Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 87, June 25, 1982
File 001
File size: 15.37 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 87, June 25, 1982 - File 001. 1982-06-25. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3483/show/3450.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-06-25). Montrose Voice, No. 87, June 25, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3483/show/3450

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 87, June 25, 1982 - File 001, 1982-06-25, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3483/show/3450.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 87, June 25, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 25, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript The ewopaper of Montrose Issue #87, Published Weekly Friday June 25 1982 Good Evening Montrost> ~ eather tonight: Partly cloudy and warm with a sbght chanC'f' of thundcnh(lwers and a Jc)w of 74 Saturda)-: .'unnse 6 22AM:. Partly ~}0th~~d~r~~;!.;r!t~nd ~i~f~~c~f~~ Sunset k 2.,.PM. ee 's Parade a als Marion E. Coleman and An y Mils Special Report: The Fred Paez inci ent Two years later 2 MONTROSE VOICE I J UNE 25, 1982 Nu ms Ct, 5 300 IJESTHEJl'IER I I I:.• I\. HOUSTON. TEXRS 11006 ..-----..... ..I ..---773-526-6557 ----------..... ~ GAY PRIDE WEEKEND Sunday, June 27- NONA HENDRICKS (of LABELLE fame) LIVE singing "Busting Out," "Do What You Wanna Do," "Itching in My Heart," and more Advance tickets available at Numbers Show to begin AFTER Spotts Park Rally Nona Hendricks will also be riding on Numbers float in the Gay Pride Week Parade Upcoming Events 4th of July Celebration Sat., Sun., Mon (Red, White and Blue Parties Saturday, July 17, Tropical Nights Party Always "A Part Of ... Not Apart From" -N-U- f-l 8-6R.5.~. -B-B1f13f-o5V2.6~-6~5r5t1s R_11_00_6 ___ ._-....;_.._.. ...... ~ ~1s\1:~a Always "A Part Of ... Not Apart From" ~ ... MontroseNews/TheNation JUNE 25, 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 3 Gay Pride Week's first event at site of 1980 police raid The second anniversary of a police raid on Marys, a popular gay bar at 1022 West­heimer, was well attended Thursday,June 17, as the opening ceremony starting Gay Pride Week 1982 in Houston. Andy Mills, manager of Marys, wished the rrowd a " Happy Gay Pride Week" nnd startt'<I the festivities marking Houston's fifth year of celebrating Gay Pride Week in a major way. Gav Pride W('(~k commemorates an e\.'(•ni in I ~)(19 wh<'n customers of the Stone .. wall Inn in New York City riot(.'d ovn poli«t.• harri.u;i-;mtmt. What wai;: intt.·nded hy pohl·t· us a routim• raid on a gay bar <'ndf'<I up with the polire having to bari c-ndt• th(•msdvE·s inside the bar to be pro· h•«tl'd from an angry moh ouL<.;id(>. To kick the week off in Houston, and to commemorate a police raid two years ago at Mary's, a wooden prison cell was erected and members of the Texas Riders, a social club, were dressed as police offi. cers. Everyone present was subject to "arrest," not unlike the situation dunng the actual raid in 1980. This time though charges could be brought against you by anyone but the police officers, charges which ranged from being rude to refusing all manner of invitations. If arreested you had to face "hanging judge" Sandra Floyd of Kindred Spirits and who is Houston's entrant for Ms. Gay Rodeo. Bribery was the rule and not the exception. All fines, bribes and donations went to the Gay Pride Week Committet•. The event rai1·wd over $6..50. Bv throwing youn;l'lfat the mere~· of the C'ouft, lt.•niencv ~a" shown only if you wt•r(' a regiRh·r<>d ~otn and signed a petition supporting Huu:.;ton Mayor Ka~hy W~lt min"s proposal lo have CJvll Sf>rv1l't' changt>d from istate to local rontrol. Larry Bagneris Jr., chairman of Gay Pride Wet>k Committee, introduced Hous­ton City Councilman George Greanias who read a statement from Mayor Whit· mire proclaiming June l 7through June 27 as "Gay Pride Days" in the City of Houston. Greanias noted that this was the first time City Hall had used the word "gay" in such a proclamation. Even State Rep. Debra Danburg was not immune from "arrest." When questioned about her release from Marys' cell she said, "We just struck out for gay rights and rushed the door." At one point during the evening, a pri­soner yelled a request for "a shot" and someone in the audience suggested pl'nicillin. The prisoners chanted the familiar ··we Shall Overcome .. which degenerated into ·we an• Overdrt.·sst'd," Andy Mills explains rules for "arrest" while Faust Pumarejo and Steve Kerr of the Texas Riden; "po/ic-ed" the area. Photos by Billie Dun.can. Montrose Mouth Pride Week peaks The G1y Hispanic Caucus ts staging its annual fiesta tonight (Fnday) at 2504 Mason and it'll include live music this year This event will run 8:00pm to midnight There are three big events Saturday: the Te n s Cup Tennis Challenge Saturday morning in Memonal Park, regular MSA softball games Saturday afternoon at Levy Field. and the Fred Paez Memorial Concert Saturday mght at the University of Houston's Cullen Aud1tonum Then Sunday, the Parade will wind down from about 1800 to 100 Westhe1mer starting S·30pm. and the Spotts Park pallt1cal ral?y will begin 1mmcd1ately after that Then Monday. you can rest (Unlessyou·rea bOwler., The City of Houston·s Health Dept mobile unit will be at the" parking lot of the old Montrose Pub during the Gay Pnde Parade Sunday for emergency first a•d. 1f required Also. of course ttley'll be conducting tneirtree vo screening After the parade. the unit will move over •o Spotts Park for the annual GPC Rally. -· The City .)f Houston Parks and Recreation Department is staging a bodybuilders contest July 10 at Cherryhurst Park, 1700 Missour. m Montrose Now this sounds like a real party You can bet your pees !he VOICE will be there to photograph Entry deadline is June 25. today Fnday• Entry fee is $5 00 And more info 1sava1lableby athng 528-3650 -·- Randolph Parks of the Montrose Mining Company and other co-hosts presented a 'Juneteenth Celebration ·er party last Saturday 3500 gues1s attended this invitation only party at Chases OJ Jimmy and Jon ga\le a Mm1ng Company flare to the music wrth an added guest DJ. J, D. Arnold from England Randolph expressed grat1tuted to the co-hosts of this now annual event. especially to Jerry Vann of Chases Mmmg Company bartenders were on duty and an 1mpress1ve selection of food was supplied by co-host La Cousine O"Art. Lasermat1c of Los Angeles provided a crowd pleasing laser hght show to complement the music -·- Ron Martin is startmg a new statewide monthly. "discreetly gay. · magazine, to be called Texas Silver Dollar Times He says 11'11 debut August 1 will be large page size {Time magazine size). slick paper full color covers. and will be free Ron was previously involved m M1dntght Rider, a weekly bar guide that competed unsuccessfully against TWT two years ago -·- The Gay Switchboard of Houston is now affll1ated with Interact (l1H Inc.). That means since Interact has tax exempt status. your financial contributions to the Gay Switchboard can now be tax deduct•ble, mforms Rich Nell director of the Switchboard Also now aff1hated under the Interact umbrella. according to Ned Par1ter of Interact, is Famiiles and Friends of Gays and the Montrose Symphonic Band • The Pink Elephant has its own official Gay Pnde Week pens Yes ink pens And they·re not 1ust your ordinary run of the mill Bies. These pens are giant red. white and blue flag waving pens. They almost reach out and salute you. -·- The Montrose Clinic has asked us to help them search for a lew goodies· a magazine rack for the waiting room, two small two-drawer file cabmets, a small refrigerator, a lawn mower. a photocopier a chalkboard and chair mats for their desks Anyone who can donate any of thP.se items will be held up in the highest esteem, says Richard Adams admmistrahve director at the chmc 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 25, 1982 _1 ) • t ) -~~:11 Monday-Leather and Pool Tourney Night Tuesday-'West Side Story' in Cinemascope July 4-The Montrose Symphonic Band in concert, Liberty Bank Parking Lot, 4pm Fly the Band to >Mt, .S:11 :cis::ct Carneige Hall, New York City 1022 Westhe1mer naturally 1 YearAgo June 25, 1981 · Judge ruled INS could not deny gays entry A federal judge in San Francisco ruled that the government could not exclude people from entering the United States just because they are homosexual. In granting a preliminary injunction, U.S. District Court Judge Robert Aguilar said the constitutional rights of the plaintiffs, Leebion-Oay Freedom Day Committee Inc. and others, were threatened by an Immigra­tion and Naturalization Service policy of blocking homosexuals or those accused of being homosexual from visting the country. June 28, 1981 Parade was biggest ever The 1981 Gay Pride Week Parade down West­heimer contained dozens of floats, the Mon­trose Symphonic Band, the Oaklawn MarC'hing Band of Dallas, and the Great American Yankee Fl-eedom Band of Loe Angeles, and had Ray Hill and Rita Wan· etrom ae grand marshalls. It waa estimated that 35,000 witnessed the parade. June 28, 1981 Rally turnout was large The Spotta Park Rally with state liberal polit­ical figure Siaey Farenthal and Minneapolis Police Chief Anthony Bouse as speakers end with ber·b-que, beer and fireworks turned out also to be greet for mud wresUing. Nevertheless, en estimated 15,000 1howed up for the annual event, more than even optimistic GPC official• were expecting. June 28, 1981 Man clubbed then shot to to death on dark Montrose street Benjamen R Nickerson, 27, was killed when wa lking in the 1700 block of Miesouri. . A friend with him said two men droveuptn a car, got out without saying ~ w~rd , end began beating Nickerson. He said Nickerson then began to fight back, and they shot him. Montrose Voice the newspaper of Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright c. 1982 Office hours: 10am-6pm Henry McClurg put:ill•1-r«MOI Johannes Stahl new1 e</J/Or 81lhe Duncan tnttr,.mm«ir'JpOrts td•tOI Ed .M.a., r.ti nez Nick Fede Acel Clark fJf~/(;J Wilham Marberry edllefl•llflfJ drttclor Randy Brown MhefllSU'tfJ David Petluck ~''''nfJ Lyt Hams e</"9f/JSlnfJ Ronnie Stephens •Mrl••infJ 'Slave auction' nets $2000 for Kaposi Sarcoma Committee The slave auction sponsored by theAmeri· can Lt>atht·rmen, a social club, raised $2000 for Kaposi's sarcoma research June IA. The event was held at the Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer Dr. Didier Piot, member of Kaposi's Sar· coma Committee of Houston, spoke to the capacity audience of the necessity to raise funds for research. Dr. Piot said, "Drugs seem to be heavily involved in the etiology of this problem. We as gay people need to review our life­styles to maybe prevent the spread of this problem." Ron Haltom, American Leathermen president, presented Dr. Piot with a life­time associate membership in the club for his t"fforts in combatting Kaposi's sarcoma. Bidding during the auction was done on a point basis. Raffle tickets sold for one dollar were worth 1000 points as well as valid for a raffle drawing for donatC'd prizes. Auctioneer Frank Spencer entertained thC' audience with "country humor" betwC'<'n the bidding hut he was accused of departing on a f<"w occasions into "the realms of sexism and racism," which shocked the audience into a sudden silence end drew a few cat calls. A contestant named "Ron" received the highest number of points in the auction and the winning bid came from Kindred Spirits' Morion Coleman. Ron will be awarded a trip to Gay Rodeo in Reno, Nev­ada, and then be flown to Sen Francisco for a five day adventure. The Deep, 2212 Converse, donated this grand prize. Sergio and Gloria get tough Pacific New• Service A New York company has developed a new weapon in the battle against counter· feit designer jeans. The International Banknote Company says its system will allow firms to add a distinctive image to their labels, an image visible only when JUNE 25, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Frank Spencer, Houston aunctioneer, points to the u.·inning bidder, Photos by Ed Martinez. the label is exposed to light at a ccrtam ang1e. ln addition to jean makers, the company hopes to market the device to record and tape distributors and other industries vic­timized by counterfeiters. SO MUCH FOR VOT1N6 RIGHTS ... BRING ON A50RT10N ... BUSING, .• PRAYER! 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 25, 1982 Montrose Counseling Center provides mental health services to gay community Montrose has become a recognized home for a large number of gay men and lesbi· an.s. consequently making it the Castro Street area or Greenwich Village of Hous­ton. Within Montrose, one finds a visible community-active in business. politics and recreation . It is no wonder tht-n that we find in the heart of Montrose. a counseling center whose services are primarily directed towards and administered from gay men nnd lesbians. The Montrose Counseling Center repre­ ·"'l'Ilts n pht·nc)mena that is occuringwithm the mental health field. During the past 10 years, a number of mental health centers have been organized in most major cities whose services !-!pecifically focus on the need.s of gay men and lesbians. These include the Montrose Counseling Center of Houston, the Oak Lawn Center in Dal· las. the lnslitute for Human Integrity in New York, and the 18th Street Program in San Frandsro. For the most part, th~e organization5> heJrnn as volunteer agencieis and have ~ince developed into viable mental health centers delivering quality services to a ve-ry eager client population. The Montrose Coun~eling Center was founded and incorporated in 1979 by Bell Scott, MSW. It& services began operating from a two-room office, staffed by four therap1al8, under a budget of $5000. 