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The New Voice, No. 673, September 17 - 23, 1993
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The New Voice, No. 673, September 17 - 23, 1993 - File 001. 1993-09-17/1993-09-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3573/show/3540.

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(1993-09-17/1993-09-23). The New Voice, No. 673, September 17 - 23, 1993 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3573/show/3540

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The New Voice, No. 673, September 17 - 23, 1993 - File 001, 1993-09-17/1993-09-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3573/show/3540.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The New Voice, No. 673, September 17 - 23, 1993
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 17, 1993-September 23, 1993
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 24648896
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ---- -----------------~- rn~; ~ T T-u -- - Over100of0urVery .L HE L~~Ew ,Jl-GICE-=.:--ALLLO~-!~~R-r:E~~~~INSIDE GAY NEWS FOR TEXAS AND LOl.JISIANA • SEPTEMBER 17-23. 1993 · ,SSUE 673 AUSTIN (512) 478-4245 0 BATON ROUGE (504) 346-8617 0 BEAUMONT/GALVESTON (800) 300-8271 0 HOUSTON (713) 529-8490 NEW ORLEANS (504) 524-3279 0 SAN ANTONIO (210) 226-1833 0 ELSEWHERE (800) 729-8490 TT TDATELINE: HOUSTON Act-Up-Gulf Coast's Terri Richardson elected as new HGLPC president By SHAUN KEENAN GILSOS The ."-:ew Vo1ec/Hous1on Terri Richardson says that she has had a life-long interest in politics. It was somewhat unexpected however. that interest would lead her to the post of president of the Houston Gay and Les­bian Political Caucu~ after less than a year of membership. Richardson has become well-known in ac11vist circles and in the press through her work w11h Act-Up/Gulf Coast. The direct action group, has not always taken the HGLPC line on mat­ters pohucal. More noticeable. the two groups have not agreed on tactics. But according to Richardson, she knew a lot of people wuh an mtcre!-it in the Caucus from her work with Act· Up. Once she got involved. she rose in the rants quickly, She wa> elected to the Caucus board m April over two oppo­nents. She was very involved in the Cau­cus' recent successful awards dinner. Perhap> mo.i pol1tically mterestmg, her ascension to presidency was over opponent Gary Van Ooteghem. a long­ume Caucu~ member "I didn't know Gary very well," Richardson said, "and I would say lhal we represented very dif· fcrcnt factions, although, I don't think we disagree on goals as much as we do m style. I repre,ent the more progres-s1ve, younger and newer people." Rather than finding this a pomt of dissension, Richardson said that Cau­cus voters "needed a clear choice to capi· talize on their (newer members) enthusi­asm." Departing Caucus president Chris Terri Richardson TT TDATELINE: AUSTIN Bacon was forced to resi,n when he accepted a position with the federal gov­ernment, precluding an active role in what qualifies as a political action com­millee. Richardson says that Bacon encouraged her to run. Richardson says that she believes that the Caucus fac°' two prob­lems. She would ltke to see 11 hecomc much more "'pro·acuve. •• Meaning, that rather than hav mg the press come to the Caucus when H has a ques tion about a gay/ lesbian issue~ tha1 the llGl.PC take a far more actne role rn d1rect1ng the debate. She also says that the Caucus 1s not sufficiently inclusive She said that she had trou­ble at tlmes m her early involvement breaking through a periodically "cli-q u 1 sh. old guard .. to be made t > feel welcome," As part of her effort to rectify that, Richard­son plans to acllvel~ attend meetings of minorny lesbian and gay groups and welcome their input m Caucus decision· making. Richardson suggests that some of HGLPC's perceived O<Stfication stem; from the defeat of Houston's Human Rights Amendment "I think a lot of people." she said, 'have been tiding wounds over that for eight years." To combat that problem, Richardson cnvt· s1ons a sort of "thmk tank" that could develop and gel passed some sort of gay and lesbian positive imtiat1ve" to revitalize the movement Act-Up's orgamzmg skills will serve Richardson well, she believes. in her new role. "Progressive civic leade~s need to ~ee our pain." she says. ··we don t say enough. They ha'c to really see tlut same sex couples can ·t rent a one bed· room apartment m some bu1ldmgs 1n this city ... we can't expect others to care about our issues unul v;e as a commu n1ty. really do A key focu> of the llGLPC has been ns political endor>emcnts Richardson ennswns more rigorous reviews there as well. 'Tm tired," she said, "of our endorsement> gomg to people who mvite us to their cock.tall parties and nothing ebe ·• T~ Capital City comes together in support of _t\IDS Services of Austin By Jl'\t RAWS()~ The Sew Voice/Austin The sixth annual pledge walk for AIDS Services of Austin, "From All Walks of Life," takes place on Sunday, Oct 24th ThlS event is the largest single- day AIDS awareness and fundraising event held m rhe capnal c1ty each year. In 1992 more th3n 4500 part1c1pants brought in $275,000 m pledges during the Walk Kathy Taylor, coordinJtor for thts year's Walk, expects over 6000 people to take part this year. For the first time the Walk has two Olympic Sponsors Caremark and Miller Lue Heer/Centex Beverage Olympic Sponsors donate SI0,000 to ''From All Walks of Life This " 1he third year for Caremark to contribu1e at the Olympic level. Miller Lite Beer/Cen­tex beverage employee' are also assist­ing ASA organizers with outreach and promotions. According to coordinator Taylor, other corporate sponsors have pledged a t<llal of $42,000 to date. Opening ceremonies for the Walk will hegm at l :OOp.m. m Waterloo Park at 121h Strcel and Trtnuy. The actual Walk begins a1 3:00p.m. followed by a po>t· Walk celehrallon around 4 :OOp.m with refreshments anJ live music Par11c1 pants will travel a pleasant 5 kilometer route throu£h downtown Aumn and back 10 Waterloo Park \\alkcrs turning m Sl50 or $300 in pledges vnll receive a commemorauve 1 - shut or swcatshut respectively Those turning in $500 or more receive a pair of New Balance shoes donated by Run-Tex, and walker~ who bring in SIOOO or more get a pair of Lady Long­horn hasketball season tickets from University of Texas Women's Athletics. University Coop Cameras will give a Nikon Touch-Zoom camera to each walker bringing in $1500 or more. The individual grand prize ts two round trip tickets for two to any American Airline de!rilinallon m rhe world. courtesy of Tramex Travel. Participants ask friends . neighbors. family , and co-workers to donate money for each of the kilome ters that they com­plete. Pledge sheets and mformat1on brochures are avatlable now Some 80,000 have already heen malled to ASA supporters, and the Walk packets can be picked up at sev- AIDS-related organ1za1ions suppor1ed by the Walk . Restaurants who have agreed to JOin m this event cover the spectrum of dm­mg from barbecue to Continental cui­sine. Delts, seafood houses, Italian cafes Chmesc and Mexican restaurants are among the choices for the evenmg. "Din ng 1-...r l.1fe" coupons are bemg mailed directly to those on ASA 's mail mg list m addition to customers on many restaurants' hs:s. They arc also available at several bus.nesses and organ1Zat1or.s er a I locations around Austin and at the ASA offices. Proceeds from "From All Walks of Life" and its related events go to AIDS Services L~ 1 of Austin and six· teen other organi zations in the city which support lllV/AIDS educa­tion care. and research Intormation rela1cd cvcn1s can be 452 WALK around the capital city and by callmg (512) 406-MEAL. Dorsc) Barger. owner of the Eas­ts1dc Cafe, is the coordinator of this event and enll'ited the contr10uti()ns of the many res taurants involved. Band together Walk unlles Cll)' groups Aus11n·s " icchouse for the arts," La Zona Rosa, will host the first annual "Bandmg Together ' bene fit for "From All Walks of Life." This mu~ica1 showcase 1s bcmg put together by Susan Cald\\cl , associate producer for 1he lelcv1s1on show. Austin City Limns •• The lmcup currently includes a variety of local performers s..ich as Jimmy l aFavc, David Halley, Ale iandro Escovedo, Km McKay, Michael Hall, Michael Fracasso, and Sarah EllZ­abeth Campbell . Dining for life on the Walk and obtained at (512) Over seventy of Au tan's restaurants will be part of a prehmmary event for this year\ Walk on Monday. Sept 27th called "Dining For Life " On that eve­ning diners who pre>ent a special cou· pon will have 10\lli to 50\lli of their total dinner bill donated to AIDS Services of Austin and the sixteen other HIV/ "Banding Together" start' at 7 .00 TT T AUSTIN QUICK NOTE pm. on Sunday, Oct. 3rd. Tickets arc SS. and mformation 1s available by calling (512) 406-6115. La Zona Rosa 1s located at 612 West 4th Street Congress A venue Mile The fourth annual 'Congress Avenue Mile" sponsored by Run Tex of Austin, 1s >Chcdulcd for the morning of From All Walls of Life" ,.uh hea's begmmng at 8·30a m Run-Tex b:. s lhrs as a one m e run. walk or Jog down Congress Avenue. It begms at the base of the Capuol steps and end' at the Congress A venue Bridge above Town Lale. Proceeds from thts year's Mile will he donated to ASA 's pledge wall Runner> and wailers mterested tn bemg a part of thlS event should register at Run-Tex at 919 West 12th Street For information on the Mile, call (512) 472· 3254 Organizations who benefit Proceeds from the Walk and related events are d1v1dcd between AIDS Scrv •~~ of Austm and sixteen other organ1· zallons. ASA receives 75 percent of the donattons and 25 percent ts d1v1ded among ALLGO'lnforme·SIDA Ausun Outreach and Communny Servtces Center. Austm Support Center for Ill­ness and Loss. The C .A R F Program, Central East Austrn Community Organization, Christopher House. Com­munity Action, Inc , The HIV Study Group, Ill\" Wellness Center , Out Youth Austm, Pediatric AIDS League, Peo­ple's Community Chn1c, Planned Par­enthood of Au>tm, PrOJeCt Transitions. Regional AIDS Interfaith Network, and Waterloo Counselling Center Austin Lesbian-Gay Political Caucus celebrates recent city collllcil victory The Aurnn l ,esb1an1Gay Poh11cal Cau. cus plans a community tundraiser on Sunday, Sc 1 26. 1993. at 8:00 p.m. at San I-ran C!'isco s, t 13 San Jacmto, Aus­tin TX A SS 00 donauon at the door will be requested. The fundra1ser is also a celebrallon of the recent City Council victory for domestic partner1h1p benefits for c1ty employees which was 1pearheaded by Al.GPC Uforts to work wnhm the political structure tor the bcneht of the gay and le"b1an community ol Austin continues. however. The rchg1ous right has already begun a petuion drive to force this recent dec1s1on to a puhllc referendum. The theme tor the fundra1scr-a hat party and contest-is "Gays in the M1lh· nery " The grand door prize a trip to Cancun, has been provided by ATS Travel of Austin Prtzes wdl also be awarded in the categories of best mih· tary, ,.cstern, biker, and formal hat wear For more mformauon, contact Jeff Garrell. Fundraisin1 Chair 11 (512) 346-4303. 2 THE NEW VOICE I SEPTEMBER 17-23. 1993 Taft Street Auto PRBB BSITMATES ALL WORK GUARANTllBD If You Suffer From A Terminal Illness, Living Well Is The Best Revenge. 1411 Taft WB 00 OLD CARS (713) 526-3723 CARBURETORS REBUILT BLBCTRICAL REPAIRS ALL BRAKE WORK Rulillai..-<'.•111Ntey. Andtf vou rrkllfuiq u'llhNDS. canart>r!.rul.:rmui, /htrr:• a ,,( your fife UO.•tutlll<Y p,/ie_v- 8_v vlli11g _vo11r p,/ir_v. y.11w111 unpn><Y' the 11uil11y of _vvur lik Righi /xrr a11J '""''· QmcJ:l.v II dha mmuw1111 ol lfll<I lf1-,.IRH,L \'{) !!1l:II lf'J::J)Q, i>rallmk111i1£•/mlt•r m•/,1. 01hYY.,¥ll'f",f,. <Y h.••lv.-n ••"ig'"'lt<' '""'"'Y'iimtlyloy..,. 1t:11h.L/,1u11{'k. Sumwpl.m-r.•, .vn./J {t1«.•. /Jo .. ,,,irthu(lf .Yt-"' ... a/u>1.wuw1/N"1th J J;1kert11rol/,11.1111e.t,,1 I or pltt£•11rr. l\1_v ,'J.:f>L•. r-:e11be be,1/ 11ir1111'11 atlmtU111 ALL BILLS PAID! MONTROSE AREA 1419 Hyde Park $100 OFF MOVE-IN With This Ad 1 Bedroom $395 Cable Available Close To Bus Line (713) 524-9660 ThE NEW VOICE One America$ Mato< NompapQ'S pnwuJub7lemn111zlly n.z/,u: ''"' ,,m_,1,uuu.1/r."; 11.11X• u1.111u11t /1•rf(t1,y,rfmu11I. \, seeks to expand its presence in FORT WORTH I/ f'<'<'f'U " ti b t bt n•1Nt w Iv ft tr f.1ir a11<l qmtr- U nm btlV f'<'"' c>f mmcl fvr .Y<•• 011.1,:n1'""''·'· Advertising ' Dl11tributlon Repr•••nt•tlv• ll~t\•tb.,f._ytn.i/•/iJ('}I/< I '' vllYt•11rliku••1m111<Yp•l1<'y. l'b.·1m1 .. 1d•111••<J11td.: m.<y "'"'""'i/1&11/•1l 11 tidktnttr•1 ''"''''"~ 42(11.f:.lf.1 //;/m1ty.' 1pt .. bi11 y.w 'ru11JL/Utl /,>. ff yw ro d eny respe..:.tOO non cont .>V£'Slal Sl motivated nd have a good busJrle appe r r o. we woul Ike Ill reai f•'>m ye .i Jourrai• tic _,. wood be an add d t:.01 ellt H ab..> n nspor •ion reQ.ro<1. Pl•••• 1end a letter or r•1um• to: lll M >R "" < \\ .\ S \\ I f \f ~ S ;n (t 0 .. 0 R \\(It I R I ( p.; "I: \\ 'QRK 'S' 10 .CIJ Th<. Now Vo o 408 Av0'1dale J-tOI.! ten. X llOOf. OR ( 8 0 .fl I Wayne - It's Not Free But It's Close! Breakfast Special LL11Ch Special See Us For $2.95 $4.95 BRLJ\JCH Charl·ie~s 7am-3pm • Monfri Everyday • Mon ttru Fri 2 Pancakes - 2 Bacon 11am ti ? 