Wright contends that Mayor Whitmire reneged on her promiee to cut adminiatra­tive overhead through reetructurinir city government. The mayor considered con­eolidating 24 departments into "anywhere from 9 to 11 departments," Wright explained. "If you condense the depart­ment and have one department head instead of three or four, you wind up cut· ting out the administrative overhead, the higher salaries-that's where the fat is. And she hasn't done that." But according to Paul Mabry, spokes­man for the mayor, government restruc­turing took shape this past summer when three city departments were consolidated to form the Department of Finance and Adminiatration. Once elected, Wright promises to Bave $30 to $40 million dollaro from completely reorganizing city government. He also promises to maintain a balanced budget and avoid tax increases. Then closer to home, Wright addressed the proliferation of sexually-oriented buei· nesses ($OBI on lower Westheimer which remains one of Montroee's most volatile isauea with the present administration. And at a recent gathering of the Avondale Association at the Bering Memorial Church, member Chris Anderson various political candidates nationwide. He denied quite emphatically that he raised funda solely for politicians his employer supprted or for politicans who promised to benefit the oil and gas indus­tries. Yet Wright has been deacribed as Warrens political operative in the Demo­cratic party. "It was a unique situation," claims Wright of his vice presidential position under former employer Jack Warren. "I made sure when I came to work for them that I would have no lobbying responsibil­ities, and I would have the opportunity to support whomever I wanted to." Jack Warren commented recently in Houston City that Wright lobbied u his former employee. And perhapa due to further comments by Warren in this mag­azine, Wright has had to face criticiam over hi1 managerial capabilities. Warren deacribed Wright aa a "super nice guy, but totally Jacking in adminiJ. trative and managerial 1kill1." Cool and 1mooth as ever, Wright replied, "It's intereoting that in the four years that I worked there, I got aalary and promotion increases riirht up to the time I resigned. Matter of fact, they just promoted me two weeks before I resigned. It was only when I took on Jack Warren's favorite politican Kathy Whitmire, that he began to say those things about me. He told people that I would be the next governor of Texas." Apart from his political experiencea within the oil and gas industry, at 39, Wright'• political aavvy and experience is notable: He had worked under former President Lyndon Johnaon, Senator Lloyd Bentsen and two governors, as well as served on the board offourstateuniver· sities. Wright claims to be a trained and edu­cated public administrator, citing as proof a Master's degree in Public Administra­tion from the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas. If he win1 the mayoral race, it will be hia first elected position. :i:.:s:r~fifiede~~~:T~M ;;:~i!h~ Vandals Harass 0 clean up" Westheimer in the past two yeTugaincontrolovertheproliferationof Gay Women SO&, Wright believes the city attorney must be much more forceful in padlocking sitee of proetitution by enforcing laws already in the books. He also said he would 1upport reguJations concerning SO Bs as stringently as he could, as long as they do not infringe upon constitutional rights, such as the First Amendment. Addre88ing the problem of police haraument toward members of the gay community, Wright proposes that the Houston Police Department should estab­lish foot patrols in Montrose. He believes that foot patrols, a more personal form of community law enforcement and protec­tion, would cause police to become more familiar with the community, not only with business owners, but also with Mont­rose residents aa well. He explained, "I thinlt it would help avoid some of the undue ha.raasment toward eome of the people who live in Montrose." And Wright intends to retain Whit­mire'• appointee, Police Chief Lee Brown. Accordinir to Bagneris, since the HPD has improved in terms of police brutality and gay harassment under Chief Brown, Wright'• stated intention "is a great move in saying to us that I think he's doing a great job in the area you people are having problems with, and I'm supporting the job he's trying to do." Even though Wright served as vicepres­ident of corporate affairs for four years of Warren King Companies, a conglomera· tion of oil and gas firms, he proved to be surprisingly vague about the position through which he waa rated one of the top ten power brokers in the Texas oil and gas mdustry. When asked to elaborate on how this influential position helped to prepare him for the mayor's office, he hedged. At Warren, hi1 responsibilities included taiaina substantial amounts of money for ~[. ~'lnw~;. ~~:_r• BERKELEY, Calif.-Vandals hurled con­crete blocks through the plate-glass win­dows of a lesbian-owned restaurant in October, the lastest in a aeriea of incident.a that the cafe's owners say is a campaign of anti-lesbian harassment. Joan Antonuccio, co-owner of the Brick Hut Cafe, a decade-old Berkeley land­mark, told reporters that earlier in the week she received an anonymous tele­phone call warning that "if you bitches don't stop fondling our children, we will torch your place." Although moet of the Brick Hut's clien­tele is non-gay, it is operated openly as a J .. bian-owned business, with a bulletin board that displays notices about lesbian events in the greater San Francisco area. Although the incident had been reported immediately to Berkeley police by a man who livea in an apartment above the rMtaurant, Antonuccio aaid neither she nor her partner were aware of the inci­dent until they arrived to open the cafe Sunday morning. Antonuccio said that the landlord "is very supportive of us," adding that she and her partner just signed a new 10-year lease, and that "he will probably bill us only $500 for the windows." Barbara Lubin, a member of the Berke­ley school board and a regular customer of the Brick Hut, waa angered over the inci­dent, promising to meet with the chief of police and Mayor Eugene Newport to ask for beefed-up police patrols and to discuss "the implications of this kind of atrocious attack on the gay community.'' In 1978, the Berkeley City Council passed a gay rights ordinance that is 1tronger than that of San Francisco in that it provides for civil and criminal penalties for violato111. NOTICE! Nightly Happy Hour 10pm till 12:30am Saturday, Nov. 5 Jail Break Party for Pickles 10pm New DJ Wayne Barton Nov. 4, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 PROPOSITION A A Bad Deal For Taxpayers On November 8, Houston taxpayers will face Proposition A - a measure that will determine how our city's crucial Hotel Occupancy Tax is spent for the next 30 years. If Proposition A is approved, Houston will be required by law to use a// of that money to pay for an Eastside downtown convention center costing $500 million - Houston's third convention center. If Proposition A is defeated, Houston will be allowed to continue investing its hotef tax money in a number of important and vital city services and civic improvement projects. What's your choice? It's your money. D A YES Vote On Proposition A Means: 1. An Eastside downtown convention center costing $500 million. 2. Another tax increase. 3. Cuts money for essential city services. 4. Cuts millions in police protection. 5. Cuts millions for street repair and maintenance. More potholes. MA NO Vote On Proposition A Means: 1. If in the future there's a documented need, a convention center could be built for one-fourth the cost, in half the time, on land already paid for. 2. No tax increase. 3. Hundreds of millions of dollars more for essential city services. 4. More money for police protection. 5. More dollars for street repair. Fewer potholes. 6. Development of Buffalo Bayou - creation of a Bayou Walk - that will bring tourists to Houston, thus creating thousands of permanent jobs and bringing in millions of dollars of new revenue to Houston. 7. A new flood control program to protect against further disasters like Hurricane Alicia. 8. More money for the City's libraries. 9. More money for the City Zoo. 10. More money for parks and recreation. Vote AGAINST Proposition A, November 8 1 Political adverlisement paid foe b¥ the ; air Vote Committee, Gene Stoffel, Treasurer Lliiiiiiii' iiiiiiiii-i-iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii_i_i_i_i_i~ill. .........,. ............ ... ....., .• ~.~11i~"lri l.i•" m'i.11111'im'" iill 10 MONTROSE VOICE/ Nov.4, 1983 Kathy Whitmire, the 'Montrose Candidate' continued from page J widening. And as soon as we finish acqur­ing the rights-of-way, then we'll be ready to widen it." The mayor also mentioned that that is why there has been no resurfacing of the rough section of the street to date. It was also stated that there is more in store for this particular stretch of Rich­mond than widening. Plans are underway to plant street trees once the road has been improved, in addition to giving the side­walks special treatment-all in an attempt to encourage quality development of the area. And the Richmond project has only been underway since 1982. It had been tabled prior to Whitmire' a administration. Whitmire also addressed the issue per­taining to controlling sexually oriented businesses in the area, admitting that leg­islating any business operation is a sticky i88ue under the aegis of the courts. She mentioned that the city had tried this in !