19k0 proved to be an important year of growth. The Center moved twice, ending up in a five room suite at 900 Lovett Blvd., operating on an increased budget of $25,000. In December 1981, the Center moved upstairs to its present location, suite 203, an eight room facility with 2300 square feet of office space. This inc1udes a recep­tion area, two administrative offices, four individual therapy rooms, plus a group room. Its budget has grown to $55,000and the projected 1982 budget stands at $120,000. The Montrose Counseling Center is cur­rently staffed by eight mental health pro· fessionals. Serving as both the executive director and therapist is Gary G. Treese, MSW, who started out as a volunteer in 1979. In June 1980 he became a half-time adminifitrative director and in March 1982 became the full time executive director The Center'!! staff therapists include Walt Cadenhead MSW; Peter Kir MA. David McGee, MA; DeniseO'Doherty, MS1'0. IL"i; Bill Scott, MSW; and Sally Spill. ACSW. Gary Beauregard ~erves as a full time administrative assistant. Travis L. Peterson , MSW, and David Hinkle. M.D. !lerve as clinical consultants. The Center is also supported by an 11 mE'mht-r board of directors. The therapists at the Montrose Counsel· ing Center provide the following services: individual, group, coupleis, and family therapy, as weJJ as other support services. These servics focus on sexual minority issues, which represents the difference betwren this type of mental health center and the many other agencies that are not necessarily empathetic towards the gay male or lesbian lifestyles. The Center operates on the premise that non-heterosexual lifestyles are valid and de~erving of support and respect; conse­quently working against the effects of a homophobic society 1982 is shaping up as one of the Center's mm~t productive years, they said. The Cen­ter recently received a $41,000 grant from the Texas Commission on Alcoholh~m to run an elcoholi~m treatment program. TWELVE, FOURTEEN, SIXTEEN INCHES? Star Pizza will deliver hot and juicy to your door COME PLAY IN OUR NEW UPSTAIRS VIDEO GAME ROOM * OVEN HOT DELIVERY * PIPING HOT CARRY OUTS * CASUAL DINING ROOMS * New York-Style hand-thrown pizza * Chicago-style deep-dish pizza * Also available with whole wheat crust * Vegetarian pizza 2111 NORFOLK * Starburst deluxe pizza (the works!) HOURS: * Super sandwiches & salads Mon: 11:30am-llpm * Tue: sorry, closed fantastic deserts Wed: 11:30am-11pm * Imported & domestic beer Thu: 11 :30am-ll pm TRY OUR NEW LASAGNA Fri: 11 :30am-midnight Sat: 4pm·midnight CALL 523-0800 Sun: 4pm-10:30pm PLEASE ALLOW 1 HOUR FOR DELIVERY This marks the first time that an openly gay organization has received state or fed­eral funds in Texas. The Center has also recently received funds from two other organizations: The Professional and Executive Council, for the purpose of helping those clients who cannot afford the minimum fee, and the Tea for Two Thousand organization donated $6000. The Montrose Counseling Center is open from Monday to Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Its services operate on a slid­ing fee scale. Information is available by calling 529- 0037 Whitmire issued gay pride proclamation The start of Gay Pride Week 19R2 brought a proclamation from Houston Mayor Kathy Whitmire. George Greanias, city councilman for District C, read her statement at the ''2nd Anniversary of the Police Raid," Thurs­day, June 17, Mary's Lounge, 1022 Westheimer. The text of the proclamation follows. "Whereas, the continued betterment and success of our city lies within the self­less dedication of the countless individu­als and civic organizations devoted to playing a vital and vibrant role in the ever-widening areas of concern to citizens; and "Whereas, the fifth anniversary celebra· lion of 'Gay Pride Week' is recognized as an effort to foster goodwill througout the community in an effort of facilitate the continued growth and prosperity of this city; and "Whereas, the sponsorship of 'A Part Of-Not Apart From' is recognized as an outstanding endeavor in the shaping of all spheres of service to the community, which will hf' a 1rnbstantial contribution toward the well-being and general welfare of the peopl<· of this city- 'Now, therefore, I, Kathryn J . Whit­mire. mayor of th City of Houston, do hereby proclaim the days of June 17 through 27, 1982 as Gay Pride Days in Houston, Texas.' City Council George Greanias reads the mayor's proclamation al Mary's. Photo by Btllu.> Duncan. Coming July 4 ~ma Weel<end ~···mm Lone Star Classic '82 National Gay Softball Tournament 2294 HO!.COMUE HOUSTON 665·9678 THE Old Fashioned 4th of July Picnic . • Home fried chicken • Fresh corn on the cob • Real mashed potatoes & gravy DEEP ( Grant at Jackson 528-8234 . Happy hour daily 7am-7pm JUNE 25 • 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 2702 Kirby 524-6272 Nat & Jane1 ~ .d 11·30-2:00 Appeara' ng June 29s-Jeurv Yin g Lune h6 ·M30o-n1d1:a0y0-,F Frir idaayy &· S alurd ay 6:30-12:00 Dm. ner Monday-ThuSrsudnadya y. B ru nch 11:30-3:00 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 25, 1982 ~uJ~l~~s 1i;i-:flufj{Jj.N~~1 THIS WEEK: a Complimentary • re•tman1 and "inc bar glass of WINE or BEER with your meal with this ad! Daily Lunch 6 Dinner Spcmls pate. cas~roles. cakes 6 more Nov. 1 Champagne brunch 11am-3pm Sundays 914 W. Alabama 529 0627 SALE! SALE! SALE! Simmons Beauty Rest Discount Center King Size (reg ssooi now 175°0 Queen Size (reg S400) now 125°0 523-8278 2115 Norfolk 10-7 M-F 10-6 Sat A New Kind of Resale Boutique Jewelry, Clothing, Gift Items, Furniture, plus much, much more Consignments taken Hours llam-Gpm l\1onday-Saturday 1405 California 523-5552 *""" BonAdeTd CO Insured !~~cieP.0~!~°F~eas • Ticks • Rats • Mice Home or Business FAST SERVICE STRONG GUARANTEE LOWEST PRICES 988-1331 lntroductorv Special S38dO Call Now for Information A part of the community Park Liquors 1006 Fairview 523-0427 520-5217 Patricia Anne O'Kane Attorney at Law • Criminal matters • Estate planning • Corporations • General civil practice • Seven years experience 3323 Yoakum 526-7911 Come see the C.J. EXPRESS with Craig & Jorge at the one and only "Just" MariQn and Lynn's Playing Friday & Saturday starting 9pm, $2 cover 817 Fairview, 528-9110 Meet your Gay Pride Marshalls Since their election to be the Marshalls of the Gay Pride Parade 1982, Marion Cole. man, owner of Kindred Spirits, and Andy Mills, manager of Marys, have been seen together all around Montrose drumming up support for this, which is expected to be the biggest Gay Pride Week that Houston has SE'en. The VOICE asked them their feelings about this year's celebration and specifi­cally about the theme "A Part Of-Not Apart From." Marion Coleman said, "In the past few months J have seen this year's theme bec-ome a rt·ahty in our community. I've seen men and women who in the past have Jx.t'n apart from each other work together to make this Gay Pride Week a positive statc·ment and a meaningful celebration of the> fart that we are a part of a caring community." "I have worked in the rommunity for 15 years, but only this year have I 8l'en us finally come together and discover that our individual strengths and talents are much greater when they are shared in a common effort ... that we can be orga­nized, raise funds, help others and still have fun. I've met many fine people whose lives have touched my own, and for that I am most grateful." "I am enjoying this year's celebration and I'm looking forward to the smaller celebrations we will share as we continue to work together in the months to come." Andy Mills related that this Gay Pride W(•ek is "showing other people in both the gay and straii;cht communities that we are rapahle of dmng constructive things, that wt• can work together and enjoy each other." "I think this year's cc>lebration is h<>tter nrgnniz('d and mO!"'t importantly more inclusive for men and women," he added . Mills tommented that the non-gay com· Manon E. Coleman and Andy Mlils. Photo by Johann.s Stahl. munity could enjoy this Gay Pnde Week, not just the parade. but all events through­out the week. Roth Coleman and Mills said they are looking forward to better cooperation between lesbians and gay men in the community. Business brisk at Montrose Clinic The Montrose Clinic, located at 104 West· heimer, is a non-profit clinic whose pri­mary purpo8e is to screen for, diagnose and treat sexually transmitted diseases (ffl'IJ's). The Houston City Health Department (HHD) recognized the need to expand its program of combating STD's a few years ago and through tht" Medical Commiltt"e of the Hou1;ton Gay Political Caucus initialed a program of 1;creening for STD's 1n the Montro8(>Community 111t several lR\ JUNE 25. 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 ems and clubs. Ruth Ravas was the HHD coordinator for the project until 1981, and was adopted as a special friend of the Mon­trose community, Initial planning for the Montrose Clinic began over threP years ago when several health professionals met to discuss how best to serve the health needs of the Mon­trose community. To best utilize the resources available, it was decided early on that a facility restricted to the treat­ment of STD's would be the best approach. Further development of the Clinic was transferred to a steering committee from a group called Lesbian and Gay People in Medicine. Over the course of the next two years, numerous planning sessions were held. during which persons noted for their experfo;e in various fields were asked to participate. From the outset, cloi:.e liaii:.on with HHD wa1; achieved by having one of their Rlaff attend these planning sessions. Once the need and the approach had been established, the major challenge was funding, for this clinic was to be a non· profit and non-governmental entity sup· ported by the community it served. As an extension of her work with the HHD pro­gram, "Mother Ruth" took a special interest in the Clinic and with a team of hard workers of the steering committee, they raised sufficient funds to cover the capital equipment and operating expenses for the clinic's first four months of operation. October 6, 1981 marked the opening of the Montrose Clinic. The clinic is open Tuesday, Thursday and Friday evenings and Sunday afternoons, interphased with HHD's central clinic operating schedule for convenience to the patient. But for one paid E1taff member (the administrative director), the clinic was ~taffed entirely by volunt('(.•r penmnnel. Currently the clinic director's position 1s being filled (at no salary) by a trustee while a formal search is underway to fill it. The medical staff is composed of JO physi· cians. OvC'r 0 nun• and al i health professionals work in the screening and laboratory activities. Additionally another 30 volunteers work in various reg­istration, busine88 and clerical duties. The chnic does need additional nursing and allied health volunteers to help cover the schedule during the summer Normal screening by the Montrose Clinic includes drawing a blood sample to test for syphilis as well as taking penile or pelvic, throat and rectal cultures to test for gonorrhe_a. When treatment is indicat~, the physician can treat the patient with antibiotics (pills or injections). Kwell (for external parasites), or by \\'ri.ting prescrip­tions for medications not provided at the chmc. The Montrose Clinic opened with tne expectation that there would be 6000 to 8000 patient visit." during the first year of operation. Thus far the actual patient vis­it. 8 have almost doubled the anticipaied volume. The clinic is developing a return· ing rlientele who are developing tht> habit of routine preventive check-ups. Operational costs average bbout $11 per patient visit. To date, the Clinic has oper­ated on a voluntary donation basis. This may change depending on the patient res~onse to i~~onnation, including a pos­ter m the Chmc. A fee structure is being studied as an option. The Montrose Clinic does not discrimi­nate on the basis of sex, race, religion or sexual orientation. The gay community can be proud of its special effort and sup­port of a project that serves its special needs and is capable of servicing the STD problems of the total community "Plea~e help uts ht"lp you. We need a few more good volunteers. We need the patien~ to donate enough to cover costs and we need fundraising support to endow the clinic for a long-term future We will succeed with your help," a spokesperl"'On said WHEN YOU'RE TIRED OF GAMES ..... /i[llffofi~ BC NOT APART FROM CLUB HOUSTON 2205 fannin 659-4998 • • • • • • 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 25. 1982 Police, firemen approve civil ser vice compromise Houston police and firemen's major unions approved a compromiseJ une 2:3 on Mayor Kathy Whitmire's proposal to have civil servict> for the two groups changed from state to local control. Tlus J to 1 approval Wednesday. June 23. conflicted with earlier report~ that it would be rejected. Thechnngt' in civil service rules wa.~ one of Whitmbe-'s fundamental rampai~n promlBes, as she saw it was necessar~· in order to establish better control over Hous­ton a police tlnd fire departmenti;. The unexpected c·hange by the police nnd fire groups will apparently avoid the necessity and expense of voting on the 18.."IUe m a public referendum, obi:tervers said. It also clears the way for state legi~­lation authurizing the local civil service control Neighborhood man pleads guilty to assault on cop A man orig"inaHy charged with attempted capital murder of a police officer pleaded no cont.est June 22 to a lesser charge and wa~ sentenced to five yean. in prison, reported the Houston Post. Jonathan Michael McGarry of the 1800 block of Colquitt in Montrose was sent· enced on the reduced charge of attempted capital murder by di~trict Judge Emstl Coker ~~~istant District Attorney John Kyles said Mc-Garry kept tl'YinM: to alash an undercover Houston policeman when a planned methamphetamine drug buy wasn't completed December 8. McGarry was ~eriously injured after bein~ shot in the stomach during the inci· dent Kyl1 ~ -iaid. 'Who's behind the gay rights movement?' The ~at, 1ni l Gay Task Force has pub­liahed a ne"" book which it said d0<.·u­mentl'> wide-spread non-gay support for y civil nghts. 'Who's &hmd the Gay Rights Mov..­me11t? A Gay Civil Rights Packet" offero d~ array of evidence at the depth of sup­port gay peop1e were said to enjoy in the non-gay community. Included wt-re reso­lutions from professional and sdentific ~"ganizations, non-discrimination state ments from Cl&Jor corporations, stntt"­ments from religiou~ leaders, publi~ opm1on polls, and quotes from other major sh ... ,. '8 of public opinion in America. Statements are included from such diverse BOurces as the Lutheran Church• :i America, the Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co.. the American Association for the Advance­ment of Science. the National YWCA.Mas· apchusett.s Institute of Technology and more than 200 others. "The booklet will be a valuable tool for act1v1St.8 to U!o!e m their work with the media, in lobbying legislators, in dealing w1th employers, and in building strength within thetgay and non-gay community.'' an NGTF spokesperson said Lucia Voleska. executive director of the group, commenlt>d. in a prepared press release, .. As we stru~otle to achieve our.­rights, it often seems that our progress is terribly slow, particularly in light of how Jong and hard so many of us have worked. But we must realize that the gay move­ment has generated ~ignifican' non-gay 1upport and that we are winning in our effort to achieve major changes in public attitudes." t=tAVi:L -- L.I 522-8227 • :• I rl e e • II n1 JOHN PAUL BARNICH ATTORNE~ AT LAW LEGAL SERVICES 3317 MONTROSE SUITE 318 (71 3) 523-5006 AIRLINE TICKETS ""'~ LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN / .?. .\ Call Rick for Details Serving the Gay Community c llisii ou1 ::t:;ouwwl '-Xitcfiell all{/ SN! om C(!_OWlhlj Ce ooh. cSJlCC('SS07l('S ... ~?llflltl 7(' af.Oll{ Om <JOlHmel coofzi119 dasse s a Ca 1nove11caf e 1727 lt'estlzeimez C.)(oll5loll, '0exas 77098 '(;efl!pf1011e 520-1397 ".-.. JUNE 25, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 11 Police Chief Brown tackleing job of improving HPD image and performance \ Police Chief Lee P. Brown. Exclusive photostory by Ed Martinez On April 19, 1982, Houston Mayor Kathy Whitmire swore in a new chief of the Hous· ton Police Department. Jt was a ceremony that broke precedent for many reasons; the mayor was a woman, of course, and the police chief was something new for Houston. Not only was he from outside the H~us­ton Police Department for the first time, but he was, obviously and undeniably, black Lee P. Brown came to Houston fresh from a term as Atlanta's Public Safety Commissiom•r. In that office he had res1>om1ibility for not only the police dt•pprtment hut ulsn the city's fire, civil defrmw. and correctional Mervin•s_ In addi · t10n, lw had guidt-'Ci the successful E!Pan:h frr the killt·r of num(>rous Atlanta youths, tcmning nationwide puhlicity and atlcn· tion in thr process. M(•mhl'rs nf tht.• Houston Polin· Jl1•part· ment wt•n· n!ClinJ::" from n torrent of nox· ious national puhlidty over tht.• draths of ,Jot• C'etmpos Torres, Handy Wt•hHlt.•r, und Fn·d Pnl'l. In tht' c~1Rr nfTorrl's. Hom•ton polir(•mt·n wert' convi<'tl·d of the deal~ ol tht• M1•xkan who waR drownt.·d aftl'r h<•111g hnndcufft·d and thrown m a hayou by polic-~·mt•n. Ncvt>rlh<·l1·sR, HouRton'i-; police groups rt>uc·t<·d with rest.