2 eggs (any style) OR Every Satl.rday and Slllday BREAKFAST • LLNCH • DN'£R • DESSERTS 24 HOrnS A DAY 1100 Westhemer Houston (713) 522-3332 NATURAL HEALTH & HEALTHY HEALING A Non-Toxic Approach to a Healthier Lifestyle Start a New & Healthier Lifestyle Today. Books, Tapes, Videos, Lecturers & Great Store Customer Service Available Reflexology, Anti-Oxidants, Herbal Therapies, Fasting, Body Building, Colon Health, Juice & Food Therapies, Homoeopathy, Detoxification, Vitamin & Minerals, Amino Acids, Macrobiotics, Acupuncture, Vegetarian Diets & Cookbooks, and Much, Much More. FOR MCIE N=ORMATlON ON OUR tlJmlTIONAL SLf'f'\D.ENTS. CALL MCHAB.. K. WI.SON TOOAY 2 eggs - 2 bacon Hash Browns Of G'its ard Toast Choice of 3 Entrees Joim:. Ue foll:' THANKGG :IVliNG liN §AH ..;u AI'T ~875.00 Tris year we tiave created a very special holday package for our Gay and Lesbian friends - THANKSGIVNG IN SAN .!JAN. PUERlO RICO!!! We leave Houston on Wednesday. November 24th for our hollday caper with 1011 glorious rlgits at the !Deluxe Condado Beach Hotel. We ret11n on Sunday, November 28th - totany exhausted from our Lat111 Thanksgiving Fiesta. lOUR INCLUDES: • Rouidtnp Air from Houston via American A:rnnes • Transfers to and from our hotel • Four nights al the DELUXE Condado Beach Hotel which has one of the most elegant gamblng casinos • Two cocktal parUes hosted by 1.D. TRAVEL • A very special Thankagiv111g least • An ID. TRAVEL stall member available for an your needs Tt-ts special tour is imited to 20 people so please ACT NOW~' I.:C Tir~ vel lnternational/Domest1c (800) 856-9332 (713) 850-9332 ·TOU' price 15 based on dOUble room OCC\4)aney. Siig e 1oom supp1ement avalable on 1equest THE NEW VOICE I SEPTEMBER 17-23, 1993 3 T T T LETTER TO THE EDITOR Mississippi gay-lesbian group seeks outside help in organizing first march From GARY BARLOW, Biloxi, MS I am wri1ing this leuer to gay papers around the country in an effort to gener· ate support for the cause of lesbian and gay equality in Mississippi. While many of your readers may be familiar wilh our situation due to stories that have run in some papers recently, some may not be aware of the urgency of ii. This is a brief account of what has happened to date, On July 9, 1993, G .L. Friendly, an organization which formed 10 open gay and lesbian-orien1ed community cen· 1ers on 1he M1ssissipp1 Gulf CoaSI, ran a ~mall public service announcement regarding meeting times in a local news­paper. Wilhm days, G .L. Friendly was under auack from local groups and churches who began petition drives to >lop u' from meeting in Ocean Springs (m a pnva1e home). The peutions were accepted by the Ocean Sprmgs Board of Alderman on July 21 sl. Al 1ha1 meellng, many per­sons were permitted to speak against us and did so 1n very slanderous and abu­sive lerms, saying lhat gays only wanted a center as a place to meet and have sex and recruit children. Some quoted scripture to support their view tha1 we should be pul 10 dealh. When members of G.L. Friendly allempled to respond, the Mayor said 1here had been enough public commen1 a1 1ha1 point. The Board reluctan1ly concluded 1ha1 there was no law under which 1hey could prevent us from meeting. but made ii clear 1hey wished we would go away. We are nol gomg away. We have instead scheduled a march and a rally for downtown Ocean Springs on Sa1ur­day, Sept 18th, al 3:00 p.m. We have received a great deal of incerest from groups around 1he sou1h and expec1 1200 to 1800 pariicipants, although m recenl days we have received calls 1hat mdicale we may far exceed that number. We hope for a peaceful, non·violen1 march. but we have received numerous threa1s, including death lhreats. There TT T OBSERVER'S NOTEBOOK are active skinhead groups m the area which have carried out gay bashings before, and some of our leaders have been subjected to intimidation and van­dalism m recent weeks. The police chief of Ocean Springs (population 16.000) has called in police from around the region and has said 1here will be al least 150 police for the quarter mile parade There will also be barricades up and down streets, and she has warned us thal lhe city's strict obscenity laws will be enforced 10 1he letter We need your support, and we need ii now Many lesbians and gay men have moved out of Mississippi in the past to large cities m order to live free from harassment and discnmination, myself included. Bui I have come back to Mis­sissippi because of my conviction that if we are 10 win full equali1y under the law, 1hen it must be won in places hkc 1his. We can only gain so much by clustermg in large cities, as the recent effort to end the military ban demonstrated. W1thou1 broad-based nauonal support, ga) and lesbian equali1y has gone aboul as far as it can go We must be a poliucal force everywhere, even in Mississippi, to go further. Those of you who cannot be here to support us in person can help us finan­cially. We desperately need your help 10 open these community centers and pay for the parade and rally. Donauons to the community cen1ers are tax deducti· ble. While dona1ions to our political group, the MtSsissippi Gay and Lesbian Task Force, Gulf Coas1, are not tax­deductible, 1hey are necessary, This type of gay ac11vism 1s a first for Mississippi and ,. a direct result of the momentum genera1ed by lhe March on Washmgton. We are setting 1he agenda here, not 1he religious right, That i> eitactly what we as a communuy. rn small towns all over the country. must do in our banlc 10 end b1go1ry and mjus­llce. If we can win here. we can wm eve­rywhere. Please help u' to make that happen. Call us al (601) 875-3335 10 offer your support , Thank )OU Conservative and neo-conservative attacks on gays frail llllder scrutiny By PAUL VARNELL FOR THE NEW VOICE There are not many JOUrnals to which 1hough1ful, m1elhgent people can repair for stimulating and informative essays on serious culfural topics. One of the best written and most interesting such magazines is the New Cruerion. Founded in 1982 by former New York Times art critic Hilton Kramer, the mag· azme quickly es1ablished ilself as a defender of high modernism-ils very name derives from a journal once edited by T.S. Eliot-as the only serious alter· native to contemporary mass culture As such, It made 1he c laim to upho ld aucono mous critica l s ta n dards in music. art, literature aesthetic stan dards appropriate to the ans them <elve\, Those siandards the "New Crite­rion" saw as bese1 on all sides by polit1- ca1 and !'oc1al age nd a~ f rom deconstruc tion, to vulga r Marxism, to a chaotic, whim-worshiping post modernism. Oddly, !hough, 1h1s magazine of high culture recently added a "media" col umn written by one James Bowman. an o therwise undistinguished movie reviewer for the conservative political magazine American Spectator. More oddly, in lhe June iss ue, Bowman devo1ed a page and more 10 the March on Washington and rela1ed gay lopics. Bowman alleges himself doubtful about 1he au1he nticuy, the sincerity of c la ims 10 gay p ride at the March because o ne ~peake r asked the crowd: If you could ta ke a pill to make them straight, would they do II ? And 1he crowd shouted back, no. Bowman claims that 1he mere fact lhe quesiion was asked, no matter the answer , suggesis a kind of subliminal anxiety, an internalized expectation tha1 one should, af1er all, be heterosex-ual Martin Luther King, he notes smugly, never asked his African-Ameri­can marchers is 1hey would lake a pill to make themselves whue, would lhey do so From there he careens on to 1he specu­lation 1hat "ii is at least arguable that such vehement proclamations of gay pride are an expression of an attitude like that of the teen rebel who wants to be bad ju\I because ll is bad." So gays are JUSI naughty children, trying 10 get attention, self-defensively deluding themselves that lhey are proud 10 be this way So the more we affirm ourselves, 1he more we confirm Bowman's do ub1s There is no way we can wm. But as usual with such crafty formulations. there 1s some1hing very wrong with Bowman's argumenl. There is no rea­soning at all Bowman affects ignorance of the obvio us fac1 1hat-whe1her or no1 any blacks ever wished they were white­blacks were never attacked for choosing 10 be black By contrast, much of 1he propaganda direc1ed against gays, especially by the Re ligious Right. has been exactly m 1erms of gays w11Jfully choosing to be gay. In thal contex1. ii becomes plausible-perhaps even desir­able- for gays 10 assert their dignity as whole and healthy people by firmly rejectmg lhe idea lhat, even tf (contrary to the felt experience of most gays) bemg gay were a choice, 11 would be a choice to be rejected as defecuve, inferior or wrong. Hardly a nyone wan1s to c laim that the ir homosexuahly sho uld be accepted simply because It 1s no t a choice. Rather, we ins is t on e qua l lega l and social regard-accepta nce, 1f yo u w i ll ­because being gay is a fully equal way 10 be fully human. TT T LETTER TO THE EDITOR Bowman can make his pomt only by pretending not to be aware of 1he differ­eni contexts in which 1he full, human digni1y of gays and of blacks are neces­sarily asserted. To rcpeat7 he can make his claim only by avoiding the obvious, hoping his readers will not notice. But by doing so, Bowman is nol upholding any high standard of analystS, but a low polemical posture . It is a mysiery whal this all is do mg in the '"New Criterion." Af1er some childish c11ches about gays as a "specially protected group" and "the militant gay agenda:• Bow­man makes his second major claim, that "the only aspects of the gay issue wor­thy of political consideration'" is "'its decorum." Starting from the fact lhat The New York Times m1Siden11fied the sexual orientauon of a White House aide, Bowman asks why a major new~­paper should he identifying 1he sexual orientation of a Wh11e House aide m the first place. "It suggests a blurrmg of the boundary between 1he public and 1he private which, if allowed its career unimpeded, must lead to 1he des1ruction of civil society," Goodness! The apocalypse already and I didn't even have time to pack my toothbrush! But as before, Bowman's cla ims arc without foundation A Wh ile House aide's sexual orientation becomes rele­vant if the administration has made a pomt of mcludmg gays, 1f the aide is open, and particularly 1f the meeung being reported on concerned gays issues. The re levance there is access and mclusiveness as official policy-surely a new thmg and 1herefore news. A child could figure this oui. Bui as to Bowman's more general point : Bowman conveniently forgets that people have been d1sc losmg their sexual o rie nta tio n, and hav ing it dis-closed by newspapers for years. People disclose-and newspapers reveal-the existence of husbands and wives. they disclose weddmgs, 1hey even reveal the existence those quintessen1ial produc1s of behavior called "children." But Bowman clcarl\" does not think activities or new~papc'r reports 1ha1 are by or about heterosexuals blur "'the boundary between public and private" or could "'lead lo the destruction of civil society .. It is only 14hen someone's homosexuality is di,closed thai Bow­man fears civiliza1ion totters. So Bow­man has a double sundard, bu1 he crafts his claim so a~ ro a\.·oid the impression of one Thus he enables him­self to avoid the inconvemence of jusu fying or arguing for a double <1andard­an argument that might be difficult to bring off successfully . So Bowman once again !>hows him self 10 be avoiding the obvious ObJCCllon, hoping his readers won't 1h1nk of 11 either. Doing so reveals him simply a-. a dishonest man. Frankly. thi~ 1~ low and contemptible. beneath the dignity of a gentleman. The odd thing i; lhat this apparently passes for argumen1 wuh New Cruerion editor Roger Kimball. Writing to one reader. Kimball responds to such criticism~ as those above. agamst the plam evidence of his senses, by saymg, "We thmk he !Bowman) pro vides an independent and original take on a number of imporlant JSsucs affect­mg our culture (stc) life today " But the good news in all this IS that apparently this is lhe be'1 the conserva­tives and nco-conservat1ves can do Their arguments are so feeble, so eva­nescent, that 1hey canno1 be spelled oul fully leSI they look absurd on their face We have far better, more in1ellec1ually sa11sfy ing argumenls. Beller pack your toothbrush now. Bowman Thanks for success of Dog Daze of August benefit show at The Red Room From CARL MORAN, Vic. i'r<<ident, Colt 45'S, Houston, TX On Sunday, Augu<t 29, 1993, heartS and hands reached acros< Montrose and un11ed al The Red Room for a pawsi1ively wonderful Colt 45's AIDS Trouble Fund Benef11 The "Dog D3le of Augusi" show raised $2,000 for ATF A thunderou, Hou~ton-proud round of aprlausc goes out to Momma Jo Carter. her management and staff at The Red Room and The Outpost. and her cliemele. for a job exceedmgly well done With 1he resurrecllon of the 1930 ·s "Golden Girls" ala Gay I990's, a truly T T 'Y DATELINE: GAY AMERICA marvelous, slapsiick, musical corned) review was performed by Miss Mona, The Sambuca Sisters (Crayola Crayon. S1ella Carp, and Miss Blister Pu<Sy), Maylen Peddlepu<her, Miss Twiggy, Tina Louise, Miss Mid Texas Brittany Paige, surp,rise guest performer Texas Renegade 'Mr Jerry," Ray. Jimmy Dale. and emcee Papa Smurf/Uncle Mikey Jeffrassic Park was ever so exciting \\ilh these Q. cc. be Jungle swinging their ";nes. Again, the Colt 45's humbly thank all the abo,·e and wi<h to respectfully tip their ha1s to all those who con1inue to sho"' compassion. Through their support, our cooperative efforts ...,.ill .conunuc t<'! con:t· municate our heart's dcslre to provide aid to 1hose who need it most Military accuses two more Marines of posing for pornographic videos CAMP PENDL!' TON_, CaltL,. Thurs day, Sepl. 9 (AP)-Mihtary olf1c1a ls who have previously denied widespread Manne mvolvement in an a lleged gay porno rm& have linked two more so l­diers to the videos and magazines. Altogether, five Camp Pendleion Marines have been connecied to the matl-nrder bustne" allegedly run by I.uciano Ceballo' Vazquez . ')lo charges have been f1led-1he 1nv.eS11gation continues.' base spol esperson Staff Sg1. Kelley Ramsey said Thursday No civ1l1an laws forbid posmg nude, or engaging in hom.osexua l mte.rcourse. Bui such behavior IS a v1ola11on of m1 l11ary regulauons and _could be sub­ject to either admin~~t_rat1ve or d1sc1_pli· nary ac1ion, •atd Chief Warrant Officer Mike Hedlund. Of the five Marines accused so far. one was p1c1ured fully clo1hed m a brochure adverlhing adult videos for sale, one ~as involved in a video that did not include a .sex ac1. and another was filmed in 1he nude. In the only video 1urncd O\•er to the Marines by Oceanside po_l1ce, 1wo Marines were pictured stttmg m a room. After one of the men left the room, the oiher masturba1ed, Hedlund said. One of those two men was identified Wedne•­day The Naval Criminal Inve•tiga11ve Service i~ still mvest1~atmg the only fel ony-lcvel offcnt.e involved-a picture depicting sex between a man and a woman .Oceanside police hegan an 10vcstiga- 11on of Ceballos' business m July after hearing of posStble mvo(vemenl of Juveniles When detectives were unable to turn up evidence of that, they turned over a photo album and video 10 NCIS. Ceballos, 42, was arresied near his home in Oceanside last mon1h on a fed­eral warrant charging him ""h v1olat­mg parole. He was being held without bail m 1he Metropolitan Correcttonal Center in San Diego. Ceballos has told reporters that between' 200 and 700 active ·du1y Marines were involved m his mall order operauon during the paSI three years 4 THE NEW VOICE I SEPTEMBER 17-23. 1993 $ HCRN ADULT, HIV-RELATED CLINICAL DRUG TRIALS ENROLLING IN THE HOUSTON AREA Houston Clinical Research Network (HCRN) is now screening a limited number of patients for six studies related to HIV_ The studies are described briefly below: RANITIDINE IN ASYMPTOMATIC PATIENTS - Previous studies have indicated that drugs known as H2 receptor antagonists such as ranitidine may induce improvements in immune function. This pilot study will evaluate the effects of ranitidine versus placebo on several immunological markers in persons with CD4 cell counts between 400 and 700 who have not used anti-HIV medications. 