~~~::.t and, due to the courts, without "The goal is to provide some type of reg­ulation of sexually oriented businesses. both in terms of where they're located and what type of outside ~inage they can have,~' She mentioned that Councilman George Grearuas had becn adamantly working for the past year on an ordinance that wil I be legally defensible that will control these busin ..... and help preserve the neighborhood. "I think it will be an effective ordinance when it'• pa88ed," she •aid. "It p&88ed on first reading today," she added. mention­ing that it wiH go through two more read­ings before it is officially tested. Regarding crime in the area, Whitmire mentioned that she has been very pleased with Chief Brown's attempt to change the course of the Houston Police Department, and is also looking forward to when Mont­rose will be incorporated into a direct area response tellm (DART) manner of polic­ing, a procedure that is already underway just south of the area, a nd will see police­men operating out of a "neighborhood" headquarters instead of primarily from patrol cars and downtown, as they are cur­rently doing. But she sees the present neighborhood driving patrols as the best approach at the moment to area crime, primarily because of a man Power shortage. In the future, she will look to the establishment of foot patrols in the p.rea, also. "I think along Westheimer will be a potential area (for foot patrols) where you have a lot of commercial activity and a lot of pedestrian traffic," she said of the crite­ria that would be used for establishing such a service. Whitmire has been proud of the people in thie city and looks at her last two years in office as presenting her "with some of the most challenging and gratifying opPortunities that I can imagine," she =~~; '"This has been a fai:;cinating time for So nding the wave of elat on kicked up Join us for a GET ACQUAINTED BREAKFAST SPECIAL, 99¢, weekdays 2 eggs, bacon & toast ~~~?t~~'h~3: ·:i:!~1':d".d~P,:,0 • .'j~~rit~.; 808 LOVETT ______ _. !":~;:;:"~ ~~=·~;;~;•;:t~;:~nbJ'd~~~ ~h~t .. ----•serving Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner ____ .. the Dustin Hoffman look-alike, and the Open Weekends, Orders to Go ____ .. d'r':sa'::!~nwl~ :.."n,te;tri~:~ ~f~O a~0J:! 521-1015 helm of this giant metropolis for another open 7 am-1 Opm two years Jesse Jackson Sees Gays as Rich, Influential ~(. ~~~i;i~~t~ce Last September, a black-tie crowd of 1000 gays heard Reverend Jesse Jackson, the prime spokesman of today's black move· ment, ask for gay people to join blacks and other minorities in a political alliance. The event wae the second annual dinner of the Human Rights Campaign Fund at the Grand Ballroom of New York's Waldorf. Astoria Hotel. Jackson was fiery and evangelical in his delivery and sounded as if he had done some homework on gay issues, but proba· bly not enough. Although well received, the possible presidential candidate was still perceived to be lacking in understand­ing of gay lifestyles and agenda. Harvey Fierstein, writer of the hit musi­cal La Cage aux Foiles and the evening's M.C., politely corrected Jackson on a cou­ple of his comments following his keynote address. Jackson had said "Sexuality is a private thing and was not other people's busine88." Drawing a burst of applause, Fierstein later said, "I would like to let you know that my sexuality is NOT a private thing, and I would like to be able to walk down the street and kiss my lover in public as freely as you can with your wife." In a litany ofobeervatione, Jackson had said, "Sex is a thrill, but so is getting the voting rights law passed in the 60s. Sex is a thrill, but so is unscrewing all the nuclear heads off all those mi88les. Sex is a thrill, but so is passing the ERA." To that Fierstein commented, "Yes, sex is a thrill, but being gay is a lot more than being just a eexual person," and the ballroom went wild for a second time. Jackson noted that the gay community represented something totally unique in minority communities in that among the gay population is a white, middle class, privileaed economic group of people with a very high number of registered voters and a large voting turnout, which he said was quite the opposite of the black and women's communities. He viewed gay peo­ple as being a rich and influential minor­ity, one which could be very useful within the Rainbow Coalition oflabor and minor­ity groups he had been actively pursuing. "You have power if you use it," he told the audience. To illustrate his point of build­ing coalitione, Jackson read off a list of black legislators supporting gay rights bills in Congress. Prior to hie appearance at the HRCF dinner, the New York Native editorially wondered if he might talk with the two black city councilmembers who have con­sistently voted against a New York city gay right.a ordinance and elicit their future backing. The question of the illusive ordi· nance was not addressed. Conspicuously absent from the dinner was New York Mayor Ed Koch who was nowhere to be seen. He did send a telegram though, which was read aloud and soundly booed by the entire tuxedoed crowd. Entertainment was provided by La Cage aux Foiles star George Hearn who 1ang "! Am What I Am,'' and by Pattie LaBelle who performed six numbers which tore the gathering apart. Presidential Aides Getting Higher Pay Candidate Reagan may have campaigned against government spending, ~ut you'd never know it to look at the White House payroll. Colorado Congresswoman Pat Schroeder 1aya in the Wash111gton Poat that Reagan has appointed nearly three times as many high·paid staffers as Jimmy Carter. Under Reagan, the average salary of a presidential aide has risen from $48,000 a year to nearly $64,000. Schroeder says Reagan' hirinR pohcy aeems 11inc:oruWtt . en ..-i\h his pled11• ,, rOOUC$ the 11u and cost of government NOV. 4, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Every Friday, Al/Over Montrose, The Voice Informs-, n a1n Thousands. The Montrose Voice is read each week by nearly 30,000 in Houston. That's thousands more than any other gay or Montrose community publication. When you have a message to deliver to Montrose, put it in the Voice ... the professional, dedicated, community-involved Montrose Voice. 12 MONTROSE VOICE/ Nov 4, 1983 t¥Js~!ii~~~.~~et r-M-.,·=:-_: ·_l:: •;::/l-:t-~-c--~.- ---.).-,.-.- -_i_)-!:..·_{.;_t_;:~: . .... National Gay Task Force Executive Direc- "THE liLTHIA TF BAAED POTATO tor Virginia M. Apuzzo, in a meeting Oct. 18th with top federal Medicare and Medi· ca id officials. called on the Reagan admin­istration to address "some of the systemic problems with our nation's health care programs that our experience with the AIDS crisis has underscored so dramati­cally,' reports NGTF. Three ma1or areas of concern relating to Medicare and Medicaid and the AIDS cri· .. is were identified. They were problems in entitlement education-letting individu als know what federal and <tate health aSBietance benefits are available to them; coverage of experimental treatments for AIDS under Medicare and Medicaid; and the huge fiscal burden placed on public hospitals in cities with high numbers of AIDS C88e8. Jay Lipner. special counsel to the Gay Men's Health Crisis, said there is a "mas­sive sense of confusion" regarding what benefits people with AIDS are entitled to. Dr. Carolyne Davis, Administrator of the Health Care Financing Administra­tion (HCFAJ, committed herself to discus­sions on this issue with the Social Security Administration and the state directors of Medicaid, who actually implement the Medicaid progTam. Apuzzo &trf'ued that "we are not asking for special treatment or special benefits~ we are asking that a mechanism be put in place that improves communication for all potential beneficiaries." One of the questions raised was whether Medicare, and ultimately Medicaid pro­grams. would cover some of the new methods being used to treat AIDS. Also, Apuzzo said that the fiscal burden that the AIDS crisis has placed on public hospitals "begs for attention from the fed­eral government." Apuzzo de8l'Tibed the meeting "as as opening round in bringing to the govern· ment'e attention our concerns regarding health care costs. We hope this admini•· tration'• interest in all aspects of the AIDS crisis will result in some fundamental changes in how our health care system deals with health emergencies and edu· cate8 the public about program• to which they are entitled." Sexual Exile Terms Brazil Paradise In response to a promised campaign of extermination of Argentine homosexuals by a clandeatined Nazi commando group, some 10.000 gays have fled Argentina, Chile and Uruguay for what one "sexual exile"' ~rmed.a paradise in Brazil, reports the Knight· Ridder newspaper gToup. Seventeen gay men have been strangled. stabbed or beaten to death in the past 15 months after the Nazi gToup burned down a Buenos Aires theater which had included gay sketches in a review The murders took place in one 30-block area of the city, reportedly a place with one of the world's loweet crime rates. and the police have not solved one case to date. The murd.era come after seven years of sys­tematic gay repreuion in Argentina, beginning in 1976 when a military coup shut down 11ay oaunu, bars and hotels. Argentines detained for suspicion of begin gay received 30-day jail sentences and were branded in the national compu­ter file aa gay. Nestor Perlonghar, one of the exiles. was arreated 15 time• before leaving the country. In Chile and Uruguay and other South· em Cone dictatorships, repression is leea violent than in Argentina. but there is no open bomo.ea.ual activity. SPUDS AREA GIRESBEST FRIEND! 416 Westheimer Houston, TX 77006 520-0554 A Full-Service Travel Agency for the Gay Community Houston Phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 0 Regular Subscription $30 D Trial Subscription $15 Name _________________ _ Addre.~----------------~ Cify. ________ State __ Zip ____ _ Type of Computer _______________ _ Clip and Mail to: GNIC NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 Scientists Conclude Monkeys had AIDS Scientists at the New England Regional Primate Research Center in Southboro, Mass., have concluded that more than two-thirds of the 70 Taiwanese rock macaques, an endangered monkey spe­cies, died from AlDS or diseases so simil­iar as to be mistaken for the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, reports the Associated Press. Recently, they discovered a virus causes the disease in monkeys, but did not specu­late on the probablity of what causes the similar situation in humans. Dr. Norman L l..etvin of the center said the microbe may not matter. By studying the viruRes that are causing Rimilar disea~es, he RBid, Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 they can learn alot about how the virus can cause opportunistic tumors and infec­tions similiar to those encountered in humans with immuno-suppressed sys· terns When going over the records of how the monkeys died in 1980 and 1981, scientists found they had either a cancer called lym­phoma or rare forms of pheumonia and tuberculosis-a11 similar to the same con­ditions killing AIDS victims In experiments. researchers injected healthy animals with tumor tissue. Some of the infected animals got lymphoma, some got AIDS. Their immune systems coJlapeed, and they died of infections. Letvin cautioned that similar viruses may cause aimiJar infections, but only in different species, so the virus at work in the monkeys may not be the identical virus causing human fatalities. However, he said it is timely, "if not urgent," to find out what the virus is. AIDS Issue Prominent in Sodomy Statute Appeal The rationale that Ttxas' sodomy statute be reenacted because of AIDS is creating a controversy prior to an appellatecourtrul· ing on the statute which was struck down as being unc~mstitutional last year. Amarillo's District Attorney is arguing that the sodomy statute is necessary to control AIDS in an attempt to influence the U.S. Court of Appeals' decision, although he did not bring up the argument at the trial level. "It i1 simply improper to bring up a new issue for the first time at the appellate level," said Leonard Graff, National Gay Rights Advocate legal director. 