·nlm(•nt and hc>Ntility to Hrown's nomination . Sufft.orinK from bud local public rela· UonM following the TorreR caR~ and thE­other int.·1dt'nt8 that Rt.•rvrd to nhl'nate the Houston Police Department from the goodwill of thE- community, the announce· m('nt by Mayor Whitmirethatshe had sue· ceeded m wooing Brown away from Atlanta to serve as the chief of HPD was the last straw. Various members of the Houston Police tried to discredit the new chief, even golng so far as to send a delegation to Atlanta to attempt to uncover evidence of any lack of qualifications by Brown for his new post. The effort proved fruitless, and the Hous ton City Council backed the Mayor and ratified the appointment of Brown as Houston Police Chief. Lee P. Brown holds masters and docto-­rate degrees in criminology from the Um· versity of California at Berkeley, a masterH degret.· in sodology from San Jo!'e State UnivE-rsity and a bachelor's degree in c-riminology from f·re.sno State Univer­toity. Prohahly no other police chief of any major <·ity in America is so well qualified H'ndcmirall\' as Chief Brown Ht•n·ntlv, ·Mavor Whitmire reinforced th mt·ssD.J;:c t.hat hN appcintment of l'h1Pf HroY. n df'Jiven·d tH the Houston J>olil'f' Jlqlnrtm('nt by <.·ailing fortheremo­vul oftht• llouston Polil-t• and Fire Depart· mt·nts from statt• civil sen:ice und formation of u local dvil Ei<'rvict.• that would givt• Ow fin• and polict' <·hit'f~ ~n·ntN fluihility nvt·r the selt.•l'lion of thl'ir astm;tants, husing the selE-ction more on qunlifiC"ntions for thf' job rather that seniority and gradt.'8 on civil sl'rvice tests. This m·ws was grN·tt'd by thl' fir<' and polict> d('portmt.·nts with lei->s than wild enthusim1m. and the firemen and police· men on the onE- hand and the mayor and her supporters on the other dug in for a fight. That fight may have been averted by recent attempts at compromise between the opposing groups, but regard· less of the outcome of the talks between Mayor Whitmire and the public safety groups, it appears almost certain that the mayor will have her way on this issue. Jn this conl<!xt, the MONTROSE VOICE asked Larry Troutt, Director of the HPD Public Information Office, for an inter­view with the Chief. The following is a sampling of the answers from the new chief. Lee Brown is smart, but he's not arro­gant. He's confident, but never smug or patronizing. He's a diplomat first of aB. and a person who inspires admiration and resp<'<'t. Whatevt'r happens in this admin· istration of tht.· first outside police chief of tht-Hl'I>. I..eeP. Brown will lt'aveanindeli· hit• mark on tht· department that now t"alls him "( 'h1ef " lfhat i1p1nw11 nf thf• Houst'Jn Pohce I>epartmcn~ dld y.,u have bt'fore )·ou came ht•rel I'vt• hct•n in this business a Jong ume. ond hnppt"'n to know thatoftentimt'swl>at •s proJf'C'ted U8 un imagt' does not rrpn·;>ent tht• fot·tual situation. Partit.·ularly ib .his tht• cast• wht•n nt·ws out~ide the city is pre­H(• nll•d on tt polict• department. If it'1-1 n11tional news it represents a nationul event. sonwthing that is of nationnl intt.·rt'st. Most of the news that c-ame from outsidl' the city of Houston ahout the Houston police was negative, dl•aling with 1:;ome celebrated cases that dealt with misconduct on the part.of Hou~ · ton police officers. Having been in thi1> business long enough I know that that does not necessarily represent what goes on in the Houston police department. I knew the publicity that came out, understood the context in which that pub­licity comes out, basically the national news does not focus in rn local news on a regular basis, but on things that are of national interest, and any celebrated case is of national interest. So I came to Hous­ton reaJly with an open mind, thinking that the vast majority of Houston police officers would he like that vast majority of police officers I've always been associated with, that they are profe~sional. Has yuur opmion changed an)' since vou't·f• fu>(•n h(•re? - l\o, m fact it's bef.n remforced, I've spent a lot of time out in the various area~ of the police dE-partment where the various functiont< take place, and what I thought wJuld be the ca~e ha51 materialzied.1 think Wt' hen• collectively a good bunch ofpolict.· offiet'r& that ore doing a good job. and under less than desirable circumstanct·s. What did )Ou hopt• to acromp/.J ... ;h u·ht"'n vou c-amC" here? · I've st-t a goal ~ince I've been here. and the goals which I'n· et;tabhshed for the Houston Pulice D(•partment is to tram•· form it into a mod.el of policeing in Amer· 1ca, to become that standard b)-· which other police department.IS are judged. And I set that goal after making my preliminary asi:iessment of what we had here, and I'm impresi:_.;ed with the foundation that exist." here in terms of the dedication and prof es· sionalism of the vast majority of the officers. I did not come here with any plan. any predetermined agenda, nor any magic wand, but rather I came with a procei:is, the pr(){'(>i:is involved making an asse1;~ ment of the Housu:in Police Department, and its strengths and weaknesses Like taking a snap~hot, this is what we have rlght now, already knowing v.·here we want to go, and then outlining the steps that are necessary to get there. We're doing the samE- thing in the community, getting input from citizens, asking throughout the community what are the issues that you have with your police department. what are problems that you see in reference to the Houston PoJice Department, and what do you want from your police department. How do you feel about a citizens police retiieu: committee? I am not in favor of a citizens' review board if we're talking about a citizens' review board that exists for the sole pur­pose of receiving and investigating com­plaints against police officers. I believe that discipline is a function of management, and if you remove that tool from management, you hamper rnanage-­ment's ability to run the organization, But 1 think equally important. there's been a long history of attempts to establish police review boards and J don't know of any that have proven to be successful. What is your position on the mayor 'b intention to remOL'e the police and fire departments from state civil service? And put them in local civil service? Right, put them in local cil'il sert"ice. I support that. I think theissueis!hatof whether the civil service S\'Stem will bE> controllOO. I believe if you h·ave local con trol yc1u have local accountability. The .ssut• l8 ven· ba~ic where ~hall it be con trolled, shail 1t ht· 1n Austin or m Hou:-;ton In most maJor C'itie."' in thb country, nnllas being anothn good example m this sl<lte, you Ji.ave local control. ,'\um<' of the members of the pulif"'I! department do not hat•e ~ood attztudrs. Hou do you chanf!C' people's altitudes2 I don 'L know of any really easy way to <·han~t· anyont>'s attitude!'.'. \\."e do have an advanta~e in th~ Hou.Bton Police Depart­ment of being a paramilitary organization that we c-an df'al with beha\.ior. t-;egati\'t• attitudt.'8 manifest th('m"elve~ in n~ative behavior. that we can dea, with. I think a. police chief can create an environment that is conducive to attitudi· nal change!'. I think the message hat-; been staU>d very clearly: that under my admin­istration I do not intend to condone mis· conduct on the part of the police officers. I do not intend to condone mistreatment of 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 25. 198::> any of our citizens. It is my belief that police cannot break the law to enforce the law. I believe that it is incumbent upon every police officer to understand that our society like any other society must have order, but we demand a different form of order than some other countries. We demand that order be main· tained consistent with the principles our our democracy. That involves not only the protection of but al•o the perpetuation of the rights of the individual. That is the message which I'm certainly going to becontinuouslyput· ting out. .. The relattonl-i betu.:een the Houston Police Department and the gay commu· mty hat·e not been good. How do you feel about gays in general and the Houston gay community in particular? I believe that as the police chief, one's personal sexual preference becomes their busine~s. That's the position that we take. Our job U. not to add value judgmenlb Sunday, June 27 8-lOpm John Day &Company Introducing Sundance Cattle Co. Fish Bairn, Thursday. 8-lOi:>m whether things are good or bad but to enforce the law ... other that that lots of persons have different lifestyles, that's not something we get involved in. Will a pattern of law enforcement that could be called harassment in Montrose contmuet I don't believe that anybody or any group of people or any community should be harassed. It's not the job of the police to harass anyone. It is the job of the police to enforce the laws that are on the books. And that means all over the city. I don't know anybody who would suggest that any segment of the community be immune from law enforcement. Agreed. There was a recent and unsuc· cessful effort to include a class on gay au:areness in police cadet training. Do you think it has a place m police cadet training? When I was in Atlanta,oneofthethmgs we had pre~ented to us was representa· Monday. Free C&W Lessons by Dennis Tues~~~~~ i~:M Wednesday: Country & WesteLi_.t;i~~~ Thursday: Pool Toumament-lOpm ME~~i~gHWa~~YH?i~~;~~;~~ NEVER A COVER CHARGE 1213 RICHMOND • 627-9071 Extra parking on the comer of ML Vernon &: Richmond Reasonable Hours Likeable Prices at Francisco's 901 Richmond Jerry's Special Prices: haircut/blow dry or haircut and set $10 permanent waves $35 colors $20 & up Call us 523-0438 tives from the gay community coming and volunteering to teach the class for us, and that worked very well for us. So my expe· rience in doing that shows that it is benefi cial, not only for the representatives of the gay community but also for the police department to develop a greater aware­ness of different life styles ... it's certainly something we can pursue. Would you hire an openly gay member of a police training class? I think we have to look at what the laws te11 us in that regard. There are laws that address that issue ... the issue is not a new one ... there are legal prohibitions against doing so ... the statute of the state. If that u:erechanged, would you dolt 1{ it u:ere not 1/legaU lf a person is eligible for being hired and there are no legal prohibitions then no police agency would be in a position not to hire them because they'd be breaking the law. What you're asking is really a legal issue, it's noL.! morel issue or a philosophi­cal issue. You've spoken of your goals for the po/ice department. Do you have any time frame for these goals? I've not set any time frame. I want to have my plan done within two months. I clearly understand that whatever prob­lems exist here did not crop up overnight. That change in any police agency is not revolutionary, it's evolutionary, and so we have to have managed change. Is there anything that you'd like to say to our readers~ I am the police chief of all citizens of Houston, and I solicit their suggestions, their ideas. I encourage all of our citizens, if they have concerns, if they have recom­mendations about what they think we should be doing, our ability to deliver police services, I want to hear from them I believe that to be a great ci ty you have to be a safe city. 'The Ultimate Baked Potato' Stop by and have a beer with us this weekend We will be aelling beer outlide 416 Westheimer, Houston, Texas, 520-0554 TUE "'' THUii "' " " " .. 17 11 DOAM • llO l'M f .. , .. I IO ... .. IDG l'M 3 301'M IOOl'M " " " n 24 .. ,.. 11 00 .fill! • .. , .. 100 , • • 3301'M IDa 'M IOGl'M tKPBC- FAMll y NIGHT TV ALL TICKETS $1.85 • $3.35 54.85 a s&.35 1:00 PM SHOW Tuesday . JULY 13 TICKETS ON SALE: SUMMIT BOX OFFICE • TICKETMASTER All AtH MONTGOMERY WARD S!OfH. DOWNTOWN TICKET • Tt~::r1::N1M:::r:~dJo~K~o~~~o~:.R~HROU~~SIC. ROCKERFELLERS. UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON STUDENT CENTER. ASTRODOME BOX OFFICE TOWER THEATRE WESTCHASE TICKETRON FOR INFORMATION CALL: (71 3) 9&1·9003 FOR GROUP RATES CALL: (71 3) &27-9470 .. SUN 2 DO l'M "'"" 25 ,2,1.1,1.'1.1 lil if'•t' l i,' •L ·i 1~ '~il MONCDAAY.L 1Lnru:S(7AT1U3RD)A 6'( 2tO7:O·O9AM4to5l:O2O PM I use Your VISA or MASTER CARD ' •• 1u11s.rwtc•a..,..el'er"'°"-0rMtJ *SAVE Sl.00 ON CHILDREN UNOER 12 AT STARRED PEflFORMANCES AllSEATSllESflll"VEO M.35-15.15 17.35-11.15 JUNE 25. 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 INS must allow entry of gay aliens, says judge U.S. District Judge Robert Aguillar in San Francisco struck down June 17 a policy of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) which denied entry to the United Stab; solely on the basis of homo· sexuality, reported Associated Press. Judge Aguillar stated that the practice violated the free speech rights of officers and members of the Lesbian-Gay Freedom Day Committee. Several officers chal· lenged the policy. He said First Amendment rights of the plaintiffs "far outweigh any governmen· tel interest in the exclusionary policy." the The Lesbian-Gay Committee suit said the INS policy barring aliens' U.S. entry deprived committee members of their rights to communicate and associate with homosexuals from other nations. On June 25, 1981, the judge granted a preliminary injunction ordering the INS not to bar aliens from the country solely because they are known or suspected homosexuals until a final decision was reached. The INS appeal on the injuction went before the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Aguillar noted the U.S. Supreme Court had said that homosexual aliens do not have rights of entry but that U.S. citizens have a right to hear, sp~ak and debate with them. These interests, he said, might require admission. The judge said that once homosexuality was determined by the medical profession not to be an illness or sexual deviation, no medical grounds would l'xist for exclusion WINE SEIJMR 11:30 AM to 2 00 AM 1408 WESTHEIMER 528-3878 Wine Bar and Restaurant Three Blocks west of the Tower Perfect for after the theatre ... solely on the basis of homosexuality. The American Psychiatric Association removed homosexuality per se from its list of mental illness in 1973. Man expected to get light sentence in gay deaths Internatio n a l Gay News Agency William 1'yack, a 42-year-old tire company owner in Bakersfield, Calif., has been con­victed of causing the death of two unarmed gay men but he could receive only probation or up to six years in prison. Assistant District Attorney Joseph Beckett said he was dismayed that Tyack 9;~ 7Jzed <f}(J,M/ 7fle.moJUat did not get the death penalty. Beckett called Tyack a "volatile gay-hater." Tyack admitted gunning down Jack Blankenship, 38, and Sidney Moses Woos· ter, 26,Augu ·t3, 1981 near the Sierra Nev­ada community of Glennville. Blankenship and Wooster were driving ahead of Tyack on a mountain road near ranches where the the three men are neighbors when Tyack's vehicle struck the gay men's pickup truck. Blankenship pulled over farther up the road and Tyack did the same. In the confrontation lhat followed, Blankenship was killed by a single shot. Wooster was wounded four times and crawled away before dying. Two bullets were found in Wooster's back. A Glennville resident testified that Tyack, spt•aking of his gay neighbors, said, "I don't like those people. If they give me any reason, rll kiJI them.