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Montrose Voice, No. 137, June 10, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 137, June 10, 1983 - File 001. 1983-06-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3603/show/3574.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-06-10). Montrose Voice, No. 137, June 10, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3603/show/3574

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 137, June 10, 1983 - File 001, 1983-06-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3603/show/3574.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 137, June 10, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 10, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript AIDS Money Allocated in Health Dept. Budget B7 Holll• Hood Es.leMivelobbyln.-ioo.,...flOCIOrnwl:ited orilh •f71.000allo<a1iooinMqo..Kat117 Whiunin'• dt7 hudn1 fot Aqui....t hnmuneDefk::ioncyS,....t,_clocumen. toilion.•id&e.... ShllloltoftheCitiano fOl' Human Eq,..lit7 P\lblic HealtbA .. u. n-Committeo. Whitmiro'•proPl*dlModct1forlfl83.8.I contoiinodmartJ"""lbo.cb.IMotlhel\indinJ fOl'AIDS-.ciiwHUllK\,H .... _ i9odin•.U.-1p,_,,t*!MIMM"J'.1 :i.=itl~ht v:ilJil rnemorioo.li11n« AIDS_. CHE"• Commiii.o r ... Pl>l>I"= He&llh Aw~--t17cond'"""°"•ma.MiY• maihn.-withrt1urn..ni.to1Mma1!edto thellooolth~tblldieltobt ...i...odtoC-ndlfur•Pl'fOY•lorilhthe AI D8~toitionp!""Clj.ecti n i1 . Thi.o '71.000ioo-,.mllChneededto"""'"'tho dataU..1..iUhelpdeftnetheocopoof. AID8inffoo-.Allcili1e,..<11 Houoton wiU btnefitfl-otn th;....,...;,,..~ "Pt..onally. I think the ci1iuno o1 1l 011otonmuMot117a"'"'1totht.~ n¥iow~toinolll'1!U..ttheproiect .-..;,,.intheblodcot,"htoaid. si.~~~::.l'"'do hu )ua1 be.-un." The mon.,. ...,..Jd IM utd tobiNan epidemiol.,.iotandclerlipl,..po.7furcom· po.torlisnt.ndmiooo!Lan-..........tcom. pl!_a~1'l;;·':w.Slliflott,"thebllldsel oril!IMvotodonthiamanlh.Lel"t koep cuntdin1<>theC:O..ndl'•M:tfo ... 1and­po. Nf ... U...~t1ep:implomenc....,,.<11 tht1>«>1"T•mupedilioul7and<"ffl· cientl7." -n.. .. monotworlc<ll .... 11.Diuitiont wil!btmeoti,,.whennM<ledtoconfer.We ::,O:;~~r...i etrort ..;11 ""7<>ffoimilat T,,.-.papero!MontroH June10.1983 •-··137 PubllahedE...,.fri61y INSIDE THE MONTROSE VOICE Briar Patch Women Win in Softball MONTROSE SPORTS, PAGE 24 Democrats in the Rain NEWS, PAGES Montrose Cloggers in Colorado NEWS, PAGE 5 Vote Saturday­and Vote 'No' COMMENTARY, PAGE 12 Organizations Reactivate Montrose Watch Back to the Movies­For the Summer FILMS, PAGE 20 'Boys in the Band' and 'Men Together' MONTROSE LIVE, PAGE 17 :~:::~~m~soa:mo":" :/!:: ~~~~~15 H- Po1 ... °"Pt-Comm~ni17Strt1. n~mb.rof<arothatwillbepo.lro!Lina-U.. ... Oiv:ieiontoldvolunc.tnl«tht Mont. n«!Jhborhood .. :r:=r~;~n!:~:~::~ n!-b'.:~~~~:.i':!:.;1;b~~ do.Bv.t,)'<Norillbelna~tiontordo7 lnlonn•tionaboonhaaicv:iolationoofthe law,"heoaid. n..r.-ctivalionoftheMon-Wal<'h wu the -ult of incnued .,,.;:,... in the Mooir- .,. AppPOJU""''""'7 60 ~ -~tiDlloi~ditre .. nletY>C: .....,,.."'11>...i.uu..ri:..h...,oe.i.1a Weothei ....... tol~ntowhuom ..... si.m· mono and MR.Clark.alaoofCont,,,un11y ...rr.;.._ had to NY aboutwganU..tion androalef«the,..ishhorhood!""trol. --o..,..,. .. .,f..,.(JChli,,..cnmo.,.....,r P<"Dciloandn~ ... id Johno.niol ~~-~~ "'::nor::."1~r:!!: nwnbenandalortlheof!I--." The Montn- 1V.td> ori!I have,...... M<i<tianltoam~tovolunteer'•.,.,..d..,. ~.-.lheirohift ao lhey_ ... ~il7 "wMnt~ainoitonlhoir~nrin.­wilhooitfearofbeln.- m......i . ....iwi.... oldor~ain..alk clown theotrMt orilhou1f .. rolbein&"robbod." Volant.n in-..i in btaomina: a partoftlwMon.._WalChohoaldcon1ac< thoN-CiYic"--'ationOl'.lohn O.niola1 llberi7Bank 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 10, 1983 ~ l~llill\~ Jl31Uill~l~ii :~ The Club that specializes in Musical Revues PROUDLY PRESENTS Weekly Show Times: Thursday, 8:30pm Fridav, 8:30 and 11:00 pm Saturday, 8:30 and 11:00 pm Sunday, 8:30pm TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR EXCITING AND REFRESHING is what they're being called ... Two sisters, who previously performed solo, have teamed up to bring Houston audiences some unforgettable moments of fine entertainment. Monday thru Wednesday featured performers: Siners, Dancers and Magicians-Free Admission Stephanie Parker & Sister Kashaka performing June 20, 21 and 22 siephallie ~~iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim2•7•0•0•A•l•ba•n•yiiii(n•e•x•t•toiiii0f~f~ic~e~r'•s•C•l•ub•)iiiiiiii~~iiiiiiiiiii~ JUNE 10, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Congress Responds to AIDS With 14 Bills Congrese is finally beginning to respond to the AIDS epidemic, with over 14 bills introduced and moving their way through the legislative process, reports the Gay Rights National Lobby. The AIDS Project, an affiliate of the group, is working intensely to help arrange passage ofresearch funding bills, patient health care benefits bills, and 'GPCelebration '83': A Night with Friends at the Summit Songtress Tina Turner headlines enter· tainment at the annual Gay Political Cau· cus rally, this year scheduled to be in the Summit on June 26, signifying the finale of Houston Gay Pride Week. Also on the bill is new recording star Pamela Stanley with her own style of high-energy dance rock. Invited guests, who will briefly address the expected large crowd, will be Houston City Councilmembers, Comptroller Lance Lalor and Mayor Kathy Whitmire. Also invited are State Rep. Debran Dan burg, Al Edwards and Paul Colbert; State Senators Craig Washington, John Whitmire and Lloyd Doggett; Kathy Webb, national secretary for the National Organization for Women; and special guest Virginia Apuzzo, executive director of the National Gay Task Force. Festivities begin at 7:00 p.m. and tickets are $9.6.5 available at Ticketron, Ticket.­master outlets and Montrose Hair Design. Let us hear from you Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 research expediting bills, they said. The most important and fastest moving bills include: • The Waxman and Cranston Bills, HR- 2713 AND S·l226: Rep. Henry Waxman (D·Calif.) introduced a bill earlier in this session calHng for creation of a $40 million emergency fund to be fused by Health and Human Services agenci~s to combat "pub­lic health emergencies." Sen. Alan Cran­ston (D·Calif.) then introduced a Senate companion bill. Waxman's bill was amended to create a $30 million fund , and then passed his Sub­committee on Health and the Environ­ment with only one negative vote. The fuH Energy and Commerce Committee also passed the Waxman bill on voice vote. I tis expected to come up on the House floor in early June and, with continued lobbying pressure, observers expect it to pass Cranston's bill has had more trouble due to the fiscally conservative Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee. Action on Cranston's bill is expected later in the session, however. • The Boxer Bills, HR·2762 and HR- 2763: Rep. Barbara Boxer (D·Calif.) intro· duced two bills to replace similar AIDS research funding bills written by the late Rep. Phil Burton (D·Calif.), one of the strongest supporters of gay rights and AIDS funding in Congress. HR-2762 calls for $10 million for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) AIDS research in fiscal year 1984. HR-2763callsfor$20millionfor the National lntitutes of Health (NIH) research the same year. Rep. William Natcher (D-Ky.), chair of the House Appropriations Subcommittee, has agreed thatAIDSneedsagreatdealof attention in fiscal year 1984. Key appro­priations staff members predict that the Boxer bills wiJI be adopted in some form by the Appropriations Committee when it writes the Health and Human Services Appropriations Bill sometime in June or July. There are no Senate companion bills at this time, but the existing Senate Health and Human Services appropria­tions bills could be amended to include measures similar to the Boxer bilJs. • The Waxman and Kennedy Amend­ments to HR·2350 and S·773: Rep. Wax-man,~ who has probably done more on AIDS than any other member of Con· gress, wrote an amendment requiring NIH to establish expedited procedures for public heaJth emergency research. It cur­rently takes NIH, the largest medical research organiztion in the world, more than a year to fund and begin research projects, due to its extensive peer review system. Waxman's amendment wasoverwhelm­ingly adopted by his Health / Environment Subcommittee and by the full Energy1Commerce Committee. Wax­man's amendment is part of the full NIH Reauthorization Bill, which is controver­sial because of its fetal research provi­sions and other new requirements. Despite these controversial items, the public health emergency amendment is not expected to meet any opposition, and key staff members are predicitng passage of the full bill before the end of the session. Kennedy's amendment, which is identi­cal to the Waxman version, has also pro­gressed well in the Senate. It easily passed the Labor and Human Resources Commit­tee and is expected to pass on the floor, although the bill of which it is a part is also controversial because of other provi­sions. "Representtive Waxman has created a whole new concept for dealing with public health emergencies like AIDS," said Steve Endean in a prepared press release. He is GRNL's executive director. ''The ability of NIH, CDC, and other federal agencies to respond to epidemics like AIDS is critically important, and Waxman's bills would finally create a mechanism for this to happen quickly and on a major scale." • The Weiss Bill, HR-2880: Rep. Ted Weiss (D-N.Y.) has introduced the first bill which would actually help AIDS victims directly. His bill calls for automatic Medi­caid eligibility for AIDS patients. This would help alleviate the huge medical costs associated with AIDS (more than $60,000 on average per patient). Weiss's bill faces an uphill battle because automatic eligibility has only been authorized for one other disease. His staff remains optimistic, however. Montrose Mouth We're having a sale The Montrose Voice men's softball team is hav­mg a garage sale folks. selling all their old drag and other goodies. this Saturday, 9am to 2pm at 2137 Branard (near Greenbriar) So we'd appreciate it 1f you would drop by and rummage through our rummage. The Gay Hispanic Caucus will have a garage sale to benefit Gay Pride Week also Saturday from 10am-6pm, at 1315 W. Clay_ Invitations for the June 24 dance at Noche y Dia Ballroom will be available_ (The Latin Express is the band for the June 24 8\lent.) -a- Don't forget the KS/AIDS Foundation benefit Tuesday, 10pm at Numbers Lots of "stars • It's guaranteed to embarassChoices. a lesbian group, will have a potluck lunch at 12:30 on June 19 before their meeting at the YWCA, 3615 Willia_ Group members are invited to meet Friday evening, tonight, at 6pm at the Black Eyed Pea on West Gray at Shepherd Following dinner, they will go to the River Oaks Theater for a showing of Lianna and Personal Best Richard Longstaff, owner of the Union Jack on Westheimer. has given gray Levi 501s to the Montrose Band for Gay Pride Week-so they·11 all look nifty He·s given similar red Levi 501s to members of the Oak Lawn Symphonic Band m Dallas. which will be appearing in Houston·s parade -a- The Church of Christian Faith, prev1ousty at 413 Westhe1mer. is moving June 26 to 217 Fair­view_ The pastor iS Rev Jeannie Leggett. The church has been at the Westheimer address for the past four years -a- A special benefit for KS/AIDS research or vic­tim services will feature a stage production of The Boys m the Band on June 10, 11. 17 and 18 at Channiung Hall of ttie First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin. Tickets are $6 each -a- Marion Coleman has squelched the rumor that she is suemg the Montrose Sports Associa­tion. It was said that she was filing because she had become violently ill from a hot dog pur­chased at the game. She was hospitalized for sometime recently, and three different special­ists attributed her illness to the hot dog; how­ever. she said she 1s not filing a suit on MSA because "MSA does a lot to bring the commun­ity together, and women and men together in the community_ I would nBYer do something like that, but my lawyer has advised me to find out the vendor who sold them the hot dogs and posslbty take action against that vendor." SeYeral other persons reportedly became ill after eating the same batch of hot dogs at an MSA softball game, but none as violently as Coteman, whose aliment resulted in pertiniti.s. -a- The Lone Star July 4th Classic is now just three weeks away, with gay softball teams coming from Kansas City, Dallas. New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles-and of course Houston And speaking of sports. we received a phone call from Phil Ragsdale of the Reno NationaJ Gay Rodeo to remmd us that the date of this year's event IS Aug 4 through 7 (not m Sep­tember, as we m1stakenty printed in the 7-0ay Calendar in the baci< of the paper.) -a- Gracielynn Gallery's A Place in the Sun Is now under the Interact Houston umbrella of organi­zatk> ns_ This Tuesday·s presentation will fea­ture Gail Guidry, femm1st musician. The location is 7CM Fairview Admission $1 -a- "Liberty and the Pursuit Of •. • os the theme for the Officer's Club July 4th celebralton on Sun­day, July3from 10pm. until "thedawn'searty light" Taets are $20, a portion of which will go to the KS/AIDS Foundation ffll be dancmg all mght plus comp dnnks until 2am at 2700 Albany 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 10, 1983 Special-Next Week in the Voice The June 17 issue of the MONTROSE VOICE will feature a Gay Pride Week event calendar plus a listing of "every­thing of interest" in entertainment that's happening in the Montrose area for that week-for showing off Houston to visitors. Also coming in the VOICE, an interview with Marion Coleman, a governor's appointee to a commission on women and political activist-and a look at "gay flight." Are gay people leaving Montrose? It's all coming in the Number One Mont­rose Publication-the MONTROSE VOICE. Vegetarians Put Bite on McDonald's A group called "American Vegetarians" has taken on a formidable adversary: Ronald McDonald. The Kansas City Times reports that the groups's coordinator, NeJlie Shriver, says, "Vegetarians want something warm and satisfying to eat. We're demanding that McDonald's sell a non-animal product in all its outlets around the world." Although she's threatening a boycott, don't hold your breath waiting for a Mclentilburger to appear under the golden arches. McDonald's says it's standing by the 10 million burgers it sells everyday. Says public relations man Steve Leroy, "This society has been a society or meat­eaters, potato·eaters and bread--eaters since we've alJ evolved over thousands of years. We're proud to uphold that history." Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contentscopynght•1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm HenryMcClurg pc.ibl1shefed1tor Wilham Marberry bu•,,,.,,•m•n-r1er AcelClark Qflphic• So=,,~~ .. Holhs Hood manag.ngtK11tor Eddie Chavez 1port•ed1tor Jon Cheetwood Joseph Lee contribu11nr1wr11•r• Bob Jones. Mary Cadena. Juhe Hollingsworth. John Cooper. Larry Popham contribulm9pholOf1flPhfHI Lyt Harns ~ert•••flQd•tK/Of M1rk Drago ~ert1Slttfl c1.~~,~==:~ Forestd~i~.~e;'~re Co ~=~':C:!~:' o, .. ,., MorilroM Bu••fMIN Guild. Ga., ::~c:•rvic.., 1n1..,na11ona1 Gay NPw• Agency. Pacific N .. w, Au•lmBvr•au C•p•tOIN-•Serv1ce ~~;:~:;:;.:,:1::.·u~~~~::,~,.~;~:~1~~;11:':;~;:!' R•nd)' Allred. S1onewan Fealures S)'nd•c•t•. Bri•n McNaught.J098aker POSTMASTER Send addreucorrecllonalo 3317 Montro•e 11J01S Hou11on. TX77ooe !~~~~'.~,;~~':i:~~,~~ ~:'.::=-~~~ ::::~:::~!! lhan281uu••) Ne1iona1ac1,.,1,.1n11,.prH•nt•twe Jo.D1Sabato. R1venoeu Maril.ellf'lg,6666thAvenue N•w'fork10011.f212)242-6863 Adv.,r1•inr1deMJ1me Tuelday.530pm,!or.,1uer&lhMCIFrt­dayeven1ng z:1e~,:=~.,:. ~=J ~=~~~~~~ae=u~'"':i: Sut·Aw1Nbeettect1veJuly1, 1183 ~:;:·:;::r1,!4:~::,.voR'Zlh':::';9·~~ V0t«l°'lo•t1)'decept1 .... actv.r11S1ng Business Guild Meets By Lacy Cale The Greater Montrose Business Guild met at Liberty Bank Tuesday, June 7, to dis­cuss a map to be passed out during Gay Pride Week and hear committee reports. The group, whose goal it is to become an actively involved chamber of commerce unit for the Montrose area, plans to print a map of the Montrose wHh all guild member's businesses listed on it foi the convenience of visit.ore during Gay Pride Week. Some 10,000 maps are scheduled to be passed out. Warren Duncanson told the group that Sarah Craig, an official of the national guild organization, wi11 visit in the fall to address the group. Decals and plaques designating mem· bership were passed out. June 15 is the cut-off date for member­ship to be included on the map as a Busi· ness Guild member. Guild president William Marberry encourages all businessmen of the area to participate in this organization as a means for communication among neigh· l-orhood merchants and as a promotion unit for the Montrose area. Senate OKs Withholding Wages for Child Support HJRl by Rep. Rene Oliveira, D­Brownsville, will remove the 107·year·old constitutional prohibition against gar· nishment of wages for chiJd support pay­ments, if passed by the voters in November, according to a recent Houston Chronicle a rticle. Only Texas and North Carolina do not allow the garnishment of wages for court ordered child support payments. The mea · sure has passed both Texas Senate a nd House. The bill would allow no more than one third of a person's salary be withheld for child support when the paying parent was overdue by two weeks or more. JUNE 10, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Cloggers in Colorado By Phil Naab The Montrose Country Cloggers were among the Texans who went to Colorado last weekend to take part in the First Colo­rado Regional Gay Rodeo. The event, sponsored by the Colorado Gay Rodeo Association and supported by the Denver Tavern Guild, attracted 35con­testants a nd about 1000 participants in an assortment of country.western events throughout the weekend. I MN~~ 1\\EY COOl.l> 5lUl1i ~ ~ "° 1\\EY ~m> 10- 1 LET 'iOJ AA\JE 1'W"- M ~ M GOtT1' ~~ 1\\E U~I:., GI~- · ) Several thousand do1lars were raised for gay charities, primarily health organiza­tions. Gary Bandy of Houston was chosen Grand Marshall of the Colorado event in competition which evaluated horseman· ship, west.em appearance, personality and fund-raising. On the fund-raising part, Bandy and his group had raised $6100 for the Montrose Clinic. 6 MONTROSE VOICE/ JUNE 10, 1983 Save the Frogs We may worry about the whales, but Euro­peans are into saving frogs, reports the Christian Science Monitor Every 1ummer the frogs and toads of Europe trek from their winter habitats to their 1pringtime breeding grounds. But many of them don't make it. The migra­tion often involves crossing busy high­way1, and cars and trucks have done in up to half the grass frogs and 80 percent of common toads in the past. But now, volunteers from all over the continent tum out in annual "toad patrols," and Holland even had a "toad­saving day of action" last year. The toads are often caught in plastic buckets to be carried to safety, but the technology is getting more sophisticated, thanks to a yearly "toad-crossing" sympo­aium on the latest developments. The most advanced method is so far UBed in Switzerland and West Germany­specially built "toad tunnels" under roads and highway&. Is all this doing any good? Observers say the toad casualty rate has been greatly reduced National Gay Archives Seeks Funds The National Gay Archives, also known aa the Barney !Carpenter Library, hou.Aes the world' a largest and best public access collection of gay and lesbian history. It includes religious concerns, psychological theorie1, legal aspects, literature and the flowering of gay culture. The collection concerns itself also with materia1a on other minority perspectives: ethnic, religious, political, radical and reform groupe, social change movements of all aorta. There are materials on the family and gender roles, S&M, transvest­iam and tranaexuality, the women 'a mov~ ment and women's history. But there's no card catalog. Why? No public funds. A fund drive with the initial goal of $9000 has been started by the NGA Board of Directors to coincide with Gay Pride Month, in order to begin the work of mak­ing this collection more accessable to scho­lars and interested persons. The library committee has completed preliminary work and now needs working space, supp­lies, staff, and storage areas and equip­ment to begin this task, they said. Tax deductable contributions can be send to 1654 N. Hudson Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90028, they said. Bad Writing Inspires Thousands Pacific Newa Service Backers of a contest to find an opening line to "The Worst of All Possible Novels" say they've received thousands of entries from all over the world. The "Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest"­named after the Victorian writer who once began a novel with, "It was a dark and stormy night," was launched in jest by the English Department at San Jose State Univeraity, California. But, says Profes· aor Scott Rice, uwe have entries from every state and about 35 foreign coun­tries.'" Here's a sample from Pennsylvania: "As she fell face down into the black muck of the mud-wrestling pit, her sweaty, 300- pound opponent muttering soft curses in Latin on top of her, Sister Marie thought. 'There ia no c!oubt about it. The Pope baa betrayed me!- ~ A private way of life. Cond111111,,111"lJ .-, ..... ""THE ULTHIATE BAAED POTATO '13 !621-8350 FOR THE TOTAL MAN LOOK YOUR BEST, FEEL YOUR BEST. At Continental Hair & Body Works, we do more than just hair. TANNING. We tan you with our UVA Euro­pean tanning bed in total privacy. MUSCLE TONING. We build and tone your muscles by Electro Muscular Stimulation. We call it the lazy man's way to a beautiful body. Plus we have THE BODY WRAP-for imme­diate loss of inches (as seen on the Phil Donahue Show). HEAD, HAND AND FEET EXPERTISE. We relax and regenerate you with reflexology: the art of stim­ulating the nerve endings to increase proper blood flow and oxgenation of the cells. HAIR And of course, your hair. Designed to fit your lifestyle by Teri, our certified MARKHAM professional. (MARKHAM PRODUCTS available.) At CONTINENTAL HAIR & BODY WORKS looking and feeling your best is made easy. Continental Hair and BOdY Works VISA and MasterCard accepted. Gift certificates available. NOTTINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER 14441 Memorial Drive• suite 10 • Houston, TX 77079 (713) 496-2943 Tue-Sat., Call for appt. JUNE 10, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 4th Anniversary of the RAID ON MARY'S Thursday, June 16, 7pm sharp ARRESTING BEGINS AT 7PM SHARP BENEFITTING HOUSTON GAY PRIDE WEEK. PLEASE BRING A FRIEND TO BAIL YOU OUT OF JAIL! RSVP Regrets Only (713) 222-3131 Love & Kisses from the girl's at Mary's: Fanny, Cass, Lief Ann, Edith Andy, Rhonda & Darlene Tuesday & Wednesday Movies, June 14 & 15 Keystone Hotel, starring the Keystone Cops Girls in Chains, starring Arlene Judge & Roger Clark Criminals at Large, starring Laurel & Hardy Three Cheers for the G iris, with Busby Burkeley Dancers Everyday Special-1/2 Price Drinks to all arriving at Mary's on a Motorcycle! ~~l,Jlllr.~~ PARKING IN SIDE LOT SPM-8AM Vvt:EKDAYS, ALL DAY Vvt:EKENDS (TOW AWAY ZONE OTHER TIMES) HOME OF HOUSTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB & TEXAS RIDERS AFTER-HOURS NIGHTLY 1022 Vvt:STHEIMER 528-8851 MUSIC BY LARRY FOUGHT Larry Fought-DJ Ev91y Weekend Mary's reminds you to attend the big KS/ AIDS benefit "Stars" at Numbers, Tuesday, June 14, 10pm 8 MoNTROSE VOICE I JUNE 10, 1983 Politics and Rain-They Mix Deepite the rain, a Democratic fund­raisina went on Jut weekend at Bavarian Garderui, attended by membera of the Gay Political Caucua and Houston Mayor Kathy Whitmire, Gov. Mark White and Attorney General Jim Mattox. (All photoe byBobJonee.) Gou. Marl< White Try Our New MEXICAN MENU Carne Gulsada Plate Pollo Gulsada Plate Beef Taco Plate Fajlta Plate with free Coke-$3.95 LUNCH SPECIAL OF THE WEEK 3 Beef or Chicken Enchiladas plate topped with melted cheese-$2.99 All plates Include rice, beans and salad. Gyro Gyros Sandwich Shop 1536 Westhelmer 528-4655 Famous hamburgers, sh1st>-kabob, tacos. gyros • Open 11am-1pm daily (till midnite Fri. & Sat.) Mayor Kathy Whitmire ~@IJ'iTil® lf«Mll'iTilll'iTil~@® Ulhllf'@M@lfil @Ml1' !f«Mll'iTilll'i1il~@® GARAGE SALE Montrose Voice softball team This Saturday, June 11 Tomorrow! (or Today! if you're a late reader) (or Yesterday! if you're real late) 9am-2pm 2137 Branard (near Greenbriar) 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 10, 1983 Letters Blackmail Charged in Bond Election From Peter Elloway In their TV ad the pro-METRO rail bond folks say we will wait much longer for good bu• oervice if the bond election fails. The METRO consultants, downtown bankers, and hangers-on a"re now using blackmail to keep their gravy train on track. In 1978 we voted for MTA to have good crosstown routes and 900 buses on the road by 1983. We have less than 500 now, though MTA could buy 2000 buses tomor­row with its cash on hand in the bank. Busway1 coot only 5'!1> of heavy rail as the Katy and Gulf Freeway projects prove. Transit problems may be solved quickly and tu-free by deregulating public tran­sit, allowing hee competition, and charg­ing tolla to private vanpool and mini-bus user1 of buawaya. Non-users would pay nothing, unlike the MT A sales tu. Remember Memorial Service From Jerry Nicholson, ccrchairperson, National Day of Remembrance Seven yeaers ago, the Houston gay com­munity oboerved the first National Day of Remembrance. a memorial service to reflect upon the lives of untold thousands of lesbians and gay males who died at the hands of tyranny in Nazi Germany. This year, the National Day of Remem­brance, in conjunction with Gay Pride Week, will continue to memorialize our brothero and oistera who suffered and died under Hitler11 rule as we remember the livea of many other lesbians and gay males who have gone before us down through the centuries. There will also be a special remembrance of those in our com­munity who have lost their lives to the dreaded AIDS dioease in more recent times. However, the overall tone of this year's National Day of Remembrance will be one of celebration. A program of past, present and future will be preoented outlining the struggles and the achievements of gay males and lesbians down through history. The event will be a candlelightserviceand will feature special music by the Montrose Singers. On behalfof c<>ehair Tim Curtis and the entire Houston Homophile Interfaith Alliance, we would like to extend an invi­tation to everyone in the community to join us at this year's National Day of Remembrance to be held at MCCR, 1919 Decatur on Thursday, June 23 at 7:30 p.m. Members of various Montrose area churches and religious organizations have come together to produce this year's service-truly an expression of our unity through diversity Security will be provided for this event by Constable Rankin's office. Counseling Center Ready to help on AIDS From Kenneth E. Vance, Administrative Director, Montroae Counseling Center During the past months, the Montrose Counseling Center has had an increase in the number of phone calls about AIDS and related problems. The staff therapists have aleo shared information that our clients are expressing more concern over the health issues that affect their lifes­tyles. In our staff meeting on May 23, the staff unanimously moved to support the var­iou• efforts in the community dealing with AIDS and the complicated problems of this public health issue. We are making ounelvee readily available to deal with theee at whatever teveJ we can. The board and staff of the Montrooe Counseling Center accepts the challenge of this problem and will take appropriate steps to approach it in a positive manner. Currently, the center provides space to an AIDS support group; but to further meet the needs, therapists are available to see AIDS patients, significant others and other concerned persons. On May 27, nine staff members volun­teered