0 And even if they could, it is a weak argument, because nobody had even heard of AIDS at the time the Texas legislature enacted the sodomy statute." Jean O'Leary, executive director of NGRA. said "The D.A. is trying to exploit the public hysteria and to use irrational fear in an emotional attempt to persuade the court. We expect the court to disregard this shallow tactic." Termites on Increase The population migration to the sun belt haa meant one thing to the region's ter­mites: food. A study by Texas A&M found that nearly two-thirds of eun belt homes aged 10 yeara or Iese are infested by the wood· eating bugs. For older homes, it could be up to 97 percent Aggravating the problem is the recent ~~;~l ~!nt:::::a:::~~~ot~:ineatef:si~; than its domeatic cousins, reports the Wall Street Journal. Neiman-Marcus and Diana Foundation to Host AIDS Benefit Houston 'a Diana Foundation, in a880Cia­tion with Neiman-Marcus, will co-host an AIDS benefit for people who have acquired the syndrome. "This ie the first time a major business such aa Neiman's has earnestly stepped forward to help our community. And we hope that others will follow," Tim Weaver, public relations director of the Diana Foundation, said. The plan is to have members of the com­munity donate dollars to the KS/ AIDS Foundation of Houston and receive a ticket which will qualify them for a door prize being donated by the glamorous department store at a private fashion show on November 13. First prize will be a men's full length ranch mink coat. Second prize will be a men's racoon jacket. "We urge all of you to purchase your tickets from Diana members or by calling KS/ AIDS (524-AIDS)," Weaver said. Gay Man Runs in Key West Mayoral Election Richard Heyman, 48, art gallery owner and city commiasioner in Key West, F1a., ia gay and running for mayor of the city, opposed by Richard Kerr, a former county commissioner and member of an old-line Key West family set. Kerr's campaign, although not overtly, has centered around the fact that Heyman is gay, and Kerr use• anti-gay sentiment, which aa one suppor­ter put it, ia "fear that if a gay got elected mayor, it would bring more of them down here" (oops, there goes the neighborhood). This was reported by the Kni11ht-Ridder newepaper group. Heyman has preferred to run an issue­oriented campaign. Always a strong oppo­nent of the good ol' boy syndrome at work in the five-member city commission, he has repeatedly called for a performance audit of City Electric System and the hir­ing of more women and minorities at city hall, and he established a task force to investigate the millions of gallons of ille­gally dumped sewage into the ocean. In a city where hundreds of gays have chosen to invest in homes and busineases, it has not been necessary for Heyman to be an ardent gay rights activiat. As a local politican said, everyone knows he is a homosexual, but nobody would call him a bad politican. Key West is an area evolving from a Latin macho ethnic to a tourist-oriented city, and Heyman backers say that Kerr and the good ol' boys are lining up for a last-ditch effort to avoid the inevitable eco­nomic and social changes typified by Hey· man '1 philosophy of government. Do Gay Relationships Ever Really Last? If you have ever asked yourself this question, this workshop is for you I A WORKSHOP ON RELATIONSHIPS For S ingles and Couples Saturday, Nov. 19, 10am-5pm For information call 529-1913 8111 Scott, MSW Denise O'Doherty, MRN, MSN Jam• BMC her, BA Judy Doherty, MSW, JO Presented by Will iam Scou & AAOC. f~ "af eans 'n ~tuff~w.r ;Ne&t & ~seb­J! lforn &~orn! QIIotJring l~e lrui..ueeb jeane. &II ";Blilb l ~ill" or "~onn1( I 2201-2203 •aelpnaton he. (across Salvation Army thrift Store) 880-8824 & 880-8844 Nov. 4, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 ~-------------------------- C!>nc HOUR ''fll/111 T-ID· /l/OG.." THE MOST II DRY CLEAlll<t 14 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 4, 1983 National Gay r.:::==========================:::::::i Pride Committees Coordinate '84 Plans ~(. ~~i;i~:t~ce Sixty conferees representing gay pride organizatioJ1J1 from 18 American cities met in San Diego in October to exchange information and coordinate plans for next year's celebrations. It was their second annual conference, and participation was three times greater than last year's gath­ering in Boston. Eighty-two cities are now known to hold some form of gay pride event, be it picnic or parade, carnival or concert. Ten of those cities have gay marching bands, and all of them have agreed to come to Los Angeles next year to participate in that city's parade as weB &tot in a combined concert in the 18,000-seat Hollywood Bowl. The 1984 activities will mark the 15th anniversary of the Stonewall rebellion. The weekend conference was hoeted by San Diego Lambda Pride and was held in San Diego's big, new MCC church. Two days of useful workshops on a variety of topics occupied most of t.he conference time. Topping off the weekend was a well­attended dinner in Balboa Park, to which the community in general was invited. The workshop sharing of ideas and experiences on such subjects as securing permits and dealing with police and government agencies was extremely help­ful. The Boston and New York committees reported on the success of having incorpo-rating suggestions offered last year by Loa Angeles, including the handling of secur­ity and the reversing of New York'• parade route. Wichita introduced an innovative button promotion which intrigued the Loa Angeles committee, among others. and may be taken under consideration by several cities next year. For the first time a single national elo­gan was agreed upon by the various pride committees represented. The option of also using it for local celebrations, or creating one's own, was left to each indi· vidual city. Los Angeles has already agreed to adopt the national slogan for ita 1984 parade and festival. Olympics and LA. is extending an invitation to the entire country to join them in making it a massive affair. The national slogan ia "United Br. More in '84." A uniform poeter for national use will be designed to incorporate the slogan, and the Las Vegas committee has offered to handle ita printing and distribution. Las Vegas holds ita gay pride celebration in May and haa also extended an invitation to others to come to "fun city" and join them. At the San Diego gathering, a stirring welcome add:reu waa delivered to the con· ferees by Harry Hays, the founder in 1953 of the early homophile organization, the Mattachine Society. He spoke of the need to recorpllze that we are a "separate peo-. pie" with a special gift with which to cele­brate each other. A radical gay who speak.I like a poet. Hays left hia audience in standing applause. San Franaico writer Armistead Maupin was the guest speaker at the closing dinner, along with Barbara Cameron, an Indian and gay activist from the Sioux nation. Entertaining were singer Kate Beck and Romanovski and Phillips on piano and guitar. Of all the gay pride organization•, Christoper Street West of Los Angeles io the only one to belong to the International Festivals Association (for five years), which includes the Tournament of Roses Parade, Kentucky Derby Parade and New Orleans Mardi Gras organization, among others. CWS had two representatives at IFA'1 recent convention in Phoenix where they set up a diaplay and introduced the several hundred delegates to what a pride­ful gay celebration is all about. The respon1e wu very positive, and two other IFA membere extended an invitation for LA'• Gay Freedom Band to participate in their nationally televised parades in Mil­waukee and Atlanta. Proudly Presenting Our Newest Musical Comedy ~-e~v ~_ 8) \ of the · , ilver ere en Cabaret/Theatre SHOWTIMES Thursday-8:30pm Friday-8:30 & 11pm Saturday-8:30 & 11pm Sunday-8:30pm Doors Open 7pm Happy Hour till 8:30pm 2700 ALBANY-Open 7pm-2am-528-3611 (adjacent to Otficer's Club) Independent Gay Baths Form Group "I found out why we're called independ· en ts," 1aid Stan Berg, owner of The Body Worko, a gay health and social club in Indianapolis. "The idea of forming an association of Independent Gay Health Clubs (IGHC) came about in early May, 1983 when I realized that the AIDS prob­lem and depressed economy was hurting my businesa." In response to these con· cems, he began corresponing with other health club owners nationwide proposing cro81-honoring memberships. He discovered that club owners were interested in two other ideas: cooperative national advertising and an information exchange between clubs. Jim Snodgra88, Diplomat Health Club of Grand Rapids, said, .. The gay population is extremely mobile, and because of this mobility, a large 'chain' of health clubs has a built in advantage," IGHC now has 30 members where members can spend the night or use facilities. Kevan Goodrich, who operates the Mid­towne Spa chain, is another key fiture in IGHC. "We(Midtowne)decided to join the association because it makes sense for businesses in the same field to communi­cate and cooperate together. The IGHC is going to get big, there's little doubt that it wiU become an important association, and we want to be a part of it." In reacting to the AIDS dilemma, Con­rad Morgan of Morgan's Sauna in Buf­falo, New York summed up the thinking of many club owners: "We have to act responeibily towards the AIDS problem. We need to talk about educating our Stan Berg of lndianapolia, owner of TM Body Works patrons about the 'facts' of AIDS, not the myths. To ignore the problem would be irresponsible. And if we don't make it a i81ue, perhaps some state health depart­ment. a will." Bob Pereida of The Compound further noted, "I don't think