3TC AND AZT COMBINED VERSUS AZT AND DDC COMBINED - This study will investigate the safety, efficacy and phannacokinetics of Arr and 3TC combined compared to Arr and ddC combined It will investigate the following regimens in HIV - infected persons with C04 counts between 100 and 300 who have had at least 24 weeks of Arr therapy alone. Ann I - 3TC 150mg every 12 hours, AZT 200mg every 8 hours, ddC placebo every 8 hours; Ann II - 3TC 300mg every 12 hours, Arr 200mg every 8 hours, ddC placebo every 8 hours; Ann Ill- 3TC placebo every 12 hours, AZT 200mg every 8 hours, ddC 0.75mg every 8 hours HIV AND HERPES STUDIES - HCRN is also still enrolling for two trials of BW256U87 versus acyclovir for treating and suppressing ano-genital herpes in persons infected with HIV THYMOPENTIN COMBINED WITH AZT, DD/, AZT AND DD/ OR AZT AND DDC - Thymopentin is an injectable drug that is based upon human thymic honnone. a substance in the body which stimulates immune cell production. This study will examine the effectiveness of thymopentin combined with several drug regimens in persons with CD4 counts of 200 to 400. Laboratory testing and the study drug are provided by the study; however, AZT, ddl and ddC are not provided DA TRI 002 - AZT IN ACUTE HIV INFECTION - This federally-sponsored study will offer free, anonymous HIV-antibody testing and P24 antigen testing to persons who have had a very recent exposure risk. Those who qualify will be offered the chance to take part in the research study. CALL 520-2011 FOR ENROLLMENT INFORMATION (also fom\lng warting ksts 10< two cionical drug tnals to begin 1n October - IVX-E-5910< ant~H IV therapy and HPMPC 10< treatment of herpes in HIV) HOUSTON CLINICAL RESEARCH NETWORK AnAmFAR Com111U111ty8ased Clinical Drug T.-s.te 520-2083 (client services), 520-2011 (clinical). 520-0934 (Spanish), 528-3719 (TDD), an affiliate of Montrose Clinic, P 0 . Box 66308, Houston, TX 77266-6308 de ectte Mo DE ~ ~" ~ - I' n H t: t U I ~- I II I f " • - Turn your LIFE INSURANCE into CASH, NOW. Your NEEDS must be met . • . . NOW. Your DREAMS must be fulfilled . NOW. PWA's Call for FREE BROCHURE 800/487-1183 aoone6-7183 W. CllRE, ..I W. tlll!JER!li'fll!J KAPOSI'S SARCOMA CLINICAL TRIALS OPEN Two trials are enrolling in the Houston Area for people with HIV Disease and lldVilI\C~d Kaposi's sarcoma (progressive disease with more than 25 skin lesions or visceral involvement). 1 Randomized comparison of DOXIL® (an inveshgat1onal drug formulation of doxorub1c1!" encapsulated in ilposomes) with ABV (adriamycin bleomycin and v 1ncrist1ne - a combl~ation of drugs considered one of the stan­dard treatments for advanced KS) 2 O p e~ tri:i ot DOXIL for treating people whose KS has pro~es se d w" 1 !l.'1.AEl\i !l.L av CALL 1-800-KAPOSIS for information about trail designs and entry criteria THENEW VOICE ISSUE673 5eplomber 17·23. 1993 Published Fridays Estabbhed 1974 a'i the Hou$ton Montrose Star, r.ee.tablsh9d 1980 as the HQtn.loo Montrose Voice, inC:orpOfahng 1001 the Now Ofloans Cresent C•y Sl.ar 408 Avondale Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 (800) 729-8490 Fax: (713) 529-9531 Contents copyr"Jhl 1993 Office Hours: 9am-5:30pm weekdays ticnry McClurgtpublshe< James Cheek/general manager Shaun Keenan Gilson/reporter t eonatd EM Johnson/c:onespandent Jav181' Tamez/af1S"& ent.......,..l AOVl RTISING SA1 ES OCPARTMENT Austtn/Jlm Rawson Bawn Roug&<Cur115 E Jackson. Jr COrpus Chft!:.111Suz:ette Locke Ga~eston/Jeny Steuart ~Ion/Don Dowden . ~· Prl'lCe, Ron Shawn New ortcansJOean Roussel Fb:> Gnuwie ValleylAJicta Lugo. Laura Coney san Anlonloll efty T aylo< -(512)47~245 - Rouge (504) 346-S617 tlouSl•)O 1113) 529-8490 Now0 rleans(504) 514 3?79 S.n Ar>toolo 0 10) 226-1833 Elsewhere (800) J'29.M90 POSTMASlER s.nd ~· COffKl!Onl • 408 Alt(lnd:ale Houl10fl 'X 77006-3099 Suo.ertptJon tat• n IJS ttJy cam.rot •JS MAlll $1 75 per.,....._ IS4S50pe18mortfll0t$91pe1yeat) ~ Ad\l'erflf no ~ MICtlM GrlVOll Riven dale Ma:rttbng POB 1268 PW'llelCI NJ (908 715!iM65Q play ~ ~ 5pm CT Monday 10 ,..,.,,. lpace 1100r1 ~ 10 lumtll'I .a ClOPt tor Fnday pwllca~aon ~Mvf't;;')j1dtfad!J,... -es:dayfOIFMay "N"o"f'U''" ""'~ . ... Nttet: l8!e .., .,.. 1 .. .nee Aug 17 199:t" Rfi.OCW- W• do 'IOI dlUIN ~ '"pontlllbty tor ll';'~DU1-.adtn•,.•1teo ~ttienews PIP8f 3' .,,,, tutpeceotl 3' trauou&enl Of dKepti.,e .O.ertdtng end IUIP' :>na ¥t11I be ln'lft.tPeO ~r N8tional a.y NeWS~ Guna Gay a "llSNn Pm• Astoaallon. AU«Miltl' rnernNf Aa~ea Prn1 THE NEW VOICE I SEPTEMBER 17-23, 1993 5 T T T HOUSTON QUICK NOTES MCCR to off er new support group to explore the realities of bisexuality The Metropolilan Communicy Church of che Resurreccion (MCCR) will begin a new series of supporc groups chis monlh exploring issues of bisexualicy In a princed s1a1emen1, lhe group lead­ers said 1ha1 chey wane 10 a11rac1 people who are ''q:.:c.st1oning their sexuality, as well as chose who already identify as bisexual." MCCR also said 1ha1 Che group is open 10 boch men and women of all cultures. Meecings will be confiden­cial and "supporcive of safe, health-con­scious bisexuality The new group begins on Wednesday. Sepe 22nd, and will meec from 7:00 10 9:00 p.m. ac 1919 Decacur S1ree1 (off Washingcon near Silver). For furcher informacion, call MCCR ac 861-9149 Reach out and touch ... The Montrose Chnic ·s capual campaign has received another major corpora1c grant. This time , Southwestern Bell has concnbuced $5.000 in che clinic's efforc to open a new Montrose facility The plan is 10 convert a former motel in che 200 block of WeSlheimer inco whac lhe Moncrose Clinic calls "a scace-of· lhe­an outpatient medical and rducation fac ility · The clinic 'peciali1es in diag· nosing and trca1ing sexually transmit .. led diseases and providing HIV counsel· ing and 1es11ng. The campaign 111 fund che new facilicy seeks to raise $1 9 million. According to chnic off1c1als. more than 80 percent of 1ha1 goal has been mec. Renovacion is expecced 10 begin soon . And in sports ... fhc Lone Scar Volleyball Associa11on will begin tts fall league 1c1iv1tie~ on Sunday, Sepe. 191h. Players wich all Iev els ol experience are welcome For Sun­day '; play, all chrce courcs ac Sc. Tho mas Univcrs11y will be ucilizcd, so Chae play can be scgrcgaced by experience. The Sunday sessions begin ac 5:15 p.m . and concinue uncil 11:15 p.m. The group will also play on Monday che 20ch from 8:15 p.m. 10 II 15 p.m . For more informa11on, call K. Doug S1ewar1 at 864-1234 . Bowlers are also cranking up cheir fall league ac1ivi11es chis week. The Monday nighc women's league sea reed lase Mon­day. Con1ac1 Pac al 437-6218 or Maria ac 862-3630 for more informacion. The Moncrose Monday nighc men's league begins nexc Monday. che 20ch, with a short organizational meeting at 7 :30 p.m ., followed by an evening of bowling. Call Sieve S1aple1on ac 529- 3261 for more informacion. The Houston Thursday nighc mixers also begm nexl week, on Che 23rd Again. a short or1anizational meetio& Miss Camp Amtrica Pag•ant TT TNEW ORLEANS QUICK NOTES will precede play II begins ac 7 :30 p.m Call 529-3261 for more on Thursday night's activities. Miss Camp America turns 25 Sacurday nighl, Che curcain rolls up once again for che 25ch anniversary cel­ebracion of Miss Camp America Pag­eanc. The Houscon 1radi1ion is a spoof of the Miss America Pageanc. and chis year one of che "lucky" members of MCAF will wear Che crown for one year of fun filled ac11vi1ies. Miss Camp America began in 1969 in a garage apartinent where less than a dozen people gachcrcd 10 wacch che real Miss America Pageanc . As you mighc have guessed. 1he participants decide to have their own contest puttmg names in a hac 10 see which one of chc lucky pariy­goers could be named Miss Camp Amer- 1ca From this small beginning, che group grew mto whac is now che Miss Camp America Found111on , a 50lc charitable foundation . MCAF members hose fundraisers all year long 10 supporc chamies selccccd by members. In addicion, s1ar1lc1s can ofcen be found helping lend cheir 1alen1s to other organizations in need of ''tal· enc." The 56 members mecl monlhly lo work on various projects coming up in che year and begin planning almosc immediacely afcer each years show for the next years performance. The Miss Camp America Foundauon is a major fundraising voice for the gay community and la!"t year gave over $14.000 10 che AIDS Communll) of Houscon. This year, MCAF funds will be divided equally among four charilies, che Colt 45's AIDS Trouble Fund, Body Positive. Pet Patrol and the AsslSlaoce Fund. Each year. the show aims to be extrav~ agant and campy Members worl.: on wigs, costumes. ~cenery . and doctor all the aches and bruises from danctng m heel> as chey prepare 10 hu chc scage. Only MCAF- members appear m che ~how as they present talent, swim suit and evenmg gowns 10 compete for 1he coveced crown Members also work bacl stage as they try and make all chc scage crafl thac one would expect m a Broad· way .sho\\ fhis year's theme 1s "Guys Noc Dolls." The show prom1Ses toes of ~liner . rhine­stones and there will nol a single feather left m Houston after the MCAF show h11> the scage Sacurday, Sepe 18 the MCAF sho,. hlls che stage ac Cullen Performance Hall on the Untvcrsny of Houscon campu,, A few !ldets are available and can be purchased by calling 5!0-STAR. Orlando featuring Quentin Crisp opens in New Orleans after lengthy delay By UW"IARD M RL JOllNS0'1 The New Voice/New Orleans Orlando, che much praised, much panned, androgynous film, wich a much delayed New Orleans opening has finally arrived al Che Prycan1a Theacer Orlando scars Tilda Swinton, as Orlando, che boy. curncd man, curned woman~ and Quentin Crisp as Queen Elizabcch I Swinton also played Queen Isabella m "Edward II ... Crisp is a lcc­curcr and auchor of "Naked Civil Ser­vant." Swmcon cold The New Voice (Issue 670, Augusc 27, 1993), "Orlando makes a clarion call for human ~ights. and an end to oi;ome rather non·vt0lent violence agamst women New exhibits Allison Scewan. a mixed media arcist 1s currcncly showing ac che Archur Roger Gallery, 432 Julia S1ree1, New Orleans. Also showing, Mike Fennelly, "an mau~ural exh1b11ion of abs1rac1 pamc­tngs' and Mary Jane Parker. "f1gura­t1ve paintings." For more mforma11on, call (504) 522- 1999. And, Mike Frolich. 1he Ninch Ward New Orleans painter, is currently show~ ing at Gasperi Gallery. 320 Julia S1ree1, New Orleans. For more mformacion, call (504) 524- 9373 "IO Windows-IO Years" NO/AIDS Task Force i' issumg a call for phocofraphs of people lose 10 AIDS which wi.1 become pare of a phocogra­phy cxh1b11ion chronicling the HIV AIDS epidemic m Lou1s1ana The exhibicion ts called "10 Win­dows- IO Years" 1n recognuion of cheir I Och Anniversary . II will be displayed m che IO Bay Windows ac che Task Force ·s 1407 Decacur S1ree1 offices. One window will be a memorial col· lagc of friends, parlners. family mcm­ben and co-workers who have died . Anyone w11h phocographs chey want 10 share 'hould 'end 1hem 10 10 Wm· dows- 10 Years. NO/AIDS Tuk Force, 1407 Decacur Scree!, New Orleans. LA 70116. Phocos may be up co 5 by 7 inches and m euher black and whue or color. Task Force workers advise not to send your TT TSAN ANTONIO QUICK NOTES only copy as photos may not be returned . For more informacion phone (504) 948- WALK. Theater Marigny turns "Sweet 13" Theaccr Marigny, chc much beloved small stage a1 616 Frenchman Street m New Orleans' Faubourg Marigny "' cel­ebrating llS 131h ~eason with a four week run of "Bully-The Advcncures of Teddy Rooseveh." The show, wrillen by Jerome Alden. IS running currcncly and was direcced by '!ah:a~·:r.~ba;:gnt.o ~ w~~~'f r~ndf~c:~a ~r:~ phone (504) 944-2653 No/AIDS Walk seeking vol­unteers NO/AIDS Walk 1993 will h11 che s1ree1s a1 10:00 a.m. Sunday. Sepe 26ch m Audubon Park. The help ol hundreds of volunteers 1s needed hcfore and during the event. organizers said "Any amount of 11me a volunteer can spare will .be apprec1a1ed. Special incer· ests or sl.:1lls such a~ computer work, sign-m.akmg, or truck driving will be appreciated." In the weels leading up 10 chc Walk, volunteers are needed to distribute posl· ers and brochures, scuff envelopes and Walk Day informacion bags, make route signs and decorations. do office work . and scaff recrui1men1 boochs ac special events. For more informa11on, phone (504) 948·WALK. Movies at NOLA 's Lesbian and Gay Community Cen­ter The Lesbian and Gay Communuy Cen­ter of New Orleans. 816 N. Ramparc (across from Lou1S Armmong Parl) 1s showing free movies. Sundays ac 7•00 p.m. Sepe 19ch: "The Lose Language of Cranes." A father-son come-our wnh w1fe/mo1her emerging chrough che pain ''ory. All grow. An mspira11onal BBC production. Sept. 26ch "Leaving Normal ," de,cribcd in LGCC lncraturc as ' 'The thmkmg man's Thelma and Louise.• The TGRA San Antonio chapter holds third annual Fall Fest this weekend fhe San An1on10 chapccr of the Texas Gay Rodeo Assoc1a1ton (TGRA) will ho<e 1cs chtrd annual Fall Fcsc chis week· end. The cclebra11on will be held in San Pedro Parl on Sunday, Sepe. 19ch. The day-long evcnc will feacure food, tieer, arts and crafts exh1b1.ts and enter~ uinmenc. The cvenl IS designed 10 help cover the costs of the upcoming ten1h annual fcxas Gay Rodeo. to be held m San Antonio's Joe and Harry Freeman Coliseum on Nov. 61h and 7ch. Remammg fund\ will be donated to local AIDS charilles. The group has a goal of $15.000 chis year. Lase year, TGRAISan Anconio successfully mec a TT TDATELINE: GAY AMERICA SI2.000 goal SAAF Seeking Volunteers The San An1on10 AIDS Foundallon is continuing Its ~earch for new volun1eers to ser"c in a variety of capac1t1es Twice each mon1h SAAF holds spc· cial oraenlation sessions for po1ential nc" v~luntecr> . Cu. rently. they are <eheduled for che second Sacurday of each month al IOilO a .m. and che lhtrd Tuesday at 7il0 p.m Orientatrnn session!'> are held 1n SAAF's conference room 11 818 Ease Grayson in San An1on10. For furcher mforma11on, call (210) 225·4715. Ex-husband: lesbian should have custody of their 2-year-old son RICHMOND, Ya . Monday, Sepe. 13 (AP}-A man whose ex-wife loSI cusc.ody Of thc-1r 2;rear .. oJd 500 because ~he IS a lesbian sat he believes she should raise che child. Dennis Douscou separaccd from Sharon Roetoms when she was two monchs pregnanc. Alchou.gh .he was present lnr Tyler Doustou s birch, his m•olvemcnc in his sons lite vircually ended Chere But Doustou said he wants to ge~ involved agam now chat Ms. Bouoms mocher, Pamela Kay Bounm,, has won cuscody ''The way this is going, u pushes me harder 10 bc a pare of Tyler\ life ," he said. In March , a 1uven1lc courc Judge awarded cuscody 10 chc grandmochcr. uymg Ms. Bounms, 23, "as an unfu mother liecause !>he lived \\Uh her lover. Last wcoL. Ifcnrrco Circun Judge Buford M. Parsons Jr. upheld 1ha1 dec1· 5ton finding 1ha1 Ms. Bonoms' conduce was illegal and po1en11ally damagmg lo lh• boy "In the opinion of thi'i cour1, her con· duct is 1mmoral ," he said. Parsons rcfu<cd 10 Ice Douscou give hlS opinion abouc who should raise the child. Kay Boctoms' lawyer, Richard Ryder. argued Chae Doustou gave up cus­tOd) when the divorce was ftnal m June 1992 and has concributed only $65 m child supporl. Douscou, a 21 -ycar-old ouc of wort con!"ltruction worker, sard he was sorry to see his ex ~ w1fc lose her son Tyler means cbc world to her, I know thac," he said m an interview published in Monday'< Richmond T1mes· D1S· pacch. ''To me. Sharon has some attl· cudcs of her mocher- shc wanes chmgs done her way Due she bas a genclc nature."' Dous1ou sud his former mother- an ­la" is cold-hearted." Kay Bouoms declined to respond 6 THE NEW VOICE SEPTEMBER 17·23. 