as committee chairs or members to work with the Kaposi's Sarcoma/ AIDS Foundation community volunteer groups. As a part of the proce88 of developing a more comprehensive approach, the staff h&B committeed themselves to receh1e ongoing in-service training in order to be better informed and up to date on current health issues. Pleaoe contact the Counseling Center if you need any additional aBBistance or information. View on Public Health Service Statement From Peter Black The sentiment expressed by Dr. Edward Brandis, a top official with the Public Health Service, that AIDS only affects • homosexuals is like a Nazi official saying that concentration camps only affected Jews, or like a Three Mile Island official saying that everything was under control. National Group Protests Press Reports on AIDS 'Household Contacts' From National Gay Task Force Recent reports appearing in USA Today, the New York Time1, and eloewhere, have suggested that AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) is transmi88able through "routine close contact" with an individual suffering from the disorder. Examination of the source article and edi­torial in The Journal of the American Medical Asaociation shows these press accounts to be misleading and inaccurate. In the words of Dr. Paul Paroski, pediatn­cian, president of the National Gay Health Education Foundation, and fac­tulty member at the University of Medi­cine and Dentistry of New Jersey: "Critical analysis of the article in ques­tion shows that it presents no conclusive evidence to support the allegation that AIDS or an AIDS-like syndrome is trans­missable merely through household con­tact between parent and child." The article describes eight cases in New Jersey of infants or children who are afflicted with immune system maladies that might be AIDS. Each child lived in a household where one or both parents was from Haiti, the Dominican Republic, or was an IV drug user, and were therefore thought to be at increased risk for AIDS The article suggests the possibility that the children may have contracted AIDS or an AIDS-like illneSB through household contact with their parent(s). The article also readily acknowledges that other explanations might account for their illnesses. · Indeed. it is po88ible that these children were suffering from a congenital, as opposed to acquired, immune deficiency. It is also possible that AIDS or an AIDS. like illness was transmitted intra utero or during the birth of the child. And, finally, it must be kept in mind that the study was based on incomplete oboervation of the houoeholds concerned, and wao conducted without benefit of scientific controls. Additional and otill unknown factors may have been responsi­ble for or have contributed to the immune deficiencies oboerved in theee children. Tommy's Barber Shop 2154 Portsmouth (Greenbriar Shopping Center) 528-8216 FREE HAIRCUTS Help kick-off Houston Gay Pride Week '83 and support our community. TUESDAY, JUNE 14th 5:30 P.M. $3.00 COVER AT DOOR (All proceeds donated to Houston Gay Pride Week) FREE CARNATION to the 1st 300 customers LIVE ENTERTAINMENT Mark Hall, Master of Ceremonies 5 30-7:30 Lyra 7 30-8:00 John Day & Company 8 00-8 30 Montrose Cloggers 8 30-9 00 Montrose Singers 900-10 00 Susan Christian 1000-11 30 Female Impersonators Jessica Renee, Brucella DeVall Marilyn-Mark Hall. Vanessa-Vicki Eddie & The Exstreams 11:30-2:00 live D.J Music ($.25 donated per drink to Houston Gay Pride Week '83) sP.r:ts - 5245 Buffalo Speedway (713) 665-9756 JUNE 10, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 GROOVIN'* CRUISIN'* BOOZIN' 2923 Main St. 522-0000 OPEN AT NOON SUNDAY FOR EYE-OPENERS (50¢ WELL AND BEER) AND PICK-UP VOLLEYBALL ON THE PATIO BOOZE AND/OR BEER BUST SAT. AND SUN., 3-9PM TUES. AND THURS., BEER BUST 9PM-2AM, WITH TERRY G's ALIVE AND HOT MUSIC WED. BARECHEST NIGHT, WITH HAPPY HOUR PRICES HAPPY HOUR 4-?PM MON.-FRI., SHOT SPECIALS ALL THE TIME, AND CHECK OUT OUR NEW CRUISE DECK! YEA! 12 MONTROSE VOICE/ JUNE 10, 1983 To Train or Not to Train? By Hollie Hood This Saturday, one of the most extensively researched and hotly debated i.ssues in Houston's history will be decided at the ballot box: a urban train system for Hout-1- ton. The Metropolitan Transit Authority. created in the late 70s by voters. was the mechanism deemed most likely to succeed in implementing the 1978 Regional Mobil­ity Plan. The MTA board consi.sted of seven members with an elected 28-membera Citi zen ·a Advisory Board to furnish citizen input and a technical advisory group to monitor Jong range planning The goal oftheauthority,armed with its on~ent sales tax revenue, wa.s ·•to make public tram1it a convenient and attractive alternative to the private auto," according to the Regional plan The plan included: immediate improv­ment to the bus system; neighborhood feeder services and other special transit programs, use of private enterprise when possible. crOBStown travel, improvements to relieve traffic congestion at bottlenecks and a modem transitway suitable for adaptation to automated guideway/raiJ to serve the growing regional transit demand. In another page in the multi-page docu­ment. it notes "as demand warrants." Whether demand warrants in 1983 is one aspect the critics question regarding the rail . MTA oays that the rail will not decrease highway traffic-then why is it being built? Just to a.11Sure that Houston gets its fair share oHederal money? Just to make sure that the soft office market of major developers downtown buildings is alieviated by shipping bunches of people into downtown? Or has the rail taken on a life of its own already, and serves only to serve itself and the people supported by MTA for its development? MT A boasts that the referendum funds will enable it to build four new mainte­nance facilities. However the cost of these centen was in the budget long ago, and they were supposed to be under construc­tion by now-not waiting carrothke at the end of stick called heavy rail for the voters to authorize. The same is true for ezpanded bus ser­vice. The 1978 plan called for 909 buses on the street by 1983 and crosstown service. Today MTA has only 470 buses at peak hour and true crosBtown service is a dream Alao monies were allocated in planning for buswaysin 1978down the North, Katy, La Porte, Southwest, Northwest, Gulf, West Loop, Eastex, East and South Free­ways. Only one is in use-the contraflow lane on the North Freeway. A couple of the others have been begun-the rest, we may never know. No original promised grade separations have been built. One has, but only because it is necessary to feed the rail and it was reportedly not in the original plan. Metro has not dealt with solving the transit problems to it.a full capacity with available funds for much of the expansion now lumped int.o the referendum. Yet it is leaping years ahead of schedule into a rail project. Leaping against the advice of its own efficiency experta per the McKin~ey report. A compilation which was neces· 8ary because MTA's performance data was so bad it had just stopped, prior to 1978, sending in an figures to the UMPTA data gathering branch. McKinsey fore· cast planning for the rail to begin in late 19R3, provided all other conditions of effi· ciE-ncy had been met. This has not hap~ pen ed. In 197H the budget for all this conKtruc­bon was $1.2 billion and the added rail conversion on existing guideway (which "" stated has not yet heed built or its capacity in bus transport tested) was to cost only $251 million. It ia naive to think that prices have not gone up, but in four years the tag has risen from $251 milJion fora conversion to $2.1 billion for a blast ahead system. The part of the bond referendum that deals with buses is a miniscule $530 million by com­parison. Improvement.a to the bus system are eligible for matching grants, and the system has always utilized a 80/20 split for operation. MTA hBB the money to bring the bus system up, and until it does, it cannot jus· tify the rail unle88 it inflates the ridership projects, manipulates demongraphic information and hit.a the taxpayers for a debt of $1000 per person in the entire ser­vice area. Louie Welch, prominent businessman, is quoted u aaying that if we don't built a rail our children will rise up and curse us. My child, being the fiscal conservative 11- year-old that she is, would curse me for incurring a $1000 or more are time goes on debt without her consent that she won't have paid off until she's in her 20s. Area engineers agree, all except MT A's and the ones who will get rich helping build the rail, that the rail is what the referendum is au about. Now, the rail, if approved will come through Montrose. I've heard rumors that it will run down the middle of Southwest Freeway, however, I find this hard to believe. If there isn't room for a dedicated bus lane on the freeway, where are we going to put a two track train? With the stations only two miles apart, it would no more than get to the middle of the freeway than it would have to jump off again. Currently there is a debate raging between two civic clubs in the area about which side of the freeway it should go on. Neither club wants it near their residents because of the noise. MTA's own environ· mental report stated that noise caused by the train will exceed maximum standards in aeveral placee in Montrose. A little known fact is how much the Japanese rail system had to spend on soundproofing homes along its line in Japan because of citizen complaints. Such trifles are not included in MTA'1 expenses needless to say. One man I talked to said he is "going to get rich" selling his property near the rail because it will become so valuable. How· ever he doesn't want to live near it himself bec..:use he thinks the noise would be both· ersome. If it would bother him, why wouldn't it bother whoever moved in? MTA's figures for operatrng expense for the ''improved system" grows from $105 million in 1983 to $255 million by 1990. However, the estimated increase in electri­cal use (I'm told the train will be electric) hovers between 8.2 in 1984 to 7.6 in 1990. How can a thing that is not on line in 198_4 u8e more electricity than it wilJ use when 1t is on hnein 1990?Therejustseemstobea Commentary disparity there somewhere. This is typical of the type of figures MTA throws around. They have trouble reconciling their annual report figures with the year before, end all that was was a mattering of coping numbers. Their accounting firm that did initial projec· lions for the rail printing a disclaimer on every page of the documentation stating that the figures should not be used for issu· a nee of securities. Aren't bonds securities? But then how secure is the whole sys tern? Historically systems run over budget and over time estimates. There is not rea· son to believe that engineers that would went to freeze Buffalo Bayou so they could build a tunnel through it would have their act together enough to make accurate pre­dictions, or be able to handletheaffectof a subway on the subsidence of downtown. If they don't maintain the hydrostatic pres­sure on both sides of the subway, it could cause massive cracking of the soil down­town where the streets would actually pull away from their buildings. As early as 1926 engineers told aspirants they couldn't build a subway in downtown Houston. If they do it it will be a first, the first time anybody built a subway in a swamp. Houston will mildew before it drys up But, back to Montrose. ThefaceofMont­rose will change. It will not be the quasi­residential place it is. With the lifting of the sewer moritorium in a couple or three years as projected there will be nothing to keep the area from becoming even more densely populated than it is now and full of highrise condos and office buildings. We will have the same problem the folks in River Oaks do now with people looking down from their condo directly above into your backyard. So much for the sanctity of American private life. A local banker's dream of a safe neigh­borhood will go up in smoke. The rail his torically causes a flurry of commericial activity around stations. The main station will be near Main and Elgin. So much for the propost>d regulation of sexually oriented businesses on Westheimer. If the area adjacent goes commerical, what will keep the ordinance from being disallowed, and Avondale and Colony-we're right back where we started. Amazingly enough, monorail doesn't have slot of the problems that rail does But MTA said monorail wasn't fast enough, but then they say the heavy rail wiH average only 18 miles per hour. They say it isn't safe enough, butthereisn'tany way to get out of an elevated train. They say it doesn't carry enough passengers, but no transit system on line today in the U.S. carrys what it was projected to carry. And .al.I of them operate only with massive subs1d1es. Subsidies: another way of say­ing you and I pick up the tab when the rail gets in trouble. Monorail ran be built faster, increased bus routes can be added faster than the rail can be built. If they are looking for immediate solutions··Why look to some­thing years down the road. The traffic didn't just start yesterday, There have been traffic jams in Houston for years. Why haven't they done anything about expanding St'rvice. Pr~haps because they had to spend S:l m1llion plus dollars reeearching how to built a train. The rail wilJ not provide more jobs of a permanent nature after construction than an increased bus system. That's one rea­son the feds don't look fondly to funding it. Buses rreatt• jobY··rail cars eliminate approximatel.y 10 bus ~rivers. All. this hype about 1m.