• c€Jmt <!J>~ Week~ June 26, 8pm, Cullen Auditorium featuring The Montrose Singers The MCCR Choir The Oak Lawn Symphonic Band The Montrose Symphonic Band General admission $3.00 Free shuttle busses from Mary's & Kindred Spirits 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 25, 1982 Scenes from last Saturday's Gay Pride Week parade m Dallas. Photos courtesy the METRO TIMES. Houston activist lobbying Democratic Party officials Past Gay Political Caucus president Lee Harrington said he was going to Philadel­phia June 25 to lobby the heirarchy of the Democratic Party concerning gay rights and other issues. The Democrats scheduled its mid-term convention there June 25-27. Harrington said he would be be attend­ing political workshops during the three days and functions sponsored by former Vice President Walter Mondale; Senator Kennedy of Massachusetts; Calif. Governor Jerry Brown; Reubin Askew. a presidential aspirant and former Gover­nor of Florida; and other senators. Harrington is a member of the steering committee for the formation of the new National Association of Gay Democratic Club8 and is to attending the founding conference for that group, he said. Origi­na1ly scheduled for Minneapolis last fall, the conference was rescheduled for June 24 in conjunction with the Democratic mid-term convention. The new association's purpose will be to '·impact the Democratic Party's delegate selection process by encouraging, nation­wide, more gays to become delegates at the local, precinct level where they vote, with a continued goal of becoming delegates to the national convention in 1984," said Harrington. Harrington said he would be back in Houston though in time for the Gay Pride Week Parade. JUNE 25, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Our Shipment Arrived Military pants Combat boots Khakis Short & long sleeve military shirts Ladies military pants J"imeless Taffeta 1623 Westhelmer 12-6 everyday HERPES A Physician's authoritative guide. Send $12.95 to The Herpes Foundation 8801 Dunlap Street Houston, TX 7707 4 A Part of It All, Apart from None . We are One (and Proud to Be) 2923 Main, Houston, Texas ~ookies, goodies, & more* Proud to Be A Part Of- Not Apart From Open Sunday during the Parade - and after the Rally too! 604 Westheimer HOURS: 11am-midnight Tues-Thurs, 11am-1am Fri-Sat, noon-10pm Sunday a dessert restaurant of'YPR/o~ A-gAft('f, ~~Aiwur~~4 16 MONTROSE VOICE / JUNE 25, 1982 Horrors Ethiopian Cuisin£ And Club A touch of Elegance, Intimacy and Fine Ethiopian Food 428 Westheimer 526-2895 Reggae Music every Friday and Saturday night Tuesday is lady's night Free drinks 10pm-2am Wednesday Happy Hour all night TONIGHT! Paul Hurlock Live Reggae OPEN for lunch and dinner Daily Lunch Special with complimcntory glass of wine f ram 395 Houston's Friendliest Country & Western Bar SUNDAY Buffet for the MDA • KON·SAT Open 7am. KONDAY: Barn T-Shirt Night & MSA Bowlers Night. TUESDAY Steak & Marguerita Night. WEDNESDAY White light'n Night. THURSDAY: Club Color Night & Pool Tourney. 710 PACIFIC 528-9427 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Mustangs The Barn wants a Bite of the Apple­Beat Dirty Sa11y's! "Muscular Dystrophy .t.s.oc1at1on ------------------------, ~! We're doing our part ... FREE RESUMES 50 COPIES PRINTED FREE! That's right ... Absolutely Free! What's the catch? There's really only one. In order to take advantage of this limited time offer, you must be currently unemployed and actively seeking employment. Bring us a clean, camera-ready copy of your resume* (along with a copy of this ad) and we'll print 50 copies on quality paper absolutely FREE! Why are we doing this? Because we feel private industry must do more if we expect the government to do less. But HURRY, this offer EXPIRES June 30, and is being honored only for the first 150 applicants pre­senting this coupon. Quality is the difference at SPEEDY PRINTING SERVICE Bellaire Store, 5400 Bellaire Blvd. 667-7417 The Community's Quality Printer & Stationer 'Offer limited to 2 pa ges; please, no artboard8. ------------------------- PROFESSIONAL Hypnosis & Counseling Service Personal • Confidential James D. Kristian, Ph.D. REGISTERED HYPNOLOGIST IMPROVE: Sleep confidence self worth . shyness. memory. concentra· t1on self·esteem , relaxation . habits love emotion OVERCOME: Fear. anxiety. guilt. depres· s1on nervousness. drug abuse. alcohol abuse. anger. loneli· ness. weight STUDENT AND SENIOR CITIZEN CALL 977-2485 DISCOUNT FIRST VISIT DISCOUNT WITH AD Washington lobby 'shocked' over alleged FBI surveillance of gay people SteV(' Endean, exC'cutive director of Gay HighL"l National Lobby, expressed "shock and dismay" at rev(•lations in a national gay publication that the FBI, CIA and mil· itary surveillance program had investi· gated thousands of gay Americans. Through n prepared press release, Endean said that CRNL would urge Con­gr(> Hs to take immediate action to ensure that this "serious government invasion into the private lives of Americans has stopped," In an article by Larry Bush for The Adt'ocate. FBI officials were said to have confirmed the fact that surveillance had been maintmnrd-not only on gay acti· vists but on closett>d gay people and even non-gay supporters of civil rights for gay people. The article that th is program, part of which was known as "Homex," was disc:ontinued. Documen ts obtained under the Freedom of Information Act confirmed long-held suspitionM that the Federal Bureau of Invt'Mtigation (and other intelligena agenc·ic·H) had hft'n conducting massive survrillance against gay people and orgn nizations from 1954 to at least 1978, reportrd Bm1h. Th(>8e inve~tigntions were reportC'd to have induded "fugitive-style" inveatign tiom1 into the lives of prominent. weulthy, dosC'tfld homosexual men; monitoring pri· vnte mail; infiltration oflesbian gay civil rights groups; harrassment of citizens; using namt's collected in investigations to identify and terminate governmental workers known to be or suspected of being homosexual, including thousands of men and women in milita ry servi C'('. Endt>an said, "If the matter WC'ren't so l'rrious, raising thr spectre of witch hunts from the Mc·Carthy period, I would recom mend theise surveillance programs for St•n. Proxmire·s (l).WI) 'Golden Fleece' Award. jo!"ivcn hy th(• ::oenator to that govt•mmC'nt program which bei;t exempli· fies wash• uf taxpu~·er money. ' .. Now perhaps pt•ople will understand why we have had to fight for our own civil rightl'i and privacy so vigorously." Endeun indicatffi that he felt many ffi(•mlM·rs of Congress who could not be cnJlrd "gay rights supporters," including a nllmber of conservativc•fi, would join tra· ditional Congressional supporters of gay ti vii rights in expresRing concern and out· rnge. ConHt·rvatives haveoft~n spoke~ out ahout government intt·rvent1on m pnvatt' livt•s. and there could be no clearer case, G~~,~~~.~\1~c:~uloufi fundraising appeals of Morn! Majority around the S<?·callc'C'.I 'gay c·onspirnC'y' bN·ome lt•tijoj amusmgwh_en we learn that it is the govt>rnment that is vio­lating our privacy," Endean concludt'd. 'Gay Wreath' laid at Arlington Under a warm, hazy sky, a.small ~ssem· bly of pt•ople gathered m .Arlington National Cemetery on Memorial Day to honor gay people who have died in war. reported the• Washington Blade. It was a simple ceremony, the gay news· paper said, when a wreath of red and white carnations was placed on the T~~ b of the Unknown Soldier by gay activist Frank Kameny, a veteran of World yva.r I.I. ond ,Jackie Bodle of the Northern V1rgmta Gay Alliance. Following the wreath-laying, the Blade reported, a female soldier played taps, the soldiers guarding the tomb saluted, and the (Croup dtparted. "It went off without a hitch," Kameny was quott>d. . The ('(•n•mony had taken place m the previous two years al~o. We Understand ia YourTypee 3~ • Letterhead/ ~~ Envelopes ~ • Business Cards !(] • Party Invitations • Ad.,,Flyers ~~ ~ • Brocrures • Layout Service ~'/. > ~~ Call BiD 522-4251 ~~ JUNE 25, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 17 MONTROSE TRAVEL WHERE ALL CLIENTS ARE FIRST CLASS 10-DAY EXTRAVAGANZA Depart July 30th RENO RODEO <a nightsl s79900 HONOLULU <4 nig h tsi SAN FRANCISCO <2 nights> ALL INCLUSIVE!! '"'~'··~""'"'"' ~~ 2506 RALPH-522-8747 - . ' -~A~~'-'~-'r.J THE DRUM continues to be a leader in Houston's community with this year's parade entry dedicated to "The Fight Against • II .PL''~_.,,_Wi:Zlj .. We congratulate Mac McAdory and Rawslyn Ruffins, Mr. and Ms. Gay Pride '82 Sunday Beerbust 5-11 pm Afterhours Fri & Sa 1732 Westheimer 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 25. 1982 Pride Week forum well attended About 200 people attended an educational forum co-sponsored by the Gay Political Caucus and Interact/ Houston Monday, June 21. Dr. Richard Murray, professor of political science at the University of Hous­ton and noted political analyst, was key­note speaker at the event held at the First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin. Dr. Murray spoke of the "obvious rise of power and influence in the Houston gay community, particulBJ"ly in city politics." The demography of Houston was cited as a major contributing factor in the rise of gay politica1 power here. The city proper is not a .. true cross section of the metropoli­tan area," he added. Houston has fewer blue collar workers, which are tradition-ally more conservative, and more minori­ties and educated middle class voters. Other factors cited were: a) Houston reli­gious leaders never had much political power, b) Houston's attractive job market which promotes economic individualism, c) Montrose itself as an identifiable gay neighborhood, d) a responsive set of peo­ple in public power aware of the gay block voting potential, and e) Houston's "rough and tumble politics" which often results in close election races. "Houston Police Department unwit­tingly played a critical role in the emer­gence of gay political organization," he added. Pink Triangle, a film addressin g the issue of homophobia, was shown. This documentary shows attitudes toward les­bians and gay men including mistreat­ment a nd exterminat ion in Nazi Germany's concentration camps and sub­sequent abuse at the Allies' hands when found to be homosexual. The National March on Washington was also shown. This film captured on video a number of events at the 1979 march and showed the extent that Texas and specifically Houston played in the national rally for gay rights. Larry Bagneris Jr., president of GPC, called the forum a "very historic occa· sion." GPC had never co-sponsored an event of this nature. Bagneris announced that GPC wi.ll shift its focus from trying to explain the lesbian /gay lifesty le to the issues of dis­crimination against lesbians and gay men in employment and housin g. He added that the gay community has learned "how important women a re in our community." Ned Parker, president of Interact/ Houston announced plans to join forces with th~ Gay Switchboard in the near future. Floridians seek six change Pacific News Serivce This could be proof of what some Florida drivers have suspected a11 along: the state highway system is part of a satanic plot. Florida's Transportation Commission created a furor among fundamenta list Christians when it named a new stretch of coastal highway Route 666. Religious groups have been flooding the commission with letters, pointing to a pre­diction in the Book of Revelations the "666" would be the symbol of a seven· headed satanic beast that rises from the sea. 24-HOUR HOT SHOT Commercial/Industrial COURTEOUS, BONDED DRIVERS AND CARGO INSURANCE FOR YOUR SHIPMENTS ~ee £!uic.k ~ ~~ Jnc. /,/ ,Y!au4fiin, 3"e.nti 72.J 5959 IS YOUR TIME FOR LUNCH LIMITED'?'?? PLEASE COME TO INTERNATIONAL CLUB RESTAURANT 248 WESTHEIMER (in Montrose, near Downtown) Tel: 528-2795 A GOOD PLACE FOR YOU TO ENJOY "CHINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" ALL YOU CAN EAT ... Only $3.75 1. Pepper Beef 8. Orienwl Chicken 2. Moo Goo Gai Pan 9. Chop Suey 3. Sweet & Sour Pork 1 O. International Fried Rice 4. Egg Roll 11. ChickenAlmondine 5. Sweet & Sour Chicken 12. Won Ton Soup f r=r=., ~r=;,:.:~~·:::-~ 6. Fried Wanton 13. Chicken Rice Soup ..... ~ 1!:::J ~ ~ 7. Teryaki Chicken 14. Daily DeBBert J, LUNCHEON BUFFET 11AM-2:30PM Monday thru Friday 1/ DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY (4-10:30PM) * * TRADITIONAL CHIU-CHOW STYLE (OLD CHINESE) * CHIEF COOK WITH 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE-JUST CAME FROM HONG KONG* *DIFFERENT SELECTED DISHES SERVED EACH DAY* Delicious Food-Reasonable Prices Relaxing Atmosphere-Fast & Courteous Services FREE PRIVATE PARKING AREA ORDERS TO GO, Tel: 523-2795 ..... .... .. Im:! .... ~ ................................... .. JUNE 25, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 The Fred Paez incident: two years later assumpt10n that McCoy was intoxicated after five beers, grossly deviating from safe police procedures by failure to com· municate a plan of action to the other offi. cer pretoent, going into a dark and unlighted area with Paez, and placing a cocked and loaded gun to the victim's head. Contended Rains. "The officer's judgement was impaired by alcohol." By William Marberry After several hours ofbeerdrinking, Hous­ton police officers Kevin McCoy and Steven Cain encouraged sexual overtures from Fred Paez, attempting to create an entrapment situation where they could arrest Parz. But something went wrong ""'.hilt• nrrt•i.ting Paez, causing him to he k11lt•d ovn what may-or may not-have d('velop('(.f into a mii.;d(•meanor offeni;c. Simple ns the facts wen•, th<· extenuat­ing drcumstances were rompl(•x. Fred PUl'7 wal" OJM•nly gay. even having nuthon><l ll Houston Ga) Politicul C'uu<·us JHlmphlet that adv1l'ed total cooperation with thr poli<-e in the evt>nt of arrt'st­espre1nlly wrongful or hnraAsmi•nt arn•st. Also. Pm-z wns k1ll<·d C1nly hour~ 1fter thP Houston Police Departmt.·nt had sta~wci u ratd on Mary's. Houston "i:- lwst known gay bor, arr(•sting 61-the third yt•nr thnt har had bt·(·n raided on theevt•of Gay Prich' Wt>t'k. Coupled togl•thn, tht•st• ('venL" t•le.ctrified Houston's heavily gay and c.-ohes1ve Montrose di&trirt. Two unrt•· latt'Ci events beC'ame one emotion laden IS8Ut•. Within days of the killing, a Fred Paez 'J_'usk Force was formed to begin investiga lton of the killing. From the 125 interested persone who attended a Monday evening meeting at the Metropolitan Community Church, five members were elected to the Tf_'sk Force: KP1' ..... f station manager Ray H_1ll, !'ttorney Jim Kuhn, community ncti· v1~t ~ue Cummings, Gay Political Caucus pres1drnt Lee Harrington. and Oehrn Danburg, a nominee for State R1·prt'8entative. Thl' Htrntegy of the quickly formed task fon·r was to involve as many public offi riah• and investigatory agencieM as pnsHihlt•. City ('ouncilmnn Lane(' Lalor ht'C'Rmt' among.the fir~t to c·all for an investigation of thr mcidtnt saying, 'The community dt•Ht•rvt'M to havt' nil the facl.8." U.S. Rt_·prt• ~wntativt• MiC'kt•y Leland (D·HouMton) offen-d to involve federal investigators. The poliC'e Homicide Division, HPD's Internal Affairs Division, and the FBI announc·ed invh•ligations of the shooting. Eventually Hix grou~i;; were conducting invt•Rtigations. indudtng the U.8. Depart· m<·ntof ,Ju1-tice. So su<·ressful was the Fred Paez Task Forc·e that when the Harris County Mt>di C'al Examint·r'sOffiC't'released its report at thl• end of August. 