1993 TT TFILMCUPS Several average to awful movies bring the swnmer cinema season to a close By JAVIER TA~IEZ 1be Sew Vo.:elHouston Years from now 1h1s summer will be remembered for "Jurassic Part .. and '"The Fuguivc." and very few will recall the season's ignommious closing. But for now, early in September, ii mates for wonderful copy. Consider 1his sam­pling. "Kalifornia" A cross·coun1ry 1rip from Pinsburgh 10 1he Wcsl Coas1 becomes a nighlmare for an unsuspec1mg ar1is1ic couple in "Kali· fornia " Carrie (Michelle Forbes) is a pbo1ographer whose slcamy subjccl mauer 1s considered 100 racy by local galleries Brian (David Ducbovny) ;. a wrucr 1t.'ho champions .serial killer~ as societal victim, and who is convinced 1ha1 1berc is an audience for a book of serial killers (1here's a real markciing nsl). The 1wo decide 10 pool !heir 1alen1s and bead across Ille coumry, stoppmg II sncs of infamous murders-she taking pictures and he absorbing the atmos­phere. Great plan. E.cepl being slrugglong artists, Brian and Carrie don't have the money 10 make Ille lrip alone. So Brian pulS up a nolice on a bulleun board 11 a local univemly. Early (Brad Pin) is a provocauvc Ncanderlhal who feels con· s1an1ly harangued by his parole officer and his landlord. While al 1hc un1ver­s1ty to interview for a janitorial posi­lion, Early spols Brian's no1icc. He gathers up his s1mplc1on significanl olher, Adele (Julieue Lewis), and I hey JOon Brian and Came for !he lrip. Carrie is pul off 1mmedia1ely. Brian adopts an alm<»I clinical a1111ude. Whal neuber of them know, nor Adele for lhal maucr. is 1ha1 Early had only mmulcs earlier killed his landlord Thus lhi< road lrip from bell begms. Tbc movie offers no twists or sur­prises. Every1bing you cxpecl 10 happen happens, making 1he film ex1rcmcly laborious 11 rimes. Ycl Early kills wuh such ferocuy and remorsclessnc» lhat even I hough us expeclcd, ii 's noncihc· less shocking. Excep11onal performances from Ju(. 1cttc Lewis and B(ad Pitt arc the h1ghci;t mark here. Lewis Is pathetically endear· 1ng as 1hc dim·wt11ed Adele and Pitt is volatile, even sexy. albeit in a revoll mg fashion. 'Kali fornia" is stylishly crude. " ·eedful Things" Once upon a 11mc the devil came to town 10 Castle Rock , Ma one He opened a l111le curio shop, and all 1he townspeople were able to fmd somcthong special, at a reasonable price of course. Nothing so ordi nary as souls IS an acceptable pay­menl at this shop, though . No, lhe KaJifornia proprietor here insists on sma11 favors. Tiny li11le 1h1ngs 1ha1 aren ·1 exac1ly nice. bur wha1's 1be harm m a lilllc prac· 1ical joke' You get 1hc p1c1urc? "Needful Things" JOms a long list of failed auempts to con· vcrt a Stephen King novel into a movie. The devil is Leland Gaunt (Max von Sydow). By 1he rime 1hc 1own sheriff, Alan Pangborn (Ed Harris) realizes that something is lerribly amiss in his hideaway hamle1, ii may be 100 lale. Whal a crock! "Needful Things" is need­ful of lhings, like better writing and di.re cling. "Hard Target" I was of the unshakable belief 1ha1 1f you've seen one Jean-Claude Van Damme movie you've seen them all, so I w111cd four weeks. unlit I had exhaus1ed 1hc olhcr possibililics before lraipsing off 10 see his latest. "Hard Targe1" did little to alter my conviction. This movie 1s a good example of the action genre, which can be tolllly crcdired to director John Woo, bur !hat only makes it beara­ble, not good. The movie is 1hc ump· 1een1h adapta1ion of ''The Most Danger· ous Game," a 1930s film m which a demented millionaire lures visitors to a remote island and 1hen hunis 1hem. In "Hard Targe1" the selling is con· 1cmporary New Orleans in the lawless· ness 1ha1 is endemic 1mmed1a1ely af1cr a police s1rike. Chance (Van Damme), a luckle.s merchant sailor agrees 10 help a De1ro11 lawyer, Nat Binder (Yancy Burler) find her missing fa1her. Though he took the job for the money, Chance becomes deeply involved in prolcctmg Nat from murderou'i former mercenar· ies wbo are killing for the sport Thanks to Woo 1hc violence doesn'1 seem quite so gratuitous. and this may even be, as some critics have said. Van Oammc's bes1 movie, bur given 1he sub­J< CI matter. is 1hat really say mg much. •112 "Father Hood" Pa1rick Swayze has hunk appeal . And as long as he radiates that charm, he can k.eep getting away with clunkers like 'Father Hood " Herc he plays Jack Charles, a fun-loving, carefree kind of guy who is very comfortable wilh his TT T YOURS TRULY IN A SWAMP decision a few years earlier to surrender paren· tat rights 10 his two children for 1hcir own good His children 1hough don'1 like 1he idea ai all. Kelly (Sabrina Lloyd) runs away from a Dickensian children's facility and straight to Jack. Kelly per· suadcs Jack 1hu 1hc ccnler lo which she and her brother arc bcong sent is a prhon. Bui Jack 1> a <mall time crook who 1s abou1 10 make the !~~r~eofs an~it'e:::~i Max Von Sydow to let two kids even hi:t own. get in h1~ way. So he take~ lhc kids w11h him Headmg down 1he highway wuh 1hc cops in pursuit, blah, blah, blah, blah Jack calls up a reporter who wrote an unflanerong srory portraying him as a kidnapper, blah, blah, blah, blah. She wants to expose 1he children's facility, blah, blah, blah, blah. Jack rediscovers his humanily, blah, blah, blah, blah. And 1ha1 about says 11 for lhc movie. Blah! "The Man Without A Face" A troubled man and a 1roublcd boy find answers and friend hip m this schlock, which also marks Mel Gibson's direclo· rial debut. With any luck II will also be his directorial farewell. ThlS boy, Chuck (Nick Stahl) can fond no happiness at home with his mother or two half·si5· tcrs. He decides he must escape to mili· tary boarding school (some kid, huh?), bur he needs tu1oring 10 pass 1hc entrance exam . Jus1in (Gibson) has been an outsider since his arrival in town. leadinR the life of a recluse. made all the more dramatic because his face 1~ horribly disfigured. Or I hould .ay pcr­feclly disfigured because the disfigure· men1 goes righ1 down 1he middle of his face. lha1 type of cin· emallc 1d1ocy is pervasive in "The Man Without a face" Gibson is an accomplished actor. but under his own hand he slinks. ·The Man Wi1hout a Face ' is a film wnhout a prayer And If You Thought Those Were Bad ... In " Only the Siron11," Mark Dacascos plays Louis Stevens. an Army Special Forces soldier, who rel urns to his Miami high school to discover it is overrun by drugs and violence. Louis tells 1hc school administrators to give him charge of a dozen of their worst young men, He teaches them a form of martial art called capoeira, which he mas1cred while s1a1ioned in Brazil(!?). Louis s1raigh1ens out the wayward youth and together they fight the evil drug lord. It's completely moronic tripe. "The Thing Called Love" (112) is all country hogwash. Two aspiring song· wri1ers, James (River Phoenix) and Kyle (Dermot Mulroney), go 10 Na~h­ville searching for success. While mal mg the rounds, playmg music for any· one who'll lislcn, lhcy bolh mecl and fall for 1he same singer, Miranda (Saman· 1ha Ma1his), who is also looking for her big break. They learn abou1 love, bur they never. make. the big time. and nci· ther will this movie. '"Fortress" (112) is another Mup1d look at a bleak future. In 1h1s one, abortion has been completely outlawed and as a population control method, procreaiion 1s limited to one child per woman­that's only one chance peribd. Of course some are bound to try and e cape dctcc 1ion. These criminals becomes prisoners and prisoners arc lhe property of 1hc cor· porations that run the prisons John Brennick (Christopher Lamber!) and his wife, Karen (Loryn . Locklin) will fight for 1heir child and will make a dar· ing escape auemp1 . Ihe film 1s riddled with cliches. One of the prisoners actu· ally •ays, "No one gels ouna here alive." ''Fortress" 1s a bona fide loser. "Boxing Helena ' (BOMB) might have been a controversial film. but con­troversial films h~vc some redeeming qualities. This movie has none Helena (Sherilyn Fenn) is a slur who uses her sexual wiles as a weapon. Nick Cavan· augh Qulian Sands) ts a surgeon walk· mg a menial high wire When llelena 1s hit by a 1ruck, Nick ampu1a1es her legs, hoping 10 make htr rclianl on him When 1ha1 fails, he ampulatcs her arms as well It is 10 the fllmmaker's credu that none of the surgical handiwork is ac1ually 'een. bur 1ha1 is ~mall comfort m this movie h's a disgusting display 1hat masks misogyny as obsession, I hared it. Reflections on a friend while riding a funeral train to Illinois By LEONARD EARL JOIDiSON The New Vo~cw Orleans My 1rain leaves a couple of hours before dinner. I have a bedroom . When you rate a bedroom on Amlrak, any1bmg on 1he menu 1s mcluded. I lhink I'll cat a steak. We do 001 cal meal m New Orleans often, 1t will be a treat. I'm bound for lllmois, "Land of Lin· coin" where I was born. and raised on lots of meal. I never ate a non-Friday meal 1ha1 didn't contain meat un1il I went away to college . I grew up wub a p1c1urc of Pope Pious lhe 12th hanging on the wall ncxl 10 a sold Jesus nailed 10 an ebony cross. You could slide back 1hc crucifix parl and expose a secret chamber containing holy oil, candles and olbcr loys for 1hc dead. I was born 1n10 a family of fanalical German Cuholics. ('"Fanatical Ger· man• is redundant."" my favorite aunt used 10 uy.) Wbeo I was 12, Pope Pious XII bad an attack of 1be hie-ups. He go1 them oflcn, and of1cn nearly died from 1hcm. I sent him a get-well card, and he scnl me a sil· vcr medal wilh angels asccndmg on one side and bis face of 1hc 01her. It buns on a cham deep inside a bank deposit box 1111 I 1urned 40, because a medal blessed by 1hc Pope was 100 pre· cious 10 wear Then, I decided to forsake my heirs pleasure at ownmg a pns1ine trea~urc. and began wearing It around my neck , The silver soon wore away exposmg whal I thought was prettier, yellow brass. Pious, 1he man, lost his glitter even sooner. In college, I learned he had been soft on fascism. He kepi quiet abou1 1he holocaus1 and helped German Nazis escape 11 W.W.ll's end. I also learned 1hat hones1 Abe Lincoln wro1e the New York Herald proclaiming national union more tmportant than the enslaved cond1t1on of II> people. I learned 1h1S, 100, away m college I was an mh1b11ed, close1ed queer. My sin seemed worse than Lincoln·~. or Pious.• A Pro1estan1 friend of mine said repeal· cdly, "Your sm 1s no sm at all,'1 Thal friend-from days I sometime remember only as smells-is lhe reason I am on this tram I am going 10 his funeral. He had been dying for several years. "We all are," he <aid, when I fmally fig· urcd out what hi> phone calls were really about. He had resred HIV poSI· uve. I blurred, I was clad I did nol have it. Then I apolosized. He said 11 was all nghl, he clad I didn't have II, too We maintained a maanificent corre· spondcncc throughoul our post·collegc years. h mrensified m whal he called "1hc final days." Twenty years before, he and a lover bough1 a duplex on New Orleans' Wcst­bank , and afler I went bankrup1 as "The 'Mcrchanl Prmcc' of South 11tmo1s Ave· nue." he wrolc ask.mg 1f I wanted to live m the un·restorcd side I did. Larer I wenl 10 sea They broke up. He moved 0 lO Hou~ton durin& the 011 boom. and left wuh 1hc bu>t. He enrolled 1n graduate school back al our llhno1s alma maler. and wrote three leners a week about the beau1y of the land around Carbondale (ii lruly 1s), and of my great weaknes< for colle&e boys. One fall, he sent me a tram licker to come sec the new crop, and him. lie founded an AIDS educaiion organ· ization in Southern Illmois and was its prcsidcn1 unul he, nccdmg care, had hlS trailer moved 10 his moihcr's farm . lie slipped fast af1cr that. When he was m 1he process of movm& his 1railer to his mother's farm, a mu1ual friend asked wha1 she could do . I suggested she buy him a word processor so he could keep wrnmg . lie said he didn'I wani it . CAT scans showed his bram uro· phied, his mother told me. He was on · again, off-agam lucid . When 1hey pul him m diapers he said, "I know wha1 this means," I phoned 1wo days before he died. He was barely con<c1ous. I 1old him of read· mg to applause 11 Kaldi's Coffee llou<e. He sparked He understood our qum· te~sential need to wrue, read and a•m praise And for 1he moment he remem· bercd who we were. FREE Zovirax For Treatment and Prevention of ** GENITAL HERPES ** (New Study: Free Suppression Medicine for 1+ Years in HIV+) ** SHINGLES ** (Less Than 72 Hours) If you have any of these conditions , you may be eligible for FREE treatment and compensated for your participation on completion of study. For more information call: The University of Texas Medical Branch Center for Clinical Studies (HOUSTON) UTMB 333-2288 .~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~---,_ ~ kllf!t~ : . . . c ... .... : .. ".. .. .. . 0 .... ... • .0.. . 0 Presents THE NATIONAL LEATHER ASSOCIATION'S ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF PLAY AND INFORMATION The f'baonai i..eahlr Assx:ia1Jarl IS procd I> pr_.,i 1NNG N LEATI-EA VIII" ., fb.l;tln. Texas hlmOCl:>ber 8 hu 10. 1993 UL B host I> warl<sh:lps and arnonsraions alorg""" a"""""""' ol lXTMlied social 8Y80IS />Ba~~ "'P'asenlr9 ~ lacelS of te LeateriSMIFelsh (X)O'l!Ul1y. N\Ao""'5 UL as an cwrtniY I> rrae1. exc111rga Ideas, and 90Cialza ...., a wde host ol poop. him 8IOU'ld .... y,oitj Rese!vaD"IS wl be oor*med al $84 per rq.,i ($10.00 per addllOnal peraon). To make~Dl&row. cal 713-748•32'21 or 1 oQ'.l0•325•3535 and ..i him you ant regislemg l'.lr UL For Detailed Information And A Free Registration Pack Call Or Write: NLA:Houston P 0 Box 66553 Houston, TX 77266-6553 Hotline 713-526-1331 z ...... ...- .. .. ~ ...."' .. ..... . .a .."' . . . .... .."' THE NEW VOICE I SEPTEMBER 17-23, 1993 7 Hills8 Science Dier Custom Care: It's not just a new pet food Its a whole new way of caring . Introducing Hill's Science Diet" Custom Care~ a new line of dog food that Ids you care for your dog's special nutritional needs. Each Custom Care fonnula has Hill's exclusive Nutrient Precision· approach 10 nutrition. with precise lt'Vels of essential nutrients . Custom Care• Natural -For the dog who thrives on food free of ar1ificial prese~<'S. 