•_reascd Jo~a i~ pahtic';ll promises in wh1.ch the mmonty vote 1s going to ht• mampulat('(f again, just as it has been before. Well, for thoHe w?o believe no explana· tion ie necessary. For thoRe who don't. no explanatio!1 is satisfactory. So, go vute your conscience on Saturday, but do vote It's one of the few controls we have over our lives anymore. JUNE 10, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 r~ John Day and Company Sunday, June 12 RENEGADES 1213 Richmond/527-9071 Hi! Neighbor Party Sunday, June 12 Coming Soon to 1318 Westheimer FREE FOOD BEER ENTERTAINMENT ~'~ JOCK STRAP CONTEST TUESDAY NITES, 10PM DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIAL Beef or Chicken Kabob. $3 95 (fries included) 112 pound burger $2.95 (fries included) Served l1am-2pm Visit our new Sweet Shop 8 .'J;ur.ml j,,,,~. lu~ _ _ fr.IT~'· 'r .;.f,1,,_ - - - ~ ~~'~i~~c:s~;t~:;s 2047 Marshall across from Alabama Theater '- - - _ _:2~9~~ - - - _J ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-, Stanford Square TOWNHOMES nw twenty-fou1 townhomes at Stanford Squan.· afford the comenit'IK<' of a near 1own location coupled with the serenity of a cardulh-planned. senire C'nvironm<'nL These one and two-bedroom traditional brick studio homes are within minute> of the downtown business and cultural district, Greenway Plaza, the medical center and the >peciality shops, g-.i lleries and fine restaurants of the Montrose, museum and River Oaks areas. C..a reful attent ion has been given to security requirments. .'\n a utomatic entr) g-..ite permit> controlled access to the townhome community, while automatic g-.ir..ige door> and \\tll-lighted pa1king areas extend sc•cu1ity within the perimeter of 1ht· JHOJX"ll) . As an add i1i onal fcalll re, eac h home has beC"n pn·-wired fOJ Its own sennity systt·m. Stanford Squan• Townhomes offt·1 a \<lficty of amenities. includmg • \\"oodbrnning fiieplaces • P1ivate patio., • Kitch('n appliances (n·frignato1 & m1nowan·m·en) • \\ashel'> & d1n·rs • Smoke det<'nors • Prt' wiring for cable T\' (.llll("dral ceilings, sblighh, attics. studies, porches and halrnnit·s also are mduckd m man) of ill(" floor plans. A sw11mning pcx>l and sun d('ck a1e lcxatecl in the center of the courtyard OFFERFD EXCLl'Sl\'ELY BY Kl'ITRFLL RU.LIT 5~-5981 On the Job Gay People at Work: Follow Up By Arthur S. Lazere, C.P.A. The first of thie column'• continuing ser­ies of profiles ofleaders from the gay buai· nees and profeuional community appeared in October, 1981. The ouject was Herb Donaldson, an attorney, a successful entrepreneur in the coffee roasting busi­ne88, and an acthist fighting for gay right.I from way back in the mid-1960s. One of Jerry Brown's last act& u gover· nor of California wao to appoint Herb to the municipal bench in San Franciaco. Donaldaon became the fifth openly gay male or leabian person serving on the bench in California (all appointed by Brown and the only upfront judges we know of anywhere). Donaldaon'a awearina-in ceremonies were held in the imposing meeting room of the San Franciaco Board of Supervison before a capacity crowd of community leaders and well wishers of all sexual per- 1uaaion1. In hi1 remarks, Donaldson made clear his continuing awareneu of the oppression of gay people, including 1tories of his own experiences of harass­ment and discrimination. LA TE JN 1981 I wrote about the begin­nings of the National Asaociation ofBusi­neea Councils, an umbrella organization of local gay business and professional groupa. NABC has continued to build its network throughout the United States. The neweet addition• to the rank.a of NABC members are Rochester Area Pro­fessional• (Rochester. N.Y.) and the Greater Montroae Busin.,.. Guild (Hous­ton). The Bwiinesa and Professional Asso­ciation of Loo Angeles will hoot this year'• NABC convention in November. NABC can be contacted at Box 15145, San Fran· ciaco, CA 94115. THE FIRST OF A a continuing serieo of columns on the policies of major American corporations and the experience of gay employees at thoee companies appeared about a year aao. The aubject was BankA­merica Corp<.1ration. based in San Fran­ciaco, the largest bank in the world. Among other facts eotabliahed at that time was that the BankAmerica Founda· tion had nrver made granta to any gay charitable organizations. Further. the bank waB obeerved t.o have only very rarely advertised in the gay press. I spoke recently with Ms. Katherin Arnerich. a program officer at the founda­tion. She confirmed that the foundation hao granted $25.000 to the Pride Center in San FranciACO. Ma. Arnerich indicted that the foundation saw the Pride Center aa "a community effort spearheaded by the gay community for both the gay community and the broader community in which the center ia locat.ed." THE SECOND of the corporate stories I wrote wao about Miller Brewing Com­pany. Miller is headquartered. in Milwau­kee. Wisconsin, the tint Btate in the union to pass a i•Y ri1ht.1 law. The law wao paoaed early in 1982. As of September. 1982. according to a company apokesperaon at the time, the corpora­tion '1 attorneys believed that no change in corporate policy was necesaary to be in compliance v.ith the new law. Millen' poli­ciea indicate that the company does not diecriminate on the baais of race, religion, • etc. Sexual orientation still ia not on the liaL Sometimes organization• which are closer to the marketplace have a stronger understanding olthe needo and interest of those who are out there buying a com· pany'a products. In San Franciaco the independent dis­tributor for Millen ia a company called Golden Branda. Golden Branda' public relation• pel"90n, Meredith Moore, i1 well aware of the importance of gay dollars to Millers oaleo. Golden Brands donated $1000 to the San Francisco Pool Asaocia­tion, a gay group. to sponsor a pool tourna­ment which was called the SFPAIMiller Lite. Now, the second annual tournament has received $2000 for 1983, according to Ms. Moore. She also told me that a request had gone to the Millers company itself for a dona­tion on the order of "several thousand dol­lars" to the 1983 Lesbian/ Gay Freedom Day Parade in San Francisco. Millers has reportedly been a co-1ponsor of a natinal gay bowling tournament held in Milwau· kee. The beer industry has traditionally had an interest in sporting events. It is nice to know that gay organizations are recehdg benefits of such largeaae. But 10 long as a company like Millers refuses to include ee:r.ual orientation in ita nondiscrimina­tion policies, we must remain skeptical At my requeat, Ralph Navarro, preai­dent of the Cream City Busineoa Asaocia­tion, Milwaukee'• gay business and professional organization, has called Millers once aaain on the subject of their nondiecrimination policies. Finally, a wil­lingnesa to discuss the matter has been indicated. Navarro, along with several colleagues (an attorney, a psychiatrist) will be meeting with Miller•' personnel people in the near future. Stay turned for further developments. Lazere ~ on IM board of IM San Fran~ ciaco Induatrial Det1elopment Authority. HU column onginates at the "Bay Area Reporter,•• a San Francisco gay news· pa~r. Let us hear from you Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX n006 14 MONTROSE VOICE / JUNE 10, 1983 AFTER-HOURS SATURDAY No Door Charge at Officer's Club Overlooking the Officer's Club Pool and Patio SATURDAY SUNDAY Dancing 11pm-4am T-Dance DJ Larry Fought &pm-midnight NO DOOR CHARGE ···································""·························································································································~· "A HIGH-SPIRITED LARK OF A MOVIE ••• moving as well as funny. The result is another perceptive, unexpectedly confident work by Mr. Duvall." -Vincent Canby, New York Times ''Simmers and pulsates with sheerly human energy ... scruffy, funny, l~ ~:;;~~~~~-.. I &.~:~~~~~~::,,,,N,~~"' th ai in la JUNE 10, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Commentary Sick in the Head For a Real Good Time, Call This Number Moat doctors agree that stress can make you sick. But studies by both private and public institutions show stressful events aren't what cauae illness-it's how people react to them. By Joe Baker '.'Call this number," . my friend , Bill, instructed me. "Who's is it?" I questioned. "It's long-distance. What am I getting myeelfinto?" j<Never mind," Bill retorted. "Just call the number and listen." Being the obedient guy I am, I dialed it. Three rings later, a husky male voice answered the phone. "Hi," he said. "I'm glad you called. My name is Chad and I'm sitting here in my aweaty jock thinking about you. I've got a real hot body and I'd love to show it off to you. ''There'• also a lot of things I'd love to do with you. What do you enjoy? I've aot a nice .. I'm getting hotju1tthinlcing about you "Boy, Ahh. Ohh. Boy, wow. Ahh. Oh, that feela so good!" The voice was a recording. I had dialed one of a growing list of New York tele­phone numbers that are serving up sexu­ally explicit recorded messagee. The number I called belongo to a national gay men's magazine that also runs an escort service and a phone­fantasy service. After I listened to my man-or rather, make that my "voice"­he told me I could call another number and talk to him "live." He said to make sure I had my major credit card number ready, as there would be a $35 fee. And, of course, I would pay for the long-distance call. I suppoHe ifl had gone ahead and caned him, I would have been "invited" to get together with him in person. Escort services have been around for a long time. Phone-fantasy services, how­ever, have just become realiy popular in the last year or two. Now we have a new dimension being added to phone-fantasy services-the sex­ually explicit recorded message. I happened to call a message aimed at gay men, but there is another New York telephone number that is attracting more than 500,000 heterosexual caBera a day from all arross the nation. As you can txped, the number and oth· era Jike it are creating a small furor in W~ahington . They also are providing snickers and howls. Snickers from people who call and hear the explicit me88agea and howls from those who discover the numbers showing up on their residential and busineffs phone bills A mother in an eastern state reportedly noticed 39 caJls to an unfamiliar long. distance number on her phone bilJ. She dialed the number, was startled to hear a sexually suggestive message, and then was chagrined to find that her child had made the calls. Similarly, the state of Virginia recently reviewed it.a phone bill-and discovered 2500 ca11s to the number in one month. Apparently, office worker1 across the country are having a great time at work. This particular number which has been receiving the 500,000 callers a day belongs to a alraight skin magazine called "High Societ " The magazine's 57-second tapes, featur· ing voires of centerfold models, run 24 hours a day and are changed three times daily. The 'llagazine nets about $10,000 a day from tue calls, while the New York Tele phone Co. receives about $25,000. I imagine that the gay men'11 magazine, which opt>rates the recorded meB88ge ser­vice I called, got the idea from "High Society." My "voice" also said he was a centerfold model and I could check him out in the magazine's latest issue. Great way to publicize the publication, I guess. The furor going on in Washington is that nobody seems to know what to do about the sexy messages. The Federal Communications Commia· 1ion, peppered with complaints from indignant citizen&, insists that under the law it can take no action and instead ha1 referred the matter to the Department of Justice. At least one congressman, saying his constituents are outraged, is preparing a bill to outlaw such uses of the telephone. There are serious questions, however, about what consitutes legitimate First Amendment protections for use of the tele­phone. Last February, for example, attorneys in Suffolk County, N.Y., sought a perlimi· nary injunction in the state Supreme Court following complainto by parento and educatora when "High Society's" numbers went into service. After the jud11e dillllli88ed the complaint on the question of jurisdiction, the county appealed to the FCC, whose rules prohibit a variety of abusive or obaoene calls. The FCC lo date has taken no action, only saying that the issue raises many legal questions. Yup, this sure looks like this is going to be the issue of the 1980s. Police, politi· cians, attorneys and judges sure are going to have a good time calling all those numbers v.-ith recorded meuages trying to determine if they a.re obscene. And the people who operate them sure are going to make a lot of money. Excuse me, now. I've got to go and make a phone can. The rates are lower after 11 p.m., you know, and I've got a real hot recorded message waiting just for me. Boy, this is a lot more fun than calling dial-a-prayer or weather recordings! And someday, experts claim, the brain may be trained to cure or prevent any disease-even cancer. AA reported in the New York Times, a five-year study of heavy smoken at a Veter~na Administration hospital in Miarm, for example, found Jung cancer patients had experienced the same number of emotional "life eventa"-such as maniage, divorce and job loss-aa 1moken: who were free of cancer. But the cancer victim.a perceived the event. to be more streuful and felt responsible for them. Appearing this Friday & Saturday and June 14-18 LOU ANN MILES cc AESTAUAANT & CABARET Dinner ~ThlA'Sdoy 6:@11:00, Fndov & Saturday 6:@ 12:00. Reservations Requested. Shows at 9:30, 11 :00 & 12:30 Coming June 21 SAMANTHA SAMUELS 16 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 10. 