club1 that offer their partrona a variety of servicea 1uch aa gyma, video and other more aocial activi­tiea have aa much to worry about aa those club. that aim ply offer a place for people to have eex.'' An international convetion for the IGHC ie being hosted by Goodrich of Mid· towne in New Orleana in January, 1984. Aaaociation memben include: Arena Health Club, Pittaburgh; Backstreet Batho, Philadelphia; The Body Works, Indianapolis; Club Baths in San Fran­cisco, Sacramento and Reno; Colony Club in Asbury Park; The Compound, North Hollywood; Diplomat Health Club, Grand Rapids, Ml; The Garden Bath, Vancouver; Jeffs Gym, Salt Lake City; Majeotic Hotel Br. Club Bath of Portland, OR; Man's Coun­try, Chicago; Melrose Baths, Loe Angeles; Midtowne Spao in Dallas, Denver, Hous­ton, Loo Angelee and New Orleans; New Morgan Sauna, Buffalo, NY; Northern Men'• Sauna, Fluohing, NY; Olympic Ba tho, Washington, D.C.; The Pines, Seat· tie; Top Deck, San Diego and The Water­garden, San Jose, CA. NOV. 4, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Coppola's Fishing in Absurd Waters By Steve Warren At the end of the year when critics list the beet and worst movies of 1983, l wonder how many will have the guts to put Rum­ble Fish on both lists where it belongs. No Snails or Brains, Please What food would you like to eat least? The Gallup Poll asked that question, and the answer came back-snails, reports the Wall Street Journal. Four out of 10 people wouldn't touch 'em. Brains were a close second, but only 5 percent said they wouldn't eat liver. Francis Ford Coppola shot The Outsid­era and Rumble Fish, both based on S.E. Hinton novels and starring Matt Dillon, back-to-back in Tulsa; but the two are com­pletely different. If The Outsiders tried to be Gone With the Wind, Rumble Fish is Coppola'• version of West Side Story played as Greek tragedy with Medea in place of Maria. It's unique, you've got to say that for it, even if it constantly reminds you of other films-West Side Story for its choreo­graphed (by Michael Smuin) teen vio­lence; InvWation au Voyage for the survivor who turns into his departed sibling in the end; Koyaanisqatsi for its speeded-up photography; and Z<elig, if not One from the Heart, for the way its puny content is overwhelmed by dazzling tech­nique. The barely coherent plot is about 17- year-old Rusty James (Matt Dillon)'• attempts to emulate his 21-year-old brother, "The Motorcycle Boy" (Mickey Rourke) and the trouble he gets into along the way. Among the potentially wonderful supporting characters who aren't deve­loped are a junkie (Diana Scarwid) named Cassandra and a gum chewing oracle­/ poet (Tom Waits) who runs the pool hall. It's as symbol-laden as a Tennessee Wil­liams festival. Such good-bad dialogue as uv ou're better than cool-you're warm" and "I didn't get to the ocean; California got in the way" alternates with naturalis­tically redundant teen talk-I mean, you won't fuckin' believe how fuckin' many times they fuckin' eay "fuckin" in thls fuckin' movie! Diane Lane, who may be prettier than Films Dillon (but I know whlcb one I'd choose!) plays his sometimes-girlfriend. Their acenes together are like an audition for a 20-years-hence production of A Streetcar Named Desire, and they should both get the pans. Dillon turns in his best perfor­mance to date, despite the demands of Coppola'• constant shifting between natu­ralism and stylization. The pulsing score by Stewart Copeland of the Police and the outstanding, mostly black-and-white cinematography of Ste­phen H. Burum are two strong pluses for true absurd attempt to create an American mythology. Between "fuck.in" and "fuckin," The Motorcycle Boy gets off one sage bit of optimism that should make your day: "The gangs are gonna come back-once they get the dope off the streets." The life is rough and the sex is hot for the boys who dance in New York's porno theatres. A behind-the­scenes look feat­uring a cast of new young beau­ties that are hot to show you the ins and outs. Starring: Falcon's Luke, Nova and Higgins' Buddy Preston and a cast of newco­mers. FRENCH QUARTER THEATRE 3201 Louisiana at Elgin (Westheimer) 527-0782 Sunday thru Thursday 11am to 1am Friday & Saturday 11am to 3am TEXAS' BEST ALL-MALE CINEMA 16 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 4, 1983 DWI CRl""INAL DEFENSE PERSONAL INJURY FAMILY LAW FREE CONSULTATION .JOHN PAUL BARNICH ATTORNEY AT LAW 3317 MONTROSE, SUITE 318 (713) !523-5006 NER~'POWN GREEK ISLAND Open 11am-11pm / MondayoFriday / 6-11 Saturday {F Parking next door Fine Greek Y Food. Seafood & St aks :/ Cocktallt 522-7040 302 Tuam WE ACCEPT AMEX. MC & VISA In honor of Sheila and Scooters Wedding, we will be closed r () :i: l> Monday, November 7th z We will be open Tuesday and offering this pre-holiday special thru Friday the 11th: FREE OIL CHANGE AND LUBE with Tune-Up. Servicing the Montrose for over 1/100th of e Century 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER)-523-2794 ~ 1::::-.....~ ~ SPANISH I FLOWER © RESTAURANT g ~ COMPLIMENTARY © wit~~r~!~r~~~r! of «J 3921 N. Main 869-1706 tqu•I or lm<r valu• till 10,30am A TASTE OF MEXIC0-24 HOURS DAILY THIS COUPON GOOD THROUGH 11-18-83 closed Tuesday 10pm; re-open Wednesday 10am We featu re ... • All Brands of Ice Cold KEG BEER • Delivery Service • Everyday Specials: Newport Vodka, 1.75 liter, $7.69 Jamie '08 Scotch, 1.75 liter, $11.79 McCormick Blended American Whiskey, 1.75 liter, $9.89 Rene Junot red or White French Wine, 750ML, $1.79 1402 Welch at MASTJ,~cARo Waugh Drive AMERICAN EXPRESS 529•9964 MICATEX VIDEO PROPERTY ! inc IN VEN TORY SERVICE A DISCREET SERVICE FOR HOME AND BUSINESS •Video Tape Inventories of Insured Valuables, Homes and Furniture, Antiques, Automobiles, Company Fixed Assets and Vehicle Fleets •Document Home Improvements-Additions • Video Histories of Property Development •Proof of Real Estate Property Condition Prior to Leasing 013) 669-9355 CanCrusher Comoration We Pay Cash for Your Trash*! •Trash by Can Crusher's defini11on is aluminum cans only. Can Crusher Corporation Is a fu -service recycling company paying market prices for aluminum cans Oui hours are Sam to 5:30pm, Monday !hru Friday. Help America Recycle and Make Money Too! 2011 Silver Spnng W.shlngton ~ "\ii) © ~ Nov 4, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 How Do You Do At Dancing? By Roz Ashley Are you a wallflower or a star? Are you 7) Tap dancing began with: a) Irish jigs; dancing? cultural, or do you sleep at the ballet? Is bl African tribal dances; c) Fred Astaire. a) There's no place to go for it; b) I enjoy dancing the personification of beauty for 81 What do you like best about a chorus the physical contact; c) It's clumsy. you? Do you thrill to the controlled ele- line? 13) What do you expect from a dance gance of the Aura pas de deux, or the a)Theprecision;b)Thecostumes;c)The partner? shimmy of latenight rhythmic abandon? legs. a) Keep time to the music; b) Don'tditch DWhe~~~;~10~0 ;~t~~~F:tion in tutus or ~ f,.o~:~ J,oeu j~i:,ec~'1J::yNd:c:~c~~~~- :;:~ ~~~e middle of a number; c) Stay off tapshoes, let's find out how you really mas? b) I love it-especially the "Waltz of 14) What's your preference in ballet> relate.to dancing. Take the following quiz, the Flowers;" c) Super! But the butt plug is a) "La Sylphide"; b) "Afternoon of a ~':t~~~~· and get your Dance Relationship better Faun"; c} Not having to go. Put a circle around the answer that best 10) What does disco dancing do to you? 15) What do you think of a "pas de completes each number's paragraph. a) It makes me high; b) It makes me deux"? Then tally up your total with the scores uninhibited; c) It makes me nervoutt. I a) Lovely when well done; b) I prefer a given after the final question. Will vou I I) What movements are important "menage a trois"~ c) Is that like a "faux lead, or ohall I? · parts of the Belly Dance? pas"? lJ What kind of dancing do you like to a) The Hip Thrust; b) The Camel Walk: Now, add up the points below for the do? c) Leaning over for a tip. answers you have given: 1) a-5, b-5, c-5; 2) a) Disco; b) Close; c) Slam. 12) How do you feel about ballroom a-3, b-5, c-0; 3)a·5, b-5,c-0;4)a-5, b-5, c-0; 5) 2) Do you do the Hustle or the California Bus Stop? a) I hate disco: b) Too hard for me; c) I'd rather drive. 3) What do you like best about ballet? a) The spectacle; b) The "grandes jetes'" c) Intermission. ' 4) What's your favorite dance move ment? a) The dip in the tango; b) The swish of the slow waltz; c) The beeline for the bar 5) How do you feel about modern dance? a) It makes me feel sexy; b) I adore the Paul Taylor Company; c) Confused. 6) Who's your favorite dancer? a) Rudolf Nureyev; b) Mikhail Barish­nikov; c) John Travolta. Civil Rights Bills Gain Support in Congress Arizona congressional representative Mo Udall recently b<>came the 73rd co-sponsor of HR2624, th• national lesbian and gay civil right• bill m the U.S. House, and Sen. Erneot ~·. Hollings <D-S.C.) registered his support of S430, making him the eighth co-sponsor of the Senate bill for employ· ment diffcrimination protection. Both endorstmentil added momentum to the national gay civil rights movement <·:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:·:.:-:-:-:-:·:·:-: Quiz a-5, b-5, c-0; 6) a-5, b-5, c-3; 7) a-5, b-5, c-0; 8) a-5, b-0, c-3; 9) a-3, b-5, c-0; 10) a-5, b-5, c-3; 11) a-5, b-5, c-0; 12) a-5, b-5, c-3; 13) a-5, b-5, c-5; 14) a-5, b-5, c-0; 15) a-5, b-0, c-0. Dance Relationship Score: 22-39-You're a clod. You won't dance, and we won't ask you. You don't know Gene Kelley from Nijinski, and you don't care. 40-57-Your lack of appreciation could make "Midsummer Night's Dream" a nightmare. But at least you know what tutus are for 58-75-We're imprestiE'd! You know all about Balanchine, the Bolshoi and Fon~ teyn. You 're also smart enough to realize this quiz means absolutely nothing. Ashley is a pertional counselor. ~ 1983 Stcmeu.