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The words arc uttered by a director/ choreographer-a character played by Richard Gere in ''And the Band Played On." That simple declarative illustrates the opinion of a fictional character who realizes early on in the epidemic-before it wao even called an epidemic-that lifestyles. attitudes and habits in the gay community had to change. Unfortunately the nameless charac­ter, intended to be a composite example of the devastation AIDS has wrought in the art and entertainment world. is speaking to himself when he says it. It is, however, doubtful that bis observa­tion would have been heeded even 1f 11 had been shouted over the public address system 1n one of the bath houses. Therein lies a large portion of the rea­son this film works so well and the rea­son it will receive high praise from most corners. The film version of "And the Band Plays On," written by Arnold Schulman and directed by Roger Spot­tiswoode, only slightly tones down the voluminous narrative of author Randy Shilts. TT T AUSTIN LIVE Shil was unequivocal in portraying the government, the medical establish­ment and the blood industry as slow­moving an their response to the crisis. The film brilliantly depicts thlS facet of the early years of the epidemic Dr Robert Gallo (Alan Alda) is por­t rayed as an arrogant, duplicitous research scientist more interested in self-aggrandizement that in making progress toward a cure . "This is big," he says. except he is not referring to the potential magnitude of the disease, but rather to the glory and praise that will go to the laboratory that makes inroads in the battle to stop it. Leaders of the blood industry are seen as bottom·line bu!.messmen, whose first concern is cost·effectiveness. not taking the necessary .)ltps to ensure the safety of the nation 's blood supply Politicians and government workers are by and large represented as spineless do-noth­ings more concerned with re-election and bureaucratic double·speak When it comes to the portrayal of the gay communny, though, the filmmakers do not match Shilts' view. Among the gay characters, only Phil Collons as the money·oriented owner or a San Fran· cisco bath hou•e is really presented in an unflattering light. I make the money when they go m; you doctors make the money when they come out," he says privately to health care workers before a public meeting to discu.- the potential closure of the baths. Gaetan Dugas, the French·Canadian flight attendant identified as Patient Zero, is shown in the film as a relatively innocent narcissist. Shilts framed him as a hedonistic libertine who knowingly spread the disease all over the world without a shred of remorse. The film does adequately recount the bitter divisiveness that rocked the gay community when efforts to close down the baths were first initiated. It could be rationalized that gay men, so long accustomed to persecution, would natu· rally be defensive ir the biggest symbol of their sexual liberation were threat· coed. How sad for us that our commu· nity failed to recognize the smcere con· ccrn articulated by a small group or health care workers; how much sadder that many of these establishments have re-opened, or were never closed, and arc doing a thriving business. Its various portrayals notwithstand­ing, "And the Band Played On" gives an eiccllent historical perspective of the political and scientific wrangling and stonewalling that plagued re•earch mto the disease from the beginning. The action jumps quickly from one venue to ano1her, identified by text on the screen. And a running count is kept of the num­ber of U.S. ca•es and deaths- -the impli­cation is clear: people are dying and time is being wasted. Matthew Modine, as researcher Don Francis, the first to suggest the possibil­ity of a retrovirus as the cause, gives a first-rate performance. The anger and frustration that Shilts so secthingly transferred to the written wo rd arc etched in the movie, mostly in the lines of Modine. "How many people have to die to make it cost-efficient for you people to do something about it?" he rails at blood bank bigwigs when they scoff u the expense of testing the blood supply. Modine is great, as arc Lily Tomlin and Ian McKellcn. "And the Band Played On" is more than a movie that deserved to made, a s tory that needed to be told. It's the drama of history as •cen from the big picture, mstcad of the per­sonal level, yet it is at t imes quite mov· ing. If you don't have HBO, get 11. If you can't, find someone who docs have it. This 1s an important movie, that's important to us. Controversial 'The Twilight of the Golds' comes to the Paramonnt in Austin By .IDo1 RAWSOS The Sew Voice/Aust1n In us last stop before Broadway. 'The Twilight of the Golds" will be playing Austin"s famed Paramount Theatre from Sept. 22nd through the 26th 'Twi­light," by Jonathan Tolins, has received a great deal of media attention because of the prophetic nature of us central theme. The central plot device for "Twilight" was called sci~nce ficuon by Jonathan Tolms at the time that the play was writ­ten It involves genetic testing which would md1cate whether an unborn child might grow up 10 be gay Not long after the play went into production the National lns111u1cs of Health announced 1he tentallve 1dcnt1ficauon of a region of the X-chromosome linked to male homosexuality , prompting much debate over medical ethics and how such information might be used Since then author Toltns has appeared on tclcvmon's "S1ghtlinc' and on the pagts of several news maga­zines as a theatrical prophet The story or ' The T" II ght of the Golds" 1s centered on the dilemma of a family confronting the posSJbihty that an unborn 'hlld might be homoscx112l. The play's protagonist and narrator, David Gold, 1s a set designer for the Met­ro po Itta n Opera. When his s ister becomes pregnant, the tests performed by the doctors show that the child, in a ll probability, will be gay When this is revealed to David's parents, both gener-atioos of Golds must grapple with the issues that 1his possibility r11ses. Because the character of David has an mt1matc knowledge or opera, "The Twilight or the Golds .. IS set against a Wagnerian background. even to the extent of utilizing music and themes David Gnld nnd hrs parents face an unartam future TT TNEW ORLEANS QUICK NOTE from Wagner's works as accent points in the play. David crafts the story as his own vcr· sion of the "Ring" cycle, exploring ques­tions about sexuality and family bonds and a bo ut reproduclivc ethics and human evolution_ In Tolms• view of the world, the fights among Wagner's gods in Valhalla over an enchanted ring arc equaled to and contrasted with the Golds' battles over the unborn child of David's sister. Reviewers across the country have described "Twilight"" a1 funny. thought ful. cautionary, and eerily topical. Scot! Rosenberg, critic for the San Francisco Examiner, has said, ''Among many other thing~. Tolin'!'. play shows us how much more there'• still left to say about the unhappiness of fam1he>-and how much one family's private story can matter to public discourse " Performances for the Texas premiere or '"The Twilight of the Golds" are Wed ncsday through Saturday at 8:00 p.m .. Sa1urday and Sunday at 3:00 p.m., and Sunday at 7 30 p.m. Tickets arc availa­ble at the Paramount, llE.B Stores' Cus tamer Services, and all llTTM outlets. Charge-a·trckct service is available at (512) 477-6060. New Orleans Odest Gay-Lesbian television program is making move to Dallas By U:OSARD EARL JOll:'iSOS The Sew Voice/:Scw Orleans "JuSI for the Record." New Orleans long­est running Access show dealing with lesbian and gay issues 1s moving to Dal· las. Executive producer Valda Lewis and her spouse, the Reverend Shelley Hamil­ton, formerly of the Vieux Carre' Metro politan Community Church, have both accepted pos111ons wuh the Dallas Ca1hedral of Hope Melropolitan Com­munlly Church . The Dallas congrega­tion is 1he largest with in the UFMCC. Lewis will serve as Media Director and establish an in-house video produc­tion unil to produce programming for local access channels "Our long range goal is to produce nationally targe1ed programmmg to counter the attacks on our community from lhe religious for right," Lewis said. TT TDATELINE: GAY AMERICA Lewis stressed, "JFTR will continu_c to exist in Dallas." The new address 1s P.O. Box 35373, Dallas. TX 7S235·0373. Reverend Hamilton will establish a Wellness Center. teaching balance between body. mind and spirit. She also will be a part of the Cathedral's AIDS chaplaincy. The Amistad Research Center at New Orleans' Tulane University has r~~el~~i:~~:~~ ~ master tapes from "Just The Amistad Research Center 1s located 1n Tilton Hall on Tulane's campus. The Center's major holdings deal with African-American and other ethnic minorities in the U.S. It is the nation's largest reposllory of primary source materials on civil rights and race relations . The center also collects information on lesbian/gay/bi civil rights issues. "lu•t for the _Record's" 165 programs dealt with such issues from 1986 to 1993 Protests few as gay rodeo held in rural Enumclaw, Washington EN\;:'.ICLA W, Wash Sunday, Sept 12 (AP)-Somc hate· f1llcd graffiti was parnted on a street and nails were scat­tered 1n the parkmg 101, but a gay rodeo held in this rural town 01hcrwisc went off without a huch. "We've had lots of letters from people appalled by the image created' from negative comments about the event, sud Lee Johnson, organizer and co founder of the Grcarcr lnternattonal Gay Rodeo. "It's a mmo11ty view that 's been magnified." The rodeo al the King County Fair­grounds was one of 17 organized by the lnterna11onal Gay -Rodeo Associauon this year. Organizers said about 1300 people attended Saturday, with events continuing Sunday. Proceeds go to char-uy, organtzers said Sol everyone approved Steve Auman stDod across the street from the fair grounds holding a sign reading, 'Sodomites, do you have AIDS yet?' "I JUSI don't like the idea of unna1ural acts," the Enumclaw resident said. "This whole thing 1s tainting us, " added hrs wife Jeri. "We loved n here I don~ want our lltlle town 10 be known as a gay rodeo town " On a nearby street. someone had used yellow patnl to inscribe, •·Fags Stop Herc " :"iatls were found Saturday morn­ing tn the parking lot. Organizers ignored the graffiti and wiped up the nails Enumclaw police reported tb2t all was quiet Down the road from the Aumans, I.or· rte Thomson said she had shooed away the protesters from her garage sale. '"They should worry about something else, like s1arvrng kids or something worth talking about,'' she •aid. Inside the fairgrounds, many said they supported freedom of •peech in any fashion. "As a person in a group who's had their opinion oppressed. l support their right lo speak out," Johnson s11d. About 15 members of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and the Northwest Animal Rights Network also protested. "Gays yes, rodeo no!" they chanted. "Oppressed people should not oppress animals, ' .Marc Mielke, a •pokespcrson for PETA's Gay and I.csbian Alliance, shouted through a bullhorn . They take docile animals and turn them into savage bculs," Mielke •aid. Clark Tylce . of the Northwco1 Gay Rodeo Association acknowledged a sieer broke 11s leg during an even1. It was reportedly destroyed, but Tylce ,aid he didn't know what happened to the animal after 1t wac; sedatc<l by a veteri ­narian and removed from the arena To !>Orne. the attention the event received was ~uccess in Itself. '"The good thing is. people now know there arc gay people here. They can't say It only happens in places hke Seattle now," Dan Ryan said. "That will affect the attitudes and beliefs of th1S commu­nuy for the rest of their lives." w• PHARMACY A A FULL SERVICE PHARMACY WITH YOU IN MIND! • W lD'ro discount to customers listed with the A AIDS FOUNDATION - Houston. vJ l.V. Infusion services available. Get details a In the pharmacy. 'fil Dlr~~t insurance billing without Increased a pncing. vJ fREE prescription delivery service in selected a zip codes. Get details in the pharmacy. We care about your needs and pledge to give you the best care possible. 3300 Montrose Houston, Tx 77006 Phone: 526-1239 Shop Kroger ••• Where It Costs Less To Get More Providing CASH for their life insurance policy NOW, when they need it the most. Call STEVE SIMON, president of AMERICAN LIFE RESOURCES at: 1-800-633-0407 We are committed to paying the highest prices with NO HASSLES ••• NO EXCUSES ••• EVERI . American file Resources® NJ4. Viatical Settfem ent Com pany'"' Steve S11non and American tile Resoorces hove helped ITIOfe PWAs toke control over lhe,, lives than any a/her organizafion in lhe world THEATER LaB HOUSTON PRESENTS UNIDENTIFIED HUMAN REMAINS AND THE TRUE NATURE OF LOVE by BRAD FRASER A SCORCHING DRAMA ABOUT RELATIONSHIPS ON THE EDGE Opens Thursday, September 9 - October 16 Fridays & Saturdays at 8:00 PM Fridays $12 / Saturdays $15 X This play deals with themes of a sexual nature and includes graphic dialogue & situations. RESERVATIONS 868-7516 NOW THROUGH OCT. 2ND Repertor~ Theat er l STORY NO ONE IN HOUSTON 1W HID THE COUUGE TO TElL PULITm PRIZE WINNING PLAYWRIGHT edmond HOMOPHOBIA, RACISM, SEXISM ..• EVERY FEAR HIDES A WISH \[PlfMBfR 8TH OCJOB[R :mo. WEON[\ OAY\ '>ATllRDAY\ 8PM fOR Jl(l(rJ \ Alf\ ANO \ fA\ON \UBSCRIPTION\ CAI I 571 3571 I 102 / WL'>llH !Ml R Al WAUGH HOU\ lON II XA'> / /006 10 THE NEW VOICE I SEPTEMBER 17-23. 1993 TT °TDATELINE: GAY AMERICA Congress forcing President Clinton to tighten military gay ban By DO~~A CASSATA F~ THE HE:N VOCE WASHINGTON, Friday, Sept 10 (AP)--Congress. by binding its policy on homosc~uals in the military to next year's defense budget, is forcing Presi­dent Clmton to accept a plan signifi­cantly harsher than his own. The Senate rciccted a measure to lea vc the issue to the president's discre­tion on Thursday. and embraced a pol­tcy tougher than Clinton's "don't ask, don~ tell. don't pursue" plan The vote was 63-33 The House ts expected to follow the Scnale s lead next week when it com­pletes work on the fiscal 1994 defense budget. Unless Clinton wants to scuttle hts first m1lttary budget. the president bas no choice but to sign the final lcgis­lauon. But the Clinton administration already Signaled last month that it was willing to accept the new policy. It 1s part of the overall defense budget for the fiscal year beginning Oct. I that the Hou<e and Senate have been work­mg on this week The issue of gays servmg m the mili­tary had overshadowed debate on bil­lion- dollar weapons systems. until the Senate voted to cut spendmg for the Bal- 1 ist ic Missile Defense program late Thursday. Liberals made futile appeals for pre­serving Clinton's compromise policy but did SO Without the support Of the Senate Democratic leadership and a Whue House eager to see the controver­sial issue dosappear. 'If we do not end discrimination. whenever and wherever it exists in soci­ety. then America is not America," said Sen . Edward Kennedy. D-Mass .. during debate Thursday that Jacked the issue's earlier emotionalism . The legislative policy states that Con­gress has the constitutional right to make rules for the military. that the armed forces are unique and that "per­sons who demonstrate a propensity or intent to engage in homo:.exual acts would create an unacceptable risk to the high standards of morale, good order and discipline." Clinton's compromise policy ended the pra-ct1ce of questioning recruits and TT °TDATELINE: GAY AMERICA service members about their sexual ori­entation, but 11 allowed the milttary to conunue to discharge homosexuals. The president's plan centers on the premise that orientation is not a bar to military service and calls for an end to witch hunts to ferret out gays. It also urges evenhanded enforcement of the Uniform Code of Military Justice for heterosexuals and homosexuals. a pro­v1s1on sought by gay rights groups. The legislation makes no mention of orientation. witch hunts or 1he code, and says a future defense secretary could reinstate the policy of asking recruits their sexual orientation. Leading proponents of the military 's original ban on homosexuals. Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ga .. the Armed Services Com­mittee cha1rperson, and Republican Sen. Dan Coats of Indiana, crafted the legislative policy. Republicans and Democrats agreed that the policy is more stringent than Clinton's . GOP lawmakers touted it as "ban-plus," and liberals were sharply critical. "This so-called codification is a return to the status quo .. Homosexuals will be hunted down and run out," s11d Sen Howard Mctzenbaum, D-Oh10. Later Thursday, in a rebuke to Clinton and Nunn , the Senate narrowly approved a budget or $3 billion for the Ballistic Missile Defense program in fis­cal 1994, a cut of $800 million from what the president requested. The vote was 50-48 with Sen. Dianne Femstem, D-Calif., casting her vote as time expired and Sen. David Boren, D­Okla ., changing his vote from "yes" to "no." In the closing mmutes of the vote. Nunn and Sen. James Sasser, D·Tenn .• sponsor of the amendment, lobbied hard for Feinstein's vote. She finally stepped to the Senate desk and indicated she would vote "yes." Proponents of the measure portrayed It as an effort to cut the deficit by scaling back funds for the program formerly known as the Strategic Dcfen~e lnitia· tivc, or Star Wars. Sen Dale Bumpers, D·Ark., stood before a blank chart and told his col­leagues, "We've spent $30 billion since 1983 and this is what we've got for it Nothing." Scottsdale, Arizona and other libraries find room for kids' gay books By KARE.N MCCOWAN FOA: THE~ voa PHOENIX, Monday, Sept. 13 (AP}-The anxious mother leaned over the child­ren's desk at a Scottsdale library and wh1;)pcrcd rn librartan Brenda Brown's ear. She'd just asked for books that might help her young son understand his par­ents · recent separation. Brown sug­gested several, wruten specifically for children of divorce, but the woman shook her head. 'You don't understand." she pleaded m hush<d tones. "Actually, my husband lch me for another man." As 1t turns out Brown had iust what the woman was looking ~or . Two years ago, the library acquired a children's picture book "Daddy's Roommate ' It gives a child's view of his father's gay relationship m simple. non­graph1c terms. But you won't find "Daddy's Room­mate" on the shelf wuh other children's picture books at Scottsdale or other met­ropoluan Phoenix libraries. In a move that has drawn fire from some anti-censorship groups. libraries across the country are shelving child­ren's books >UCh as ''Daddy's Room­mate'' elsewhere Many have even moved the books to their adult stacks m categories such as "Parentmg." The books are usually moved after bemg challenged as inappropriate by parents who obiect to the homosexual lifestyle. Many librarians see moving the books as a good compromise But, like many compromises. it hasn't really satisfied eother side. In Phoenix, the main library and at least one branch moved "Daddy's Roommate" to a special shelf in its children's library, adding It to a collec­tion of books on sensitive issues, intended for parents to read with their children. That wasn't enough, accord­ing to one patron who challenged the book, Cathi Herrod, Arizona president of Concerned Women for America. "Thos book is still on a shelf where any child could walk up and check it out,0 she said. Meanwhile, the Director of the Ameri­can Library A.sociation's Office for Intellectual Freedom has charged that moving children·~ books 1s, effectively, cenc;orsh1p. ''This is becoming a solution for mate­rials 1hat some people don't ltke," said Judith Krug, who works m 1he associa­tion's Ch1ca10 headquarters "Libraries move them out of the locatoon that is fre­quented by the audience for whom the materials were written.'' "Daddy's Roommate" was the most­challengcd library book m America last year Wtth a similar book, "Heather Has Two Mommies," it was at the center of a fierce debate over New York City's pro­posed Children of the Rainbow public­school curriculum, which recommended both books for a first-grade reading list. Outrage over that proposal helped top- TT °TDATELINE: GAY AMERICA pie New York School Superintendent Joseph Fernandez in February. It is not surprising, then, that the local libraries also have received com­plaints about the book But none has gone so far as to remove It or others like it from children's areas. Instead. they have decoded to >helve such books m the non-fic1ion stacks of their children s or young-adult rooms under "alternative lifestyles" or "homo­sexuality." "We decoded a book like "Daddy's Roommate' really didn't belong with the picture books, where young children who were iust browsmg for so111ethmg fun to read would run acros~ it," said Ralph Edward>, Phoenix city librarian. Librarians also felt that the big~est demand for the book would come from adults who wished to read 11 to their children because of 1ts subject matter. "In a way. you make the book more accessible to parents by shelving it according to non-fiction subject matter, rather than dumpm& 11 in with all the picture books, which are shelved only by author's name," said Vince Anderson, director of the Mesa library. Whether the local approach JS censor­ship "depends on the motivation," said Anne Pcnway of the American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom. "If the intent is to prevent easy access by the book's intended audience, based On disapproval Of the ideas II presents, then that clearly is censorship," she said. "But if it's moved to facilnate access, then it's perfectly acceptable," Concerns about appropriateness of subject matter are clearly a part of the equation locally "If we don't thmk a book os at the level of the average 2-or 3-year·old child, then we don't shelve u with the other picture books," said Cara Waits. a Tempe children's ltbranan . " But that's not censorship . We haven't taken it out of the library or even out of the children's area." Nor do lihrarians 11nele ou1 homo~ex. uality as inappropriate for their picturc­book shelves. The Phoenix library, for example, puts children's fiction on topics from divorce to toilet training on a shelf labeled, "Let's talk about it," "We have a responsibility to present diverse points of view on many of the~e topics," said Ela me Meyer, head of the children's area at the main Phoenix library. "But we really do believe 1hat parents should be able to decide when they want to introduce a topic to their children." The local libraries are taking a "rea­sonable approach," said Steven Penry of the Gay and Lesbian Parent Coalition International . " Nothing on "Daddy's Roommate" should be offensove to kids." he said, "But quue frankly. it's mappropriate for 2-or 3-year-olds because u hits on an issue they wouldn't understand without adult help." Oakland brokerage firm's database tracks companies' policy on gays OAKLAND, Cal f Thursday Sept 9 (AP)--People who want to invest only in companies with tolerant attitudes toward gay and lesbian employees now have a little help. Proaressive Asset Management, an Oakland company specializing in socially responsible mvesung, has pro­duced a database on 250 publicly traded companies and their policies toward homosexuals. The Oakland company gave a pre­view of the database on Wednesday and released a partial lost of companies rated as ''progressive and "reiressive. It planned to formally introduce the database at a news conference today in New York The database evaluates whether each company has five features a wrinen, non-discrimination policy; benefits for domestic partners~ diversity training: organization and recoanuion of gay and lesbian employee groups; and sup­port to employee. with the AIDS virus. The information came from responses to surveys, interviews with employees and news stones said Howard Thars· TT °TDATELINE: GAY AMERICA ing, a Proaressivc Asset Management account executive who developed the database. Forms on the "progressive" lost included Apple Computer Inc., Borland International Inc. and Wells Farao & Co . The "rearcssovc" companies included Delta Airlines and Taraet Stores-which challenaed the listmg. A spokesperson for Dayton Hudson Corp., which owns Target, u1d the com­pany's diversity standards tnclude sex­ual orientation and that the company regularly funds programs for gays, les-bians and bosexuals. She s11d the com· pany never received a survey from Asset Target Management Tharsing said the broker•&• firm made follow-up calls to companies that failed to respond to us m111al survey. He also said that Delta told him Wednesday that It has a written policy that forbids discnmination against gays and lesbi­ans and that he sent Defta another copy of the survey at Delta's request He said the partial list released Wed­nesday was not intended as a best~or· worst ranking of firms but to show the variety of corporate policies. West Lafayette follows Lafayette, Indiana example in gay civil rights WEST LAFAYETTE Ind. Tuesday. Sept 14 (AP)--The West Lafayette City Council tS following the example of their neighbors on Lafayette in affirming civil rights for homosexuals. The council voted 4-2 Monday night to adopt a policy previously passed by the cuy's Human Relations Commission that "fair and equal treatment should be extended to all citizens of West Lafay­ette regardless of sexual onentation." However, lhe rcsolutJon notes that the Human Relations Commi>Sion. an appointed body, has strictly l1m11ed powers in cases involving discrimtna· tion over sexual orientation. The resolution, like that passed by the Lafayette City County 1n May. allows the human relations commission to investigate and mediate cases of sexual orientation, but n~ powers to compel tes· timony or make bmding decision,, The council acted after two hours of tesumony from 32 speaker;, 20 of whom spoke against the resolution THE NEW VOICE I SEPTEMBER 17-23, 1993 11 You are invited to HOMECOMING '93 ~L CHURCH Celebrating eleven year ome "LOOK WHAT THE LO D HAS DONE" SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 • 11:00 AM Dinner to follow in the Fellowship Hall. Continuing at 7:00 PM with Ronnie Farrington & These Are They Gospel Emsemble Rev. Alvis Ray Strickland May 23, 1937 - October 15, 1990 Founder Rev Chris Chiles Pastor '~ Church Built On Love'' 0 - - ---· METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION Rev. E ler JN'Wl Gilt, Pastor Rev Car 1yr Mi 1 "Y As~t. Past1 r 1919 Decatur, 861-9149 OFF WASHINGTON & S VER Fri., Sept . 17, 7:00pm FELLOWSHIP FRIDAY Fri., Sept. 17, 7:00pm CODA MEETING Tues., Sept. 21, 7 :00pm CODA M EETING Wors hip Servic e s: Sunday, 8:3 0 am, 10:45am &. 6:00pm W edn esday: 7:00pm HOUSTON MISSION CHURCH 1505 Nnad1 at Common•ealth Sept. 19: "Problems, Compassi·o n, and H ope" I I Pastor: Rev. Robert Carter Kingdom Community Church COME EXPLORE HIS KINGDOM Sunday Worship Service 11 am 614 E. 19th 862-7533 Houston 7 48-6251 ~b~:- /' Catholics & · Friend& meet for M .. Slit ..... ,. at 7:30 pm 1307 YALE, SUITE B (713) 830-Z872 Todoo b!ea .. oldOll BJl.S. 911-IUI 5lJN'DAY 10~ R~J~P~ "Trust ... The Key to Successful Living" Sept. 12, 19. 26 Oct. 3 Holiday Inn West Loop 3131 W. Loop South (Opposite Transco Tower) PO. llo• 667032 •Houston 77166-7032 528-6756 ASK THE PASTOR Q: What docs "'saved'' mcan'I A: In the English language, one of the dcfimllons of the \\Ord "'saved"' means to rescue or preserve from harm or danger In a theological context, or in reference to God. the word ··sa,ed" means to deliver a person, soul, etc. from sm and punishment What 1s sm·J Sm 1s separation fron1 God Sm Rev Jnne1 Parl er 1s bcmg out of relat1onsh1p, estranged from the One who made you Sm occurs through rebellion (deciding to run m} O\\n life without God's help). pnde (believing that I am able to handle my own affairs because I am so capable and am so talented on my own). etc Separation from God leads one through hfc on one's own ment It leaves a person \\Ondering about their future destm~ A person without God m their li fe, without a personal relationship \\1th Jesus Chnst, has a false hope m their own abi lities At the end of hfc, each person 1s asked to gl\e an account of their accomplishments. and their sms (actions of mlfu l d1sobcd1ence) Aecordmg to God's standards, the p<.,1alh for sm 1s death (eternal separation from God) If during the course of bfe, one comes to sec who Jesus Christ 1s, and that He paid the full pncc for all of the sm of the world, then their ~'1cmal salvation ts obtained The) arc "saved M Salvation m.:ans more than bemg ddi,cred from sm Sal\auon 1s also a \'Cl) posttl\c experience. Salvauon frees us to scr.c the On" "ho created us We b<.,'CQm" connected with the Potter who formed this cla~ We tap m to the resources o hca,cn and han: the power of the Hol~ Spmt unleashed \\1thm us to do the works of God We ha'e thc ab1lit~ to hve \lcton ousl) free from the poy,cr of our smful nature that \\OU!d hkc us to go back to runmng our O\\TI lives Salvation gl\CS us pcacc, hope and JO)-rcgardlcss of our circumstances Bcmg "'sa,ed"' fills us \\ Ith lo'e \ \'c then can rcc:cl\c love and express love " 1th patience and ~111dncss and "1thout sclfishn~'SS, jealous\ or possessl\cncss l.O\c nc,er fails Our rclat1onsh1p w1th Jesus Chnst \\1ll take us 011 mto ctcrnlt) It becomes a forever lmc Arc )OU s:l\cdr IF YOU llAVI: A~Y QUf..STIO'S ,\'.\D \\.'OULD LIKE TO HA VE !llH\I ADDRl'SSED BY REV JA '[T P \RKER, PLEASE \\RITE TO \ 1ARA,A'IHA fEI LO\\ SHIP \KC', P 0 BOX 667032, HOUSlO TX 77266-7on 12 THE NEW VOICE SEPTEMBER 17-23. 