1983 'Boys in the Band' and 'Men Together' ThePointerSisteraincoTU!rtatNumbmafewweeksback o 'Boys in Band' (Revised) Makes Montrose Premiere By Hollis Hood Th<! Boys m the Band, Mart Crowley's classic comedy-drama, will be presented m Channing Hall , First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin on June 10, !I, 17 and lR as a benefit for KS1AIDSrescarch. James Der, a veteran director/ actor with 25 years of experience in theater lends his own interpretation to the produc: tion . "I think the play was a milestone in the late 60s both in theme and language used on stage," he said. "It still has a lotto impart, however the shock value to the dialogue is no longer there." The play takes a look at gay life in the 60s, and. the 80s version emphasizes the similarities between gay and non-gay per­sons. ult includes the philosophy that gay people are the people who live next door to you. The public attitude can no longer be that they are freaks or stereotypes," Der said. "The way it is written it lends itself to the attitude that everybody is the same." Der said he has wanted t.o do the play for several years, and, through the little theater group at Bayt.own, who performed the play in April, he found that opportun· ity. Now bringing the production t.o Mont· rose, the troup's goal is to raise money for KS/ AIDS research donation. From rehearsals, the play promises to be a delightful evening full of fun and pathos. Several Montrosians are in the cast; among them Joe Watt, KRBE per•onality Curtain time is 8:00 p.m. and tickets are S6 at the door, or call 522-2204 or 424-1928 for refiervations o Men Together Dances at Tower By Joseph Lee i'Toduced by Dallas-based Community Productions and sponsored by Citizens for Human Equality in Houston. Men Together-an eight member dance theater company "came together" at the Tower Theater for three performances June J..5. Founded in 1981 by artistic director Roger Tolle, this TexaR tour (playing in Dallas and Austin) was the company'R first appearance outside New York . Men Together is dedicated to working in a gay context, and providing dances of high artistic quality which deal with a gay tht.>me. They are not classical, they are not ••trocks," hut are men dancing together sharing and feeling with other men, proudly and without shame. Their .Program consisted of seven pieces e8:ch different, some wonderful. som~ without focus. First was "Contra Dances"-bright faces and good humor nothing serious. Light and mellow leap~ and sweeps and sweetness. Some repeti­tion, but a fine piece. ''The Glade," one of the best numbers, typified touch me, see me, feel me-two dancen1 discovering and sharing their bodies. Special, poetic feel­ings expreSBed thru tender, yet masculine movements. "Walls," the strangest dance of the pro· gram, was about escape-freedom, four animals caught in a jungle of ]onliness and need. My favorite piece WBB a creative playet called "I'll Love You Forever." A look at love and relationships, talking and playing-it was clever and thoughtful. An unusual piece for a dance company, but it worked very well. Tom Keegan and David· son Lloyd were both fine actors, and worked beautifully together. Next came "Intimate Voices:'' trio eroti· cism. A rather menage a trois of Karate type drag queens camping it up; weird as hell. The effeminate side of gay-male life. "Everything Must Change" was nbout the young who must get old. "Dance Suite from the Song Weavers" was by far the best dance piece of the even­ing. Some wonderful mystical move­men ts. Stange, but interesting. Beautifully carried through the theme of brotherhood. Men Together is a promising company of respectable dancers, who need a bit more focus to their efforts. Don Baker (Community i'Toductions) and Steve Shi· nett of CHE are to be commended for bringing them to Texas. o Smith and Allen Appear at Baja's A Montrose favorite, Luisa Armal·Smith ~as t('aml'd with a newcomer to this sec~ hon of Houston , Geoff AJlen, to put together a really dynamic act for the folks to ser at Baja's until late this month Luisa said they had been away for the past month playing a Stouffer's Hotel, and thr wispy lady with the big voice t1ttm1o1 to have found a harmonious muEli· cal pnrtn('r in Allen. He played for thrrt• y('ars around north Houston . and has just r('Ct>n~ly let thr inner city in on what out­Atnndmg talent hr haA "l Love the Nightlife" kicked off the.et whu·h included a duet .. Ea~e on Down" and n Geoff Holo "Just Onre •• cl_~·~s~~j:!i~i~~~~ ~~1s~~:i~~~~ei~ ~~= mght.8 are as lovely as they have bttn lately, I really want to go to the ocean and feel a part of nature." . But the perky university student sport.­mg a new more cosmopolitan look, put everything she had into her selections and inspired last Wednesday night's crowd to enthusiastic applause. This new duet will surely be on the scene for a long time to come o Pointer Sisters Make Them Crazy at Numbers By Lacy Cale "They just _ha~ the audience crazy," said one enthusiastic fan following the recent Pointer Sisters concert at Numbe!'s, 300 Westheimer. . "They had us screaming with anticipa­tion during 'Fire.' It was by far one of the best concert.a I have ever been to," he com­mentt;< f. "Those were three hot, hot ladies. There_ s nothing bad you can say about it. The lighting was perfect, the sound was perfect, the costumes were wonderful" Among the numerous hits that turned the audience on were "Slow Hand" and "Happiness." They didn't use materials from the "old days," but concentrated on selections from their new album I'm So Excited. ' Af!-d excited is what they kept the ~ud1ence during both shows that night. lt ~as a . '.real' concert," our self· ~::?::::::r~~'t;f;gi::r:~fs·c/.~ galH! some The sisters, and they art really sisttrs took turns singing the kad on their fal'Or: ite fam_ous tunes, and Anita left them scre_aming for more u·ith her snappy antics and gyrations. ."There was nel'er a dull moment," the Vlf'we~ commented. ..It u:asn 't like they ~he;eu~:,~~ ~~ar~~~ ~.~;t!~~;~.~;:~d:~ee~ the-y_ gaL·e a 100 per cent, and tMaudiRnce ate Ii up. I hope they come back soon. " o Bernstein Premieres A Quiet Place Wo_rld renown conductor Leonard Bern stem will premier his new opera "A Quiet Place," on June 17 at 8:00 p.m.' in Jones Hall, 615 Louisiana, with subsequent per· formances on June 18, 22, 23, 24 and 25 at 8:00 p.m., June 19 and 26 at 2:30 p.m. and Jun ~ 28 at 7:30 p.m. in tandem with "Trou bl_e m Tahiti." B.ernstein't; 1952 opera. {V~d~~~;~{' A Quiet Place" 1~ by Stephen The opera featureb soprano Sheri Gret""­nawald as D~e and baritone Timothy Nolen aa Junior. Peter Mark Schifter is PHOTO JON CHEETWOOO This g_roup is p~eparing to entertain you m a big way mid.JuTU. Fmd out who they are in the June 17 Voice. Alton Herring f/eft, as Harold) and Douglas Matens fas the cowboy} in "Boys m the Band" Luiaa Arma/.Sm•th and Groff A/kn out spmt m Baja ·s crowd 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 10 1983 directing and Tony-award winner William Ivey Long ia designing the costumes. Ticket.a are available at Ticketron and the Ticket Center in Jones Hall; prices $6- $50. o Miles Plays to Rascals Audience In understated fashion, Lou Ann Miles came on 1tage at Rascals and simply car­ried the audience away with her fine, fine voice and beautiful 1tage presence. A veteran of musical comedy, she said she hasn't done cabaret since 1974, but lucky for us she has decided to come back to it. With extraordinary stage assurance she launched into .. From This Moment On" and "Got A Lot of Living to Do" from her work in theater. She said she loves doing eonga from Broadway, and "from Lou Ann Miles wows Ra.acala audience with a bright smile and great uoice some musicals that haven't been wirtten yet!" Captivating the audience with her ser· enity and broad smile, slowed the tempo to "Can't Help Loving That Man of Mine." Catch her act before she goes-she has been cast in the musical comedy Nine. Steve Shepley, her accompanist, also exhibits a veteran entertainer's expertise as a truly beautiful pianist that can play i'in any key you like," she quipped. Miles will be a Rascals through the mid­dle of the month o 'Torch Song Trilogy' Wins Tony Awards Torch Song Trilogy, which made history about a year ago by being the first gay play to open on Broadway and which has confounded skeptics by playing to packed houses aince them, made history by win­ning the Tony Award as BeatPlayofl983. Harvey Fierstein , who wrote the play, also won the Tony Award for Beet Actor in a dramatic p]ay. The Tony's are Broadway's equivalent of the Oscars o Rhetta Hughes at Numbers By Jon Cheetwood Being of the opinion that Sunday nights are, for the most part, incapable of holding any aurprisea, Number&, 300 Westheimer, was a source of an unexpected delight when it presented Rhetta Hughes from the Broadway cast of Dreamgirla. She is a lovely lady with a most affable personality that creates a comfortable audience rapport. She's just one of those "real nice" beaming people that are so easy to like; perhaps because she'sa Texas girl. These qualities might have gone unnoticed had not ahe gained national notarity for her tremendous voice. Her eong selections were sharp and effective. One slower number. "What Does One Say With Love?" was particularly impressive. Were she further established in her individual career, this surely would have been gold. Although she took the stage sans musi· ciana, the quality of Number's sound sya· tem made the tape infinity leas of a problem than it could have been some· where else. Thia arm and natural performer made a wondership weekend last a little longer. Thanks, Rhetta-come back soon John Cagan he ia alone in the hoU8e, i$ du· turbed when he hears noises from above and decides that Holly Villaire and Jim McQueen (back­ground) mU8t be ghosts in thia scene from "Tak· mg Step1" play· mg at the Alley through Jurn? 26 Two American premieres plua 11 Hou.aton premiere& highlight Houston's debut of the Soloist• of Royal Danish Ballet at Jone• Hall June 10, 11, 12. Each performance ia unique. Call 227-ARTS for reseruationa . "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum" plays through July 2 at the Chocolate Bayou Theater. Shown here are (from left) David Olive and Suzanne Santer as the louere and Peter Bryson as Psuedolus the slave. o Mairi Street Theater Extends Run The Main Street Theater, 2540 Times Blvd., ha1 extended the run of Working, a musical play about American life, to July 9 Performances are Thursday, Friday and Saturday• through June 18 and Thursday and Saturdays June 25-July 9 Curtain time ie 8 p.m. Advance tickets are $6 and $7 by calling 524-6706. o Organizations Plan 'Clap-Shtick' As a part of Gay Pride Week 1983, the Montrose Counseling Center, the Gay Switchboard and the Montrose Clinic will present Clap·Shtick or Everything You Alwayo Wanted to Know About the Coun seling Center, Su:itchboard and Clinic but were Afraid to Laugh The production i1 scheduled for Wedne1· day, June 22 at 8 p.m. in Channing Hall at the First Unitarian Church located at 5210 Fannin. The three agenciea have combined their efforts, said a spokesman, to present the Gay Prido Week Educa· tional Forum on health through humorous vignettes about the agencies and the gay community. General admieeion ia $3 and limited reSE"rved seating ie $10. Advance tickets are on sale at the Counseling Center, Clinic and Wilde 'n' Stein Bookstore, and at the door. 04Come for an evening of entertainment and show your support-Unity Through Diversity-Gay Pride Week, 1983," they said o Danish Ballet Replaces Jaffrey The Society for the Performing Arts will present the Houston debut of the world famour Soloists of the Royal Danish Ba11eton June 10, 11and12in performan· ces replacing theJoffrey Ballet's Houston engagement. A company of 13 dancers, the Soloist& will perform three different programs on the three nights. Houstonia the first stop on an American tour arranged in aseocia· tion with the Nordic Arts Exchange's Scandinavia Today program. Ticket.a are available at the Ticket Cen· ter, all Ticketron outlet.a. The Law Having Children By Henry Walter Weiss 0 My lover and I would like a chiJd," explained Alice, the young women in my office. "We've been together for three years and we'd like our own baby. Do you know any gay men who might be inter­ested in fathering a child, through artifi­cial insemination?" Alice explained that she sought a gay man because she felt such a man would be less likely to seek custody. She might have added (or perhaps she thought) that a gay man would have little chance of success­fully challenging custody, even if the child's mother were a lesbian. The judicial system is an unfortuante bastion of homo­phobia , particuarly in custody cases. Alice went on to explain that she wanted to enter into a contract with the prospec­tive father: he would relinquish all paren­tal rights; she would give up any poBBible claim for child support. I told Alice, as I have told others, that prospective fathers have occasionally con­tacted me and I have invariably discour­aged them from proceeding, unless they are prepared to undertake the financial burden of the child. Mother and father may make whatever contracts they will; these contracts do not bind the state or the minor child. Courts invariably look to the best inter­ests of the child, completely disregarding contractual arrangements. No father is permitted, in our society, to opt out of the obligation tosupporthischiJd. Thus a con­tract waiving the child's right to support is not worth the paper it's written on. I suggested to Alice that another solu­tion might involve artificial insemination from an unkown group of donors. In such event, of course, the father is not known, and thus the risk of paternity obligations is alleviated. Unfortunately, she was not Advertising Directors The Montrose Voice Publishing Company (Montrose Voice, Dallas Gay News and Out in Texas) is expanding into the Austin and San Antonio markets and has positions available for advertising directors. Inquire to Lyt Harris, 3317 Montrose #204, Houston. TX 77006. (713) 529- 8490 Register Now for Your FREE LISTING in the 7th edition of the Gay Areas Business Directory Houston/Montrose Section now in preparation SPECIAL OFFER: A custom trademark ad is FREE to the first business that takes our a 1/3 page or larger ad 11 each classification Call for details at 713/524-7200 Or write us at Gay Area Telephone Directory 3317 Montrose. Box 1010, Houston, TX 77006 receptive to this approach: feeHng that gentic questions get muddled when the true identify of both parents is unknown. On reflection I found her genetic argu­ment weak and reaJly no more than the excuse of a rationalization for insisting on having the identity of the father known. In fact vast numbers of people in our society (adoptees) are obliged, owing to fairly stringent laws, to know nothing of the genetic history of both of their parents. Multitudes of others are orphaned and having little working knowledge of their history. Under the circumstances, having one parent unknown seems a small price to pay for insuring that an unwitting father is not burdened, by a court, with the obligatione of support. JUNE 10, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 TOTAL ANIMAL CARE CENTER DOG AND CAT GROOMING We offer all-breed grooming services plus medicated skin conditioning treatments. Give your pet a new look this summer! Call for appointment. 