1980, ruling Puez's death at'cid<•ntal. other investigations did not Htop. Said Marv Sinderson, chief of the civil rights divi~ion of the U.S. Attorney's Office, "Even ifa death is accidental, if it is the reEmlt of a civil rights violation, it is still within the purview of federal statutes. I'm not telling you we have made any such conclusion Our investigation is continuing." Terry Wilson of the district attorney's office said his investigators were "still try­ing to run down Rome folks" to complete their Htudy, just as if the ruling had been homicide. This in spite of the acknowl· edgement by the medical examiner's office that th<·re had been pressure on the office for "anything they rould find that was not in agrtt•ment with what we were finding." Thf' mt·dirul examiner'R report t·on dudt-d that offi('(·r McCoy's gun nrci· dentlv dtsc·horgt·d to ca~sr the dNtth of Puez; and then• wa"' no ev1drncr toc·ontru­dit't tht• offic'('rs' ven,ion of the dl'ath. Tht•rt• wt•n• no sij!ns of struggle. Contatt burns wne pr<'sl'nt where tht•. hulll't t·ntt•r<'<l Pm•z'R ht•ud from a straight-on shot whic·h angh·d only ten degrees up and trn dt>grN•s to the right. And too, t~C'rl' w(•re hair8 from Paez's hrad on offtct'r MrCcr~:·s non-standard issue, chromed A5 pistol. MC'Coy's lawyc>r, Michael H.inton, may hav(' thought he was summing up the Pat·z inc·idt•nt for good when he> told repor· tt-rs, reft>rring to the mrcli.cal examiner's n·port, that there ''.are go1~g to hr some misfortun(•S from ttml' to ume as long as police offi<·l'Ts rarry guns. . HCJuston is Frt·d Paez l<Xl tough a town, this is too tough a nation for offi(·t·rs to enforce the law without weapons." NonetheleHR, on October 15, 19~. the Harris County Grand Jury indfrted McCoy on a charge of neghgl'nt homicide after three days of testimony which included apprarances from members of the gay rommunity, News media repeatedly reminded the public that negligent homicide was the same charge first used against two policc­ml'n l'ventually given probation in the death of Jot> Campos Torres. The grand jury indictment charged that officer McCoy, "while under the influence of alcoholic bevc>rage, placed a corked, loaded pi•tol against the head of (Paez) and as a reMult thereof said pistol dis­charged," killing Paez. Though only a misdemeanor charge, the trial would takt> place in felony c·ourt bt·cuuse the aC'Cul'c·d was a public ~fficiaL Maximum p<'nalty for negligt'nl homicidr is on<' yf>ar in jail and a $2000 fine. l't·rtainly ryo rookie cop, McCoy had a good record, un excelll'nt and unhh·m· isht•d n·cord. Never hcforC'-nl'tTr-had McCoy hod to even fire his gun during un nrrl'st. The chnrgt.· was not as strong ais wanlt>d. but t•ven a weak c·hargC' was better than nom• at all. "It's a beginning," renc:ted GP{' prt•Hident I.Rt' Harrington. "Reaction to the indictment from McCoy and his attorney, Hinton, was Jared with emotional surprise,dismay and assuranrN~ the case would never end in a conviC'tion," reported the HoutJton Post. Pret1ident of the Houston Po1ict> Officers AsMociation, Dave Collier, and Police Patrolmcns Union prea;ident Bob Thomas Wt'r<.· vocal about saying gay pr~sure con· tribuh>d to the indictment. Said Collier, "The gay community was very active in trying to get an indictment in this case" And Thomafi allt·ged that the indictment was to "8oothe the public whim of the ga_y community." Twice postponed, the misdemeanor trial against Kevin McCoy began on Sep· tember I, 1981, in visiting judge Van Sto­vall's court. Filled to overflowing each day of the trial, the eighth floor courtroom of Houston's Harris County Criminal Courts Building was a strange circus of comings and goings. McCoy's wife, Mary, and Paez's parents and sister were nearly invisible among the observing masse;. At times the number of uniformed police officers observing the trial exceeded thirty. Lots of plain clothes officers were there, too. Many nPws reporters and two artist.s wc•re aF<signed to the trial Fred Pnez Task Forcemt>mbers Rav Hill and 8ue CumminJ,!fi were there. and. GPC prPsidt•nt l.t·e Harrington was there with Rome· of his mt_•mbt•rship. Steve Shiflett apJ><•ared nt tht· trial. Some loc·al politiciani. kc·pt an eye on the trial, too. Mayoral C'andidate Nobk Ginther had an aid making ocrassional appenranc.·es at McCoy's trial while he made news hendlint>s from a different floor of tht• same building with his lawsuit over Houston's property tax inequities. State Reprefientative Debra Dan burg sent an aid to observe parts of the trial; Dan· burg even made one brief appearance her­fielf. The court room was always full. and Nomrone was always coming or going. AssiNtantdistrictattomey Brian Rain~, the lone prokecutor, built his case on the Defense attorney Hinton, aided by a full table of afisisting lawyers. asked for acqui­tal on the groundfi that McCoy was merely performing his duty as a policeman, char~ing it wa"' actually Paez who caused tht• acddt-nt by r(·sh:ting arrest. To i.nstdl rensonabll' iioubt in the minds oftht' jurors, Hinton called officers McCoy and Cain to recount the vents of the night of June 21->. 19t-0. During testimony both offi('('rS snid that •he two ix-packs Ofbe<>r consumed lwtween them had ro effect whatsot"VeT and the:\· were completely sober Other policf' officers tf'stified they had bttn unable' to dl'tect Ute acc·utloed: offi· cer had been drinking on the night of the inndent Expert police offic·l'rs wece C'.a.lled to ks­tify that placing a gun tu the head some­times het·oml'fi ne<:C'ssary in unpredictable "street situations." One witness inadverf. ently likened the hostility and unpredi<.:,ta· bility of street patrol to a "combat zone." One often repeated characterization to raise reasonable doubt in the jurors' minds was Hinton's references to Paez as "aggressive." There were few surprises at the trial since little new information was intro­duced beyond what had already been known for a year, mostly supplied by the testimony of McCoy, and Cain as the only witnt':-;s Doggt..Jly cool in his deliven and manner. prosecutor Brain Rains was a sharp c·ontrast to defense attorney Hin­ton's demonstrative and sometimt's agi tatt>d styJe_ Hinton was the !'Uperior in handling tht• w1tness('ss: Rains never achit>vt'd the same d~ret> of rapport with ti ·W o ro t at Hinton did. 1Jd'en11t• uttumt•.\ John Pizzitola, with his pt_·rf(.>(_'tly grayed k>mples. began final 1:1ummation by assuring the jurors that McCoy was hifi friend. then confiding he felt his friend was innocent. Oefrnse attorney Hinton completed the defense summation, relying hea\·ily on a characterization of Paez a~ aggressive and an undesirable element of sOcietv. It was a strung and impassioned plea .. Pro~ecutor Rains" summation t·oncen· trated on McCov'sdrinking a." a rea:.;on for grosfi deviatio~!>i from ~afe police pr~ durt>. The lone prost'Cutor reminded the jury that the evidence in the ca~e wa~ mot>tly what HPnchost>torelease, making a point that HPD had f'ven dispatched a lawyer directly to the i:.;cene of the killing. Through Rains• summation-as throughout the trial-there were repeated objections from Hinton, the sharpest objections coming when Rains told the jurors that it was not Paez on trial and that Paez had not killed himself; it was McCoy who lost control of the situation because of his drinking, committing negli­gent homicide. It was after 10:00 p.m. when the jury returned their verdict, having rompleted four hours of deliberation Kevin McCoy was acquitted; the jury ruled him ''not guilty'" of negligent homi­cide in the shooting of Paez. Within tht" jlay community. which had been th<' driving fore~ to bring McCoy to trial, the predominant (lpinion was that although a H·rdict had bt>en rendered.jus· tiC'f' waF; not servtn.>d. "I heard enough evi· denc(• to convict on that indictment and I heard enou~h evidt>nce to discredit tht> whole story,"' 8aid gay ~pokefiman Ray Hill. The vc•rdict agreed with the medical exa" mmer's finding1:> of a year earlier. The requirl'ments of the law had been met When the trial ended and McCoy went hack to his HPll job, the saga of Paez did not end. The night after the trial verdict, thert' was a gay "community meeting .. to di!'C'Ul'!i available options in seeking to restort.· the mutilated reputation of Fred Pan. Too many people knew Paez as a good person, and a gentle- person. 20 MONTROSE VOICE/ JUNE 25, 1982 Letters & Comments MCCR assistant pastor describes activities of church From the Rev. Dee Lamb, MCCR Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection (MCCR>, a viable and grow· ing part of the gay community since its charter April 20, 1975, as a Christian Chruch within the Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Chruches (UFMCC), boldy, on the authonty of the Bible. proclaims the love of God and salva­tion through Jesue Christ freely offered to each and every human being. Stability has been further established within the gay community since the acqui­sition of MCCR's church building in 1979 at 1919 Decatur. Renovation is on-going to be able to meet the needi; of a growing membership (at )>resent exceeding 450), expanding outreach, and to provide meet­ing space requested by organizations and group~ within the gay community. Worship Services at 10:45 a.m. and 7:15 p.m. on Sunday& and at 7:15 p.m. on Wednesdays, with ~igning for the deaf, are enhanced by beautiful and talented musi­cians and music by the choir, the Resurrec­tion Singers, groups individuals, and the congregation. In addition to the Child­ren's Sunday School and contemporary, introductory and advanced adult Bible study groups,. a full calendar of social and educational events are offered. MCCR'a monthly newsletter, "Out­reach,"' available in many community eMtablishments, has a full listing of cur­rent events. ~ontinuing to be favorites. are "Homosexuality and the Bible," ''Gay Relationships·· ''Country Western Dance,"' and the potluck supers the last Saturday night of each month. The ''Signing for the Deaf' c1asses have grown to two classes now: beginners and advanced. The number of Covenant Fami­lies ha11 doubled withing the past year, providing a cloe;e family relationship and support group to even more of our C(Jmmunity. MCCR has added a Nursing Home Min­istry within Montrose during the past year, and is the home of an AA group that meets twice a week. MCCR rejoices with gay Jewish sisters and brothers in the growth of Beth Chiam (continuing to meet in MCCR's Fellowship Hall). MCCR ie the home of the bOwling teams, ''The Holy Rollers;" the women's softball team, "Chuck's Angels;" and cheerlead­ers, "Dee's Dolls." The library of MCCR, one of the largest resource centers of gay literature and peri­odicals in Teias, is used both within our community and by others in search of greater understanding and for research projects. MCCR continues to meet requests for speakers for a number of organiza­tions, including mainline Christian denominations. universities, medical schools, and civic organizations. In addition to spiritual counseling within the gay community, and hospital, home and prison visitation, the staff of MCCR enhances acceptance by parents, children and friends of gays through greater understanding. MCCR continues to be an educational resource for the police academy, and a support system for agen­ciee and families of gay youth. MCCR has a 24-hour emergency telephone coverage and regular office hours during the week. Last August, MCCR hosted the Interna­tional Conference of over 170 churches within UFMCC which was held at the Shamrock Hilton, and recieved national radio, newspaper and television coverage. Together with many of our gay eetab­lishmkents, MCCR provided sisters and brothers from around the world with an experience of aouthern hospitality they won't soon forget . The committment of the pastor, Rev. Charles W Larsen, M.Div.; the assistant p ... tor, Rev. Dee Lamb; the staff of student The Gay AtheiStli League of America fire engine float m last year's Gay Pride Parade is to be repeated this year Traditional float of the Metropolitan Community Church, MCCR. clergy and deacons, the board of directors, the members, and the friends ofMCCR is to the witness of the Gospel messagae, that weareapartof, not apartfromGod's redeeming, liberating, saving love. We praise God that we, ofMCCR are a part of the ce1ebration of our community, and invite each of you to be a part of our celebration of life in Jesus Christ. Gay Atheist League will have fire engine again in parade From spokeperson for Gay Atheist League of America/Houston Chapter The Houston chapter of the Gay Atheist League of America is one of 12 chapters of the Gay Atheiot League of America head­quartered in San Francisco. At slightly less than two years old, GALA/Houston is one of the moat active, visible and out­spoken of the GALA network, bringing the concept of atheism to the minority (gays) that has probably suffered the most under the dicates of Christianity. At slightly less than three months old, GALA/Houston, along with the ACLU, took on the Texas Department of Correc­tions for not allowing gay inmates the right to read gay educational and informs· live material such aa The Advocate, Gay Commurnty New1, TWT, MONTROSE VOICE, GALA Reuiew, etc. We're happy to say that through some diplomatic chan­nels, some of this material is filtering into TDC today. However, further work is needed to be able to see that all gay educa­tional and informative publications can be obtained by gay inmates. In the spring of 1981, GALA/Houston established the first (by the way, still the only) Dial-A-Gay-Atheist in the nation giving 24 hour, 7 day information about homosexuality and atheism to the general public, as a part of GALA's educational outreach program to help bring under­standing about atheism and homosex· uality not onl} to gay, but also society as a whole. The number is 524·2222. The line is busy all the time, but be persistent-you'll get through. During the 1981 Gay Pride Week, GALA/Houston had the first fire truck to have ever been in the Gay Pride Parade, as well as being the first atheist entry ever in any parade in the state of Texu. Another first came when, in November of 1981, Gay Atheists were rep~e~ented ?n the Phil Donahue Show. Domm1c Florio, GALA/New York president; Kevin Sea· hill the then-national vice-president; and Do~ Sanders, GALA/Houston ~resident; were guests on the highlY·f!-cclaimed talk show. As a part of its educational outreach program the Houston Chapter has VHS video ta'pee available for groups who would like to present this show to your organization. Besides being the first gay organization from the city of Houston to have been on tho Phil Donahue Show, Gay Atheists are frequent guesll-1 on the American Atheist Hour, the only weekly atheist radio series in the nation, which is on KPFT 90.1 FM and is aired every Thursday at 6:30 p.m Just thif' month, GALAt Houston was instrumental in establishing another first for atheism and gays: The Texas Federa­tion of the Gay Atheist League of America. The Texas Federation will link the chap­ters of Dallas.rFt. Worth, Austin and Houston into a working coalition to strengthen the chapters of the respective cities by incorporating them into a single working body. As a wat,..hdog for viola­tions of separation of church and state that directly or indirectly affect the rights of gays and lesbians in the state and nation, the Texas Federation will also print a monthly newsletter that will be distributed on a state-wide level giving news of atheist happenings and present· ing atheist thought. Certainly, on(!