1993 TT T HOUSTON QUICK NOTES Houston Lesbian-Gay Pride Committee to hold first meeting of 1994 season By SHAIDi KEENA'\ GILSOS The ~cw Vo1CcfHouston The Houston Lesbian/Gay Pride Week Committee formally begins work om 1994 's celebration Tuesday night, Sept 21st, at 7:00 p.m. The group will meet to take nominations for. and elect next year's co-chair>. Anyone attending the meetmg 1s eligible to vote. Posllions are also open on the group's board People mterested in becoming involved on that level are asked to attend a short meeting following the 7:00 p.m. session and to bring a short resume. After the new board members are selected, a vote will be taken for board chair. Both meetings will be held in the New Alliance offices at 811 Westheimer. suite 105. For more mformatton, call 529- 6979. Friday demonstration As recent auack. against long-lime gay acttvtst Rob Cavanaugh has sparked a demonstratton to be held tonight (Fri­day). A new group, organized by Michael Crawford and Scott Lewis, Out­rage hopes to fill what a void that organizers feel wa. left by the dissolu­tion of Queer Nation's Houston Tribe. Queer Nation drew considerable media attention through its "direct actions," a traduion that Outrage hopes to revive in this city. Cavanaugh was assaulted last week on the way back from a neighborhood convenience store to his apartment Many gay activists consider the assault a "gay bashing" as Cavanaugh's assailants reportedly called him "queer" during the attack (see The New Voice, issue 672). Participants in tonight's demo.nstra­tion will gather at the intersect1on of Waughcrest and California Street at 8:30p.m The march itself will begin at 9:00p.m Further information is available by calling Michael Crawford at 224-2947 or by paging Scott Lewis at 708-1193. Black tie ... please Plans arc m place for the Human Rights Campaign Fund "Black Tie Dmner" to be held at the Westm Oaks Galleria Con­sort Ballroom. Roberta Achtenberg has confirmed as the keynote speaker for the event The event is a fundraiser for the Human Rights Campaign Fund and severa1 local organizations. Tickets are $150, with VIP tickets at $250. The event will also feature an appearance by Atw­ood and Comeaux, and the Ed Gerlach Orchestra Tickets are available at Lobo and Crossroads, or by calling 524-4540 Another perspective on the cr isis Rice Un1versuy 's Center for the Study of Cultures is sponsoring an unusual. interdisciplinary workshop in early October. "AIDS appropriations" will cover, in different seminars, fields ranging from medical ethics to religious studies and literary criticism. It is an attempt to explore how the AIDS crisis has been handled by various media and in politi­cal and scholarly debate. Douglas Crimp, the eduor of October magazine. a political/htcrary quarterly published at MIT, will provide the key­note address on Friday, Oct. 1st. The conference sessions continue through~ out the weekend For further information, call Helena Michie at 527-4840 or Jeff Hooten at 527- 4947 Homecoming '93 Community Gospel Church 1s hosting Homecoming ·93 in celebration of their eleventh year anniversary, Sunday, Sept. 19th, at 11:00 a.m. and continuing Sunday night at 7 :00 p.m. with special guest Ronnie Farrington and "These Are They Gospel Ensemble " A dinner will be held after the 11 :00 a.m. service in the Fellowship Hall. Eve­ryone is invited to share the celebration . Community Gospel Church was founded by the late Reverend Alvis Ray Strickland and was located at 1700 Montrose Blvd. The church has been at 501 E. 18th and Columbia (in the Heights) for over three years, and is cur­rently pastored by Chris Chiles. The church offers a full Gospel Worship Service in their newly redecorated Sane· tuary. Plans are under way for the con­unuation of redecorating of the entire facility. For more information you may call (713)880-9235. Service times are 11 :00 a.m. and 7 :00 p.m. Sundays and 7:30 p.m. Thursdays Insurers limiting real th care for AIDS cases face major test case in court A lawsuu was filed Tuesday 1n the Fed­eral Court in Virginia and a companion complaint with the United States Department of Labor which will deter­mine whether insurance companies and employees who self-insure can limit the coverage of the disabled (when the lim1- tallon 1s d1sab11ity based) who are their policy holders or employees. The Federal Court filing, which seeks an tOJUOcllon to prevent the denial of AIDS related health benefit claims under a company ·s heallh insurance policy, will be the first case ever decided to test the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) proh1biuon against caps on tnsurance coverage for AIDS patients. A New York case is currently testing whether insurer.s can exclude AIDS patients from coverage. The current case was filed by a tcn­year employee of the Alexandria, Vir­ginia- based Victory Van Corporation, who suffers from the AIDS virus which is defined as a disabiluy under the ADA. He has filed the suit under the name John Doc to prospect his 1denrny This is not a case about coverage ratios and actuarial tables~ It is a case which will dctermme the quality of life, the painfulnes> and the speed of death for thousand; of AIDS pallents and oth­ers who suffer illnesses on top of their disabilities,·• said Eric Drattcll. an attor­ney wllh the law firm of Howrey & Simon, which represents Mr. Doe. ''Plac­ing a cap on the amount or coverage of AIDS patient may receive is exactly the same. as far as the ADA 1s concerned. lim1t1ng the amount of cancer patients may be reimbursed for chemotherapy treatment. Mr . Doe was a valuable. com­muted and loyal employee who is now sick and will not be able to receive proper medical attention because his employer's in$urancc coverage limits the amount of coverage available for AIDS treatment. We believe this is ille­gal under the ADA " TT TNEW ORLEANS SOAP Mr. Doe began treatment in 1990 for his HIV infccuon and contracted AIDS in 1993. His employer, Victory Van Cor­poration, a large moving and storage company, may have first learned of his cond1t1on in July m 1991 when he sub­mitted claims for reimbursement for AZT ( a drug prescribed 1n the treatment of some AIDS vicums). Six months later Victory Van amended its insurance cov· erage plan and made 1t retroactive to Sept. 1, 1991. Victory Van's amendment to it's health care plan placed an annual limit of $25,000 and a lifeume limit of $50,000 on the benefits an employee with the AIDS virus is entllled to . The ADA prohibits discriminauon against persons with disabilities and the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission (EEOC) recently held that health care plans thal contain AIDS benefit caps are illegal under the ADA because a person with AIDS 1s legally disabled. To date, John Doe has incurred $18,000 in medical expenses, however he has now been prescribed the drug Neupogen, which costs $287 a day, and is certain to rapidly exceed the annual and lifetime cap. According to the U.S. Public Health Service, the average cost for medical treatment for an AIDS related illness is $38,000 per year and $102,000 over the course of a llfellme. "One hundred thousand dollars may not be a lot of money to an insurer, but it is impoverishmg to individuals . John Doe is rationing h1:-i treatment," contin­ued Drattell. "Like many AIDS and other disabled patients who have spent their life savings battling this and other diseases, he is dependant upon his insurance coverage to pay for his medi· cal. 1reatment: when they _~et coverage llm1tS, he 15 forced 10 ar11f1c1ally ltm11 his medical care, a decision which he has to pay for with the qualuy of his life." Carmen Leveau may be a descendant of Marie; itnJxlstors have surf aced By DEA-. ROt;SSEL The -.;.,. Voice -.;.,., Orleans There were so many new reports that came m this week on the Carmen Lev· eau mystery I don't know where to begin However allow me to give a brief overview on what we know about Carmen Levcau for our new read~ ers. on Saturday at lO:oO p.m. and on Sun­days at 9:00 p.m. that I figured that would be a great place to start We parked our car. walked over to MRB's at 515 St Philip, and grabbed a few good seats near the dancers. An unusual man s1Utng ne-.t to me leaned over and whis­pered, "a direct of de>cendant of Marie "What?" I ques­tioned. Two weeks ago, I received reports on a mysterious woman that roams through New Orleans' gay bars and busi­nesses affecting all the patrons within the esrab­hshment. Rumors claim that her Carmtn LtVtau in Jackson Squart' "A direct descen­dant of Marie," he repeated. lie then stood up and walked out the door. I had no idea what he was say­mg unul It bu me about an hour and two drink.s later. aura fills enure He WI\ implying rooms wich joy and Jubilation. a sort of religious e•pcnence Wnncsses confirm that she stands about S '1'' tall and has blond hair that flows past her behmd. So one has clauned to have met her; however. some say her name 1s Carmen Leve au. Thu week, I received numerous calls from people wanting more information on Carmen Leveau, from people who claimed they have seen her, and from people who have claimed to be her. that Carmen Leveau was a direct descendant of the nineteenth century infamous New Orleans voodoo queen. Mane Leveau_ The man was so unusual , I had to look into his claim After a "onderful evening at MRB's. then later at Good Friends, I returned home but was una· ble to sleep. The face and words of the man at MRB's kept coming back to me . On Monday I would go to the public library to do some rc:-iearch on the Leveau family tree However, on Sunday , I checked wuh a few people claiming they ha.,.e seen and taken pictures of Carmen Leveau . First of all. more information was discovered on this mystic woman LaSI Saturday. my friends and I were trying to decide on juSI where to go and party 10 the early evenmg I enJoy the dancers at MRB s so much Momqut W<Jt · "impostor busttr" I spoke wuh Jef­frey Kr1escl, a bar­tender at Cafe Lafitte's at 90 I Bourbon. He gave me a name 10 contacl The person Jeffrey poke of did not want to be identified m th1ii. column. however. he gave me two photographs that he had taken while touring the French Quarter w11h an out-of·town friend. Each picture wa' 1aken of a historic landmark, bul a woman wuh long flow­ing blond hair past her behind JUSl hap­pened to be in the background He thought nothing of this unusual woman until he read la't week ·s soap column The pictures hemg the Mrongest evi· dence I had received, I showed my grau­tude to this source hy taling him to lunch at the Heartbreak Cafe and Bar at 625 St. Philip, JUSl one block up from MRB's. The food wa. so dell<1ous, he felt he was well rewarded for hi~ pictures. He truly en Joyed the atmosphere too. At Sunday night T·dance at the Parade Disco. I spoke wnh bartenders Mark. and David about some new mfor? mauon. They told me that on Tuesday, Sept. 21st at 11:00 pm., durmg Amateur Star Search at the Parade Disco, Car­men Leveau will make her appearance They ,.,d thlS info was only rumored but I should be there wuh my camera anyway. I don't know what to think about the rumor reported by Mark and David. A rumored appearance docs not sound Ille something the Carmen l.evcau I am lookmg for would do I will he there, hke I am every Tuesday night, and will he ready with my camera Since I ve already had a few impostors call me dur mg the week cla1mmg to he Carmen l.eveau , I am not going to hu1ld my hopes too high. I will a'l my friend, Monique West, to ass1,t me m Jetermm mg the true 1dcntuy of the person who shows up that Tuesday night .1f anyone shows up If u 1s an impostor, Monique will know the person. Monique knows everyone On Monday mornm~. I got dressed and headed to the mam branch of the :o;ew Orleans Public Library nn Loyola . I mquued at the resource desk on where I could fmd a book on the lineage of the Leve au family. Instructed where to go, I found two books that could help me I Mark & David of tht Paradt DISCO opened both volumes only to find thaP the pages needed were torn out. The assistant at the resource deii.k called the other brancheii. but no other cop1e~ were available . As I do more re!-iearch on thh claim, I'll keep you updated. One other sighting of' Mi. Lc.,.eau l!ri. worth mcnt1on1ng During the Saints and Oilers football game tn the Super· dome on Sept 5th, Carmen Lcveau was supposedly seen by some. However, she was obsen·ed lca.,.mg about eight min­utes before the end of the game Soon after, the Olle" made two quick touch­downs. hnally, I appealed to 111,, l.evcau last week to reveal herself to me so that we can all take part of her JOY and 1uh1la · 11on. Apparently, ~he chose not to do so at this lime. Perhaps. rucsday night will be the night, or 1f not ruesday, the day of the NO/AIDS Wall 1$ rumored Do picl up some pledge sheets I rom the NO/ AIDS ra~k force at 1407 Decatur, and come and wall wnh me to locate Ms. Carmen Levcau. A place for us to meet at the WALK , alona wllh more extremely intcrcs11ng Lcveau mfo, w1U ~be~n next Weeks's soap column Until TT T IN MEMORY OF CRAIG PAUL BROWN Crwg PalA P• rwr a fi' y1:c11 r d 11 of Hous!On dlcd ~ <'f a g balllO With AIDS SuNlved by parents, Mr and Mrs Eugene Brown, Kisslmmoe Flonda. SISier Mrs Vicky Hendricks, lBfayellO, Indiana. bfotllcr Mark Brown of Lancasler Callfomia and son Scott Brown or Larayello, Indiana Pnvale tuncml scrvce> and internment were held !hiS week. Al tho family's requesl donabons may be made to the MCCR bu11d1ng fund Ar· rangemmls by Ali ir Sharpslown Funeral Jome TERRY "T. C." CARL TON Terry "Tc. Csrllon. 50 died las! week 1n 1111. nois Mr Csrllon lived in New Orleans and Hoos· ton Co< many years He died or complicabons rromAIDS He and his fo<mOf lover, the lale Dan Gnffin. lived on Belhvele SI. In Algien:. Following their seperabon he lived n several locabons 111 the French Ouar1er and was employed by Helen Doclrich Agcocy Allor moving lo Houston Mr Cs~ton bought a hOuSo on rutane Avo , Montrose Heighls. Ho wo<ked tor an audio visual company Ho was ec­tiVe in Oemocrabc pohbcs and gay/lesbian rights ., both clllcs Ho was a graduale or Soulhom Illinois Umver­Slly. cart>oodale Ho returned to Csrbondale Co< pos~uale work following his HIVIAIDS diag· noels RecenUy he established residenco on lus rnolher's farm A runeral seNIC9 was held In Wayne City, llfi· nots Runal was at the ramlly cemetery LEON "NOEL" JONES JR. Laon 'Noor' .io<>cS a Texas residenl SlllCO 1976, passed ow~ •'*" 29 at !ho ago of 42 Ho was the son of Mario Jones of South Boslon, Massachusel1S and the lato Leon Jonos St or Missoun Ho leaves one sistor, Vicky • ynn Dobos> of St Joseph Missoon. rnree nephews. mrts. un­clos. coustns and frocnds lie wa. an employee at the Monlroso Clime ano had arso worked 01 UlMB in Galveslon. 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WN seμ. vice LA.NOSCA.PIN<; • FREE ESTIMATES • AFFORDABLE RATES • MONTHLY MAINTENANCE (713) 931-6679 14 THE NEW VOICE I SEPTEMBER 17-23 1993 TT TDATELINE: GAY AMERICA Federal judges, lawyers spar over who military considers a homosexual By HARR) F. ROSE.-.THAL FOR TIE tEW VOCE WASHI:"/GTON, Monday. Sept 13 (AP;-Judges on a federal appeals court sparred wuh lawyers Monday over whether an admitted homosexual who 1s also celibate would be discharged from the military under pre-Clinton administration rules. The issue was raised when Justice Department lawyer Anthony Stern­meycr was cxplammg the difference in military policy toward homosexuals before the Clinton administration adopted the '"don't ask, don't tell'" rule that will go into effect next month. Stcmmcycr said the military defmcd a homosexual as a person whose con­duct. acuvu1es. desire and intent show that he ts gay. ··r could u ~e a hon hand phrase 'celi­bate homosexual,"" Steinmeyer said "That is a person who says 1f I had sex, I would prefer a person of the same sex. but I'm not gomg to have sex. never had sex and never will " Such a person would not have the desire for sex and therefore would not fall under the milltary"s definition of a homosexual. Steinmeyer said, He added that the government doesn"t take action against people for thoughts unrelated to conduct. Judge Patricia Wald asked if anyone had avoided discharge from the mili­tary by making that claim. 