1640 Westhelmer 521·92n Summer at the Movies in Houston ~(. ~~v~~don Wire Service Now that Return of the Jedi has stolen oome of the Blue Thunder from May's other big release, the atudioe are prepared for an all-out auault to keep you in the habit of going to the moviee at leaa:t once each weekend. Schedulee have been juggled like those of prime time televiai.on to give each of the ~iggest ~Ima aa clear a ahot u possible on its openmg weekend. Only a fool would challenge Jame1 Bond on June 10 or Superman on June 17, and only fools (Robin Williams, a cut of comics in "Ye!· lowbeard" and a cut of nerds in "Porky'a II") are challenging "Twilight Zone" on June 24 Independent vultur .. are hovering with product.a to replace any giant carcass that's hauled away prematurely. Fantasy is the key word, with superhe­roee and auperhunka for days. Whether they make you laugh or scream, at least you won't have to worry about the summer movies making you think. '1!eleaaed June 3; THE MAN WITH TWO BRAINS-Cast aaainet type {he u1ually playa a man with rw brains), Steve Martin etani in Carl Reiner'• comedy about a brain surgeon married to a ahrew (Kathleen Turner), who falls in love with the~diaembodied brain of another woman. PSYCHO II-Anthony Perkins is still Norman Bates. 22 yean older and legally aane. The•u•penaecomea from wondering whether Austrtalian director Richard Franklin will be a new Hitchcock. or this will be just another mad 1lasher movie that could have been called Sicko LXX· All dressed up and rw place w go: tM atars of "Porky'• Two" ![{{; ~~~~: :~din~~t it's a comedy Roy ScMi<kr 1tara aR a police helicopter pik>t who runs into a <onfrontatwn with an extrem11t clique within the government in WARGAMES-Matthe" Broderick .. Blue Thunder" Qucl'rty Dental Care. The Smile Store. At Quality Dental Core, we believe in living up to our name. And that means not only giving you quality dental treatment, but providing it at a price you con afford . We' ll customize your payment pion to your family budget Plus, you con save up to 20% of your costs with our Quolident membership pion, even 1f you hove dental insurance Quality Dental Core. Complete dental services at a price you con live with Now that's something to smile about Qua lity Dental Care Southwest 2315 Southwest Freeway ot Kirby 523-2328 Bring 1n this ad and ~Io complete dental check -up. d1ognost1c ii.rays and your leeth deaned f0< $25 00 OfferexpuesJuly 15, 1983 Protect your most valuable possession For glowing skin that looks Younger & Younger A complete skin care treatment formulated for those special people who care about how they look 1. Cleansing Miik Creame-8oz.-$8.25 The cleanser can be used on the most tender skin. 2. Honey 8t Almond Scrub-2oz.-$9.00 The treatment refreshes, unclogs pores, cleanses and brightens the texture of the skin 3. Skin Toning Lotlon-Soz.-$8.00 This lotion Improves the skin tone, closes the pores and stimulates the skin 4. Solr De Fete Mask-2oz.-$15.00 The beautifying results of this mask are Immediate-even on the most sensitive skin. It soothes as it renews tired complexions s. Aloe JoJoba Creme with Vitamin E-2oz.-$10.00 p. creme that softens & helps prevent premature aging 6. Creme de Excellence-4oz.-$14.50 This special formula 1s ennched with collagen. truly a creme of excellence ----------------------­Younger & Younger. Please send me the Mail to Younger & Younger, PO Box following 42809. dept. 352, Houston. TX 77242 -'ddr•H - City S•l•Tax Poet•g• & Handhng Total Enclosed Include $2.00 per order for postege and handling. Include 6~ sales tax for Tex as addresses. Allow 2-3 weeks delivery Visa & MasterCard accepted - - -~ 0 Check or Money Order - 0 VISA exp date -- 0 Mutercaird ••P date State _ - - Zip Credit card 1 PhOne - - ------ Signature You've Taken Your Pride to the Streets ••• Now you can take home a handsome, fashionable souvenirof"Pride Week '83" · · ·~~~~ . . . Bold. Fashion Colors . ··:r&::u~g DOitt sit on it! Place your order now & wear them with Pride ~dres.s ____________ _ SlzeS(28-30)_ Mt32·341- U36-381- Color ___ Krll\' Grttn Naw Blue. Ro\'al Blue ---Solfd orStr1~ · · ~~~O~·i'4!!:11~ ~~~~~~~,:'~k~Mu~. 22 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 10, 1983 ~;~ ~~;~;L:; J~arrie Fisher prepare to swing W safety from the top deck of Jabba 's desert Sail Barge in "Return of the Jedi" plays a computer-crazed teenager who almost otarta World War III when he accidentally accessea the Defense Depart­ment. He thinks it'• a game; they think it's an enemy attack Being Releaaed Today, June 10: OCTOPUSSY-Roger Moore is Jamea Bond again, chasing Maud Adams' circus from India to Germany in aearch of jewel smugglers TRADING PLACES-Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy do a "Rich Man-Poor Man" role reversal in a colorful comedy of black and white. Coming Next Week, June 17: SUPERMAN IIl-Chriatopher Reeve flies again, confronting computer wiz Richard Pryor and romancing Clark Kent's high school classmate Annette O'Toole in the intereat oftruth,juaticeand the yankee dollar. June 24· PORKY'S II: THE NEXT DAY-More horny high school hijinks, as the local bigot tries to keep a Seminole from playing Romeo in the ochool play. THE SURVIVORS-Michael Ritchie clirects Robin Williama. Walter Matthau and Jerry Reed in a comedy film in New York and Vermont. TWILIGHT ZONE-THE MOVIE­Steve Spielberg and J ohn Landis pro­duced and each directed a aegment of this four-part anthology of aci-fi atories in the Rod Serling tradition. The other directors are Joe Dante (The Howung) and George Miller (The Raad Wamor). YELLOWBERD-Thia pirate apoof stars Peter Boyle, Cheech & Chong, John Cleeee, Martin Hewitt, Michael Hordern, Eric Idle, Madeline Kahn, James Mason and the late Marty Feldman ~1!f;JKER ACE-Burt Reynolds races cars and into Loni Anderson's lovin' arma in his latest fast-moving violation directed by Hal N~am. Ned Beatty, Jim Nabors and ex-Hardy Boy Parker Stevenson co- 1tar. July 15: SfAYIN' ALIVE-Sylvester Stallone direct.a John Travolta in the aequel to Sat­urday Night Feuer. (And whatever hap­pened to the Bee Gees?) July 22: CLASS-Jacqueline Bisset and Cliff Robertson are the nominal stars, but the story centers around preppy roommates Rob Lowe and Andrew McCarthy, one of whom has an affair with the other's mother in this comedy directed by Lewis John Carlino. JAWS 3-D-Just when you thought it was safe to wear :J..D glasses ... This time the shark will get as close to you as to stars Dennis Quaid, Bess Armstrong and Louis GoBBett Jr. July 29: BRAINSTORM-Douglas Trumbull directed what has become famous as Natalie Wood's last movie. Christopher Walken co-stars as a scientist who devel· ops a kind of aynthe•ized telepathy. KRULL-Handaome newcomer Ken Marshall defends hie distant planet against alien invader& in Peter Yates' fan· taay which adds laaer technology to the sword-and-sorcery genre. NATIONAL LAMPOON'S VACATION-Midweoternera Chevy Chaae and Beverly D'Angelo drive the family to California's futuristic theme park WalleyWorld, and getting there ia halfthe funny. Ao always. achedules are aubject to change; but moat of the above dates are pretty firm .... o watch mainly for additions. We'll Bend Over Backwards NOW OPEN UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP LINDA "LULU" SIMPSON Featuring: Free Sunday Buffet 4pm Wednesday Steak Night 6pm, $300 Happy Hours 7am- 7pm Monday-Friday 7 Days a Week with 75¢ bull shot and bloody mary specials Manager Danny Miller 109 Tuam- 528-9128 Ta help )IOU get )lour selection home safel)I . . . at ver)I reasonable rates. Old English Furniture 1138 W. Gray, 521-9145 E.J;.0:.!f~ -!!)j . ~..[}~I ~ 1£1<.0'UJ:bl 'Where the W::lrldMeets Houston" 106 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 713/520-9767 402 Lovett 527-9866 PATIO BAR NOW OPEN 4PM TILL, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY NOW APPEARING Luisa Amaral-Smith and Geoff Allen In ordn to allow us to maintain the high quality of m tertainmmt that )'OU expert, Baja's now has a SI doorchargepn-pn.on on FRIDAY bSA. TURDAY NIGHTS ONLY. Happy Hour 4-Spm GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 JUNE 10, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 , BUND IMAGERY ...... 7_,_~ ... - ... 45% OFF Mini Blinds (Free lnstolotion - S or More Bllnds) Vertkol Bllnds Custom Drapery Verosol Shades Custom Bedspreads Wood Mini BUnds Woll Upholstery Commerdol - Aesldent1ol Col T odoy For A Free Estlmote (713) 523-2670 2377 Grant at Fairview-528-8342 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer KRAZEE HOUR DAILY 9-10PM KRAZEE TUESDAY Happy Hour noon-6pm daily, $1 well drinks, 7~ beer NOW OPENING AT 12 NOON WITH BIG JACK A People's Place. Your bartenders Big Jack, Daniel, Andy, Ronnie, Pewee, Morrie C(IauuJiew ~iquo/t 524 1245 1006 FAIRVIEW at GRANT 'Wide sefection of importea 6ee1i wine & cliampagn£ Larq~ inventor}! of. cfulfce fiqucr, cotffia{s & cot1l.tti.i{ m~es Gooa prices - Friendfy service Convientfy focatea in :Montrose 24 MONTROSE VOICE I Jur.;E 10, 1983 Sports Briar Patch Captures Women's Softball By Eddie Chauez In the heat of sun, humidity and rain, the four-way deadlocked league was solved at Fonde Field last Sunday as the Briar Patch rose to victory. The team (known as the Renegades) did not lose a game even in the last inning when they trailed the River Rats 10-8. The Patch banged in three runs to overpower their opponent.a. No one ran away with anything because the four evenly paired teams struggled through every inning. Sports Coverage Unlimited faced the River Rats and defeated them 7-3. The Briar Patch edged the Montrose Voice's First Edition 2-1. The Briar Patch bating placed hits solidly to overpower Sports Coverage Unlimited 7·3. The First Edition edged the River Rats to a 4-3 win. SCU and the First Edition met in the lowest scoring game of the playoffs. The First Edition pulled it out in the top of the seventh with the only run scored in the game. The last game was great. The Briar Patch had already won first place by virtu­ally head-to-head competition and scoring most runs. When they faced the River Rats, the River Rats placed balls all over the field even taking an 8-2 lead. The Briar Patch came right back narrowing the score inning after inning. At the bottom of the seven, the Renegades became the 1983 Spring League Champion~ and captured their second women'• title. Lota can be said of this dynamic team And Iota can be said of their dynamic man· ager, Myrt Badding. With all this going for them, it was only a matter of time. o Softball Upsets Recorded Looking back at last year, you may remember Dirty Sa llys was undefeated until they met the Barn team. Seems that thia year's Barn team is just as committed. Last weekend, they defeated the Montrose Voice 12-6. Here's how it started: To the left, to the right. to the left, to the right, to the left. My back is aching, my pants too tight, my bottie is shaking from left ot right say oooh, aah, ooh, aah. One, two, three, four, five, the Barn is mighty fine. Say ooh, aah, ooh, aah. Six, seven, eight, nine, ten Come on Barn let's do it again. Say ooh, aah, ooh. aah. The Barn team did do it again as the "Spolier Squad" gripped and choked their bats to swing to victory led by many play­ers. Gary Najraver battled two for three with two RBis; Gary Gano was three for three with three RBis; Billy Holl brook and Tony Popper batted two for three. The other batter who added just as much was Buzz Smith, Last week's issue featured him missing a ball by a mile, but he made up for it batting two for three! Sunday, the Barn team faced Jim'• Gym in a close game. The Barn took an early lead batting in three runs in the first fin. ning. Bard Hay, Tony Lozano and Tony Popper all recorded two hits as the team downed the Gym 5-2. The Brazos River Bottom also recorded an upsef Carl Fries' pitching held the Montrose Voice to few hits. The Voice's Dave Gebert batted 2 for 3; Jeff Parker 2 for 3 and Dodie Ramirez 2 for 2, recording the only hitting on the team. The BRB hitting was lead by William Powell 3 for 3; Richard Deleon's 2 for 3' with two doubles and Bill Goetz 2 for 3 brought the Voice their second loss that weekend. The BRB 8, the Voice 6. In other Saturday game action, Char­lotte's solidly defeated Jim's Gym 12-2. Nie Borjas was 3 for 4 and Eddie Reagan was perfect batting 4 for 4, scored four runs and batted in two RBis. Sally's overpowered the Briar Patch to an 11-6victory. Sally'sHarryGoldberg's3 for 4 and three RBis led the pack. How- ~::r R~fsh:l:n~:~hza b~~ ;n~: ~a8cri~ fice fly. The Briar Patch ' Dennis Owens batted 2 for 3 with 3 RBis Catch One forfeited to the Montrose Mining Company/JR's team. The Montrose Mining Company/ JR's team played a great game against the Gal· leon the next day. The Galleon'• Bill Fike's 3 for 4 with two doubles; Arthur Castillo 3 for 3, and Richard Evangelon's 2 for 2 with three RBis lead their team past the Mining 13-8. The Mining's Philip Loveland's 3 for 4, Wilbert LeBeaufs 2 for 3 with two RBis, and Carlos Romero's 2 for 3 provided a good showing for the Min­ers. Catch One scored six runs against Dirty Sally's. A 2 for 3 by Sam Francis and Rigo Romo's 1 for 2 on a triple batting two RBis helped. Saly's Jim Cates was 2 for 3 with three RBis; Mario Marcheua 2 for 3 with a double and triple. Jerry DeSale and Ken Gray perfected a 2 for 2, but Ken also hit two RBis. o MSA Softball Names All-Stars The MSA Greater Houston Softball League has announced its 1983 All-Star teams for their traditional Gay Pride Week games, scheduled for June 18 at Levy Field. From the North Division: Richard Gay, Danny Webber, Bob Fleischer, Dennis Ownes, Sammy Ramirez, Tim Boates, Bobby Collake, Bob James, Bill Sansom, Joey Holton, Reggie Osborn, Jeff Parkers, Scotty Paulus, Barry Perky and Mike Wil­liams will take the field with coaching assistance from Gene Russo and Jerry Chaffin. The team's scorekeeper will be Chuck Meredith The South Division All-Stars a re Carl PLEASE HELP ME I am trying to locate the man who witnessed the collision May 19 at approximately 11 :30 p.rn. (the night of t.he big storm) between myself, in a black Carnero, and a police car at the intersection of Montrose and Alabama. You told me, "Don't worry, I saw the whole thing." Call Kirn at 529-2378 before 4prn. I NEED YOUR HELP! ~a:;· G~~op::nf!