•aU Featureli S)·ndicate. Udall, first elected in 1961, is a respected eldn statesman well known for hjs libernl views and strong stand on environmental isaues. Because he had held off sponsor­ship for several years, Steve Endean, Gay Rights National Lobby executive director until his recent resignation, said Udall's co-sponsorship should be considered a major breakthrough for the bill. The two recent eponeorshipe, the other by California representative Douglas Bosco signed in early September, renewed GRNL'o commitment for "84 by '84"-to have 84 bill sponsors by the end of Jan. 1984. HARRIET LEDIEA ''THE DIVA" appearing thru Nov. 12 Hollings, an announced candidate for the Democratic Party nomination for pres­ident, restated his support for the anti-gay employment diacrimination bill at the National Organization of Women's con­vention recently. "Thie is an excellent example of several organizations working together for gay civil rights," said GRNL Field Director Tanyan Corman. Endean further commented, "Sen. Hol­lings played a key role in the past by standing firm against former anti-gay 'McDonald amendments' to Legal Servi­ces Corporation billa that passed the House and were sent to the Senate sub· committee he chaired. With his help, we were able to stop these amendments from becoming Jaw." Direct from New York, Provincetown, "Hello Dolly," "Mame," "Adler on the Roof," "Bye, Bye Birdie" -•••-•••·• r •I•l •l _l~L . ~ ......, I I L I 2702 Klrby-524-6272 Dinner Mott-Thin 6-11 fri & Sot 6-12 rese1Wtk>ns requested Shows 9:30, 11, 12:30 18 MONTROSE VOICE/ Nov 4, 1983 Look Again By Randy Alfred WHIFF AGAIN: A few months ago, I wrote about misleading ads and press releases by popper manufacturers and dis­tributors. Those self-serving statements had claimed that poppers' "misuse" as inhalants (rather than as room odorizers) "posed no health hazards." San Franciscan Hank Wilson, a moving force in both the Committee to Monitor the Cumulative Effects of Poppers and the AIDS Political Action Network, brought the statements to the attention of Dr. James Curran, Director of AIDS Activity at the Center of Disease Control's Center for Infectious Diseases. In September, Curran sent a testy letter to Joseph Miller, president of Great Lakes Products, a major distributor of poppers. "Other health hazards from misuse of these drugs have been documented," Cur­ran wrote (emphasis original). 11Your press release and advertisements ... are misleading and misrepresent the CDC findings and their implications. For exam­ple. you etate .. .'recentgovemmentstudies clearly show that such misuse posed no health hazards.' This statement is not cor­rect. In fact, the enclosed article by Jaffe, et al., of our staff indicates a small, but significant, relationship between inhal­ant usage and AIDS .... "While it is unlikely that nitrites will be implicated as the primary cause of AIDS, their role ae a co-factor in some of the illnessee found in this syndrome has not been ruled ouL I must insist that you dis­continue the mi1uae and misrepresent.a· tion of CDC findings." That's strong language. It may also be the first time a ranking government scientist has directly termed butyl nitrite a drug. To date, the Food & Drug Adminis­tration has declined jurisdiction over the product. When reached for comment, Great Lake•' Miller acknowledged, "Perhapo our wording was not as accurate as Cur· ran 'a." Although the original ad is no longer running. MilJer said his company will continue the campaign with other ads. He al80 denied that poppers are drugs. SIGNED AGAIN: When I reported two weeks ago on legislation on the desk of Governor George Deukmejian, Senate Bill 910 still awaited hi1 action. Good news: the guv signed it. S.B. 910, by Sen. David Roberti (D-Hollywood), creates an AIDS advisory panel to encourage research and education. That makes the Deuk 2-for-2 on gay­related legislation. He'd already signed a bill allowing San Francisco to prohibit anti-gay discrimination by the local rede­velopment agency, a state body. COUNT AGAIN: In August, Wayne Fri­day of the Bay Area Reparrer complained that "less than 1 percentofthe$3.4million handed out" by the city's Publicity and Advertising Fund went to gay cultural groups this year. The Cund is supported by a tax on hotel rooms. Theater Rhinoceros received $7500; Frameline Film Festival, $2500; Golden Gate Performing Arts (an umbrella group for several musical organizations), $3000; and the Gay Freedom Day Parade, $13,500. In October, Allen White of the B.A.R. again raaed the iaaue. The headline called the $26,500 total ".00076 pen:ent" of the $3.4 million. Count again, fellas. You're Ready for Joan Rivers Greeting Cards? Fans of Joan Rivers will soon be able to send her raunchy one-liners to their friends .. or enemies, rePorls the Kansas City Times. The comedian is coming out with her own line of .. Can we talk?" greeting cards. A sample meeaage: .. I want to give you mething _you like on your birthday . .. only off by a factor of 1000. The actual total listed is $3,354,460, and $26,500 is .0079, or 0. 79 percent, of that. More to the point, much of the fond is distributed to citywide groups without eth­nic, neighborhood or community affilia­tions. It would be ridiculous to claim that gay citizens and tourists do not benefit from funds granted to the opera, sym­phony, ba1let, museums, art festivals, resi­dent theater companies and similar institutions. Only $333,250 goes to ethnic and minor­ity groups. The gay community gets 7.96 percent of this. (That puts the B.A.R. head­line off by a factor of 10,000.) That ia still not enough. We constitute about 20 percent of the city's population and probably one-third oC its minority­identified population. So, we are still get­ting only about one-fourth of our fair share. That is the figure we should use. In the long run, dramatic truth will always be more effective than dramatic exaggera­tion. THE WHITE STUFF: No, that's not the name of the John DeLorean movie. It's an item about Dan White, convicted of mans· laughter in the 1978 City Hall slayings oC Mayor George Moscone and gay Supervi­sor Harvey Milk. Unless local officials convince United States Attorney General William French Smith to prosecute White under federal law for interfering with Milk's and Mos­cone's civil rights as candidates for re­election, White will be released on parole on or about Jan. 6, 1984. He will have served only five years, one month, IO days for the two aseassinations. The statute of limitations on federal Dateline S.F. prosecution expires on Nov. 27, the fifth anniversary of the killings. In the mean· time, someone has been posting signs on Castro Street: "100 days until Dan White is fl;~·" "99 days until Dan White is free, ... OZ AND ENDS: Do you find the Old Spice "for him, not for him" TV ads as offensive as I do? Quarterly Press has published a guide to more than 1000 Third World and interra· cial gay groups, bars, magazines and other resources. Colorful People and Pla­ces also includes a historical section on the hot spots of yesteryear. It's available for $10 from Quarterly Press, 279 Colling­wood, S.F., 94114. Alfred's column originates at the llSen· tinel," a San Francisco gay newspaper. ~ 1983 Randy Alfred, all rights reserved. • San Francisco only $329 Round Trip •San Dieao only $270 RounaTrip • Miami & Ft. Lauderdale Gateways to Key West as little as $229 Round Trip (daily non-stops to Ft. Lauderdale eff. Nov. 1) Certain travel restrictions may apply. Call your travel agent or Eastern Airlines In Houston at 738-8615. EASTERN, Houston's oldest and largest major carrier serving you since 1936. EASTERN America's favorite way to fly.. . but for that lnoed a prescription." "- &;.~=~.;.;.;...,;.;;~---------__.;-.;.... ___ ..._ _________ ___. Nov. 4, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 19 Starring as President ... Commentary By Peter Harrison I hate to be hard on the party I Jove, but we have to face it: Democrats are slow learners. Unfortunately, they're also too serious about politics; most Democrats seem to hold on to the old-fashioned belief that people elected to high office should be qualified for it. Isn't that silly? You'd think that after two centuries of Fillmores Grants, Hardings and assorted clownish senators and representatives, they would have learned. Republicans, on the other hand, seem to be more realistic. uPragmatic" was the word the Great Nixon used, and it fits. The best illustration of that right now is the way the Democrats squander one of their most precious political assets: entertain­ers. Demos can easily assemble about half of Hollywood and Broadway for a fund· raiser, but the fund-raiser will be for some bland nonentity whose name everyone forgets once the music is over. Republicans are far thriftier with their more limited names. Look at the facts! They got a second-rate song-and.dance h::::''s!~!~t;yfr~:'C!a1T:o~f:'. ~~~n mth~; located an ex-shill for Boraxo and pumped him through the California governorship all the way to the presidency! Be Ji eve me, all the possibility of power is not being lost on some of our more ambi­tious actors. It shouldn't take long for Jane Fonda to realize that if she dropl'I: her ex-hippie hubby, !'.he can draw the womPn's vote to any office she wants to campaign for. Robert Redford 1a smart enough to know that hi• name and face are far better received than those of that ex-astronaut from Ohio. But the Decmorats keep on using those invaluable faces and names for mere appetizers, when they should be the main course. They have no sense of how to build a show. Go to a Democratic extravaganza, a nd you get a bunch of great warm-up acts, and when the supposed star appears, nine times out of ten he doesn't know how to use a mike, and if he does, his jokes are so bad you wish he'd never learned. Show-biz folks hate to be underexposed. They'll take a cameo appearance when a leading part isn't available, just to keep their oar in. Put all this together, and you get a frightening scenario. Have you noticed the president lately? Jokes, quips, snappy patter; he's getting ready for eomethina. Last summer he stuck Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 his thumbs in his ears and wiggled hie fingers at the Washington preee corps, a charming gesture meant to demonstrate his essential humanity. He's ready for a new job. You see, the Republicans, with their thirst for order, are setting up-not a military·industrial complex, which works well enough on its own-but an enterta1nment·political complex which will work on the hearts and minds and libidos of the American public. There's an entirely new heirarchy of political advancement coming. Reaagan will not run again. We need Rterner stuff in the coming years. Having parted the Red Sea, brought down The Ten Commandments, pamted the Sistine Chapel, routed the Sudanese and led Force Five, who oould be more suited for the job than Charleton Heston? Beoides, his polit­ical credentials are impeccable. Charleton Heston will be our next president. But what of Reagan? Well, there's one post in the United States far more impor­tant than the one he now holds. Ronald Reagan will become Johnny Carson, sit­ting on stage each night on NBC with sure-laugh-getter James Watt as Ed McMahon's replacement. Johnny'• cooperation in the venture will be rewarded when he becom .. the next moat impo~t person in the world, Frank Sinatra. It may require some thought for all of us to become accustomed to white bread and mayo replacing scun­gilli with marinara sauce, but it sure will appeal to Middle America. Frank Sinatra will become Pope. He will hold that office until his death, when he will be immediately canonized. as patron saint of naoty people. What happens to the present Pope, a foreigner, is immaterial. Meanwhile, on lower levels of govern~ ment, the arts-politics interplay will be increased. Jerry Falwell will be given a government grant for his new extrava· ganza, a film to be called Leviticus, Now! Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina will also produce and star in a film on the Jife of Jesus. In his version, set in contem­parary times, Christ will live after tri- CLUB HOUSTON 2205 FANNIN (713)659-4998 umphing over the Sadducees and Pharisees. By the use of a simple nuclear device, He will blast the buggers back to the Stone Age. The Republicans are sure that their ros· ter of big names will overcome most oppo­sition, but just to be sure, they've designed a few sops to be thrown to minority groups. Phyllis Schlafley will be named "Secretary of the Kitchen," a new cabinet post that deals with tbe ever mounting problems of finding new hamburger casse­role recipes and pleasing tired but horny husbands. Bill Cosby will head up the new Depart­ment of Natural Rhythm and Whimsical Wit, staying off the threat of oh-S<>-serious­but- boring Jesse Jackson. He will find jobs for black teenagers, cutting their high unemployment rates by sending them to MEMBER CLUB BATH CHAIN the lawns of rich party supporters to stand in cute jockey costumes with hitching rings in their hands. Look for Charles Nelson Reilly as Secre­tary of Closets, Abominations and Perver­sions. This new post will severely punish infractions of the hankie code (as "false and misleading advertising") and func­tion closely with the first lady to deter­mine schedules for Gallegos fittings and new china patterns. Believe me, it's a winning program. By co-opting all the big names and finding them important titles, the Republicans can stay in office a long time. Harrison lives in New Jersey. His column appears here and in other gay publica· tions. C' 1983 Swnewall Features Syndi­cate. CLUB DALLAS 2616 SWISS A VE (214)821-1990 •SHOWERS •VIDEO ARENA •LOCKERS •MINI LOCKERS •DRESSING ROOMS •FRIENDLY STAFF •SUNDECK •DRY SAUNA•OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOL •WHIRLPOOL SPA •STEAM ROOM •EXERCISE a. WEIGHT ROOM (COMING SOON TO HOUSTON) 20 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 4, 1983 Stanford's Trolley Catching Attention By Hollie Hood One almoet expects a trolley car to come rumbling down Hawthorne in Montrose and roll to a atop at Stanford in frontofthe townhouoe row aptly named Trolley Square. Evoking Victorian charm on its exterior and futuristic amenities inside, the national American Wood Council awarded the Disneyland-like project its Design for Better Living Award. The homes. which have already been sold or apok.en for at prices beginning at $160,000, were created and built by designer Preston Wood and his financial partnereJacqueeC. Shureand H.W.Jeese Jencu of Jade Propertiea. Surrounded by older residences reflect­ing the charm of daya gone by, the homes carry out the Victorian concept to the ful­leot, combining the beauty of yesteryear with the convenience and easy mainte­nance of today. Criteria for the prestigious award includea aeative design, imqinative uae of wood product. and e>:cellen~ in crafta­man. hip. Each of the homes is as individual as its colora-paetel blue, gray, green, yellow, peach or rose-with contrasting colors to highlight the arched windows, turrets and gingerbread embellishments. Wood, a native Houstonian, said "I came up with the concept just as soon as I saw the site and based my original draw· ings on the stately old Victorian homes we saw in Galveat.on and San Francisco." He never deviated from this original look and using wood because uwe found that the oldest standing buildings in Gal­veeton, and across the world for that mat-­te:- were wood, and they have held up thrl,ugh the severest weather conditions becauae of wood'a resiliency which helps resist wind dam.age." Adding to the Victorian feeling, Trolley Square ia heavily landacaped with planta remiruacent of the good ol' days, like crepe myrtle (a Montroae staple), jasmine and ivy. Stained 1lua , another important tum­of- the-<:entury touch, waa alao inlecrated The council bu not often looked to the into aach townhome. Hou.ton area for entri .. , but Joe Porter, ~onal council repreeentative, aaid Trol­ley Squre oxcellad on all counta. "All of the atained1laaaiaantiqueEuro­pean and wu imported from London and have wood tram.. for the jewel-like pie-cee.'' If you are an avid fan of THE FAR SIDE cartoons, you'll have to have ..-r.- Gary Larson's newest collection ... And if you missed his first best seller, you'd better be sure you have ... Order now if you love humor that starts from lnteriora of the hom .. range from art and remains firmly footed in left field! -------------------------, Please ~;~?esm~f The Far Side at S3 95 each : ~ ==copies of Beyond The Far Side at S3 95 each 1 ?,::'~ / Total amount enclosed ____ . 1~ 1,. anclude s1 for postage and handling per book 1 Ordered) I Mail ro Far Side BOOks, C/0 Montrose l,,l)iCe : ' • 4<IOO Johnson Orlve, Fairway, KS 66205 !Make Checks payable to universal Press Syndleatel : Ca..dC-.,.,,._CVISAC-..c-1 : -- ~ I ~- '~------------~ I °" ...,, ~ --- : "Pull out, llellyt Pull outt ... Youw hH on artery!" --------......,., __ I •-..,_.-.-.- .--...,.-_,-.,..---------- ....... : Neighborhood deco to ru.h tech, with extenoive ,... of black and 1laaa ourfacee. Health Officials Tracking Down Plasma from Austin AIDS Victim Charlea Whitfield, 30, of Austin diad of AIDS on Oct. 21, and following his death, health officialo checked their records and found that Whitfield had been a frequent blood donor, report& the Aasociated Preas. Cutter Laboratorie• of Berkeley, Calif., recipient of Whitfield's plasma, i• cur­rently tracking down the dispersion of the plasma, which probably was used to make substance& to help blood coagulate in hemophilia patient.a. Bud Moderabach, Cutter spokesman, •aid "I expect very soon we will be able to identify each lot that was eventually pro· duced from the particular donation in question." Jeri Moore, manager of the Austin Blood Components, read about Whitfield's death in an Austin newspaper and checked her records to discover that Whit­field had sold plasma to her company 50 times between Nov. 1982 and Sept. 16. Philip Zbylot of the Austin-Travis County Health Department said any med· icine containing Whitfield's plasma should be withdrawn. 0 The dilemma is that, until they can identify thecausativeorganism (of AIDS). they can't control it for products fTom any fluids from any known AIDS case," Zbylot said. Just Put Your Head in the Dentist's Lap Japanese methods are in fashion from the boardroom to the assembly line, reports the Wa1hi"6ton Poat, and now they may become standard in the dentist'• office. Reaearchero at the Univer•ity of Mary­land are experimenting with 1.en dentis­try. Surrounded by huahad voices, muted colora and potted planta, patients lie with their heada practically in the dentieta' !ape while they operate in graceful, effi­cient motiona. Dr. Michael Belenky thingo patient& will feel more HCUfe, and the added con­trol riveo the denti•t a lighter touch. NOV. 4, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Commentary Savage Among the Software, Or Microfiche and Me By Sharon McDonald One day when I wasn't looking, I'm just sure of it, some cosmic dial was turned forward several notches. The world I used to navigate with ease has become a silicon jungle of technology far outetripping my limited comprehension. Mine is not a simple case of being anti­technology. On the contrary, I am not what you'd call a nature lover. I'd rather heat something up in a microwave than cook over a campfire, and I'm as alienated by the whales as I am by silicon chips. I love freeways, supermarkets and all that wonderfully dependable fut food. Oh, I may have fretted about the ozone layer, written a few hostile let(\!n to bil· lin1 computen, and on one expensive occasion ripped a smug, uncooperative litr tie telephone out of its mooring on the wall-in 1omeone elae'1 house. But gener­ally apeaking, I Jove technology, as Jong as it remembers who's boH. Just the other day something happened that let me know we humans have got to get a firmer grip on things. My telehpone: Ring, ring. Me: Hello? My telephone: Hello. My name is Hal. I'm a computer. Me: You're a what? HaL I wonder if I could ask you three short questions for a survey I'm doing. I've been programmed.- Me: You're a what? HaL -to record your answers after I ask each question. Mt>: Now .. I've heard everything Hal: So, if you'll juet answer briefly­Me: I"ll do nothing of the kind! Hal: -at the sound of the tone- Me: WHO GA VE YOU MY NUMBER? The call ended prematurely with my hang-up, or more accurately, slam-down. Thie is a new one on me, and I don't hke it one biL All right, I know computers are the coming thing. I know there's no use fighting it. But, damn it, this was in my own home! For years, I've endured compu­ters ingesting my account numbers and Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 divulging my private financial details to complete strangers, but this is really per­sonal. When I answer the phone in my own home, I expect to .hear a h'!man being stammering, hollenng and m1~pr~mounc­ing at me, not the smooth, eenly moffen- 1ive voice I heard. Give me a bored telephone solicitor who calls while I'm making love, or a 2:00 a.m. breather. I'll even take an irate intimate calling to enu­merate the flaw• in my character, butjuet make it human. The meaaure of good technology is whether it servea my human needs (a hot tub) or some other priority (a computer that confirms a store clerk's 1u1picion that I am a nonentity). To clarify the distinc· tion between acceptable technology and goin11 too far, I have compiled a list of examples. Each item of Good TechnolollY is followed by it& corresponding equival­ent of Bad Technology, thusly: GOOD TECHNOWGY: Criteria-Can I tum it off if I want to? Can I afford it? Doea it eave me time, money or face? BAD TECHNOLOGY: Criteria-Does it make me feel stupid? Can a child operate it perfectly easily? Is ia humiliating?. 