- of the most important thingH on our list offirgts 1s the upcoming GALA National Convention to be held in Houston this fall. Gay atheists and their supporters from across thenatlon will con­verge on Houston Oct. 15-17 for the first atheist convention to hove ever been held in this city. Among lhe lineup of impor­tant guests who will be in attendance at the convention will be none other than Dr. Madalyn Murray O'Hair, founder of the American Atheist Center in Austin. The Gay Atheist League of America is proud of its heritage and looks forward to a very bright future. Look for us again in the 1982 Gay Pride Week Parade with our big red fire engine. The Gay Atheist League of America is proud to be" A Part Of .. Not Apart From" again in 1982! MSA Softball League 3 years old From spokesperson for MSA Softball League The Montrose Sports Association Softball League was organized in early 1980 and began 1eague play in May, 1980. The league is now in its third year of competi­tion and over the years has grown from six teams in 1980 to it.a present 10 teams this year The MSA Softball League 1s a member of the North American Gay Amateur Athletic Alliance, the organizers of the Gay Softball World Series, and is a member subgroup of the Montrose Sports Association. The goals of the league are to promote new friendships through competition in the league and to provide a better under­standing of the gay community with those outside the community by promoting membership in the league and competi­tion with those outside the gay community. In promoting und~rstanding outside the community and trymg to help better rela­taions with those outside the community, the league annually selects all-star teams to compete with the Houston Police Offi­cers Aesociation and the Houston Fire­fighters. The All-Star Games in 1980 and 1981 have together raised almost$1500for th0&e two organizations. Again this year, the all-stars will play the firefighters and we will again be asking for donations which will be given to the firefighters. As a member of NAGAAA, the league has sent its championship team to the Gay Softball World Series 4 and 5. In 1980, the Galleon team represented Houston in GSWS 4 and finished fourth in the Series. Last year, 1981, the Venture-N team com­peted in CSWS 5 in Toronto and again finished fourth . This year's championship team waill travel to Sen Francisco to par­ticipate in GSWS 6. Also, a contingent from Houston will be presenting a bid to NAGAAA to host the 1984 Gay Softball World Series in Houston. Groups get shelter under Interact umbrella Jtl-om Ned Parker Board of Directors, Interact/Houston Each of us have been aware in recent years of the continuing need for unity in the gay community. Through mutual sup­Port we have grown in strength and flourished . It is significant that during Gay Pride Week, llH, Inc. is proud to announce its affiliation with Families and Friends of Gays, Gay Switchboard, and the Mon­trose. Band. Choices, a newly formed ~s.b1an 1 Womens Group al so announces 1ts intent to join hands with us. We hope other co~m':mity service and educational groups wtll Join the Gay Ar<"hives, Inter n~t Forums and Coffeehouse in work ing with I H, Inc. Board of Directors and members toward a new and better Gay Community. Mustang Club seeks to · purchase retreat area ~r~: spokespe r son fo r the Mustang Do you occasionally like to get away from it all? Would you li ke a place for your club or organization to go on an outing? Need a place for your church outing? Would you like to hold a sports (or sport­ing) event? Do you want to have a birth· day bash? Would you like to do thi s in comfort and pr1Vecy? Would you like this at li ttle or no ('Os t? We feel that there is a need for just Ruch n pince near the major population areas of Texas-a pince where members of the gay community can entertain and be enter­tainl'< i in privaC'y and security yet still be within easy driving distam·e. The Mm1tang Club ha.s placed in truRt $2000 a nd pledged an additional $WlXl on July 4, 1982, toward a fund to purchm1e jui;t such a place. These contributionR rep· re!lc•nt a total committment to this cause. This monC>y cannot be returned to the Mus· tang Club treasury and will be contributed to on appropriate charity in the event that our ,goal of S.~.000 is not attninOO within a reasonable period of time. Initially this fund will be administered by corporate officers of the Mus tang Club. As other organizations become involved additonal trustees will be appointed. An organizational meeting of the Recreational Land Fund Committee will be held 8::10 p.m., July 4, at The Barn, 710 Pacific. Further information can be obtained by contacting Terry or Walter at The Barn, 528-9427. The gay community has been noted and C'ommended for contributing to worth while causes in the past and we feel that this is the time to contribute to a cause that will be of benefit to the entire gay community Houston Dignity chapter one of about 100 in U.S. FTom Bo b Heer, treasurer Dignity , Houfiton, an outreach to Cathol~c gay men nnd lesbian women a~d the1r frit>ncls c·t·lebratc·s itfi eighth anniversary u~ n c·harh•r('<I \haptl'r of I>iJtnity, In<· this month. Our purti<'ipntion in tht" Gay Prid(• Parttd(>s of 1979 and 19~0 ha~ hei·n joint C't-lt•hartions of our t-xisU>nce and our par· ticipation in th(' J[aY community of Hous· ton Wt' look forward to doing tht' same this year. Many realize the need for positive and realistic ministry to the gay Catholic. We are working within the Church for the development of its sexual theology and for the acceptance of lesbian women and gay men as fu.11. a1:1d equal members to provide a reconc~hahon with the Church. By encouraging a spiritual atmosphere via concerned . support and sympathetic understanding we hope to facilitate that reconciliation . Simply, we provide a sup· port group for gay Catholics. Dignity, Inc. is composed of almost 100 c~apters across the United States and Cnna~a. Its office is maintained in ~a~hin!i"ton , D.C. The chapters are d1v1d~ into 11 geographic Regions. . Region VII, of which Dignity, Houston ts a part, consists of Texas, Louisiana, O~laho~a and Arkansas. Presently in this region we have chapters in Austin Dallas, El Paso, Ft. Worth, Hous ton , Lui>'. bock, New Orleans, San Antonio, as well as chapters in formation in Baton Rouge, Lake Charles and Lafayette. Our Region Offi C'e is maintained in Lubbock at present. Dignity, H~>us~on is a voluntary, non· p_rofit organization. No salaried profes· s1onols are doing our work for us. The m_or~ personally involved a member is v.:1l11~g to be is a direct reflection of our v1tahty and desire to grow and support gay Catholic men and women. Meetings a'.e held each Saturday at 7:00 p.m. at the Rice Catho1ic Student Center I ?03 ~lsover, just north of the campus~ L1turg1es are celebrated the first and third ~aturdaye at 7:00 p.m. A special program is usua JJy scheduled for the second Satur· day and a pot-luck supper is usually held on the last Saturday of the month at a member's home. In nddi~ion t? the voting privilege, paid membesh1p brings monthly newsletters from Dignity Houston as well as Dignity ln <" .. F urthr r in formation ma .v be hnd h.~ ci~ llu~g 52H-7644 or 520-9269, or by writinK D1gn1ly-' Houston, P.O. Box 661'!21, Hous­ton, TX 77266 Colt 45's raise funds for charitable purposes From spakesperson for Colt 45's In the fall of 1975, a group of men of tiim­ilar interest saw a need for a type of com­munity service utilizing their community. A copyright was issued by the United States Government securing rights to use the Colt 45's Houston design for club pur· poses. As a result, the Colt 45's Houston was founded in the spring of 1976. A fed­eral exemption status was applied for in 1977, and approved. As a western charity organization, our basic goal is to serve the Houston commu· nity as a charitable organization. Colt 45's Houston sponsors such events as annual country carnivals, skating parties, garage sales, etc., to raise monies for this purpose. A committee of Colt 45's Houston me~bers review local causes and organi­zat1~ n s that seem eligible for these monies. Their recommendataione are voted on by the membership and near the end of the year, or more often depending on the nC'ed, Colt 45's Houston contribute the neL proceeds of their events to that cause(s) or organization(s) as voted by the membership. Roys Camp of America, Childr('n'R Oncology Services (Ronald McDonald ~ouse), Montrrnw Clinic, Good fellows and St. Anthony Nursing Horne are to name but a f(•w of the organizationR that hav(• beni'fitt.-d from the proceeds rai~t'<l bv thE' Colt 45'R Houston. · Wf' RinC't'rt.'ly apprtadate the intert"st and tht> support being shown by the commu· mty, and wt- will continue to pre:-oc•nt our· aelv(•Jol as hard workt-rR so that othNs mav lwnefit. · JUNE 25, 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 Paul D. Fraternali, D.D.S. Cosmetic & Restorative Dentistry in Montrose r,1<YPl!i'l< /~~ ...~. . Located just off Montrose Blvd. at 6 CHELSEA PLACE ~9 " Call 523-7432 ~ ,;;;,-.'!§ For appointments Tuesday-Friday 'J1I i ~ Insurance assignments welcomed J~ fHC,- HOUSTON GRAND OPERA and TOWER VENTURES The Society for the Performing Arts and Theatre Under the Stars Present Special July 4th Weekend Performances Now Available Friday, July 2-8pm Saturday, July 3-Spm Sunday, July 4-2:30 & 7:30pm Monday, July 5-8pm PHONE CHARGE Call - 713-526-1709 Tickets available 11 Houston Ticket Center. 111T1cketron & Tltk.etmaster outlets & by Mad order Tues . Wed, Thurs .. June 29. 30. July I 8PM. Sun . July 4 IJOPM. Mon . Tues . Wed . Thurs July 5. 6. 1. 8 !PM: July 9 SPM 126. 123 50. 119 50. 116. 112 110 Fri , July 2 !PM Sat July 3. 10 5 & 9PM. Sun., July 4 2 30PM. Fri July 9 9PM . 130 125 120. 117, 112. 110 . M11I Ordtn: Make theck or mol\ey order pay1ble to HOUSTON TICKET CENTER & "" I to 61S lou1sana. Houston, TX 77002 Include home & office phone numbers Add 75 handling charge per tttket. Include stamped. self addressed envelope For groups of 20 or more ONLY: Call 713-227-0126 22 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 25, 1982 ~poris Texas Challenge Cup ready to rip By Billie Duncan The time has come (Rich Corder said). To tighten racquet strings. To swat, to smack, to smash the ball/ Llke Texas tennis kingi:;! Yes, folkn, 1t i~ here at last. The Texas Challenge Cup w!ll be played tomorrow, Saturday, June 26, in Memorial Park on courts onP through seven. !'.'ow that the top MSA Tennis League players are through trouncing on one another in their struggle for position, let us hope that they have enough t'nergy left "Ver to gwe Dnllas a real fight. The biggest surprise going into the tour­nament lB that Fred Lopez is no longer the top-seeded player for MSN Last Friday, Rich Ryan upset him 6-2. 6-2. Fred (known as Simmms to his friends) is coming off an injury and sume in-and­around tennis types are insisting that he should not be counted out for poRsibly tak­ing the top prize at the tournament. Houston won last year. so Dallas knows what to expect and may have some plans to stage an upi;et or two themselves. The Dalla people will get in town on Friday in the midst of a swimming party thrown for \he occassion. Actually, the Tennis League seems capable of throwing a party for an)· occassion. After the Dallasites have been wined and dined and wined and wined on Friday night (after car-pooling it from Big D, mind you), they will have the pleasure of rising early on Saturday to be on the courts by 10:30 am (bright-tailed and bushy-eyed to be sure). The compitition will begin with the sin· gles matches with MSA's finest: Rich Ryan, Fred Lopez, Ron Landrum, John Ryan, Lester Vela. David Robicheaux and Jon Colbert. The names of the Dallas play­ers were unavailable, but will appear next week After the singles, the doubles compiti­tion will begin. The MSA doubles teams are Ryan/Ryan, Lopez/Hopkins, Robicheaux/Elliot and Colbert/ Landrum. The organizers figure that the whole thing will finish up by 3:00 p.m. At the same time that the main events are taking place, side matches between teams from at least four Texas cities will Ron Landrum, no. 3 s~ed: Fred Lopez, no. 2 seed; and Rich Ryan, no. I seed in the MSA Tennis League also be played. There are no entry fees or awards for these side matche1:t and parlici· • MSA Volleyball preparing for Dallas Invitational On July 17, the MSA Volleyball League will send three or maybe even four teams to the Dallas Invitational Tournament. According to M arcue Lee, t.he t.urnout. should be comprable to the recent Austin tourney, with probably five Texas cities participating in the competition. So, the practice that takes place in the Lincoln Jr. High gym (comer of Dallas and Taft) every Tuesday night is really practice to deveJop tournament potential for the tournament-oriented teams. For those who do not care to enter the modern-day tilts, the games are a way to pants will furnish their own balls. The awards party will be on the Galleon get together and have a good time and a decent workout. Because there are only five regular teams in the volleyball league at present, they have decided not to publish standings. With a vest difference between the top team and the bottom team, Marcus Lee I ined, ""There ould have to be an A division and a B division. So, only three teams would be in the A and two in B. That would be silly." But sometimes, it does not take long for a new team to get good. One new team to watch is the Die Hards. Said Marcus, ''They're good. They're coming along They have the potential to beat any team right now." ... back patio and will begin at 5:00 p.m. The Galleon iH furnishing hamburgers. knew they could beat-each other. The gods of the weather were not on their side, however, The first game was delayed 30 minutes because of the rain, and then played on a field that resembled damp play-doh. The game saw Dirty Sally's squashing A&K Jewelry 23· 1 There was a descrepency between hits and runs for both teams. Dirty Sally's got their 23 runs off of 19 hits, whileA&K only managed 1 run off of 6 hits. Sally's Ken Gray got hie fourth homer of the seaAon a nd wound up 3 for 4 on the day. Also 3 for 4 was Mike Morrison, who was batting .548 going into the game. In the only other game played on Sun­day, the Montrose Mining Company and the Briar Patch stuggled with each other in a close match that sew the Miners edge past Briar Patch 11-10. Firefighters douse All-Stars The Die Hards played several exhibition games on last Saturday, June 19, at the Juneteenth ce1ebration at Cherryhurst Park Also playing were the West End Stars and Rascals. Look for those teams to play in Dallas next month. The rain continued to sift down through· out the game, and Jerry DeSale said, "The field was actually more suited to mud wrestling than softball, but the umpire decided to continue the game to the end." By Billie Duncan The MSA Softball League All.Stars went to Levy Field with hope in their hearts. A188, it was to no avail. The HFD smo· thered them in a home-run frenzy that left the first game at 30-8 and the second game at 14-10. The same team from the HFD played both games. so they were pretty tired by ttie time they got to the second one-but not quite tired enough. That JS not to say that there were no good moments for the MSA guys. In fact, whenev("J' anvthing went right for MSA, the crowd ch.eered enthusiastically. Uke m the sixth lllnmg of the first game (played agamst the South All-Stars>. Montrose Voice pitcher James Cutler had taken over in a lop-sided game so far The first man up smashed the ball some­where between '1ors and VenuR-over the fence in any case-. and bad was looking worse. Then the next Firefighter stepped menacingly to the plate. James pitched. The Firefighter swung, connected. and wacked the ball right back into James' glove-surprised the hell out of him. As the crowd cheered. James took the cutest bow. Soon, a popular Firefighter took the swinging stance and the crowd perked up. Someone said. "'That's Hot Dog." The guy walloped the ball, knocking in two runs. Ai& he ran the length between third and home, he blew a kiss to the stands. The audience went wild. Later THE VOICE talked to him and found out that his name is James Wis noski and that his nickname is "Whis· key." When asked how he got the nickname, the channingyoung firefighter explained, "It's a long story." A passing teammate laughed, "It ain't that long." When asked why the guys in the stands were calling him "Hot Dog" if his name was Whiskey, he smiled, 'I don't know. You better ask them that." ~ike Zapata, the mann~rr of the Fir~ fighters gave some insight os to why the South All-Stars lost so badly ··we hit the hall good. They didn't. ' Gene Russo. manager oC the South All­Stars, nl50 felt thnt that was a pretty good assessm(•nt of the eventual outcome. Said Gene, .. We just didn't have the power tht'y have." When questioned as to hnw the Firefigh tRrs mannged to hit so many home runs, Gene equivicated, "l 0m not yoing to blame the pitching." In the 11econd game, there were more homers on both sides end the crc)wd chttred everyone, regardless of race, creed. or sexual preference. When the duRt settled down and the fire-­truck departed, there wa.i:i no senRe of defeat in the faces of the crowd. A good time had been had by all. Now, next year •.. • Two damp games last Sunday After the All-Star games on Saturday, the MSA Softball League players were just itching to get back to play someone they The rained out games will be played later in the season. Next week, Dirty Sally's faces that sur­prising team with the off-beat methods, the Barn. Now, folks, we all know that MSA Volleyball League players at practice. Dirty Sally•s is unbeaten, hut tht• Harn i.R on n roll right now and tht-y have a motto: 'Hentt•n onn•. hut n(>ver twice." And in tht• gamt' that Dirty Sally's lwnt them last time, the Barn actually out-hit Sally's. but lm;t on errors. Besidt>S, Terry from the Harn was reported seen buying n ca/'ie of crazy glue at Walgreen's. • Some more new records in bowling Both h.