~e:=k. :.~uBc;:ioe;: Mike Morrison, Robert Arriaga, Sammy S Mario Marchena, Bill Goeta, Jerry D~Sale, Jim Cates and Tony Matuzak. Their coaches will be Bob Long and Ron Kennison. Jack Carville will assist as scorekeeper. o Lone Star Classic Expands MSA Softball president Jerry DeSale has confirmed 18 entries to the July 4th tour­nament. The tournament was originally se~~:: :::::ss~re the Barn, Brazos River Bottom, Galleon, Montrose Voice, Kansas City Rangers, Dallas Round-Up, New York Eagles, San Francisco Trox, Los Angeles Blue Dot, Dirty Sally's, Montrose Mining Company' JR's , Dallas Gay News Dallas Steel, Dallas' Throckmorton Mini~g Company, Charlotte's, Cafe San Marcus from San Francisco, the Briar Patch and Sports Coverage Unlimited'• women's softball team. Persons interested in housing may con­tact Ferrell Bivins at 521-9889 or Hank McPhate at 552-0265. MSA Women's Sof tball League FINAL STAND~GSl.09! Pct GB POST PLAYOFF RANKINGS 1. Bnar Patch Renegades 2. Montrose Voice 1st Edition J Sports Coverage Unlimited 4 River Rats BEFORE PLAYOFFS River Rats SportsCoverageUnl1m1ted Montrose Voice 1st Ed1t1on BrlarPatch Aenegad• ~:;1~edSpmts T-shirts+ HI Hopes Coffee Beans Special Blend Double R Swanger• MCCRAngels Manon &Lynn"sJustUs . s 8 8 6 5'"' 4'11 5 5 2'h 7'11 2 8 2 8 0 10 800 800 800 800 600 2 550 2'/J 500 3 250 5'11 200 6 200 6 000 8 MSA Monday Night Bowling STANDINGS Fol owing June 6 compeMson A DIVISION C DIVISION 1 Tush Ttckle,. 1 Barnyard 2Hole 2PlusA 3•2Dust Rollers 3E/J"sMen 8 DIVISION 1 OirtySally"sStrokers 25 Easy Pieces 3FiYeEnes HIGH SERIES Montrose Tennis Club Challenge Ladder Followingrecentcompet11ion 1 Rich Ryan 2JanMauldin 30on Kessler 4Tim Calhoun 5RonLandrum A LADDER 6John Ryan 7 David Robicheaux 8JonColbert 9DavidGarza 10 Randy Dickerson MSA Thursday Night Mixed Bowling STANDINGS FollowtngJune2compe!lt1on 1 Calamity Lane 2Marilyn&theFab4 3 Kmdred Sp1r1ts Overdrive 5 MSA Greater Houston Softball League LAST WEEK"S RESULTS Saturday. June4 Charlotte's 12 J1m"sGym Montrose M1ne1JRs 7 Catch One O (forfeit) Barn 12 Montrose Voice Dirty Salty"• 11 Briar Patch Sunday. June5 Galleon Barn 13 MontroseMine/JRs 5 J1m"sGym Dirty Sally's 12 CatchOne Brazos RB 8 Montrose Voice Galleon Montrose Voice J1m"sGym Briar Patch Catch One South D1v1s1on s 1 7 • 3 6 2 7 0 11 North Division S88 636 333 222 000 D1rtySally'1 10 O 1000 Brazos River Bottom 6 3 667 3'-" Barn 5 6 454 5'h Charlotte's 4 5 444 5'h MontroseM1ne/JRs 4 6 400 6 BATTING LEADERS through June 5 basfld on at least 21 t1m•~:t ::'' H AVG ~ ~~~~~:1~ o~s ~ ~ ~ = 3 M•r10M•rctlet'lt10S 28 19 16 571 4 GaryGanoBARN 29 9 16 552 5 Tony P1etschner BARN 31 12 17 S46 6 Jimmy Cates OS 26 9 14 538 7 Scotty Paulus MY 28 16 15 .536 8 HerbMuenchowos 21 8 11 .524 9 Harry Goldberg os 27 8 14 .519 10 BobJamesMv 35 12 18 .514 THIS WEEK'S GAMES (ANV--11l...,.F191d f,_M<Jr>t•OM. go OUI R•Cflft'IOnd. PMI K t~. left on Enl•ldt I Saturday. June 11 Catch One va Montrose Voice. 5pm Charlotte's vs Montrose Mine/JR"s. 6pm BarnYS Dirty Sally's, 7pm HIGH GAMES Galleon Y$ Jim's Gym, 8pm Wayne Holloway Jerry Manor GeneBascc 234 Horacelallmer 583 Sunday. June 12 223 Gene Basco 220 Wayne Holloway Capta1n"sMeeting730pmJune13 574 Briar Patch vi Barn.6pm 569 DirtySally"svs Gatleobn. 7pm Brazos R111er Bottom vs J1m·a Gym. 8pm Charlotte·ava Catch0ne. 9pm JUNE 10, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat JUNE JUNE 10 11 JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE 12 13 14 15 16 For•ckMlonalinlorm•honorphonenumber1loreYentsU11edbelow,looklorlh•.,,on.oringorg1nl­Hl1on under "Org•nu:atlons- In tn. MontrOM Clu1il1«1 Selected Events through 7 Days llFRIDAY: Black & White Men Together movie night, 8pm llFRIDAY: Gay Compoaera Con­cert, New York llFRIDAY-SUNDA Y: Wrangler M.C. annual Stampede in Dallaa, "Celebrating a Decade of Deca· dence" llFRIDAY-SUNDAY: 5th National Lesbian/Gay Health Conference, Denver &SATURDAY: Metropolitan Transit Authority Bond Election II.SATURDAY: Montrose Voice men's softball team rummage sale, 9am-2pm, 2137.Branard near Greenbriar llSA TU RDA Y: Lambda Bicycle Club meets, then tours, from llam. unlesA raining, at 210 Fair­view, apt. I •SUNDAY: Montroee Tennie Club plays 10:30am-1:30pm, Mac­Gregor Park flSUNDA Y: Black & White Men Together "Fruit Bowl Brunch" 2-4pm mMONDA Y: AIDS victim aup­port group meets 6:30pm, Mont· r06e Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 •MONDAY: MSA Summer Sea· 8on Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •TUESDAY: Flag Day •TUESDAY: Gay Pride Week Committee preas conference •TUESDAY: Gail Guidry, femi­nist musician, 7pm, Gracielynn Books, 704 Fairview •TUESDAY: Montrose Sym­phonic Band meet.a at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm •TUESDAY: Lutherans Con­cerned meets, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh •TUESDAY: Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) meets •TUESDAY: Houston Data Pro­fessionals meet 7:30pm, East Room, Holiday Inn Central, 4640 South Main •WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Caucus meets, 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm •WEDNESDAY: Montrose Cho­rale rehearsal at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30-lOpm •THURSDAY: Gay Pride Week ("Unity Through Diversity") beg­in& in Houston •THURSDAY: Wilde 'n S"'in gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPIT Radio, FM-90 •THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm ~t Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmam •THURSDAY: Gay Pride Week: Anniversary of Police raid on Mary'•· 1022 Weatheimer Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: "A Salute to Gay Businessea," June17 •IN 1 WEEK: Black & White Men Together rap group, 8pm, June 17 •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week; Familie1 and Frienda of Gaye reception, Liberty Bank Commun· ity Room, 1()()1 Westheimer, 12- 3pm, June 18 UN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: Montroee Sports A880C. allstar games, June 18, Levy Field, feat­uring women'• league allstars, men'• leque al le tan and Dallae: alletara, 3:30-7pm 81N 1 WEEK: Choice'• Leabian Mothers' Group meeta 6:30pm June 18, 210 Fairview, apt. 1 81N 1 WEEK: Texae "June­teenth" Day, June 19 81N 1 WEEK: Father's Day, June19 81N 1 WEEK: Choices meets 12:30pm, June 19, YWCA, 3615 Willia mJN 1 WEEK: Unitarian/ Univeraalist Gay Caucus meets Jun(> 19 at 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin •IN I WE'EK: Families & FriE>nds of Gays metots 2pm, June 19. Presbyterian Ct-nter behind Firfft Pn-sbyterian Church, 5300 Main •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pnde w .. k, Houston 'e ''Salute to Dallas Day," June 19 81N 1 WEEK: Dallas Gay Pride Parade, "Marchjng Out of Obs· curity, Into the Dream," June 19 8JN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: Black & White Men Together Juneteenth afternoon BBQ at Dirty Sally's, 220 Avondale, and evening buffet & show at Catch 1, 4965 M.L. King Blvd., June 19 81N 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: "Men and Women Together, An Evening of the Arts" at the Swim Club, 2114 Peckham, June 20, with Montrose Chorale and Mont· rose Art Alliance 81N 1 WEEK: 7th Annual San Francisco International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival opellB June~. lasting to Juneo 25 •IN 1 WEEK: Summer beings at 6'10pm June 21 •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: Montrose Sparta Assoc. variety show at Numbers, 300 West.hei­mer, June 21 81N 1 WEEK: Houston Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers & Scientist.a meet 7pm June 22 •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: Montro&e Counseling Center, Montrose Clinic & Gay Switch· board present "Clap-Shtick" June 22, Spm, lat Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: Homophile Interfaith Alliance's National Day of Remembrance with Montroee Singera at MCCR, 1919 Decatur, June 23, 7:30pm •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week· "Salute to Gay Youth" June 23 8JN 2 WEEKS: Latino Day, Gay Hispanic Caucus 5th anniversary dance, Noche y Dia Ballroom, 2103 N. Main, 8pm-2am, June 24 •IN 2 WEEKS: let Latin Ameri· can & Caribbean Gay/Lesbian Conference June 24·29, Bogota, Columbia •IN 2 WEEKS: Full moon, 3:33am, June 25 UN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Mardis Grae Maddne.. Inc. after· noon fundraising carnival for AIDS research, June 25 •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Political Montrose Classified Caucus reception June 25 for out of town visitors to Gay Pride. Week 81N 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week· Montrose Symphonic Band, Montrose Chorale and Kindred Spirits Ensemble in Fred Paez Memorial Concert, "Festival Ch~ rus," Cullen Auditorium, Uo!H main campus, June 25 81N 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Gay Pride Parade down Weathei­mer, 5:30pm, June 26 •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Parades June 26 in San Fran­cisco ("Strengthen the Ties, Break the Chains") and Memphis ("Gay Righto are Civil Righto'1; and Gay Pride March in New York City mIN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Gay Political Caucu• rally at the Summit, 7:30pm, June 26, star­ring Tina Turner 8JN 2 WEEKS: Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) meet.a 7pm June 28, Bering Church, 1440 Harold 8JN 8 WEEKS: Twin Cities Good Time Softball League invi· tational July 1-4, Minneapolis •IN 8 WEEKS: Lone Star Gay Softball Claaoic, Houston, July NOTICE BUSINESSOWNERS~<»l;_I, Ir .. Md'! week •n ttitl Mo"trOM Clliu•l..cl bull· nen nUlblishments Mrv1ng •• d11tnbutio" ~~=~!.,,~th• Vo•c• and commun11y •lndic.t•thfl i .. Un,"i.MonlroMVole9dllttt· butlonpolnt CARS & BIKES GAY Tired of being hassled by straight salesmen? Looking for a car? Call Ted Lynch at 529-4911 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES GRAND CENTRAL PIPELINE Your gay roommate service. 523+ 3223 EXPERIENCED APT. MGR. will exchange service for apt. & utili­ties Montrose area_ Bob 522-8970. 520-5777 ;;N 3 WEEKS: Blue Boy Cla88ic 'Montrose Live' each week Bowling Tournament, July 2-4. in the Voice is your guide to Seattle Montrose entertainment ~~t'bf-Ei!:~b:~:e;:~:."g:c~ - MONTROSE UPPER DUPLEX er's Club, 2700 Albany, July 3, 2 BR. 1 bath. living. d1n1ng. kitchen, lOpm, partial bt·nefit for $501). Bills paid_ Days 523-8802. KSt AIDS Foundation nights 522-6732 •INS WEEKS: lndeJ)<'ndence HEIGHTS GARAGE APT. Day, July 4 Large 1 BR. $265 523-0427. 81N 3 WEEKS: Greater Mont· rose Business Guild meets 7:30pm The Voice has more news, July 5, Liberty Bank community more Houston readers, room, 1001 Weotheimer more Houston advertising •IN 4 WEEKS: Metropolitan Community Church general con· ference, Toronto, open• July 10, lasting to July 17 8JN 4 WEEKS: International Gay Assoc.. Conference opens July 11, Vienna, Austria, lasting to July 16 81N 7 WEEKS: 8th Interna­tional Conference of Gay & Les­bian Jews open& Aug. 4, IBBting to Aug. 7, Miami •IN 7 WEEKS: Reno National Gay Rodeo opens Aug. 4, IBBting to Aug. 7 •IN 12 WEEKS: Sixth Biennial International Convention of Dig· nity, Seattle, Sept. 2-5 •IN 12 WEEKS: Gay World Series Softball Tournament, Chi· cago, Sept. 3-5 •IN 12 WEEKS: Labor Day, Sept. 5 •IN 12 WEEKS: "Come Out and Sing Together," lat North Ameri· can Gay Choral Feetival, opena Sept. 8, lasting to Sept. 11, Lin­coln Center, New York 81N 16 WEEKS: Human Rights Campaign Fund annual dinner, Waldorf Astoria Hotel, New York, Sept. 'Z7 •IN 16 WEEKS: Texaa Renais­sance Festival opena near Plan­tersville Oct. 1 and 2, aleo running Oct. 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23, 29,30&Nov.5&6 8JN 17 WEEKS: Oct. 8 deadline to register to vote in November INTERIOR DESIGNER'S HOME in Southwest Houston priced below its value for quick sale. Approx 2150, 3/2 with parquet floors vaulted cetlings, Fr. doors. uphol­stered walls, designer wall papers. mirrors. storage. 25'"13' screened spa room with redwood decking & brick flooring. Landscaped private yard with lighting system. Excellent home for entertainmg $108,000 Call 498-3416 or 498-1764 for appointment HOUSE FOR RENT 2 BR house. large living room. din­ing, den, kitchen Must see to appre­ciate 1112 miles NE of U/H, 10 minutes to Montrose $475 month. with lease + deposit & utiht1es Call 721-4439 HEIGHTS 2 BEDROOM Large upper. 1 bath, ceiling fans. au appliances, air, rear parking_ $525 880-1777. MONTROSE HOMEtOFFICE 3/2'h, study off master. Owner pays closing costs Low move--1n. Perfect for investors. roommates. etc Updated and clean. Priced for quick sale. $117,CX>Cl Century 21 Shear & Co., 72!f-4800. 72!f-0758 An estimated 24,400 -­HOUSTON readers each week-the Voice! election• EMPLOYMENT & ~ /o7 WEEKS: Columbus Day, JOBS WANTED •IN 20 WEEKS: Halloween, Oct. 31 UN 21 WEEKS: Houston city elections, Nov. 8 •IN 24 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 9th National Conference, San Diego, Nov. 26-'Z7 8JN 88 WEEKS: Gay PrNa As80ciation Southern Regional Convention, Jan. 27.29, Houston ACTORS/STUDENTS Telephone promotion of '83-'M Alley Theatre season. A great sense of humor a must. Call Jam&1 Fowler, 228-9341, 1-9pm. Excellent pay - RECEPTIONIST/TYPIST­Mature individual with technical office skills and knowledge of Hous­ton ·s gay community Contact Annette at MCCR Monday thru Fri­day, ~5. 