1. pain killers-root canal operahone 2. hold button on my phone-hold but.. ton on your phone 3. vibrators-video 11amea 4. blendera-food P""'""'!,.. 5. Aretha Franklin on tape anytime I want-the Information Lady on tape tell· ing me I should have looked it up myself 6. lightbulba-fluoreocent lights 7. push button phones-computers mak· ing phone calls 8. electric typewriters-mechanical bulls 9. electric blankets-electric tooth· brushes 10. my name in lighte-fingerprint IDs What bothers me about certain techno­loe), cal advances is that human emotions are invisible to the mechanical eye. Where ia the eoftware to give a computer a sense of humor? What doea a llilicon chip know about tone of voice or a pounding heart? What happens when ourmootdistiniUish-ing characteriatie&-our individual feel­ings and reactions-do not compute? I knew this would happen. I'm atarting to make sweeping predictions of doom. Hysteria i1 another thing a computer would never understand. The development of the jacuzzi has dem· onstrated that humankind can live in har­mony with technology. Now it's up to us to make sure it always serves and reflect.sour real needs. A friend of mine complains that he inevitably arrives at one bar the night Prince Charmin11 is making his appearance at the other. How about a com· puter that calculatea location of Prince Charminll on a given night? Or one that will tell you the exact time your father would be most receptive to your coming· out announcement? I could use a home computer that understands a person who keeps her financial records in prose. While I wait for these innovations to appear, I shall remain calm. I will not engage in back-to-the-woods doomsaying, nor will I panic just because today's ten­year-<> lds are better equipped to make a living than me. I never did like the woods, anyway-too chilly at night, and there'sno place to plug in the blanket. McDonald, wiw liue1 in Lo. Angeles, ia co-winner of tM 1983 Certi{U:au of Merit for O"utanding Work in FeatMn Writing from the Gay PreH Aaaociation. Her col"mn ap~ro Mre and in otMr gay MWlpapera. rship. THEABIUTY TO MAKE TOUGH 1---· • DECISIONS THAT HAVE: • INCREASED POLICE PATROLS BY 15% • RESURFACED A RECORD 512 MILES OF CITY STREETS • CREATED NEW DEVELOPMENT IN THE INNER CITY HOUSTON NEEDS A STRONG LEADER. HOUSTON NEEDS KATHY WHITMIRE. Paid lo< by Ille Kathy Whitmire campaign Fund, PO. Box 53180A, Houstoo, Texas 77052. Chat1es Sapp. Treasurer. ~ 22 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov 4, 1983 Former GPC President Pushes Convention Center. From Lee Harnngton A FOR vote on the Downtown Convention Center (Proposition A) this Tuesday is in the best interest of the gay community and our businesses. Tourists and convention delegates bring BIG money to a city-a large portion of it being earmarked for the arts here-they put thousands of people to work, stay in our hotels, eat in our restau­rants, frequent our nightclubs, and they even pay us tax to do it. Our only problem is that Houston does not get its fair share of visitors because our convention facili­ties are critically inadequate. Virtually every city leader supports this plan, and I cannot recall the last time a mayor and all 14 City Councilmembers were unanimous on anything . . .. The .reaaons there is so much confusing publioty are clear also: (1) the average citizen is not fully aware of the convention industry and its host city competitiveness for the dollar potential ... (2) more visitors will uae the facility than Houstonians (so it's more difficult to see the enormous benefits-conatruction, permanent jobs and the literally hundreds of millions of dollaro visitors will leave in our city), and (3) for some unknown reason (only 8-10 conventions are held there per year now). the Astrodome people feel threatened, so they hired Jim McConn to help defeat the proposal by taking full advantage of the voters' laclc: of information as outlined in (1) and 2() above. It is intereoting that McConn had pushed the convention center proposal through City Council when he was mayor. It ia also clear why lots of money and effort are being expended for passage of Propoeition A ... an overriding committee concern is to make absolutely certain thia political effort does not turn out like the MTA referendum debacle .... Texas East­ern, who donated $12 million in land for the center .. . will continue to help further revitalize that blighted area of downtown. A west-of-Main Street location was far too short on land space, but the bayou will otill be beautified. as well as other cultural and tourist attraction projects . ... Thie project will not represent a third convention center, it will be the ONLY one. Albert Thomae Hall is barely one­fourth the oize of facilities in Dallas, San Antonio, New Orleans, Atlanta and Chi· cago .•. The Astrodomain was built for baseball, rodeos and livestock shows­certainly NOT conventions. And the financing plan for thi1rnew pro­ject? Conservatively sound, and not one, but two emergency insurance backups, even if the visitors' hotel ta:x were to fall short. Homework has been done on this effort, all the way around. Thie project will NOT cost Houstonians one cent, but we'll get all the monetary benefits. .. .. There is not .. . one accusation by the Astrodome people that has any substance whatsoever. What they have been saying has been truly amazing. I was walking into the Officers' Club one Monday night in August when I encountered an Astrodome petitioner who, in only one minute, managed to ~tate to seven people at the entrance three com pletely inaccurate pieces of information about the proposed Downtown Conven· tion Center. I was astounded and told him that gay voters were too sophisticated pol itically to fall for that kind of rhetoric. When president of GPC, I consistently said to the city that the gay community is not a on~issue political group, that our converts concerns are the same as those of the rest of the citizens. Here's our chance to prove it. gay community. Once upon a time in a small village of never, never land, a beautiful "fairy" prin­cess descended from the sky to free us all, and we all lived happily ever after-or so the story goes. In reality, it is two years later, and all the magic dust has settled, leaving us with only stark facts to face. The fact is that beyond superficial protocol, no serious, significant gains have been made in the direction of gay rights under the Whitmire administration-at least none that she has had anything to do with. Certainly, Kathy, George, Eleanor and a few others have cracked the door, but we have failed to open it beyond that. In all fairness, I must say that the GPC has taken some wise and courageous steps in their endorsements this year. Although we have been unable to develop an envir­onment of competition for the gay vote in many races, in the Position 4 race, while Kathy has urged the support of Demo­cratic Party loyalist Anthony Hall, GPC choae to endorse Nikki Van Hightower, sending a clear message to Kathy that she will not control the GPC. To further the message, although GPC endorsed Kathy, they chose not to target her race for volun­teer services this year, deservedly so in view of the fact that Kathy felt the volun­teer services given to her last year by the gay community "were important but not that significant" (quoted from her GPC screening this year). The problem with the GPC is that it has placed Whitmire on a pedestal and now finds itself in the embarrassing position of having to anawer to her, rather than her answering to us. This is a problem which is crippling serious efforts toward the advancement of gay rights in Houston. Let'o examine the record. (So that I will not be accused of making charges off the top of my head, I have listed source infor­mation.) Beginning with the appointment of gay instructoro in the HPD cadet school, remember that in February '82, Capt. Michna, head of the police academy, announced that the HPD had already hired Lee Harrington and Bill Scott (see Houaton Post, Feb. 12, 1982). It was the next day that Kathy announced her oppo­sition to the proposal, saying that while she agreed with the idea, she was opposed to hiring Harrington because of his "po)it. ical involvement" (see Houston Pqst, Feb. 17, 1982). Several weeks later after all the controversy had cooled down, Police Chief Bales announced that the HPD would not hire gay instructors (see Houston Post, Mar. 5, 1982). Giving Kathy the benefit of the doubt on her promise to hire "non-political gays," such as Rev. Larson of MCCR, we must pause to question why it is two years later that this alternate proposal has not been instigated. While part of the fault lies in the failure of the GPC leadership to push the program, we cannot dismiss Whitmire in her responsibilities to follow through. We must acknowledge the fact that she is more interested in her political career than in the advancement of the gay commun­ity. In February '83, GPC attributed the removal of nine questions dealing with sexual orientation from the HPC screen· ing and hiring process to our "fairy" prin­cess/ politician. Once again leaders of GPC swallowed the official line. giving her credit for the change without checking the facts. It was as a result of a Federal District Court order that Houston was bound by law to make those changes, not the optional graciousness of Ms. Whitmire (see Houaton Post, Feb. 3, 1983). In several foruma, Kathy has listed as her moat significant achievement for the gay community the appointment of Police Chief Lee Brown. (le Chief Brown gay?) To this I must acknowledge the fact that despite the increased number of raids on Whitmire No :&ti:J"·a~ti'!r'~ ~h~t hb';"tt1i;n :~~.! 'Fairy' Princess th•i•~ 'ith~~gh she jokes about Montrose From Gregg R1UBell ~!:-u~~rs:i,~h~~~:::ind":.1:::.~i;~ "Who the hell else are they going to vote ohe did have pebbles (no tar, but pebbleo) :::::~.:!'? e ~ri::z:i::=. _ckl:=;.