'To my knowledge no one has made it, so it was never accepted _'' the govern­ment lawyer replied. TT T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Now we arc dancmg on the head of a pin.'" commented Judge Abner M1kva The discussion arose in the case involving Joseph Steffan, a former mid· shipman who resigned from the U.S . Naval Academy shortly before gradua· tion in 1987 after acknowledgmg to a superior that he 1> gay. He was appealing a ruling by U.S . District Judge Oliver Gasch who in 1991 upheld the Navy"s right to expel Ste· ffan. on grounds that the military ban 1s a justifiable weapon against the spread of AIDS. "The only thmg he did was to say he was gay," said Steffan'; lawyer. Marc Wolinsky. "Gay men have and do <ervc in the miluary. Now ll is determined that good order and di<cipline is not affected ... sexual orientation in itself does not predict m1scondu't " He said the military·s old policy of dis­missing gays 1s brought on by the assumption that homosexual status can affect a different kind of conduct and "now they are going to argue that they can predict the conduct of people who say they are gay." Judge Wald asked how the military would act m a situation where two men are asked by their buddies to go to town to pick up girls. "One says 'no, I'm too tired.' The other says 'well, fellas, I'll pass because I'm homosexual,"' she postulated. Steinmeyer said the military would consider the second one a homosexual because he has shown "propensity." Massachusetts lesbian couple describes 'non-traditional' family By JANET KERLN FOR TtE. H£W VOICE CAMBRIDGE. Mass., Saturday, Sept 11 (AP}-Katie has two mommies. The 5-year-old calls one "Mommy," and the other ''Momma." At a news conference Saturday, Dr Susan Love and Dr . Helen Cooksey described what life is like for their non­traditional family. They spoke a day after the Mate"s highest court ruled that the lesbian couple could jomtly adopt the child that Love conceived by artifi­cial msemmauon The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled 4-3 that there JS nothmg m s1ate law to prevent joint adopuon by a homosexual couple Love, Cooksey and their attorney, Katherine Triantaf1llou said they were thrilled by the court's ruling, which muns that other gay couples in that state can proceed wnh co-parent adop­tions 'Clearly , the time has come to acknowledge that many, 1f not moot. of us do not live in so-called tradtt1onal families, and the court's opinion cour­ageously reflects that reality," Tri­antafillou said. T hey a lso voiced compassion for S ha ron Bottoms, a Virginia lesbian who last week lost custody of her 2-year­old son, A judge said that her '"immoral relationship" with her live-in lover made her an unfit parent ''We want her to know that she is not alone. We support her in her struggle again•t bigotry," Triantafillou said Love, a nationally known brea~t can­cer expert. and Cooksey said they began to seek legal rights u adoptive parents af1er 1hey were stopped m a Southern state on their way to Mexico. They a<kcd if we could prove with a notarized document that we had the father's perm1So1on for the child to leave the country," Cooksey said 'Tm delighted that I now have legal rights," Cooksey said. The couple told the story of the birth TT TDATELINE: GAY AMERICA and rearing of Katie, whom they described as a well-adjusted girl who wants to be a ballerina and prefers dresses to pants. "Helen and I planned together to have her. Helen was the first to hold Katie in the delivery room," said Love, who was a r tificially inseminated by Cooksey's biological cousin. The child knows that Cooksey's cousin is her father, and his relat1onsh1p to Katie is like that of an uncle whom she sees during holidays, Love said, ''My daughter ha. a father all child· ren have fathers. It s a matter of biol­ogy," Love said "She knows tha1 some fathers live somewhere else. which is 1rue of a lot of heterosexual families;• Love u1J. Katie calls Love, her birth mother, "Mommy" and Cooksey "Momma •· ''She came up with thal when she started to talk," Love said. Cooksey ;tay> at :flome a' Katie"> full time caregiver The couple now lives 1n California As for male role models, Love said her brother and brothers-10-law are ve ry active m Katie's life . They also said they would not encour­age Katie to follow their style of sexual­ity. "We will not influence her and I hope she finds a life partner that will make her happy," Love said. As Katie grows to adolescence, she may be unhappy beini the child of a les­bian couple, Love said. but she said that all. children eventually find fault with their parents for bemg too old or too fat or thin. Prejudice from others h something that the family will have to deal with. Love said. For now, the couple said tha1 Katie en1oys the support of her extended fam· ily, neighbors, church, and school. "In kindergarten. she i• the envy of her class. Most kids at her age like the 1dca of having two mommies ," Love said. University of Minnesota plans benefits for partners of gay employees MINNEAPOLIS, Friday, Sept. 10 (AP}-Domesuc partners of gay and !es· btan employees at the University of Mmncsou will receive the same bene .. fns accorded to married employees, the Board of Regents decided Friday. The full board finalized a unanimous committee decision euending child care, sick leave, rcuremcnt plan and other pn,·1lcges to same-sex partners. The one maJOf exception would be health and dental msurance, Same-sex domestic parlners would receive _a cash stipend of up to $2.500 a year mstead. becau<Sc the un1vers1ty's msurance car· rtcr wouldn't provide full health bene­fi1s for same-sex partners. Approval of the benefits was virtually ensured after President Nils Hasselmo last wmter embraced the recommCnda­t1ons of a campus task force '"Im delighted said Marjorie Cow-meadow. chairperson of the task force. 'This JS another example of President Hasselmo's bold leadership m th" area. to be fair to all employees m this univer­sny" The move 1s expected to cost the uni­versity about $250.000 a year if 100 cou· pies rcgtStcr, s1gnmg an affidavit that they arc exclusive domestic partners. Cowmeadow. associate dean of the Gen­eral College. expects only 3~ to 40 cou­ples will register . "'Some people simply won't do this," she said. '"One partner may be out and one may be closeted.'' T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA The university IS likely to be .ued because tt 1s not extending benefits to unmarried heterosexual parlners, uni .. versity auorney Mark Rotenberg said. But, he said, the university can defend itself on the ground that heterosexual couples can get married while same·sex partners cannot. Opposite·sex henefits were con idc_rcd but rejected because of cost, C!ffic1als said. Cowmeadow said the u01vers1ty spends more than Sl9 million a year on insurance for dependents of married employees. Money for extending benefilS to domestic partners has not been pro vided in this year's university budget. sa id Carol Carrier, associate vice presi­dent for human resources. It 1s unclear how n will be raised , The univef',ity pushed for domc~t1c partner provisions in the state's health plan, which covers university employ­ees. But Robert Cooley, director of employee in~urance for the :state. said coverage costs were hard lo dc:termrne, "so both sides let n go off the table." Inclusion in the health care plan would be preferable. Cowmeadow said. because buying individual coverage would cost at least twice as much as a group plan. ''We have a lot to celebrate."' said Cow· meadow, "but the struggle continues. The issue is equal compensation for equal work. My married colleagues still have a subsidy that I don't have for my partner," Lesbian and gay news executives discuss AIDS, activism, 'outing' By Rlc:JIARD PH.E FC>ft nc HEW VOICE :O.'EW YORK, Sunday. Sept. 12 (AP}-A panel of news cxecuuvcs agreed Sunday the American media arc mil struggling with such issues as ·outing" gay newsmakers and whether journalists should take part m gay marches and other po? ucal acttvn1es. The quesuon of whether the AIDS cri· SIS 1s adequately coveted by U.S. news­papers and broadcasters a•so arose dur­ing the sometimes- heated panel dJScus· s1on that wrapped up the three-day Nallonal Lesh an and Gay Journaltsts Conference Some ~00 gay cdnors and reporters from around the country attended the group·s second annual mcetmg. Panelists agreed the news media should not aggre.s1vcly out ' or reveal the homoscxualny of ncwsmakers, but efforts should be made 10 persuade md1· v1duals to reveal that information If it is relevant to the story "My own predisposition is that we need to be very careful about keepmg things out of the newspaper. but I don't think we should make a pomt of 1dcnt1· fymg someone as gay or lesbian unless there ts a special pomt," said Geneva Overholser, editor of The Des Moines Register Pearl Stc\\art, editor of The Oakland Tribune, said that m cases where sexual oncn1a11on 1s pcrtment to the story. "n seems to me some pressure should be brought to bear on the person" to dis· c~ose that 1nformat on. Bui "1f he chooses not to , I don't see takmg n any further," she said. Members of the panel wrestled at length with the usue cf whether homo­sexual 1ournallsts should he allowed to JOID in public events such as the recent gay pride march ID Washmgton, D C W1l11am Ahearn, executive editor and vice president of The Associated Press, said the AP bas no rule against homo· sexual reporters coverin11 aay related stories. But he said 1ournall ts were barred from the march because of a long-standing company policy against political acttvny ''When you arc a iournallst . as far as I'm concerned, you check some thmgs at the Joor." Ahearn said. "I have a proh­lcm when personal beliefs are allowed to get m the way ot coverage." Rober! Murphy. an ABC-TV vice pres· 1Jent, said his network has a similar pol· ICY Stewart >aid she would "have a hard time tcllmg a member ol my Mall that he or she could not march t~ a c1v1I rights demonstration so n would be dif· f1cult for me to tell them they couldn't march m a gay or lesbian parade On AIDS coverage, Overholser said the failure of newspaper obituaries to mention AIDS as a cause of death wu one reason "hY the public did not rccog nizc the thrca1 sooner Chan It did Ahearn said public md1flercncc JS a factor that must be overcome an getttnf mformation out "I have not been 1n one newsroom where I haven't seen aggressive cover· age of AIDS The problem JS gcttmg pcO· pie to read it ," Ahearn sauJ. "It is mcum­bcnt on us to come up wuh ways to tell the story. to get it read and get 11 mto the newspaper " Murphy. who was mtroJuced to the conve1:t1on as bemg gay, said one obs.ta · cle to AIDS coverage IS .. the increJ1hle amount of disinformatwn that 's out there you have to be careful lhat what you report is new and respon!.1hle Robert Giles, ed1torlpublisher of l'hc Detroit News, said his paper' diverse staff, tncludmg lesbian columniu Deb Price, has boosted the paper's overall coverage. ''We d•l recogmze that very often the story 1s helped hy the understandtng and perspective that a member ol that group brings to the coverage," Giles said. THE NEW"VOICE I SEPTEMBER 17·23. 1993 15 T TT DATELINE: GAY AMERICA California judges plan secret-ballot vote on discriminatory organizations By BOB EGEi.KO FOR THE HEW VOCE SAN FRANCISCO, Monday, Sept . 13 (AP)-After sidestepping the issue a year ago, California's judges plan to vote by secret ballot on whether to pro· hihit themselves from belonging to organuations that discriminate against gays. Ballois are to be mailed this Novem­ber to all 2400 members of the California Judges A.sociation , along with as many as. three counterproposals-one of which would exempt the Boy Scouts and any other youth group from the mem­bership han. The associatton s e1hical standards for Judges. in a provision passed nar­rowly m 1986, declare membership map· propriate in any non-religious organiza· tion that discriminates without legal JUSt1f1cat1on on lhc ba~1s of race sex religion or national origin. Violations are subJect to discipline by the state Commission on Judicial Per­formance. Though 11 has the authority to recommend removal of a JUdge from the bench, the commission has issued only private reprimands so far to judges who were found to belong to discrimina· tory clubs. A re<olution offered at last year's CJA convention would have added sexual orientation to the list, while exempting the armed forces It was tabled alter supporters realized they lacked a three fourths ma1orny, which they nccdeJ because the proposal was mtroduced after the normal dead­line. Only a majorui· vote would h.ave been needed at this yC"ar's convenuon. scbed· ulcd for San Diego next month. But the as~oc1ation·s Executive Board decided TT TDATELINE: GAY AMERICA instead to submit the que:,tion 10 all its members. About 80 percent of the judges favored that process m a poll earlier this year. said CJA president Patrick Morris, a San Bernardino Superior Court judge "There wa. a JU<llfiable concern that (for) an i<sue this important and this sensitive ... all he allowed to take part ," Morris, a supporter of extending the ban to include sexual orientation. said Mon­day. He said In a column in the as ... oc1ation's news· lener thi> month, Morris said " Equal protection for gays and lesbian> ha> become the visible ctv1l r1gh1s muc of the 1990s .... How judges respond to this new consciousness 1s a matter of great 1mror1ancc to 1hc ethics of our profes­s10n A leading opponent of the proposal Lo> Angele> Superior Court Judge John Farrell , said he was confident of Wtn· ning ·or two reasons ~ the secrcc' of the ballot. and, more importantly. 'the fact th.at it will be submitted to all associa­tion voters rather than "a group of activ ... ists" at the con\·ention. Farrell said he wants all future changes m ethical <tandards to be sub­mitted to the member>h1p, a proposal to be considered at next month's conven· t ion. He contended the proposed exten­sion of the di~crimination ban to sexual orientation was aimed primaraly at the Boy Scouts and was "a pure mtruston tnto the per>onal hfc of the judges ." Contents of the ballot have not yet l>een determined. It '"II include at least the proposed extension of the d1scrim1- na11on ban, approved by the CJA s Exec uuve Board. an 1ccompan) mg com mentary says a judge c-an belong to 1 local group th.at does not discrimmate, even tf u 1s part of a d1scnmin1tOr) national organ1zat1on. University of North Carolina campuses move to protect gay rights Saturday, Sept. II (AP}-A majority of the 16 school' m the University of North Carolina sy>tem have adopted in recent years policies lo prohibit discrimination because of sexual orientation. and another school may follow this week. Western Carolina University in Cul lowhec could do so at a meeting next week, officbls u1d. One of the first colleges in North Caro· Ima to guard homosexual rights was the North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston·Salem. It adopted its policy about two years ago. said Preston Lane, 25, of Boone, who led the student gov­ernment m the early 1990s 01.;cr1mmat1on 1s d1scriminat1on in any form. whe1hcr n's again~t blacks or women or ~ays . It's wrong and u 's un American," Lane said h1day Nine colleges 1n the UNC system have adopted policies to protect gay rights. Some have used admissions policies to add sexual orientation to the list of fac­tors for which discrimination is proh1b· ued-along with those of race, color. national origin, religion. sex, age and handicap •tatus. Others have added the language to hiri
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