861-9149 ADVERTISING SALES The Montrose Voice Publishing Company has openings in Austin and San Antonio for advertising representatives. Inquire to Lyt Har­ns, 3317 Montrose #204, Houston, TX 77006. (713) 529-8490 TYPESETTER Montrose Voice Publishing Co. now interviewing for an experienced "graphics typesetter," one extremely familiar with AM equip­ment. Actual typing speed not important. Ability to •·code" an advertisement fast and accurate is Duties will include typesetting ads for Out in Tex as, Montrose Voice and Dallas Gay News and independ­ent typesetting jobs Person will be required to meet customers, esti­mate typesetting and graphics costs, and follow the job through to completion. Send resume to Mont­rose Voice-. 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. Or call Henry McClurg, (7131 52!f-8490, Mondays only 2-Spm INCOME RESEARCH CENTER Tuesdays, 7:55-10pm. Call for loca­tion and details. Filtrish ll's over-3 years in business means stability, commitment. dedication, expe­rience. profitability. Call Trish and Phyllis at 723+8368 Hank at (W) 529- 7525 or (H) 523-6598. Kent Naasz 520-6541 (M-FS-7pm) Geneat85~ 0418 anytime CALLING All RETREA.DSI See above ad. Try it again with us1 LOOKING FOR SOME •·Do 1t yoursetr 1ob security in these uncertain times? Local Amway dis­tributor wlll show you how to get it with profi1able part-time business of your own_ Phone Gene at 85~0418 anytime. Kent Naasz 520-6541 (M-F S-7pm). Hank at (W) 52!f-7525 or (HJ 523-6598. Trish & Phyllis at 723- 8368 GAY BARS ==t52i"L~l1.;9"- :!:'~'1-402 Love!l-527.e&ee dining. 1 • ..; 9~10~c:oUfitry 9 &-azOi"-Rt~BiW0.-·52&. t'=~~~~---n eC.-rCh.• ·odc:0.::49155 M•rt•" Luther K.onG= 6'2_·2521 ~-­• Cti1c:k11r1 Coop-535 W•t"-"---526-2240 ~2831 Rdunon6-S2&-2259 d•KOWltt'I =~IDl'1.1m-1132Westt1eim8r.,:--~ e o.rtfS.nY.-:;::mA.ond8.,._5&7sii - 9 ftJ'i.:1213R1Ctlmoncl 527·i071 •Ex11e--1011e.it----659-0f53couf'llry eG11ieori-23o:JRIChmOl'ld-522-781fl e GBt-1,.19 Ric:hmond-528-8903 i7::--IOl..::''":o_T:;=Poc;:c,lflc---=:,52=.,:1.,.~,.~ :,J,t,I! ,:,.,-::n & Lyrwfs~17 FaitvieVw-526- ~301~ - 9 K1nd'9d Sptnt1 5245 Buffalo $pMdw•y fl65..975e pndominantty le&tMan •Larr J-312 n .• ar•-521-9343 iUi1u Depot-911 Fww19W~2 eM9ry·1-1022w.hreilnel' 521-&151 ~~ Pll'11 AAotel ~-50 W•ugh Dr- ::::.~-----;;::_534~-52&-7511 =::ry CNrtott.·1-911 W Drew-~ i Momro. M1nlrog Co--IOS P.c1tic 52$-7 ... =~Mi*i2~1-- ioo.cei:·, C~~270iJAtt;;r;y~~ - • ON on e>n.-1016 W Gt9y--52&-8503 :=EieiPh•nt-1218l .. lancl~w•lh · ·~liMai-528-3730 !~-=m2 K;;by-=.m:w2 -d,~ eR1pcorct-715F••rview-521·27t2 .e..T.w,.• ,,.-.535 W•~-520-0244 1.Wn e VetvetH•fl'Vl"lel'~5elM iV~,.N-2123 Mll-!\22..()000 ORGANIZATIONS 26 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 10. 1983 Stupid birds " Well, hey .. . These things just snap right off." " Take me to your stove? .. . You idiot! Give me that book!" The Far Side by Gary Larson "Wen, there it goes again .. • Every night when we bed clown, that confounded harmonica starts in." ~~1:~=1~tOBll92. W•th1ngton Humanfhght1C.~Fund- P081398. WMl'I· 1f191on. OC20013-(202154&-2025 l~o:::Ti;,°::':M 132 W43 rd. New YM. NY Mt<11• Fund tor Hum111 R•ght• (Gay Prn1 ~~E;~c;~;~;;; N.iiont11Auoc111'1onotGay6l..tl.anDetnoe,.tl(: ~;;;;:;.~;~04 Av.SE. WQtungton . OC Nt;::.~.y~~~·,:~::~~;111ro-S.n N•,~~l~i,;,•;:i-:-eo51hAve . N-YOfll.NY NGTF1 Cn1ia1one--(900) 221-7044 (outs1d1 New YOritSlllal ~h~~~~i~~-~~ru; :(MOntrOMT ChUrCh ol A Place 1n 1.,.-·gu;;-_:_c;c; Gr1cilynn8oOk1-.704 Fairv•ew- 522·7695 aubgroupofl1Hlnc con­certl7pmTuea ACLU=t236-wGraY"·~524-:_5925- - ~ · - AIOSH0111ne--C/0Giiy -Sw11chbo.rd~11 AmerKlnG1YA1~tl"-•~- - £",:fx:7n~J =~t!..:.~-5~: ctub"'ghtWecl ~trOAe.ribOwAt11ince:-S20-9451{vOice).520- "'62(TTY) ~~MeMOOtroM~ ~'1t.~~1~~~s'o.~~~- ~liMtinTo9ethefl8WMT)-c/oGay Sw•tchboud.~3211 "10Y>e830pmJuM10. "fruit Bowl Brunc:h"2-4pmJune12; rap group lpmJUM 17. ~Junet...,ttlC.lebrlliOfl of Fr .... dom~ afternoon 880 II Dirty Satty'I. 220 Allon· ~·~· :':g T..!1~1u~"~~ & 1how •t C•tch 1, 49&5 C.1¥8,Y--Pent;C0.1.1 Church 5210 F•nnin- 520-5437 Sel'lllcet1230pmSun ~~1:-~~!=~~~~i:.1l~5;~ Chn•h•n ChUrc-h Oi 1he000d-Sheph.~ Montrose MfVICft 1pm Sun. Blbte ltudy 730pmThurt ~~i~=-~~h~f~~~-1700 Montrose-- CnU-rCh o,-Cho1t1•n Fl11h -2i7-F~· 8005 Ml'lllCM 10 &rn Sun & 7 15pm Wed ~==i~~=TUM &Sun ; cholrprachce c.-tLZefis iOr HJ,.,.,; ECiu•hty (CHE)-«19 Fsnn1n 11301 4 ·23&-1869 bcMitGrneet1ng2ndTueadays ~:c:;:~~t~~~52~·1 e~; =;•ty Gospe1c;-te°7:.1700 M(;lrOM-= ~1ur"!~2~~.rn~r~:·.!:~~ lpm2nd& 4th Fridays CONol ArU Linlbd• Soc191y-=:,=;;;~7~ OfR•yll75&--4097 CntilHottiM-22i=15os ~::~iy~-Athe11t-t5~ Amenan G•y 0.IM Found111Qn_:"2100 Muon-524--5791 01gn1ty --mee11S1C.ii;o·11cstuden1Center, 1103 Bolsover--520-92911 528-76« meetings 7pm S•lurd•ya ~ Fii9nds0tG•v•-~ meet• :lpm3tdSund•y11tPr•byter11nCenter.41 O•kd•le.betunclfw11Pr•bytlll'1•nChurch.5300 M11n. community reception 12-Jpm, Ju,,.11 ~:.~~m!•nk Com!'l'luntty Room. 1001 1.-1un.1an.nchu;ct;=S21oF.nnin-52&-~ MtV•ce 11 15-m Sun _ G•y Pnde WMk ahoW ~~:r~~~.~~h~r~rJ:ne:.~:~~. ~ Fr'Ont~siO.ma _ __ _ ~ll'lllFM1990'"A~S-= ?J'1y1_&sf~:r-nng'Eitper~2&: Your dependable, unbiased source of community news in Montrose-the Voice ~y & Leabi• n Arc;tww of Tu .. • tfl41• l•ofllH :&:.i::•1 H~~tG Tt.u:~ ~-S:':!!~,!!I · June 24, N~ y or. Ballroom, 2103 ~ G.•v1i.1ia'n-GrouP-626-....,. G.;"Nu(M;Aii!.~ ?~~t;~~=~~~-:.<i~11~ ::.'t.!1-~:::=•fu'a~n': ~=.~~ ~.f~'::Sul'l'lrnilt7309n'l . June26.ltttmng ~.=.w:r~:n·.'~:'fi:.~~ 2521meet11r•r10U1Sunclay1.230pm.Klfldred Sptrill. 5245 Bufl•lo SpMdway. preuconlllf· enceJune14.GayPnd9W ..... Juoe16-26(l'ftlll(M' 9l/el"lllll1ted1n7-D•yalend•r) O.v Sw11Cnbo.rd--_P08_3&2i=m.:~10.."'.' tt::.·.c:: &::"p~~"*'·~r~:· --J.!~s:i~~ •1lh MOfltroM CounMhng c.nter .nd Montrose ?,.~;:;;..lpm.Ju,,.22..111Unit•r .. nChurch.5210 G<Ht.7'MontrOM BuiineN. Gu11d .:oontact t=.s-~~~=n•~0r~m~t!t;~~·,~~ =le~~~~~~."~;-:::~:.~!~; MontroeeSlngen•t :.:tC:R.111110.C•tur,June 23. 730pm ~!~fi.-,':~s2~~3~aL~,,EnJ~,1~ Wedn.d•YI Hou.con Community Cl~ Houston D•I• Prol .... OMll-meetl In Eut Room,HoliMy lnnCentr1l. 4640 S ~• in-523- lt22 ,.....ng730pm2ndT~ HOU°.:.Q;;" Motorcycle Club {IOClelclub)-clo MW'(•. 1022 W•thel:mer-62...a51 ~~~'~°=~e~ rrlfftl morithly ~ Tennos-Clu-b-J1m •I 527-9178 l>l•Y• Sund•y.. 1030llm-130pm, MecGregor P•rtt ==i~~~,~~~~~i~=m r5~~~:~~~~·=~~,. MSAIUMec:tR1cquetbloi1LMgue MS.VGre1i1e;-H001JOn -1MaO·I) SottbloU·-523- 8802d1y.,523-0l 13 ...... Allsl1r g•n.9June111 ~ .. _Y _F'!_~· ~~~pm- MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED RATES Advertising rate. o $2 tor up to three bold words and o 30¢ for each remaining word in regular type Total minimu~ charge per ad $3. There_ are no other rates Advertisers who wish something different should consider running a display advertisement. c Deadline for all advertising is 5:30pm Tuesday for newspaper released mid-day Friday. c Blind box numbers can be assigned for $3 each week the ad is run and all responses will be forwarded to you by mail or picked up at our office. c Deduct 15% if you run the same ad 4 weeks oi: more and pay for the full run in advance. o Bring or mail your Montrose Voice Classified to 3317 Montrose #204, Houston, TX 77006 Advert1s1ng placed under our old rates and format will continue to run until it woutd normally expire Use this form or blank sheet of paper Nlln!MrofwHll't9d 11torun ___ Amot.<nlW1CI019CI __ _ o Ch«:Jt o Money Ord•r O CHh /not by m1r/J C \I/SA ch1rg1 c M11t1rC1rd r:f!M~ MONTROSE GWM. 5'7". athletic type looking to find a nonsexual relationship with WF who enjoys a good nightlife rock and also into sports­perferably tennis All serous responses will be answered. Ad 137- A c/o Montrose Voice RESTAURANTS e er-r11 Two-1322 W•lheome-r· -5H-0355 e ChapU1iap;c:=a13-Rlcntiii::wid---522-2~ -- 9 0:A.moro-=-219 West~iiner - 520-1864 ~nkio--Mo-;;'trO-M •t -Welthe1m1r=-529- • Gr•k laJand-302Tuam-522-704o :~r~me~!.~~W:r~ri-shOP = 153e .-~,;e,: ; E-1h1CiP••~C-:011M- •28 w .. ii..mer- 52&-2815 e 1-1ou .-.- --otP•--=3112K1rt;:"'~111 ~MOiSh.""1t1 K.b0b---io42 Mar9hau- m - 9Jade Oraoon- 22• W•lht'•mer- 5:2o-2&83 • 9"-~-13liiwe.1helr;;;; -52&-8e.23 · ~W Hoi..lt°" o~,,.,-_9,. w " 1.t;;m•= s2 .. . 9"P9rttY,-R1ctimonc1 at K·rbY- 52°•-0075 e R.sC.-1s- Vci2K1rtY;--S2•-=6212 :!:;~:rr!~-\~34";~• & r:otle. blor- 1338 i S9ud-U=l 1ka- -4111-w.St~tmer:.._~ e s1a7P1iza:...2111 Nort01k- ::52i-oeOo • St•lr. ·ti· eVV:-·•231 Mono~-~~~ ~~rriiCOttM StioP- 1525westhe1mer:S:ii-e W1ne- sei1er- ~,Q W•tMtrMr· ~52&:38-18 SERVICES LIMOUSINES D'ELEGANCE Custom stretches, color TV, privacy windows. stereo sound. wet bar Call 523-4352 PROFESSIONAL PIANO TUNING David Hoening. registered techni­cian. 643-8410 RELAX 6 ENJOY the Bodyworks massge. Evenings and weekends Call Bill, 526-2470 Gift certificates available LIFE RELATIONSHIP 6 LONELINESS PROBLEMS can be alleviated through psycho­therapy Sliding lee scale for cou­ples and individuals. Some evenings Tony Carroll, M S.W. 527- 9051 ESCORTS, MODELS, MASSEURS We do care enough to send the very best. 751-9000. TexEscort Ma1or credit cards honored JUNE 10. 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 DRAINS STOPPED UP Doctor Rooter Sewer and Drainage Co. 24-hour service No overtime ~~~4~or Sundays, holidays Call JOHN'S TRUCKING Moving. hauling, trash removal. 524- 7203 ~•JnetsExchang-;:._3307- R-1 Chmon"d=-S2~ ~~R.Ctmonci= :.~s~g~:;at HouM lodging- 10ll A.; ~Ch00i=327w-;,t;.;, _ ~1~n6s Heir Qnign-IOll WMlhe•tner 527- e lionel Hair C>esign-3220 Ya-11um- 526-44!M ~ritroseHeifO•ign 1004C.lrio.-me=522- :~5~:;=- news~ 3317 MonltOM :~~;,- rn.gw_ine-3317 MOtllroM ::;:.':n.,~~~=- me!I boXM··1713 :=;r Barber Shop-215A ~., .. ?cZiJatru·b ~~- :;.=; SHOPS & STORES ByTycho e A.1 1 Tha1Gl , tfers~ose--522""--N16 i A.svlumAdutt BookSI 1201 Richmond ~~Adult----SOOU~bamli rs~:::=~~helmer· iBtue lt ll- 361SS~-523-11127- ~~eb Liquors-2036 wffthe;,;;;;::_52g:_ ~,;, , A~n~~-=-m:. 900ubra..-a-Jon. the Mllnhole clottun"'Q_.:-1993 ~~~~;~'._., 089~_~,,,~, ~."~,--.~.- 523- i&lm.11U Qi~~~ e Facets91tts-1412Westhe1mer-523-1412 e Fnd•y'I Flonl!-133e Westheimer-524-6518 • GrK ... yM Boolla-704 F8lrtllW-522-71195 • Greeliogs Plui-1411 Westheuner-e.30--01118 e K1rbyNewltaod-3115Klrby-52G-0246 :a.r.r7~L•lhll"Gooda--912Weltheimet : 1c:5 d Enghsh FumitW*--11311 W Gray-521· e PlentHouM--112w..thetmer 529-«l50 ~thw-<JIW•lhemler 527--9044 e ReconSRacit -310lilS SMpherd--524- 3002 .•..S,h. oe W-------202• WMt~mer 524- i stvctz A.<kltt Newa-1132 w A.labloma ~lonJacilctoih.lf\g-1212WMthe;;_52&- :..~os~~.:,.r,1ern/ lHther- BR8"24Do ew .. 1he.mirfie.-Ma~we&t;:;;; ::_-:~\;, m;;. ~;,o.:S-1121 wffihe.met-:: f::~f Ste•n t;;Oii s'tor.--802 Weslhe1:ner- Fortunes For Friday flVenmg. June 10, 1983, through Fr1d•y evening. June 17, 1983 ARIES-You're looking and acting and feeling like a lover- and just when you thought you were the one in the driver's seat, your lover is moving you over to ride shotgun. This week's surprises are far tastier than last week's! Mmmm-good' TAURUS-Mercury remains in Taurus through Tuesday morning. So you went and gave your heart away, and now you're standing therewith your mouth wide open and an empty space in your chest. Wondering what to do next? Nothing. It's a time for letting things happen to you Find a dark and quiet place and see what hunts you out GEMINI-Mars and the Sun are in Gemim all week. The Moon exists Saturday afternoon. Mercury enters Tuesday morning. In the midst of last week's wild and crazy obstacle course. you were able to make some kind of discovery, That insight may be far more important than you first thought. Stay with it. Investigate. Inquire. It will be something tochensh CANCER-The Moon passes through Cancer Saturday afternoon to Monday afternoon. Get down! But not on yourself. If you'd stop being so self-denying, you might have a lot more fun getting hard with others_ Do tough times require soft actions? You bet they do. Yield_ Give in. And if things get tough again, find the way to soften them LEO-Venus continues m your sign. The Moon enters Monday after­noon. exits Wednesday evemng_ Somebody wrth a whole lot of fantasies may want you to fulfill a few of them. If you're up to 1t, go ahead. but don't take any of 1t too seriously. This is strictly fun and games Be unbelieva­bly absurd. but don't start believing 1t yourself' VIRGO-The Moon enters Virgo next Wednesday evening. leaves next Friday evening. the 17th. If the stars get in your eyes and the moon breaks your heart, what do you do? Start all over. That's what you·re considering now and you've just what 1t takes to do it Consider the possibilities and make your decision. The summer will be much better if you do LIBRA-In your sign this week: Pluto and Saturn. Your whimsical. fun-loving. lighter side gets its turn this week. It's about ti me after all that seriousnesst Time to relax and enjoy the pleasures of life and friends Have a party or two. This ls you. too. you know SCORPIO-Someone as strong and determnined as you are may force you to change your ways. The power of love and desire may overwhelm you and leave you wondering where you've been and where you're going. This is a powerful time; JUSI try to keep part of you down to earth SAGITTARIUS-In your sign this week: Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune Go home. Someone there can offer you the love and confrontation that you need. Last week's recklessness need to be put away. Take all the advice you can get. and all the nurtunng you need_ Let yourself be pampered and loved CAPRICORN-Someone you view as conservative and old-fashioned may be able to supply help you've been needing. Don't be blinded by old pre1udices. What you threw away as old hat may sound pretty new again You may not hear what you want to hear, but listen anyway. AQUARIUS-Ah, sweet mystery of life' You frnd that you're playing the detective now Clues are everywhere and you love the search. So, go where the action 1s, and use all your considerable talents Dick Tracy and Nancy Drew never had it this good' PISCES-Tycho doesn't mean to confuse you, but some of that con­trol that you needed should now be toned down. Loosen up. Bend with the wind a bit. Let your mtu1tion have a chance. Day by day, night by ni~~~ ~~~~~w~~~ !~:~~~!si~;N~~c!~~e some thoughtful chances 28 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 10, 1983 "WE SUPPORT CELEBRATION 83" into Summerl
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