~ .. ~~l":.i.! given to city services under her adminis­tration. I plan to vote for Kathy this time around, not because I am pleased with her performance, but because we have failed to develop reasonable options. We must stop deluding ourselves into thinking that she places our advancement above hers and begin to treat her as a politican, not as a 11fairy" princess. Questioning the GPC Demand of Bloc Voting From Neil lsbin Every election, the gay community is told that our continued political influence depends upon the bloc vote which depends upon every member of the gay community voting all of the GPC endorsements. To publicly oppose a single endorsement is to be accused of trying to destroy the bloc vote. But what is the bloc vote, and how is its Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston,T_x _7_70_06 ___ succeH measured? Generally, nearly 100 percent of the active gay political com­munity agrees with 90 percent of the GPC endorsements. Is public diuent over occa­sional endorsements really injurious to the interest.a of the gay community or to the concept of the bloc vote? There is little disagreement that the bloc vote is a vital ingredient in gay political influence, but there is considerable dis­agreement over what is meant by the bloc vote. The GPC line, as expreseed by Ray Hill in this fall's GPC Election News, is that the bloc vote means that once the GPC haa made their endorsement.a, the gay community loyally and blindly votes ALL of the GPC endorsements. Typical of such dogmatism is hypocrisy. It should be noted that this year Ray Hill agrees with all of the GPC endorsements. In the past, when he has disagreed with the GPC endorsements (twice in 1980 and once in 1978), Ray saw nothing wrong with publicly encouraging members of the gay community to support candidates who were not endorsed. Even president Larry Bagnerie has publicly opposed a GPC endorsement-supporting Judson Robinson against GPC endorsed Mickey Leland in 1978. The fatal flaw with the dogmatic (and hypocritical) GPC interpretation of the bloc vote is that it ignores the opportuni­ties and advantages of having political influence with more than one candidate in a given race. However, that flaw is consist­ent with the leadership's view of the GPC as a political machine. To date, in my criti­cism of the GPC, I have been unsuccessful in changing their self·image away from the controlling aspects of a political machine to the guiding aspects of a politi­cal force. The reality of the bloc vote is not seen in the blind obedience of the gay community, but in the spontaneous agreement of the gay community. The success of the bloc vote is not at stake when there is disagree­ment, but is measured in the 90 percent of the races where there is agreement. The bloc vote materializes naturally when there are anti-gay candidates like Frank Mann (who was defeated by Elea­nor Tinsley in 1979), or when the GPC endorsed candidates are attacked because of their gay support (like Kathy Whitmire in 1981). The bloc vote also materialize• poeitively when there are such excellent candidates like Anne Wheeler and George Greanias. However, the concept of bloc voting has Letters stands to lose some credibility and influ­ence when gays are active in both cam­paigns, the GAY COMMUNITY GAINS political influence. To accuse the number of gay people actively supporting Anthony Hall of damaging gay political influence is ridiculous-they are protect­ing and promoting gay interests. Just as individuals can make mistakes, so can endorsing political organizations. When one considers Anthony Hall's long record of supporting gay rights, the fact that he is an incumbent and the fact that the GPC Screening Committee voted 12 to 7 to recommend him, it is reasonable to question the wisdom of the GPC's decision to endorse Nikki Van Hightower. The GPC endorsements should be seen aa recommendations and not commands to the gay community. As such, they must stand up to public scrutiny. Public dissent over occasional endorsements is neither injurious to the gay community nor to the concept of the bloc vote. In fact, public disagreement heightens interest and engenders discussion so that the people going to the polls know for whom and what they are voting. What is at stake in ra~s. such as the At·Large Position 4, is neither the bloc vote nor gay political influence as the GPC claims-but simply a judgment by members of the gay com­munity as to which candidate would be the most effective in office. Americans Still Crave Dessert We may be sweating our way to fitness, but that hasn't reduced our appetite for deuert, reports the Wall Street Journal. Cakes and crepee throughout the coun­try are getting richer, fancie .. and more expensive. Nick's Fishmarket in Houston, for example, pulls down a hefty $51h forits sour cream custard with a strawberry glaze. YEAR ROUND GROUNDS MAINTAINANCE INSECT CONTROL FERTILIZING SEEDING ~~r ~? :':i";a~g :g'l:'~.°F~~e:!;.".!;i.~:1.:dc~; FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE CALL Council Position-At-Large No. 4,Anthony DAVID WORTHY Hall and Nikki Van Hightower are the 1 (713) 529-0027 ~=~~g~?i~!"e1GPC.da:~ 1:;':,r;~tig:: ' ._1·,----------.J Montrose Live Main Street and Rascals ... o Comedienne Scores at Rascals By Jon Cheetwood I love Harriet Leider. She is a very funny and talented woman. She may not be everyone's cup of tea, however, but you really should see for yourself. You surely won1t be bored. But there's a need for a little word of warning to those sitting within earshot of the stage: you had better have come to see Harriet perform or watch out! And this is one of the reasons I have always loved Harriet Leider. She is a brave and extreme performer who really doesn't put up with any crap, and she has the knack of han­dling it in the severiet manner-short of coming to blows-and remaining an extemely funny woman. She warned the audience early in her set, "Shut the ... up! If I have to come out amongst you, it's not going to be pretty." True to her word, before the set was over, she had to come out in the audience, and it wasn't pretty-but it was awfully funny (actual comments by Ms. Leider at this point should not be printed) and certianly stunned the audience into submission. For some, Harriet is an acquired taste. If you don't like her immediately, give her two or three sets and then perhaps you will begin to understand the full wonderful sickness of the lady. She's scrambled my brains and kept me io stitches for a couple of years. Oh, she sings, too. I think one of the reasons she left the legitimate musical stage a few years ago was that she just had too much to say to her audiences. Plus she has lung control that would put Orea to shame. Her Broadway-trained voice is evident in its brassy strength throughout her show, but in particular in numbers such as "Shiver Me Timbers" and "I'd Rather Leave While I'm in Love," where she contrasts her reverberating leather-lunged delivery with soft, subtle control in passages imbued with emotion. Harriet's show is not what I would call nostalgic. Wlrile she has numbers that might fall into that ilk ("Going Down to Stoney Inn," "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow" and a "Mr. Sandman" med­ley), she remains an eclectic performer. Her deliveries defy memorabilia status by interpretation-such as "Just A Little More Time" being dubbed "parked car music" with the tale she dropped on us before presenting the ditty. Harriet invites the audience to call out words or phrases-"The closer to my demented sensibilities, the better" - then she will create, on the spot, a quite humor­ous sonr with these ideas, complete with rhyme and punch line. And these lyrics interpteled in various stylea are no feeble prose. She could publi1h thi1 1tuff. You ehould have heard what she did with "dildo" openinr night. If you find Harriet intitnidating at fint, juet 110 along with her. She'• on your side­ahe ju.st wants you to have a good time, too. And believe me, •M knows how to have a good time! o Main Street Presents the Real Virginia Woolf f,?' ~o: ~;,~~~~g saga of Hou~ton thea-tre's celebration of the Susan Snuth Black­bum Prize (for women playwnifhts), Mam Street Theatre is presenting Edna o·~~d:~s a~i~g!~~~al" to Ma~ Street's 83184 season, Virginia., a finalist for the 1979 Blackbum Prize, is a dram~tic rend­ering of the life of English novehst/cntic Virginia Woolf (1882-1941!· . . Virginia whose life is still a fascination to many ioday, was a member of the Bloomsbury Group, a collection of artists and intellectuals who left their mark on English culture in the early part of the 20th century. Virginia kept company with the likes of E.M. Forester, Yeats, Shaw, T.S. Eliot and Gertrude Stein (whom she remembers as a 14suave sausage"). Together with her hus­band Leonard, Virginia founded Hogarth Press, remembered for its early support and publication of T.S. Eliot, Sigmund Freud and, of course, Virginia Woolf. The play centers greatly on Virginia, but also contains two other actors (male and female) who partray the "significant others" in her life: her husband Leonard and her "Sapphic friend" Vita Sackville­West. Virginia focuses on the troubled life of a woman who fluctuated between poetic dreaming and her own despairing con­cepts of everyday domestic reality, Virgi­nia experienced the tragedies of many deaths in her family, as well as her rape by a half brother, all while still a very young woman. Speaking while writing her thoughts at her writing table, Virginia talks at length about her mother and her death. While playing madly with a doll in her hands, Virginia relates the seduction by her half brother, a clever and very effective piece of staging. Virginia, a devout feminist, hated male dominance and detested marriage and all it stood for: terribly conventional and 11all that copulation." In spite of her beliefs, she wed Leonard Woolf, a Socialist writer who remained a compassionate devoted husband, especially during her mental breakdown when Virginia was institu­tionalized for several years. After meeting Vita Sackville-West, Vir­ginia toJd Leonard that s he looked li ke "an overripe grape with a moustache," but she couldn't deny her strong attraction for this female creature. Remembering Vita with her raven black hair and her scarlet dress, Virginia reminds hereself to 11prac­tice equanimity." An intimate scene between Virginia and Vita was written and performed in extremely good taste. Leonard approves of his wife's lesbian affair with Vita, hoping that it will bring her happiness. In telling Vita about Virgi­nia's many mood changes, Leonard reveals that at times "she leaves the ground and listens to her voices." Harold, Vita's husband, "hates jealousy like any other disease," and
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