•ngues saw some new rC'cords th(• past <·ouple of weeks. On Monday, Galk•on Om• ~wt the new record high team game for th(• summer with 1114. Whih• they w('rc setting that rec·ord, team member Rich Corder bowlE'd a 625 i-;('ri(>S which included a 226 gnmt>. That help<'<i On Thuri.day, Clara Esparza set a new high handirap seriE..s for women with a 62X, l'<lging out Kathy Winkler's 624 Baron Baldridge also set a rt·<·ord for high handicap game with a super 28:J. Baron bowls on the Thursday Knights, who are currently in seventh place. Last week, someone neglected to tell THE VO!Cf; that Donny Kelley, who bowls on Thursday, had two 200 games (202 and 208). Go get 'em, Donny! • Women's softball wrap-up Most of the games last Sunday may have been called for rain, but that did not damJ>('n the Woman's Softball League's enthusiasm for a happy and successful seaRon . Th~ games may be made up on Sunday morning, so that the slate is clear for <'Ve, ryone to go enjoy the parade with the knowlegethe that season is actually over But whatever happens, the players are bubbling with good feelings. For one thing, their All-Star games turned out to be a great deal of fun. They were on ly scheduled to play one game, but attheend of that game, an All-Star line-up of all the othn h•nms, faced the top-ranked R<·negndt·s. The All-Stars won 7-5. In the meantime. the MSA Softball League donated $100totheMSA Woman's Softball League. Jerry DeSal~ present<>d the check to Martha Rit.c..-hie, and Clair<> Vnsilioy ran out onto the field to tell the players what had happened. "They all hooted and hollered and thanked them and everything," said Claire. "The (mostly men's) Softball League and the bowling league (the Eddie Chavez Mixt-d Bowling League, which doanted their entire bhareof the MSA gar­age sale to the WSL) have all been very supportive of the Women's Softball IA·ague." Martha Ritchie was also very excited about th<• gift and very grateful to both lrngue~ that had helped so much. Martha ah;o had some news about her team, Armadillo Graphics. They ar(' pre­senting trophies to every team member "for being the team they are" and special prizes to certain players. Most Valuable Player is Barb. Most Enthusiastic is Nancy. And Most Improved is Becky. CongrntulationR! • Lone Star Classic progressing The organization of the Lone Star Classic is moving along, with 18teams now regis­tered to play. That includes eight Mon· trose teams and IO out-of-town teams, The Montrose teams registered are the Galleon, Dirty Sally's, Montrose Voice, Jim's Gym, Brazos River Bottom, Briar Patch, Montrose Mining Company, and A&K J<'wt.•lry The out-of-towners are Los Angeles (The Spike and Hotshots), Kansas City (Cabaret and Open Range), San Francisco (The Stallion and San Francisco Cafe Tara Bond). Tulsa (Blue Boys and Tim's JUNE 25, 1982/ MONTROSE VOICE 23 Out awsJ. Dallas ~Fitnet"s Exchange) ond Nt·w York 1Eugle). \'oluntens art' still needed for hom;in~ and trnnsportation. If you can help out either by providing a place for people to stay or by driving a van between the fields with people and <'QUipment, please call Wayne Romero (524-53ll). Carol Clark (667-0299) or Ferrell Bivins (521-9889). MSA Volleyball League players at practice. • New assistant director of special projects Larrv Kirk was t.·hc.•sen by acclamation to fill the potit of Ai->sistant- Director of Spe­cial Projects for the Montrose- SporUi ARsociation The post was left vacant by the recent resignation of Rob Connors. Coming Wednesday, June t; 30, 5-10pm-The Montrose ( Voice softball team and Dirty \%: Sally's softball team jointly k bartend, In a fundraiser for if both teams """ 529-7525 t~· Happy Gay Pride Week l~ ::.~:~~~'.;:-n .. :· . :-:~ 24 MONTROSE VOICE/ JUNE 25, 1982 TUESDAY· SUNDAY CJfat&-/.a'i 9:,ea,se; Houses & Apartments. Montrose & Downtown area Base Realty Inc 3030 Fairview 524-1871 Hardwood floors, Venetian blinds. track 11ght1ng adults only LOCKERS SHOWERS PRIVATE ROOMS ox 1625 RICHMOND 522-1625 GAY PRIDE WEEK SPECIAL Custom frame your Gay Pride Week Poster Frame of Reference l.li:J'.'l W~thtimtr ~20-0710 ' ... ~ ~hpl.1\ tf I m " Cofff't• 'ho j Serving authentic Mexican food & delicious American food 24 hours a day 708 W. Alabama 528-8837 also! Now Open! Decatur II 1700 S. Main featuring live Mariachi Band Fri., Sat., Sun. _ S£a~ Li/~~ Jfamuur· Jfil'lf/- 3 days, 2 nights as low as s53 per person For special reduced airfare to Hawaii Mexico Las Vegas Call Bob, 821-2577 24 hours major credit cards travel tickets issued 24 hours a day Houston Travel Consultants 520 Westhe1mer 520-7050 Diamonds • Gold • Silver Custom Jewelers & Repalfs PROUD TO • BE ... £1/fliit~# NOT-~rYJM r------------------------ ~ HAIR CRAFT COUPON SPECIAL Men's & Women's Summer Survival Cuts s15°0 with this coupon only 2110 Lexington 526-5472 ------------------------~ -----G--Y-R--O- -G--Y-R--O-S-- ---~ SANDWICH SHOPPE 1536 Westheimer 528-4655 JUNE SPECIAL, WITH THIS AD Gyro Sandwich, Fries and Coke, $2.85 -with this ad Open 11am-10pm everyday (till midnight Friday & Saturday) Imported Beer and Wines -----------------------· oJ'Y""1~ /.\ Playgirl Follies This Saturday, June 26, 10:30pm, $1.00 cover Laura Lee Love Lana Kane Eydie Mae with guest ERICA LANE Happy Hour Saturday midnight-2am Sunday noon-midnight Mon-Fri 4-Bpm Open 10am Mon-Sat, Noon Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink Levi sandles & shoes plus Clementi' Boots Also Justin, Frye, Dan Post, Acme, Dingo, Wrangler boots MSA Softball LAST WEEK-$ RESULTS Saturday. June 19 Hou Flfel1ghters 30 South All-Stars 8 Hou Firelighters 14 North All-Stars 10 Sunday. June 20 Dirty Sally's 23 A&K Jewelry 1 Montrose Mtnmg 11 Briar Patch 10 Montrose Voice vs Brazos River Bottom. ppd Mary's vs Galleon. ppd., rain STANDINGS w~ ,~, South D1v1s1on xGatleon 6 xJ1m·s Gym 6 A&K Jewelry 3 Montrose Voice 2 Bnar Patch 2 North D1v1s1on yD1rty Sally's 11 Montrose M1mng 5 Mary's 4 Barn Brazos River Bottom xclinched playoff spot yclinched first place in division 3 3 5 7 8 0 3 • 6 6 '" 667 667 375 222 200 1 000 625 500 400 250 THIS WEEKS GAMES \All~"'" It l""Y foeld From Montrow. go out Richmond. pH! Korby. lett on Ea1tsode) Saturday, Jun• 26 A&K Jewelry vs Bnar Patch. 4pm Barn vs Dirty Sally's. 5pm Mary's vs Montrose M1n1ng. 6pm Jim's Gym vs_ A&K Jewelry, 7pm Briar Patch vs Galleon, 8pm GB 2'• 4 4'"i 4~ 5~ ,6.~. Montrose Mmmg vs Brazos River Bottom, 9pm Sunday, June 27 No games scheduled LEADING HITTERS (Based on 20 or l'TIOfe at-ba11 lhrough June 20) Player (T•"'I AB R H AVG 1 M Marchena fSa11y·11 35 23 23 657 2 D. Davidson ~Sally"s) 30 20 18 600 3 B Schmidt tS.rn) 26 13 15 577 4 J_ DeSale 1Sa11y"sJ 27 12 15 556 5 R Gore !Ganeori) 29 18 16 552 6 M Morrison 1Sat1y·s1 31 19 17 548 7 N Borias IA&Kl 22 12 16 545 8 B Tre1 tBarn) 32 9 17 531 9 A. Castillo !Galleon) 34 17 18 529 10 0 Brown IJ•m·s Gym) 27 14 14 519 11 M ScoggmslJ•m'sGy"'I 24 8 12 500 12 J Summerall jBrNosl 20 4 10 500 HOMERUN LEADERS (Through June2'0) Pl•re• !TNml HR Playirr (TMrnJ HR M Marchena 1s.11y·a1 7 K Gray (Sally"s) 4 8 Schmidt !B•ml 6 K. Johnston tA&K) 3 J OeSale (Sauy·ai 5 0 Kesaler tG1r1eonJ 3 K Bailey !S1uy·s1 M Morrison 1sa11y·11 3 B Fike (Galleon) B Pirkey (Galleon) 3 MSA Women's Softball LAST WEEK"S RESULTS Sunday. June 20 Chuck"s Angels 7 Kindred Sp1nts Renegades 7 Hell Raisers Armadillo Grph 10 Twms Special Blend vs Ducks. ppd . ram Chuck·s Angels vs Armadillo Graphics. ppd Renegades vs Special Blend. ppd, rain Ducks vs Hell Raisers. ppd., rain STANDINGS W<WI Loat Pel Ge Renegades 7 1.000 Ducks 667 2'4 Hell Raisers 571 3 Armadillo Grph 571 3 Twms 500 3',; Kmdred Spmts 375 4YI Royal A"s 375 4'~ Chuck"s Angels 286 5 Special Blend 1 167 5 1~ THIS WEEK·s GAMES fR9'9ular g-11 fonde Park Tak~ 1-45 South to Tet~hooe •••I Tllke l~r to M~ roghl on Munger go I bfol::k_ tur'°I fett Sunday. June 27 Possible mormng games lo be announced MSA Monday Night Bow ling LAST WEEK"S GAMES Monday. June 21 HIOH QAMES HIGH SERIE~ Steve Mcconaughy Steve Mcconaughy 244.226 Rich Corder Paul Buenger Dms1on A 1. Barnyard Hoers 2 Eurotan Inn 3 Daddy's 4 69ers D1v1s1on 8 1 E/J"s Protein Suppl1ments 2 Bushwackers 3 Five Easy Pieces 4 LOIS Lanes 226 Rich Corder 224 Paul Buenger STANDINGS D1v1S1onC 1 Ci11zen Pain 2 Cock-T1tlers 3 Strikers 4 Slow Hand Division D 1. Happy Trails 2 Galleon One 3 Gator-Aid 4 Interact THIS WEEK'S GAMES 1All g-a1 S1~ .... eo .... r_ 8200 er ... ..,,,nl Monday. June 28 Regular competition. 9pm MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League 674 625 590 PREVIOUS WEEKS' GAMES Thursday. June 24 Resulls next week HIGH GA.MES Baron Baldndge John Davey Butch Irish Thursday. June 17 240 232 229 De! Fullen Louis Schneider STANDINGS !Through June 171 1 Just Marion & 7. Thursday Knights Lynn's Tropical Fruit 8. Thursday Nigh! 2 Kmdred Spirits' Tricks Aces High 9 Gutter Sluts 3 The Rockettes 10. Kindred Sp1nts' 4 Chases Leather & Lace 5 For a Few Daddies 11 4 to 1 More 12 Hang 10 6. Salt & Pepper II THIS WEEK"S GAMES ~All galflN Ill SIMI.um Bowl, 1!1200 8r'"""•n) Thursday. July t Regular compet1!1on. 9pm Pool Tournaments THIS WEEK"S GAMES AIO'>dey. Jun• 28 Kmdred Spmta !524:> e...11110 Speedway. 665--9756) at e JOpm. emgte et1m1nat1on. S2 entry_ winner take an Ranch 16620"' Main. 5&9730) at 9 pm. s1no1e el•mmahon $2 entry. winner take au ($50 guarantee) Tue•day. June 29 laml)091 f2417 Tomff 81¥'d. 528-89211 at8pm,amgleehmt­nation. $2entry. w1nrier1akea11 WwJnU<Jay. June 30 Briar Palch (2294 W Holcombe. 665-9678) at 9pm. 1mg1e ahm1nat1on. $2 •nlry. $50 pnze GB I (1'19 Richmond. 528-8903) at epm. amg1e ehmit'll· hon. S2 entry. winner lakes all plus new pool cue Thurtday. July 1 Barn (710 Pac1l1c, 528-9'27) al 9pm doubleel1m1nahon, S2 en1ry. $2511111 roond pnH. $15 second round prize Just Manori and Lynn·s (817 Fairview. 528-9110) at 8pm E/J'a (1213 A•chmond. 527-9071) at IOpm. doub•••llm•N· hon. $2antry_ w• ner take au MSA Tennis STANDINGS TOP TEN 1 Rich Ryan 2. Fred Lopez 3. Ron Landrum 4. John Ryan 5. Lester Vela 6 David Rob•cheaux 7. Jon Colben 8 Don "Rmger'' Smith 9 Michael Green 10. Mrchael Houston 8 LADDEA 1. Rich Corder 2. David Garza 3 Charlie Brown 4 Terry Rich 5. Eddie Chavez 6. Daniel Casillas 7 Jim Olson 8. Randy J1erscheck 9 Jimmy Thames DOUBLES LADDER l Ryan/Ryan 2 Lopez Hopkms 3 Rob1cheaux/EU1ot 4. Colbert-'Landrum 5_ Houston/Green "41m'IOn1I Ori .. •n Memor<al Park l Saturday. June 26 Texas Challenge Cup Tournament. 10 30am. cour1s 1·7 •Don't skate at Sunday parade,' officials advise If trends of the past years hold up, the Gay Pride Parade to be held this Sunday, June 27, will be larger than last year's. The parade is scheduled to start at 5:30 p.m. and will follow the traditional route down Westheimer from Shepherd to Bagby. A few changes have been announced by Gay Pride Week 1982 Chairman, Larry Bagneris Jr. The most important thing is to "stay out of the street." GPW parade marsha1ls said they will help -remind the spectators to stay back for their own safety as well as to allow the units in the parade to pass by. Skating is against the law in the parade or by observers according to city ordi­nance, they said. Anyone ignoring this law will be asked to remove their skates by the Houston Police Department, they said. A section of the street is to be roped off, at the request ofGPW Committee, stretch· ing from Mary's Lounge to the reviewing stand. The stand is being reserved for spe­cial guests. Bagneris said he expects a good turn out from the City Council to view the event. Due to Houston's heat and humidity, Bagneris recommended that spectators wear something cool to withstand the heat in the sun. Lighter colors will reflect more heat and keep you cooler. Comfortable footwear was advised to avoid fatigue. Bagneris also asked that spectators stay away from the organizing area so the parade can begin on schedule. JUNE 25, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 In celebration of Gay Pride Week, The Happy Trails proudly presents a salute to Bourbon Street and the French Quarter in New Orleans Saturday afternoon , J une 26, 3-6pm with Dixieland Music featuring the ever popular Dixie Kings Saturday Night, 9:30-1:30 The Happy Trail Riders Sunday, 9pm-midnight The Dixie Kings Join us after the Spotts Park Rally 715 Fairview 521-2792 Open noon-2am 7 days a week Every Monday, Tuesday night, 7-10 The Manning Music Co. Every Wednesday thru Sunday The Kampy Kapers of KeokiKona at the Top of the Hole Join us this Sunday, 2pm, for our pre-parade Bar-B-Q 109 Tu am 528-9066 26 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 25, 1982 Montrose Live A look at entertainment slated for Spotts Park Rally By Billie Duncan How entertaining is a politica1 speech? How much music is there in the voice of a politician? Does it matter? These and other useless questions will not get anwered today on this page. However, there will be entertainment, music and politicaI .statements at the GPC Rally at Spotts Park on Sunday. Between the end of the parade and the beginning of the fireworks. a whole lot is slated to happen. Rli"rords and tapt-s may not be live enter­tainment, but the people who send them out to you are ct-rtainly in the living cate­gory. And the peciple who will spin 'em on Sunday will be Larry Fought from Mary's and Cherry Wolf fTom Kindred Spiril><. Larry and Cherry (sounds like a 508 pop duo) were both top DJ's m the D.J Spin-Off that was held to raise money for Gay Pnde Week la<t April 24 at the Loading Dock. Larry was second and Cherry was third. Bobby Konrad of the Drum wa& the first place fundraising DJ on that auspicious occau10n. Once the rally gets underway, there will be entertainment besides the politicos (who really can be entertaining) provided by John Day & Company and Houston. Off Broadway. John Oay has written a song titled A Part of. l'i,/9t Apart From which wiB be featured on Sunday. He and his group have been performing the tune at various fundraisers around Montrose. John v.TOte another wonderful tune for last year's rally, but the group never got to perform because of the delay caused by the stage getting mired in the rain·.sogged turf of the park . Sister Doris has been seen recently doing what could he sun dances, although lhey were done by the light of the moun. Also appt>aring ¥.ill the improvisational collective known as Houston tOff Broad­way. which has a varymg cast that has included for this particular show James Harvey. Claudean Bridges, Ray Mendez. Kent .Johnson, and (moi) Billie Duncan. The group's fundraising efforts for Gay Pride Week wt"re eo popular that they were asked lo perform at the rally. Last year the group wa!'il also slated to perform, but, mudso-elosh·!-dosh, it was a last minute no-go. Among the selections that the group will present is The Little Old Ladv and thi' L~athu Queen. They will also do .-.everal humorous and serious monologues. All bits in the show (which 1s a shorter version of their fund-raising show) are based on the ·•A Part of-t-.'otApartFrom"themeof the wet>k, Cherry Wolf will lend a hand for their opening and clo:;:ing music. And at 10:30. the fireworks will go ofr Fir orks just have to fit in the catagory >f live entertainment. Happy rally! Houston Off-Broadway. • Duncan's Quick Notes Proud Music on Saturday: The Mon· trose Symphonic Band, Montrose Singers. Oak Lawn Concert Band and Houston MCCR Choir will perform on Saturday night at CuJien Auditorium at the Univer­aity ?f Houston , starting at 8:00 p.m. It is billed as the Fred Paez Memorial Concert. but it is a tribute to his Jiving efforts, as well as a continued expreb.sion of loD~ felt by the communitv because of his death. · Expect a warm and expansive commu­nity feeling at the concert. And do go. The tickets are only . 3.00 and it should be a aupf>r program. Sounds Like a Personal Problem: Breck Wall, who appear~ in Houston with Ewme regularity with hi~ Bottoms Up Ret•ue, sent me a bt1nC'h ofpre&1' dippings -of his latest shows: Bottoms Up 'H2, Naul(~ty But Nice. and Bravo \legas. He mduded a note inviting me to come see the show in Vega,. Maybe THE VOICE will pay my fart" to covt"r the shows. And maybe Anita Bryant will invite Roxie Starr to dinner. And perhaps Mark Twain III will join the Tf>xas Riders. Not Sold Out: Peter Allen not only did not sell out his run here in Montrose, but he cancelled hiA last Ahow for lack of mterest. The show was great and Peter was the sort of performer that seemed like a natu· ral to play to SRO in Montrose. Why not? Perhaps not enough people knew who he was or what a dynamic show he puts on. In any case, the Tower intends to bring him back next year, and maybe by then Montroaians will have figured out what a treat the man really is. Extended Run: The Alley Theater has had the good sense to extend the run of Lanford Wil!Wn's Pulitzer Prize-winning play Talley's Folly. It was a smash o:a Broadway. and the Alley\ production al!'llo is exceptional. It will play through July 3. Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose ,,.., y ..... ne25. through Thursday July IJ "A O -----~---- Stephanle Parker & Doug Mowery 9pm Fnday and Saturday. Richard Ellis 9pm Mondau: Nat & Janet 9pm Tuesday. Wednesday and Thursday al Rascals, 2702 Kirby 524-6272 Jim Cater 8 3Qpm Friday & 5 1Spm Sunday: Kenton Pa11on 5 15pm Saturday and 8 30pm Tuesday. Tom W1U1ams 8 30pm Saturday. Monday. Wednesday and Thursday. Greg Oavrs 8 JOpm Sunday and V1rg1I 01iion 5 15pm wf!t'liidays at Keyboard. 3012 Milam 528-6988 Richard Askin and Dana Rogers 10pm nightly 1e11cep1 Monday and Tuesday) at the Copa (p1afl0 bar) 2631 Richmond. 528-2259 Ruth Hashngs gpm nightly {e•Cept Sunday and Mon· day} LIOnthare !}pm Sunday and Monday at Baia·s. 402 Lovett. 527-9866 Lee LaForge 8 30pm nightly (e,.,cept Sunday} w1tn Alexandra Haas Friday. Saturday and Wednesday at Arno's. 4002 Montrose. 528-2993 Marquerite 8pm nightly {except Sunday and Mon­day) and noon Sunday at Baeehus. 523 Lovett. 523- 3396 •ORGAN .<eok1 Kona 5pm Fnday and Saturday. 3pm Sunday and 5pm Wednesday and Thursday at the Hole, 109 Tuam, 528-9066 GRANT STREET S T.~J I 0 N KRAZY HOUR 7 days a week, 9-10, 75<: well drinks 2377 Grant at Fairview 528-6342 A People Place • DISCO Nona Hendncks 10pm Sunday at Numbers 2. 300 Westhe1mer. 526-6551 Kelley Mane 10pm Friday at the Copa. 2631 Rich· mond. 528-22 ;g • COUNTRY & COUNTRY/ROCK The Happy Trail Riders 9pm Fnday and Thursday at Happy Trails. 71!5 Fairview 521-2792 Ab & the Rebel Outlaws 9 30pm Friday and Saturday and 8 30pm Thursday •I the Ex1te. 1011 Bell. 659 )453, and 8 JOpm Sunday at Brazos River Bollom, 2400 Brazos, 528-9192 Flying Blrnd Band rugntly fexcepl Monday and Tues-­day) al Miss Charloue·s. 911 Drew. 528-8840 Mustang Band g 30prn Friday. Saturday. Wednesday and Thursday •I Br&.(,Da ~1ver Bottom. 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 • GUITAR L 9pm Fnday and 1ru;h f"~lk 9pm Wednesday al the Parlour. 2402 Mandell. 529-8069 Susan Christian 5pm Friday Lyra-·Kat Graham & Lmda Aum Rhyme !>pm M<)nday. Wednesday and Thursday. and Rawslyn Ruffin 5pm Tuesday at Kindred Spirit· 5245 Buffalo Speedway, 665-9756 • SHOW GROUPS Out1e Ktngs 9pm Saturday and 8pm Sunday at Happy Trails, 715 Fairvmw. 521-2792 Mata Hari 9 30prn Friday and Saturday at Lampost 2417 Times Blvd . 528-8921 John Day & Co 8pm Sunday at E/J"a, 1213 Rich· mond. 527·9071 Manning Music Company 7pm Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at Happy Tnals 715 Fauv1ew 521-2792 • JAZZ Robert Ceballos Group 9pm Sunday 1nd with Jimmy Ford 9pm Friday. Saturday. Wednesday and Thurs­day at Las Bnsas. 614 w Gray. '528-9959 Paul English 4pm daily (except weekends) at Arno·a. 4002 Monlrose 528-2993. and nightly Jexcept Sun­day) at Cody's, 3400 Montrose. 522-9747 W1ndrose 9 30pm nightly (except Sunday and Mon day): and Horace Grisby 9 30pm Sunday and M(>nday at Birdwatchers 907 Westhe1mer. 527-0595 • REGGAE Paul Hurlock 9pm Friday and Thursday at Harrar"s. 428 Westhe1mer. 526-2895 • NU WAVE The lncred1bles and The Lift 10 30pm Fnday. ""he VOlumataand The Teez 10:30pm Saturday at Omni 1540 Westhtt1mer, 52tr4230 • IMPRESSIONISTS Jahonau Reis. Donna Day. Naomi Sims & Hot Ch<>C06 late Sunday evening al lhe Copa. 2631 Richmond 528-225Y L•ttfe Bobby. Tracey and guest Sunday e ... ening at Eiille 1011 Bell 659-0453 Playgirl Folhes" w1lh laura Lee Lo,.e. Lana Kane Eydie Mae and Erica Lane 10.30pm Saturday at Pmk Eleph•nt. 1218 Leeland. 659-0040 • MISCELLANEOUS Talent shows Tuesday evening at the Copa 2631 Richmond. 528-2259. Wednesday evening at M1dnite Sun. 534 Westhe1mer. 526-7519. and Thursday e ... e­ning at Twins, 535 Wosthe1mer. 520-0244 ............ Montrose Art Student art: Albet Puente Photostory by Ed Martinez One of the most difficult things for young people beginning a career in the arts to achieve is recognition. A style, and educa­tion, a job, commissions even; these things are usually much easier to come by than recognition, awareness by an artist's peers or even just neighbors that he or she is, indeed, creative, a purveyor of the arts. One of the reasons for this is, alas, that so few students have earned the right to that recognition that mpst artists crave. The discipline, the tedious, grinding, rou­tinely dull day to day work of learning one's craft and art is very demanding, and few are willing to subject themselves to such drudgery for such a will·o'-the wisp as artistic achievement. 8till, there is no substitute for the hard work that must precede any accomplish· ml'nl in the arts. Albert Puente is a native Houstonian, a specimen almost as rare as a native Cali­fornian. H(• is presently studying at the University of Houston, pursuing a curricu­lum in fine arts, majoring in painting. He has studied at the High School for tht• Performing and Visual Arts and Hous­ton Technical Institute, where he studied commercial art. JUNE 25, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 27 " Untitled," tt•mpera on canl'as by Albert Puente. His strengths lie in his strong sense of line, and he readily admits that his one life drawing course has been ". _, one of my biggest highs and surprises." His interest in the human figure has led Puente into drawing nudes and photographing the human body. "Reclining Nude," charcoal dralL'ing by Albert Puente. This has led him further into using pho­tography with his drawing and painting to achieve different effects using these mixed media. The results have delighted and startled this young artist, and brought him praise and encouragement from his teachers. The difficulty feeing Albert Puente, as it does so many budding artists, is to select a focus, to narrow the multifaceted prism's rays of talent into a particular beam that Happy Hour Daily 2-8pm Thursday Buffet 8pm A Part Of-Not Apart From 2303 Richmond 522-7616 THE GALLEON can illuminate the path toward a life's work. That task is, regrettably often. the one stumbling block to fulfillment for so many talented people. An embarassment of riches is not an unmixed blessing, and Puente must struggle with his talents to choo~e the one area that can best express his own particular ,__;sion. The undertaking is already underway for Albert Puente. His work to date dis· plays the ste>eds of a talent that deserves to be nurtured and furthered. ~*ST!lt ~VM!SSIC '82 28 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 25, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat JUNE JUNE 25 26 JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE JULY 27 28.. 29 30 1 Mc Selected Events through 7 Days • FRIDA l': Interact, Houston's Community Coffef'house 7;:-J{)pm· midnight, 3406 Mulberry mFRJ DA}': Lambda Alan on meetinll at First Unitarian Chur<"h, 5210 Fannin OIFRIDA t': Ga> Pride Wuk: Gay Hl.Spanic Caucus Day with fiesta at 2504 Mason. Spm-midnight a.SATURDAY: Texas Challenge Cup Tournament, Memorial Ten­nis Center, 10:30am ILSA TllRDA Y: MSA's Softball League gamea. 4pm, Levy Field ILSATliRDAY; Gay Pride Week. Fred Paez Memorial Concert. Cullen Auditorium. C of H, 8pm, with MontrOt>e Symphomc Band. Oaklawn Symphonic Band of Dallaa, MCCR Choir and Mon· troae Sing-eu -SC:NDA Y: Ga> Pride Week: Salute- to Louisiana Day -Sl.'!VDA Y: Gay Pride Week: Gay Pride Parade, 5:30pm, 1900 to 100 blocks of Wet1theimer -SllNDA Y: Gay Pruie Week: GPC political rally at Spotts Park, Hpm ..'l fONDA Y: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • TUESDAY: MontroRe Sports Volleyball League games 7:30 p.m., Gregory-Lincoln School, 1101 Taft •THl'R..')DA Y: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Brae!'lmain • THURSDAY: Wii<k ·n Stein gay radio show lOpm·midnight on KPFT Radio, f"M.9() Selected E vents in Future Weeks •I.'\i 1 WEEK: The Lone Star Cla.Hic 1982 gay softball touma· ment in Houston July 3-4 •IN I WEEK: Independence Day, July 4 • IN I WEEK: Mu<tang's Recrea· tional Land Fund Committee organizational m("eting H:30pm, July ..t. the Barn, 710 Pacific •IN 1 WEEK; Lone Star CJa!isic ~oftball tournament trophy prea­entation~. 9:30pm, Brazo_ .. River Bottom. 2400 BrazOR, July 4 •If\' 1 WEEK : Full moon, L32am July 6 m!N 2 WEEKS: Bodybuilders contest, Cherryhurt-it Park. July JO •IN 2 WEEKS: Annual confer­enC't'" of International Gay Associ­ation opens in Washington, D.C., ,July 12 •IN 4 WEEKS: "AH&embly '82," 3rd bif'nnial ronvtntion of Luthe­rans Concerned for Gay People, opens July 29 in Houston, lasting through Aug. 1, at Grace Luthe­ran Church m!N 5 WEEKS; 7th Annual Reno Gay Rodeo. July :»-Aug. 1 U N 5 WEEKS: MSA Women's Softball League post·aeaaon tour· nament July 31-Aug. l, location to be announced U N 7 WEEKS: National gay Jeaden;hip conference in Dal1as, Aug. 13·15, sponsored by Dallas Gay Alliance at Grenelefe Hotel •IN 7 WEEKS: MSA Volleyball tourna ment.. Aug. 14 at F onde Recreational Center U N 9 WEEK S: 1982 Gay Athletic Games in San Fr ancisco begin Aug. 28, lasting to Sept. 5 mIN 9 WEEKS: Gay Softball World Series begins in San Fran· cisco Aug. 31, lasting lo Sept. 4 •IN 9 WEEKS: Integrity Inter national Convention opene in New Orleans Stpt. 2. luting to Sept. 5. UN I 0 WEEKS: Texas Gay Conference in Houston, Sept. 3-5 •IN 10 WEEKS: North Ameri· can Gay Men's Music Festival. Sept. 3-5, Minneapolis U N 10 WEEKS: Labor Day, Sept. 6 Montrose Classified • IN 12 WEEKS: .1rd Annual Gay American Arts Festival in Chicago opens Sept. 17, laj;ting to Sept. 30 • •IN 15 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 8th national conference Oct. 8-10, Chicago We'd 11ke to remind you of our own '"Dear Dorothy." your source for answers to all the questions of hfe • IN 16 WEEKS: Gay Atheist League of America national con· vention in Houston. Oct. 15-17, Americana Hotel, 3:J01 Southwetit Fwy. Well, perhaps some of the questions of life Anyway, read her each week on the inside back cover, and 1f you've got a question. write in care of the VOICE. Dorothy is a real person (with a counselmg background) living m Kansas (yes. Toto). wnting exclusively for our readers U N 16 WEEKS: W°"thoim.r Colony Art Festival Oct. 16-17 Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of these styles: 10Cperregularw<Jo1"0.Jr1~P ,..AlL...:APl"AL WORD on 6-pornt lype. IS 1tww'1 here jll ut.11'10 few word5 m ttus size or 11 centenng on a line compute at SOC a ltne. us•ng ma111mum 8 regular words or 5 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line 2se per regular word or 4()¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WOAD in 8-poont type. as shown here (If using few words m this size or 1f centenng on a line. compute at $1.50 a line. usmg maximum 6 regular words or 4 ALL CAPITAL WOADS to a line.) 40¢ per regular word or 60¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 10-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $2 00 a line, using maximum 5 regu lar words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) soe per regular word or 75¢ PER All CAPITAL WORD In 10-polnt bold type, as 30C per regulor word or 45C PER shown here. (If using few ALL CAPITAL WORD In 8-polnl words In this size or If cen- =dw~::~ ~t~~:;;.~~~:~~1~,~~~: terlng on a line, compute at on a line, compute at $1.50 a line, $2.00 a llne, using maximum using maximum 5 regular word• or 4 regular words or 3 ALL 3 ALL CAPITAL woRo ~o. u .} CAPITA WORDS to a line.) Individual or few words in any one size should be computed at the per line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case words, and regular and bold words, provided they a re a ll the same type SIZE (6, 8 or 10 point). Simply compute each word individua lly. BUT you may NOT mix type SIZES on the same line. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $3 per classified ad. BLlND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra. Run the same classified 4 weeks in a row and deduct 15'1'. If your classified is lengthy, you may want to consider running a "disp]ay" ad instead. Call our advertising sales department. for information. WRITE OUT your ad on ap/am sheet of paper. Include your name, address and signature, and mail or bring it to the Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. We do not bill. Pulltizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice BUSIN-ES°SOWNER! il)We tfreeHchwf!t'k 1n Ch11 dorectory fl) tJo.,s1ri ntt1bh1hmet1ts 1erv1ng 11d11lribut1ori pomts IOf Che newspaper (bl current dospll)' advertisers (cl 1!111 Hous\on 9•'1' bars & prova111 clubs (!or the btnel1t ol ouc-ol lown \11trtll'll 1
File Name uhlib_22329406_n087.pdf